THE SUNDERLAND SITE - PAGE 042
SHIPBUILDERS - PAGE 3

May I suggest that you navigate the site via the index on page 001 PRIOR PAGE / NEXT PAGE

A list of the Sunderland built vessels referenced in these pages is at the top of page 040.

A list of the Sunderland shipbuilders referenced in these pages is a little lower on page 040.

Copyright?

Do you want to make a comment? A site guestbook is here.

On this page ... Austin, page bottom (Lake Applet frogs).

Corrections in any of the material which follows, however tiny, would be most welcome. And additions, of course! (100 = 100) Test.

To search for specific text on this page, just press 'CTRL + F' & then enter your search term.

PETER AUSTIN (1) (1826-1846)
PETER AUSTIN (2) (1846-1860?)
S. P. AUSTIN & SON (1860-1874?)
AUSTIN AND HUNTER (1874/1879)
S. P. AUSTIN & SON LTD. (1896/?)
S. P. AUSTIN LTD.

(1826/1954
- originally founded in 1826, in 1954 became a part of 'Austin & Pickersgill Limited.')

First a few images. Hover your mouse over each thumbnail to read the subject matter.

Can you help with the history of this company?

Another site page offers literature published by 'Austin', photographs etc. Steadily increasing in size & content. Available here.

A part at least of that history would surely be contained in a small 1954 volume of oblong format, published by 'S. P. Austin & Son, Ltd.' (as per the cover of the volume) or maybe by 'S. P. Austin & Son Ltd.' (as per the frontispiece). Entitled 'Shipbuilding & Repairing' & covering the history of the shipyard from 1826 to 1954. A copy of the volume was sold via e-Bay for GBP 40.00, in early Sep. 2007.

The paragraphs that follow have been revised & re-revised over the years as new data has been located. They surely will now need further revision to incorporate data published in 'A & P News', the employee magazine of Austin & Pickersgill Limited, specifically in issue No. 6, of January 1976. Alan Vickers has kindly provided scans of two pages from that issue, a two-page spread about the history of the collective 'Austin', derived from the manuscripts of James W. (Watson) Corder (1867/1953), whose lifetime work is now held in the Sunderland Central Library. These two pages summarise what Corder wrote about the history of the many 'Austin' businesses & companies over the years, as you can see here. The 'Corder' data is not yet included below.

It would seem that the shipyard came into existence way back in 1826! On North Sands. Founded by Peter Austin, born in 1770, whose name this site knows because he was in 1805, I understand, a partner with Samuel Moore in the Wear Pottery & had earlier than 1805 been trained in the pottery business by Robert Fairbairns at High Pottery in Newbottle, located just a few miles away from Sunderland. Anyway, in 1826 he changed occupations & started a ship repair facility on North Sands 'with a repair slipway up which the ships were hauled by capstans worked by horses'. Those words are from 2 1/2 pages about the yard in 'Where Ships Are Born'. Forgive me saying it, but a most confusing 2 1/2 page text indeed.

At a date after 1826, but at a date unstated, Peter Austin was joined in the business by his son, also named Peter Austin. For simplicity, I will call them Peter Austin (1) & Peter Austin (2).

I read that Peter Austin (1)'s 'first registered launch was in 1831, a brig. This was on ground called Nova Scotia, near Dame Dolly's rock.' Brian Dodds states, however, that not only was the site called Nova Scotia, additionally the shipyard itself was called 'Nova Scotia' & was at Sand Point, near Dame Dolly's Rock, which rock was so named as it was the viewpoint from which Dame Dorothy Williamson and her maids would gather to watch ships sailing out to sea. That is good information, but can anyone tell us exactly where 'Dame Dolly's rock' was located? And what happened to it? And who Dame Dorothy Williamson was? It was a large rock on North Sands. Which apparently had a beacon atop of it.

This site (thanks so much, yet again, George H. Graham of Tulsa, Oklahoma!) tells us that Peter Austin (1) took over, in 1833, the shipbuilding yard of the Allison family, who were in the shipbuilding business in Sunderland from 1818 to 1833. It is interesting to read there that Robert Thompson, (1797-1860), also served his apprenticeship at the Allison yard.

In 1846 Peter Austin (1) retired and his son, Peter Austin (2) 'crossed to the site now occupied by the Company, where he conducted the business on his own account'. Whatever does that sentence mean? Was North Sands abandoned or sold? Was not an entirely new business started? And where is 'the site now occupied by the Company' - the word 'now' presumably meaning 1846. I presume, however, that they mean a site on the south bank of the River Wear, east of but close to the road bridge. Which site was previously occupied by a bottle works which had gone bankrupt. If I sound critical, I apologise. I am most sympathetic with the difficult of assembling accurate data so far into the past.

Samuel Austin, I read, 'laid down a patent repair slipway, also two building berths .......' Just who is Samuel Austin? Where does he come from and how is he related? My source is quite silent on the matter. And 'Samuel Peter Austin' of the third generation & his father entered into a partnership in 1860 entitled S. P. Austin and Son. I am advised, however, that 'The Standard' of London, referred on Nov. 16, 1971 to the 'S. P. Austin & Co.' partnership having been dissolved. If you can help me figure this all out, do please be in touch. None of it makes sense to me. Samuel Peter Austin may be the son of Peter Austin (2) (to be third generation) but if that is so it should have been 'P. Austin and Son', shouldn't it? 'S. P. Austin and Son' does not seem to make sense - where perhaps 'S. P. Austin and Father' would be more logical.

There was, it would seem, another partnership, named 'S. Austin and Mills'. At Southwick. The reference to 'Mills' is apparently to George and John Mills. Which 'S. Austin', I wonder?

It would seem that there were major changes in 1869 & in the following years as the yard was extended again & again as wooden shipbuilding came to an end & iron shipbuilding became the norm.

The 'old slipway', which I presume means the one built in 1846, 'together with rails, cogs, cods, and cradles was taken up and shipped to a buyer in Helsingfors'. A 300 foot graving dock, opened in 1870, took its place. (A graving dock is, for those like me who do not know these things, is a multi-purpose dry-dock, which can be used for a variety of purposes - for new ship building, for ship repair, & for ship maintenance. The word 'graving' was used, but perhaps is no longer used, to refer to the cleaning of a ship's bottom, the term being derived, perhaps from a French word which meant 'beach'.) I am advised that that graving dock is still there today - in Jun. 2009, though I understand that the dock gates, in considerable decay, were removed in the mid 1970s.

In 1869 they built their last wooden ship, "The Choice", and the yard changed over to iron shipbuilding. I think that the vessel was 'Choice' rather than 'The Choice' however.

The yard expanded eastwards into premises previously occupied by John Denniston (& William Pearson before him). And probably other yards also, until the yard ran right up to the 'Scotia Engine Works' facilities. I read that in 1874 they started a branch yard with G. B. Hunter, who later went across to the Tyne to start Swan Hunter's yard. G. B. Hunter is in fact George Burton Hunter later Sir George B. Hunter, famous for his leadership role in what became Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., of Wallsend-on-Tyne. As you can read here. In 1890 they expanded into shipbuilding premises previously owned by John Hutchinson which included two small graving docks. And in 1897 they expanded westwards to take over a bottling plant located, it would seem, immediately to the east of the Sunderland road bridge.

The yard would seem to have been known as the 'Wear Dockyard'.

This section is very much in progress! As in indeed, the whole site. Every time I read new data, many changes are required to the data which is already on site!

It would be good to be able to provide on this page some images of the early members of the Austin family, from contemporary prints or from other sources. The only image I have seen so far, related to the yard at all, is an image of Mr. E. Workman, Chairman of S. P. Austin & Son Ltd. I suspect, however, that he was Chairman in relatively recent years (by that I mean the 1940s or 1950s), though exactly when it was I do not presently know.

I have seen a few postcard images which show an S. P. Austin 'pontoon' which opened in 1903 (but City of Sunderland says in 1904). Via e-Bay in Jul. 2012, I saw that a stereo image of the pontoon was published by 'Realistic Travels', which company while based in London had offices around the world including one in Toronto, Canada. A 'webmaster modified' version of the e-Bay image is next, available in a slightly larger size here. But do, by all means, view the original e-Bay image offered by vendor 'claudiacaroline' - available here as this page is updated, but the card is now already sold. It is a beauty! I read that 'Realistic Travels', run by H. D. Girdwood, was in business from approx. 1908 to 1916. And that the company published a large series of stereo images of WW1, 'The Great War'. So we know roughly the dating of the image that follows. The name of the ship on the pontoon is, however, another matter!

Next is a simply splendid image of the pontoon & yard in Jun. 1953.  An even larger version of the image is available by clicking the image. I cannot, alas, tell you the origin of the image which was provided to the webmaster by a site visitor. The 'pontoon' is under Westburn, the vessel at right, built in 1929. Fireside, built in 1942, is beside her & Borde, built in 1953, is the ship in the near left rear. All 'Austin' built ships, it would appear. Can anybody advise re the origin of what is a truly fine image.

I am advised, (thanks John Rowson), that the pontoon was built by Swan Hunter. The images I have seen do not, however, date from 1903 - or 1904 for that matter. Far from it. So when did it 'close'? 1964, I now understand. What was the 'pontoon'? I understand it was a giant platform which essentially rested on the bed of the River Wear & could raise a vessel out of the water & lower it back down again. Kind of like a 'dry-dock', I guess. 'Imagine' calls it a 'submersible barge' in their page re 'Austin's Pontoon, Sunderland', which features a print (of unknown date) by Herbert William Simpson (1907-1972). The first image on this 'pdf' page (thanks City of Sunderland!) shows 'Austin's pontoon' with a ship on it - in 1962.

And here is the Herbert Simpson print:- When other quality postcard or other images of the pontoon become available, I will add it them in also.

A 'Valentines's Series' postcard of the pontoon, #57739, of British manufacture.

The Austin 'pontoon' was located on the south bank of the River Wear, just east of the railway & road bridges. Visible to all who crossed that bridge, since they just had to look down to see the pontoon & its activity laid out before them. A sight of great visual interest. There must be hundreds if not thousands of photos of the pontoon, 'out there' somewhere, taken by passers-by over 60 or more years. It would be good to have one or two of those images on site, wouldn't it! The main Austin yard would however seem to have been just a short distance away, on the same bank & a little closer to the sea.

A sign at the site today, shown here (& in the image strip above), in an Alan Collie image, advises us that the pontoon was towed half way around the world to a shipyard in Hong Kong a year or so after the 'Austin' ship building yard was closed. Does anybody know what later happened to it? Now it is really not for the webmaster to criticise from afar re such matters, but the sign looks to my eye to be have been 'low budget' - a more distinguished sign, perhaps illustrating the pontoon, might better have been commissioned in the first place to commemorate such a significant part of the city's history. Certainly the sign, in the summer of 2011, was in urgent need of repair or replacement. And perhaps, if it is replaced, consideration might just be given to improving the wording?

The scene today. The 'pontoon' used to be located at bottom left of the image that follows, parallel of course to the river bank. The sign is affixed, I believe, to the railing that is visible at dock side.

The next image is visually interesting, I think. Of 'Austin' workers walking up to the bridge in the early 1950s. At the end of their shifts, perhaps. In the forefront is Paul H. H. Rhodes, then a student at S. P. Austin & Son Limited & later its Planning Manager. And later in the same role at 'Bartrams'.

In a snippet of data, I read that the yard made a net profit of £51,900 in the year to Apl. 30, 1951, & £43,499 in the year prior.

It would seem that the yard merged with W. Pickersgill & Sons Ltd. in 1954. To form Austin & Pickersgill Limited. And in 1964 it closed for good. Can somebody tell us exactly what happened & when. I think that the main 'Austin' yard may have closed in early 1960 & the business was relocated to Pallion. But that assumption may be quite wrong.

We need your help with the next image. It is of an 'Austin' launching party at Wear Dockyard in the 1950s but the name of the ship being launched is not known. Can you identify which particular ship it was? The image was kindly provided by Tom Millar, whose father, Thomas (Tom) Millar, was General Manager of 'Austins' from about 1950 through 1957/58. Tom's father and mother are both in the launching party - his father 8th from the right & his mother 5th from the left.

Tom has provided launch images with everyone identified re 4 vessels (Ardingly, Borde, Hackney & Wallarah) & also another launching image with an 'identity' problem. I have placed all material where your help would be welcomed, together, on page 105.

I read that 'in 1958, more than 600 ships underwent repair at the yard of Wear Dockyard, adjacent to the Wearmouth Bridge.'

Austins have always specialised in building colliers and coasters, the demand for which has been falling off in recent years, so that now (early 1961 perhaps in that context) Austins are building a luxury yacht, the first, they hope, of many to come.

I have also read that the yard was closed in Oct. 1959, but was reopened 6 months later to build Radiant II, a luxury motor yacht.

I am advised that the tower cranes of Austin's Shipyard were dismantled in about 1968/69, and one of them fell into the river blocking it to traffic for 14 days or so - 'which cost the contractor dearly'.

Part of the above text originates with a paper written by J. A. Marr, with the 'Austin' words available here.

Miramar lists, 11 pages, (highest hull number on each page). It used to be that you could click on the links that follow & get to the relevant Miramar page. But no longer! The new procedure must be to go to Miramar (here) & log in (you must be registered to view any page). And once you are logged in, return to this page & all the following links should work for you:- 138, 171, 203, 233, 263, 303, 324, 354, 384, 414, 420. And on this site, at page 140 is a list of 'Austin' built vessels, starting in 1831 & ending in 1959. Which list includes unnumbered vessels built as much as 43 years prior to the very first Miramar listing.

Names of just a few of the vessels constructed by 'Austin' of Sunderland - added as I happen to spot references to them. In a table in build date sequence.

1  
286/307 tons
1840

A snow-rigged vessel.  Per 1 (data), 2 ('snow' re rigging). A 2 masted sailing ship carrying square sails & a trysail on a small jackmast. Built by Peter Austin for Hunter & Co. (Thomas Hunter) of Monkwearmouth. Later owned, 1855/57, by Moore. Repaired in 1850, 1853 & 1855. In service in the Mediterranean perhaps (1855/56).

2 Mora
225/200 (later 186) tons (different tonnage measures, I suspect)

2157
1848

A wooden brig, later a snow (a type of brig). Per 1 (Board of Trade inquiry into 1876 grounding & loss, ex 'Accounts and Papers', published 1876, a 'Google' book), 2 (ownership in 1858). 85 ft. 0 in. or 87 ft 0 in. long, signal letters HMWR. & later WSKF. Vessel not listed at Miramar. This vessel was being listed in these pages as 'builder unknown', because early Lloyd's Registers do not record builders' names, & the WWW was no help either. But the 1848/49 Lloyd's Register, along with data on this page, establishes beyond doubt that the ship was in fact built by Peter Austin (2), for his own account i.e. on speculation. It was initially owned by the builder therefore, S. Austin it would seem, & likely used in the Mediterranean trade. By 1852/53, the vessel had been sold to 'T. Wilson', of Whitby for the London/West Indies trade. And so owned thru 1864/65, on the Mediterranean service & then a coaster ex Liverpool. We can read, indeed, that in 1858, the vessel was owned by Thomas Wilson, of Whitby, & Wm. Widby of Sunderland, Widby clearly being the vessel's master. The webmaster has a few, but not all, Lloyd's Registers available from the time period - a puzzle perhaps is the vessel seems not to be recorded in the 1870/71 & 1873/74 registers. The vessel was then sold & in the 1874/75 register 'I. Bedlington', of West Hartlepool, is listed as the owner, which data conforms to the vessel's final chapter, as next follows. On Apl. 5, 1876, Mora, then owned by 'Isaac Bedlington and others' & registered at West Hartlepool, Henry Beane ('Beane') in command, left Hartlepool with a cargo of 308 tons of coal for Flemsburg, (Flensburg, Germany, I believe), with a crew of 6 all told. At 4 p.m., Darss Point, Germany, was 4 miles distant, & the vessel followed a course to pass through Femern Belt (Fehmarnbelt). At or about 9:45 p.m. on Apl. 16, 1876, the vessel sighted Ohlenborg Light, but the light was only occasionally visible as the weather at the time was thick & the wind was blowing hard. The vessel changed course twice & at about 11 p.m. it struck Puttgarden Reef (off Puttgarden, Germany & Femern island). The seas broke violently over the ship & the crew took to a boat & sheltered to leeward of the hull until daylight. The ship was then abandoned & became a total wreck. The crew made it safely to shore. The Court concluded that Beane had caused the loss of Mora by neglecting to verify the vessel's position by the frequent use of the lead. The Court suspended his certificate for 3 months, but suggested he should be granted a mate's certificate. Can you add anything?

3 Thomas Wood
520 tons

27503
1859

A wooden barque. Per 1 (data, Thomas Wood, the 2nd ref. to the name). The vessel is not listed at Miramar. Now the webmaster has a number of 'Lloyd's Registers' ex 'Google' books available to him (image at left) for what would appear to be most of Thomas Wood's life. 125.0 ft. long, signal letters PRMK. Built for 'Ritson & Co.', of Sunderland. The vessel would seem to have traded initially to India & later to Japan. 'Ritson & Co.' presumably later changed their name & by the 1876/77 register, 'F. & W. Ritson' had become the registered owners. In the 1880/81 edition of Lloyd's Register, 'V. Nilsen' had become the owner. That edition is the last Lloyd's Register record of the vessel that I have available. The vessel is not recorded in the 1882/83 edition, the next that I have, at least not as Thomas Wood, though it is quite possible that it was still listed there under another name had 'V. Nilsen' chosen to change the name of the vessel or had sold it. At this point, I am unable to tell you what finally happened to her. But we can tell you that the ship's bell has survived, & a composite image of it is at left, thanks to a kindly site visitor. Anything to add or correct? An image of the ship?

4 Madeline
383 tons

28044
1860

A wooden barque-rigged ship. Built by Peter Austin (2) at Panns. Per 1 (Board of Trade inquiry into the 1875  wreck, ex 'Accounts and Papers', published 1876, a 'Google' book). 131.5 ft. long. Built for Wm. Ord & Co., of Sunderland, to trade with South America. In subsequent years the vessel would seem to have served South America out of the ports of Liverpool & Swansea also. In the 1873/74 Lloyd's Register, the name of G. S. Simpson is added to that of Ord & Co. And in 1874/75 Lloyd's Register, the owner is recorded as being G. S. Simpson. In Dec. 1875, the vessel then owned by G. S. Simpson, of London, & two other persons. On Nov. 13, 1875, the vessel, under the command of Alexander Oppen & with a crew of 13 all told, left Demerera, (South America, now Guyana) bound for London with a general cargo. On the evening of Nov. 21, 1875, the vessel was off St. Martin's Island (St. Martin). The ship was 'steered by the wind' & at 2:15 a.m. on Nov. 22, 1875, the vessel struck three times on a reef to the westward of Dog Island, maybe at West Cay. A squall took the vessel off the reef. The pumps were manned but the vessel had 2 feet of water 'in the well' which rapidly became 6 feet. The boats were ordered out & a gig with all the ship's papers was swamped & lost. The entire crew took to a longboat which stood by Madeline for a while, lost sight of her in a squall, & never saw her again. The longboat safely reached St. Martin, (Lesser Antilles) on Nov. 23, 1875. The vessel & cargo was fully insured. The Court considered that the Captain had committed an error of judgment, but returned to him his certificate. In a dissenting opinion, C. S. Broome, Nautical Assessor, states that in his view Captain Oppen had committed 'culpable carelessness' in neglecting to take soundings & in permitting the vessel to approach Dog Island, which is, per the sailing directions, 'to be approached with great care at night'. He also believed that help should have been sought from Anguilla, (Leeward islands, Lesser Antilles), a closer & British possession, rather than from St. Martin, a French & Dutch possession. Anything to add or correct? An image?

5 Carmelo
711 tons
Hull 114

68940

Ethel
1876

A 3 masted iron barque. Built by Austin & Hunter. Per 1 (data, Ethel), 2 (an 1893 voyage to Hobart, Tasmania), 3 (archive of Australian newspaper reports re Ethel), 4 (attempt by Euro to refloat Ethel), 5 (painting, Ethel, the correct one?), 6 (image, Ethel), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 54.1 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 177.4 ft., signal letters PRNM. The webmaster has a few editions of Lloyd's Register available to him from 'Google' books, thru 1889/90 - see left. Built for G. J. Hay, of Sunderland. In the 1882/83 edition of Lloyd's Register, 'H. Gourlay & Co.', of Glasgow, had become the owner. The vessel was sold in 1891 & renamed Ethel. Of beautiful appearance, as per the following words in 'Where Ships Are Born', here & here - 'Carmelo ... famous when she was sold to Fenwick, Stobart and Co., and placed in the Tasmanian trade. As the Ethel, she came regularly to the Thames, and was noted as the biggest sailing ship to go right up into the Pool of London, her tall masts and beautiful appearance always creating tremendous interest among the passers-by on London Bridge.' Miramar states that she was rather sold to Fenwick & Co., of London, I believe. It would seem that her principal cargo, returning to the U.K. was wool, however I have spotted references also to cargoes of timber, silver-lead ore, & animal skins. The vessel was sold, in 1902, to S. A. Sande, of Flekkefjiord, Norway, with no change of vessel name. In Dec. 1903, the vessel was at South Africa, & was instructed to sail, in ballast, to Semaphore anchorage, Port Adelaide, South Australia, to pick up a cargo of wheat. P. A. Borgwald ('Borgwald') was in command, on his first voyage to Australia. I have not read how many were in the crew. Ethel encountered a 'freak' storm & on Jan. 2, 1904, the vessel struck a reef, lost her rudder & was driven ashore in a dismasted condition on the beach below Reef Head, just S. of Pondalowie Bay on Yorke Peninsula, South Australia, near Cape Spencer - a site surrounded by steep cliffs. Leonard Stenersen, an 18 year old seaman, volunteered to get a line ashore. He was badly battered in the attempt - they tried to pull him  back to the ship, but he never made it aboard & it would seem that his body was never recovered. The rest of the crew waded ashore in quieter conditions the next day. Ferret, a steamship engaged in the Port Adelaide-Spencer Gulf trade, saw Ethel & reported her situation to a nearby lighthouse keeper. Leverten, a tug, attended the scene with Borgwald aboard, but could no nothing. The vessel, as it was, was sold at auction on Jan. 26, 1904, for £100, to A. H. Hasell, proprietor of Marion Bay Gypsum Works. A few months later, in Apl. 1904, Euro, a tug, attempted to pull Ethel off the beach into deep water, but a sudden storm snapped the tow line, & the effort was not successful. The vessel was later driven high up the beach, where she remained for many decades, & until the 1980s, the wreck was in a relatively good condition (see the 1964 image at left). It then disintegrated & while the wreck is still there today (2011), on what is now known as Ethel beach, only a few rusting ribs are visible above the sand. One of her anchors is today exhibited on the cliffs above the beach. The area is now part of Innes National Park. In Nov. 1920, Ferret was wrecked just a couple of hundred yards away from where the Ethel lay. There were many ships named Ethel, indeed another vessel of the name was built at Sunderland by Pile. The above text may well need correction. Anything to add or correct? #1747

6   Fenton
784 tons
Hull 116

73735

Stonehenge
Adone
1876

An iron cargo ship. Built by Austin & Hunter. Per 1 (image, Fenton), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 61.2 metres long (perpendicular to perpendicular). Built for W. Milnes, of London. I have seen a couple of ref. to a 'W. Milnes' of London, one re a 1857 vessel purchase by 'W. Milnes', of London Coal Factory. Initially used as a collier, it would appear. Vessel sold in 1913 to H. W. Page, & renamed Stonehenge. Sold again, in 1925, to A. Giuffrida, & renamed Adone. On Mar. 6, 1932, the vessel was wrecked, near Pozzallo, Sicily. Am grateful for the data at Miramar, since I have not been successful in finding WWW data elsewhere re any of the names above. Anything to add or correct?

7 Lanoma
700 (many references are to 665, the net tonnage) tons
Hull 115

73710
1876

An iron barque. A wool clipper. Built by Austin & Hunter. Per 1 (wreck data), 2 (Chesil Beach 1888 ref.), 3 (vessel's 1888 cargo, etc., ex Launceston 'Te Aroha News' newspaper), 4 (detailed wreck report), 5 (T. B. Walker & Co. 'Blue Peter' article, Col# 3, ex 6), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 56.3 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 184.6 ft., signal letters QTPS. Built for Thomas Boss Walker ('Walker'), of London. Walker was a prominent ship owner in London, & for many years was Chairman of Lloyd's Register. In 1888, the vessel is stated, per 3, to have been in the 'J. B. Walker & Co.' line. That is almost certainly a typographical error, & should correctly have read 'T. B. Walker & Co.' Selwyn Williams advises (thanks Selwyn!) that Walker was the owner, which data is confirmed by the editions of Lloyd's Register available to the webmaster from 'Google' books, thru 1887/88 - see left. The vessel was used in the wool trade, & after 1881 linked London with Launceston, Tasmania. A very fast ship indeed. Have read she once completed the Australian run in 63 days. But it is possible that the 63 days was derived from adding together portions of different voyages. It did not have a very long life. The vessel left Launceston for London on Dec. 23, 1887 under the command of Thomas B. Whittington, a most experienced captain & her captain from 1881. In early Mar. 1888, it was in the English Channel, 76 days out of Launceston, carrying 1,083,650 lb. (2,000 bales) of Tasmanian wool & all sorts of other interesting cargo also. In thick blowing south westerly weather such that for perhaps 500 miles no positional readings could be taken. Late on Mar. 8, 1888, the weather would seem to have cleared a little, land was suddenly near, efforts to avoid disaster were not successful & just before midnight she stranded broadside at Chesil Beach, Portland Bill, near Weymouth, Dorset. Near Fleet, perhaps? She fell over to seaward, & began to break up in heavy surf. The Captain & 11 crew were drowned. Herbert Rhys Jones, (page bottom), aged 26, was one of those lost. Just 6 crew were saved, by rocket apparatus from the shore. By Mar. 17, 1888, it was described as a hopeless wreck, both vessel and cargo being completely destroyed. I am advised that the wreck, which is privately owned, has been located & positively identified. A photocopy of a painting depicting Lanoma on Chesil Beach exists in Launceston Library, Tasmania. Anything to add and/or correct?

8   Keroula
1547 tons
Hull 130

82812
1880

An iron cargo ship. Per 1 (4th item), 2 (Cairn Line, Keroula), 3 (NY Times archives 40% down), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 260.4 ft. long. Built for Porteous & Senior, of London. On Apl. 1, 1881, Keroula (same one?), en route from New Orleans to Stettin, Germany, via Halifax, arrived at Falmouth short of coal & with her boats smashed due to bad storms. In 1887, I have read, the vessel was transferred to Avis Steamships, of London, with 'Gilbert Porteous' the manager. Sold in 1895 to Cairn Line, of Newcastle, which then served Baltic, Black Sea & Mediterranean ports. On Sep. 11, (or 14, data differs) 1903, when owned by 'Cairns, Young & Noble', the vessel was wrecked at Seby (nr. Segerstad), on E. coast of Öland Island, (off SE coast of Sweden) while en route from Wyburg, Finland, to Calais, France, with a cargo of timber. Anything to add or correct?

9 Lady Katherine
945 (or 845) tons
Hull 131?

81487
1881

An iron cargo ship, a collier, schooner rigged. Per 1 (sea trials, p.46), 2 (Lady Katherine, in middle of image, beached W. of the bridges in Sunderland), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 211 ft. long, attained a speed at trials of 10 knots. Built for The Earl of Durham, a major colliery owner, of Sunderland. After her sea trials, on Apl. 1, 1881, the vessel left for Aberdeen with a cargo of coal. I read i) that the vessel was wrecked, off Newbiggin, Northumberland, on Jan. 9, 1889 & ii) was rescued at sea by the Newbiggin Lifeboat after coming to difficulties at sea. Clive Ketley advises that it was rather wrecked on Jan. 26, 1889, while en route from Uddervalla (western Sweden) to Sunderland with a cargo of timber. Per, he advises me, the custom house records which he transcribed. Anything to add or correct? 

10 Tana
1169 tons
Hull 137

84934
1882

An iron cargo ship. Per 1 (launch in 1882, p.58), 2 [Christian Salvesen, Tana (1)], 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 233 ft. long overall. Built for 'Christian Salvesen and Co.', of Leith, Scotland. Christened Tana by Miss R. J. Wilson, of Sunderland. A sister ship to Marna, which served on a regular Leith, Scotland, to Norway service. It would seem, in fact, that Tana may have replaced Marna on that Leith/Norway service. The WWW record for this ship is very modest. A intriguing data 'snippet' - 'Tana herself had a remarkable reprieve'. I read that it refers to an incident in 1894, when her Master thought that the ship was sinking, off Ushant, an island off the French Brittany coast. And abandoned the ship. He was apparently quite wrong - the ship was towed into Ushant & survived for over 40 more years. I have not been able to read about the circumstances of that incident or indeed anything about her lengthy service life thru to Mar. 1935, when the vessel was broken up at Grangemouth, Firth of Forth, Scotland. 'Salvesen' is covered in 'Salvesen of Leith', a 1975 volume by Wray Vamplew. Anything to add or correct?

11 Cairngowan
1286 (or 1215 or 1269) tons
Hull 142

88733

Odensvold
Oddevold
Torsten
Dorita
1883

An iron cargo ship that had a very long life indeed - 74 years. Per 1 (Sanne or Sannes, extensive data re Odensvold & image), 2 [Cairn Line, Cairngowan (1)], 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Oddevold, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 68.68 metres long. Built for Cairns Young & Noble (Cairn Line) of Newcastle (T. Cairns). Was involved in some kind of collision in 1889, it would appear. In 1909, the vessel was sold to 'AB J. N. Sanne', of Uddevalla, Sweden, & renamed Odensvold. Was renamed Oddevold on Mar. 19, 1918, or maybe in 1919. In 1927, the vessel was sold to 'Rederi AB Oddevold', of Sölvesborg, Sweden (Oscar A. Paborn the manager?). How strange that the vessel had been named Oddevold eight or so years earlier. I presume that the companies were related. In 1938, the vessel was sold again, likely to Carl-Otto Pernlow of Gothenburg, Sweden, with Henckel & Schander (Ingolf Schander) the managers. No change of name. I am advised that there was modest WW2 service, between Methil & Norwegian waters in Jan./Feb. 1940, hopefully available to you, if not to me, via 3. On Nov. 28, 1941, while en route from Gävle, Sweden, to Holtenau, Germany, with a cargo of iron ore, the vessel collided with Kattegatt & sank. Have not read where. 3 crew members lost their lives. Kattegatt must have survived for it lasted until 1953. Oddevold was later re-floated & repaired. It was sold on Aug. 26, 1950 to 'Rederi AB Torsten', of Stockholm, Sweden, (Torsten Carlbom & Co. the manager?), & renamed Torsten. The vessel was sold for the last time, on Oct. 6, 1954, to 'Compania del Norte S.A.', of Puerto Limon, Costa Rica (same manager) & renamed Dorita. On Dec. 10, 1957, the vessel arrived at the 'Eisen & Metall K.G. Lehr & Co.' facilities at Hamburg, Germany, to be broken up. And was broken up in 1958. So a life of 74 years! Anything to add or correct? 

12 Hedworth
1079 (or 1085 or 1149) tons
Hull 149

90308

Assos
Calluna
Ramscappelle
Sant'Antonio
Regulus
1884

An iron cargo ship, a collier. Per 1 (1884 launch ref., p.186, data is available as an image at left, listed on p.269), 2 (extensive data, Calluna, out of sequence on page, after Californier 22% down), 3 (24 Jun 1942), 4 (image, Ramscappelle, also -02), 5 (image, Regulus, the correct one?), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 232.7 ft. long. Built for The Earl of Durham, a major colliery owner, of Sunderland. But likely owned in 64ths with E. T. Nisbet, of Newcastle, the principal owner & H. T. Morton the manager. Can anybody confirm that data or correct it? Named Hedworth by Miss Smith of Stirling. Could it have been named Hedworth after Sir Hedworth Williamson? Or more likely Hedworth Lambton, who later became a Vice-Admiral. In 1921, the vessel was sold to Mrs. O. Anghelatos, of Greece, (Miramar states O. Anghelato) & renamed Assos. 'McAllum & Co.', of London, the managers. In 1923, the vessel was sold to Maurice Rossion, of Profondeville, Belgium, & renamed Calluna. And in 1925 was sold or transferred to 'Maurice Rossion & A. Vandam', also of Profondeville, Belgium, with no change of name. On Feb. 15, 1928, the vessel was sold to 'Soc. Anonyme du Steamer Ramscappelle', of Antwerp, Belgium, 'M. J. Van der Eb' (Miramar adds 'Miller' to the name), the manager, & renamed Ramscappelle. On Feb. 10, 1930, the vessel was sold to Dimitriu Sofia, of Catania, Italy, 'Av. Giuseppe Maddiona', the manager, & renamed Sant'Antonio. The vessel was sold for the last time, in 1936, to Francesco Pittaluga, of Genoa, Italy, & renamed Regulus.  On Jun. 24, 1942, Regulus was sunk by HMS Turbulent, N98. a T Class British submarine, when 4 miles W. of Ghemines, Gulf of Sirte (N. coast of Libya, also known as Gulf of Sidra). Have not read the circumstances or if lives were lost. Anything to add or correct?

13   Magnat
1010 tons
Hull 152
1885

A barque. Per 1 (1885 ref. to launch, p.162 & ref. on p.258), 2 (data re the 1892 Magnat, of related interest, though it references 1885, incorrectly I believe), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 62.8 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 206 ft. Data about this vessel is confused. This Magnat was built for Gerd Bolt & his partners of Elsfleth, Germany (per Miramar, 'G. Bolte'). Vessel was named by Miss Newton. Captain Osterman (most probably Ostermann) ('Ostermann') to be her first captain. Now there was a second Magnat, built in 1892, originally named the Edward Pembroke, but built by A. McMillan & Son of Dumbarton & so beyond the scope of these pages. But there is a relationship. Captain Ostermann, who captained our vessel, was a part owner, with partners, of the later vessel. Anyway, on Oct. 25, 1897, our vessel, Captain Ostermann in command, was wrecked, per Miramar, at Galera Point, Ecuador (i.e. Punta Galera, in northern Ecuador). It would seem that Ostermann, was 'gaoled in Chile for this loss for a period of two years, but the full sentence was not served, and he was released early when the charts were proven to be inaccurate'. So maybe the wreck was truly off Chile instead of off Ecuador? The later Magnat, in ballast, left Cape Town, South Africa, on Mar. 23, 1900 for Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia, when it was wrecked on May 9, 1900, 32 miles off course, in Bass Strait (between Tasmania & Australia), specifically at Tarwin Lower, close to Wilsons Promontory, Victoria, Australia. It was thought that the vessel could be re-floated, but that was not to be. Ostermann, depressed at the loss of his ship, died aboard the hull on Aug. 20, 1900 & was buried nearby. Parts of the wreck remain there to this very day. Anything to add or correct?

14   Offerton
724 tons
Hull 151

90323

Eleni
Rifat
Marie Rosette
1885

A cargo ship, a collier, rigged as a 3 master schooner. Per 1 (1885 ref. to launch, p.78 & ref. on p.258), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 198 ft. long. Built for H. T. Morton of Biddick Hall & designed to serve 'the London coal trade of the Lambton Company', which company was, I believe, owned by the Earl of Durham, whom Miramar indicate to be the ship owner. Vessel was named by Miss Badcook. The vessel was sold, in 1908, to D. M. Los, of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Eleni. It was sold again, in 1909, to 'A. Cambi', & renamed Rifat. And in 1911, sold to 'Cambi Vidovich C', of Italy, & renamed Marie Rosette. Both of the last purchaser names may well be agents rather than owners. The vessel was captured & sunk by gunfire by the Russians, during WW1, on Jan. 4, 1915,  off Sinop (Black Sea coast of Turkey), while en route to Istanbul (from?) with a cargo of oil in barrels. WWW data is essentially non-existent. Am most grateful for the data at Miramar. Anything you can add or correct?

15   Verulam
1663 tons
Hull 158

John & Albert
1887

A passenger/cargo ship. Per 1 (1887 ref. to launch, p.21 & ref. on p.338, data at thumbnail), 2 (Andresen, John & Albert), 3 (Spanish page, image John & Albert), 4 (link 3 translated), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 259 ft. long (76.2 metres perpendicular to perpendicular). Accommodation for 20 passengers in 1st Class & 120 in 3rd & good cargo capacity. Likely built on speculation. Christened Verulam by Mrs. Austin on Feb. 23, 1887. Delivered to J. H. Andresen ('Andresen'), (or Linha de Navegaceo de J. H. Andresen or Andresen Line) of Oporto, Portugal, & renamed John & Albert (after the Andresen children?). Andresen provided cargo service in Brazilian waters & in 1887 added a triangular passenger service between Antwerp, Oporto, Rio de Janeiro & New York. The vessel had a very short life indeed. It was wrecked off Corcubión, Cape Finisterre, NW Spain, on Jun. 26, 1889. I have not read its routing or the circumstances. Carrying passengers? Any loss of life? Anything you can add or correct?

16 Pallas
1457 (or 1439) tons
Hull 157

Frank
1888

A 3-masted steel barque. Per 1 (image, Frank), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 71.0 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, (233 ft.). Built for Martin G. Amsinck, of Hamburg, Germany. The vessel was sold in 1906 to A/S Frank (P. Christoffersen), of Tvedestrand, Norway, & renamed Frank. And sold again, in 1912, to 'J. W. Wroldsen', also of Tvedestrand, with no change of name. On Mar. 9, 1915, while en route from Mobile, Alabama, to Buenos Aires, Argentina, with a cargo of lumber, the vessel was stranded near Havana, Cuba, near Colorados, N. Cuba, & wrecked. WWW data is modest indeed, so I am most grateful for what little I found. Anything you can add or correct?

17   Adriatico
1358 (or 1393) tons
Hull 169

Matias F. Bayo
Españoleta
Maria Dolores
1890

An iron cargo ship. Per 1 (launch), 2 (page in Spanish, re 'Españoleto', with modest 1937 image), 3 (2 translated by Google), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 74 metres long, speed of 9 or 9 1/2 knots. Built for 'Gerolimich & Co.', maybe 'Eredi C. Cav Gerolimich & Co.', of Lussinpiccolo, a town on the island of Lošinj, western Croatia, in the Adriatic, but then belonging to the Austro Hungarian Empire. The vessel was sold, in 1899, to 'Olavarria y Lozano' of (I think) Asturias, Spain, & renamed Matias F. Bayo. Later names all seem to refer to Spain. The vessel was sold again, in 1911 (no name change), to 'Melitón González', (maybe 'La Sociedad de Vapores Melitón González Y Compañia') which company merged with 'Gijonesa Lopez de Haro' in 1914. In 1917 the vessel was sold to 'Ferrer Poset' & renamed Españoleta. And in 1936 sold to 'Adolfo Ramirez Escudero' & renamed Maria Dolores. Broken up at Bilbao, Spain, in Q3 of 1937. Anything to add or probably to correct?

18   Majorca
1158 tons
Hull 177

99231

Leopold de Wael
Luana
1892

A steel cargo ship, schooner rigged. Per 1 (an 1893 voyage), 2 (data), 3 (dive page with images), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 225 ft. (68.6 metres) long, speed of 9.5 knots. Built for Leith, Hull & Hamburg Steam Packet Co. Ltd. (J. Currie), of Leith, (Edinburgh) Scotland. Sold in 1924 to Cie. Belge de Nav. S.S. (F. Alexander Fils & Cie), of Antwerp, & renamed Leopold de Wael. In 1931, the vessel was owned by 'Armement Alexander'. It was sold, in 1933, to 'Bartolomeo Loffredo', of Naples, & renamed Luana. In 1936, the vessel was owned by Giovanni Longobardo, also of Naples. On Mar. 3, 1947, while en route from Manfredonia to Venice (both Italy) with a cargo of bauxite, the vessel was mined 20 miles S of Cape Promontore (today Cape Kamenjak in Croatia). 12 crew lost. A dive site today (strong currents) at a depth of 39/49 metres. Can you add anything?

19 Northdene
1356 tons
Hull 182

101847

Krivs
Antoinette
1893

A cargo ship. Per 1 (image, Northdene, also -05), 2 & 3 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Krivs, re years 1930/31 thru 1945/46), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 73.1 metres long (240.0 ft.) perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters TBDF later YLDJ. Built for J. Thompson (Fenwick), of Newcastle. In 1923, the vessel was sold to 'A Kalnin', of Riga, Latvia, & became Krivs. In 1935/36, the registered owner became 'Tv. "Krivs" redereja', of Riga, with 'M. Kalnins' the manager. However, in 1941, despite the Lloyd's references, it was acquired by the German Government & became Antoinette. On Feb. 1, 1944, the vessel was wrecked 'near Scharhorn Riff'. The WWW record for this vessel is most limited. Is there anything you can add

20 Harborne
1278 tons
Hull 192

105880

Corburn
Ea
Somio
1896

A cargo ship, which had a very long life - 72 years. Per 1 (page in Spanish, data & image Somio at page bottom), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 71.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 235.1 ft., speed of 9 knots. It would seem that the vessel was intended to be constructed for J. & C. Harrison. But the owner when built was Wm. Cory & Son Ltd., of London, (an amalgamation of some sort?). Likely used to carry coal from North-East ports to London. During WW1 the vessel carried Royal Engineers' stores for the British Army between the Thames & France. Renamed Corburn in 1920. In 1921, the vessel was sold to Cía. Anónima de Navieros del Norte ('Norte'), of Spain, & renamed Ea. Sold again, in 1923, to 'Cia. Maritima Elanchove' & in 1942 to 'Carbones de Tenerife'. No change of name in either case. In 1943, the vessel was returned to Norte. In 1948, the vessel was sold to 'Maria Manuela Menendez Ponte', (J. Ponte Naya the manager?), or perhaps to 'Maria de la Consolacion Menendez Ponte', of Spain. Vessel again returned to Norte. In 1952, the vessel was sold to 'Santiago Rivero' or 'Santiago Rivero Moran', of Gijón, Spain, & renamed Somio. It would seem that in 1962 it became owned by Transportes Frigoríficos Marítimos. On Feb. 16, 1968, the vessel arrived at Santander/Parayas, Cantabria, Spain, to be broken up. Can anyone confirm/explain the unusual ownership changes above or otherwise correct or add to the above data.

21 Harbury
1838 (or 1746) tons
Hull 191

105858

Smut
Aarne
Heinrich von Plauen
1896

A cargo ship. Per 1 (ex e-Bay, copper plate drawing, which was surely ex a Wear Dockyard Ltd. clock), 2 (extensive Russian data, 20% down page, re Aarne), 3 (image, Smut), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 81.7 metres long, 268.2 ft., speed of 9 (or 8 1/2) knots. It would seem that the vessel was intended to be constructed for J. & C. Harrison. But the owner when built was Wm. Cory & Son Ltd., of London, (an amalgamation of some sort?). In 1911, the vessel was sold to 'Kjobenhavns Bunkerkul Depot AS' (Copenhagen Bunker Coal Depot) ('Joh. Hansen & A. Erlandsen' managers?), of Copenhagen, Denmark, & renamed Smut. In 1926, the vessel was sold to 'SMUT Travarutransport OY' (Kristian Hansen manager), of Helsinki, Finland. And in 1939, was sold to 'A. Kalm' (ESGA Tallinn managers?), of Tallinn, Estonia & renamed Aarne. It would seem to have been taken over by the Government of Estonia in late 1940 & became a troop ship (BT-568), if, that is, my understanding of the WWW translation of 2 is in order. There are Jun. 1941 references there re Venta river & Ventspils, that escape me. I think that the texts mean that the vessel was left for use as a pontoon to permit crossing of the Venta River if the bridge was destroyed. And that the vessel was taken by German troops at Ventspils on Jun. 27, 1941. On Oct. 10, 1941, the vessel was seized by the German Government (& maybe then transferred to Helmsing & Grimm, of Danzig, Germany) & became Heinrich von Plauen. On Jun. 6, 1943, while en route from Danzig, Germany (now Gdansk), to Riga, Latvia, with a cargo of coal, the vessel was sunk in the Baltic by aerial torpedoes fired by a Russian aircraft - off Cape Domesnaes, at approx. 57.48N/22.27E. SW of Hango? Can anyone correct or improve the above text, especially re the Russian?

22 Harlech
1282 tons
Hull 194

108198

Pompey
Samal
1897

A cargo ship, a collier & later a stores ship. Per 1 (image, 8th image down, Pompey is the small vessel in front), 2 (quote 40% down), 3 (data), 4 & 5 (brief NY Times refs. to Pompey), 6 (data, Pompey), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 71.7 metres long, speed of 10 knots. Built for J. & C. Harrison, of London. In 1898, the vessel was sold to the U.S. Navy & renamed Pompey. AF5. In 1900, it served at Shanghai, China, on the Yangtze Patrol, but ..  'POMPEY, originally a collier, later a torpedo boat tender, never became operational due to the chronic shortage of crewmen and her general state of advanced decrepitude.' On Apl. 12, 1912, Pompey, a torpedo boat tender, landed a force of men at Nanking, China, to protect American interests there (ex p155 of a giant 'pdf' file) - I have left that link even though it no longer works. The 'pdf' is probably still there, somewhere, but I cannot find it absent a site search facility. The vessel continued to serve in the Far East for many years. To the U.S. Army in 1922, perhaps. Used as a stores ship. The vessel was sold, in 1931, to 'Fernandez Bros', & renamed Samal. On Dec. 29, 1941, the vessel was bombed by aircraft at Pier #7, Manila, the Phillipines. More research needed re this listing. Is an image available perhaps?

23 Elizabeth Holland
1802 tons
Hull 198

106427

Leonidas
Elizabeth Holland
1898

A cargo ship. Per 1 (text & 4 images), 2 (data), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 264 ft. 3 in. (80.7 metres) long, speed of 9 1/2 knots, complement of 52. Built for F. S. Holland, of Sunderland. On Apl. 16, 1898, the vessel was acquired by the U.S. Navy from Samuel P. Holland (?) as a collier, & supplied Navy vessels/installations on the eastern seaboard of U.S. On May 21, 1898, the vessel was commissioned as USS Leonidas. The vessel was out of commission, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from late 1898 until Nov. 1900. Decommissioned & recommissioned three times. On Apl. 1, 1914, the vessel became a Survey Ship & made 4 surveying trips to the Caribbean, charting the coasts of Panama, Honduras, & Nicaragua. On Oct. 30, 1917, the vessel became a 'sub chaser/destroyer tender'. It served in the Mediterranean in 1918 as a base ship for a force of submarine chasers, stationed at Corfu, Greece. Designated AD-7 (destroyer tender) in Jul. 1920. Decommissioned Nov. 1921. And sold on Jun. 5, 1922 or maybe on Mar. 24, 1923 (data conflicts) to Ammunition Products Corp. of Washington, D.C., at which time the vessel's name reverted to Elizabeth Holland. 3 says broken up in U.S. in Jun. 1922. Can you add anything?

24 Hadley
1777 tons
Hull 215

114713
1901

A collier. Per 1 & 2 (sinking), 3 (image), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 73 metres long, 268.1 ft. Built for W. Cory & Son Ltd. ('Cory'), of London. Carried coal from the Tyne to London. Made a single trip to India, I read, (I wonder when?), with a cargo of electrical cable from Woolwich. I read that she also made a number of trips to Rotterdam to carry back to Tilbury 'the first coaches for the newly-electrified Metropolitan Railway' (London). In 1915, she would seem to have been owned by Cory Colliers Ltd., of London, a Cory subsidiary perhaps? Served as a collier during WW1 but in Sep. 1915 'was taken over to carry timber for H.M. Office of Works'. On Dec. 27, 1915, while en route from the Tyne to London, probably with a cargo of coal, Hadley hit a mine in the North Sea, 3 miles SE ½ E off the Shipwash Light Vessel (Shipwash Sands, off the coast of Harwich). Arie de Lange advises (thanks!) that the mine was laid by German submarine UC-3. Loss of life? Data is most limited. Do you possibly have anything to add?

25 Ambient
1517 tons
Hull 226

119201
1904

A collier. Per 1 (wreck ref.), 2 ('u-boat.net', sinking), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 75.6 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 248 ft., speed of 9 1/2 knots. Built at the cost of £18,300 for James Westoll Line, of Sunderland, [then would have been owned in 64ths with James Westoll being the managing owner], which 'company' carried coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & was involved also in the Black Sea grain trade. The 'company' later, in 1917, became 'James Westoll (London) Ltd.' On Mar. 12, 1917, while en route from Sunderland to Dunkirk (Dunkerque), France, with a cargo of coal, the vessel hit a mine laid by German submarine UC-4 off Aldeburgh, Suffolk, & sank. At 52.08.30N/1.46E, 7 miles NW of the Shipwash light vessel. No loss of life. The crew was landed at Lowestoft, also Suffolk. Can you add to the record? Any images?

26 Brentwood
1192 tons
Hull 225

118470
1904

A collier. Per 1 (extensive data & wreck location), 2 (loss ref., Brentwood), 3 ('uboat.net' sinking), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 224.9 ft. (about 70 metres) long. Built for W. Cory & Son Ltd. ('Cory'), of London. Was 'particularly employed in the Goole trade'. The Goole to London trade, I think that means. Remained in Cory service during WW1. In 1917, she would seem to have been owned by Cory Colliers Ltd., of London, a Cory subsidiary presumably. On Jan. 12, 1917, while en route, in ballast, from London to the Tyne, Brentwood hit a mine laid by UC-43, in the North Sea, & sank in just 4 minutes 4 miles ENE of Whitby. Crew of 15. 2 lives were lost, the 2nd mate & a fireman. The survivors were taken to Sunderland by Togston. The wreck lies at 54.32.0221N/00.35.671E in 40/50 ft. of water. WWW data is limited. Do you possibly have anything to add?

27 Hampshire
2717 (or 3006) tons
Hull 238

122861
5285

Porjus
Moldavia
Beykoz
Yolac Can
1906

A collier/ore-carrier/tramp-ship. Per 1 (data in Swedish, Porjus), 2 (link 1, translated), 3 (data, Porjus), 4 (data, images, Porjus), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Porjus, but I cannot check the link), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 95.6 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 318 ft. 7 in., speed of 9 or 9 1/2 knots. Built for Hampshire Steamship Company Ltd., of Newcastle, or maybe of Leith, Scotland, with Thomson, Elliott & Co. the vessel's managers. In late 1909, D. Russell & Co. became the managers. In 1912, the vessel was sold to 'Rederi A/B Luleå-Ofoten', of Stockholm, Sweden,  P. A. Welin the manager, & renamed Porjus. Used, for 34 years I read, to transport iron ore from the iron mines at Narvik, northern Norway, returning with coal & other cargoes. On May 19, 1916, the vessel was acquired by 'Trafik A/B Grängesberg-Oxelösund', also of Stockholm, with no change of vessel name. I read that on a number of occasions, the vessel also carried iron ore from Canada to U.K. in the 1930s. During WW2, the vessel escaped seizure at the  time of the German invasion of Norway & for the balance of the war was chartered by the Ministry of War Transport for the Allied war effort. 61 WW2 convoy references, including, it would seem, 6 N. Atlantic crossings, returning with such cargoes as lumber, pit-props, phosphates, steel & wood pulp. Also into Norwegian waters early in the war & to West Africa, Lisbon, Portugal, & into the Mediterranean. And many U.K. coastal voyages also. On Jan. 17, 1946, the vessel was sold to 'Rederi A/B Soya', of Stockholm, Olof Wallenius the manager, again with no change of vessel name. And later that year, on Mar. 28, 1946, the vessel was sold to 'Rederi A/B Maud', of Jonstorp, Sweden, O. M. Thore of Helsinki, Finland, the manager, & renamed Moldavia. In 1954, the vessel was sold to 'Ismael Enver Subasi', of Istanbul, Turkey, & renamed Beykoz. And in 1957 was sold again, to 'SS Yolac Can Donatma Istiraki', also of Istanbul, & renamed Yolac Can. She was sold for the last time, in 1960, to Malik Yolac & Osman Marmaradenizi, also of Istanbul, with no change of vessel name. On Oct. 15, 1964, the vessel arrived at the Fener, Istanbul, ship breaking facilities of 'Canakcilar Sti' to be broken up. It is surely clear that Austin built most sturdy ships indeed - so many of their vessels survived two world wars & had productive lives of a great many decades, as was the case with Hampshire. The above text may well need correction, since the translation of the data sources is often most difficult. Do you possibly have anything to add? Or to correct. Another image?

28 Lady Cory-Wright
2463 (or 2516) tons
Hull 237

123697
1906

A collier. Per 1 (extensive data, image, & list of the 1918 cargo), 2 (data including names lost in 1918, but the list is of 42 names), 3 ('Wikipedia' page re vessel), 4 ('uboat.net' sinking data), 5 (image), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 94.5 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 9 knots. Built for W. Cory & Son Ltd., of London, a company noted for its coal shipments to London. It would be good to see how the vessel was first Lloyd's registered - because W. Cory & Son Ltd. acted as managers for Cory Colliers Ltd. In 1907, the vessel 'loaded 3875 tons coal and 75 tons bunkers, in 12 working hours'. A Google books data 'snippet' suggests that the vessel was involved in a collision in 1912, perhaps with Beta (many vessels of the name) or maybe with Cornwood, (built at Sunderland by 'Blumer'). On Jul. 30, 1914, Lady Cory-Wright was at Hamburg, Germany, discharging coal. 4 days later, on Aug. 3, 1914, the vessel was commissioned for WW1 service as a mine layer, crewed by Royal Navy & Royal Fleet Auxiliary personnel. In 1916 the vessel was apparently transferred to Cory Colliers Ltd. On Mar. 19, 1916, the vessel sailed from Gibraltar, likely for Port Said, Egypt. Two years later, on Mar. 26, 1918, the vessel was off the Lizard, Cornwall, outbound from Devonport, Plymouth, for Malta, with a cargo of mines, depth charges, detonators, etc. Escorted by two trawlers. A number of sites indicate that the vessel was en route from Malta, but that data is surely incorrect. The ship, most likely under the command of Lieutenant Daniel Richardson, had a crew of 40 all told. At 3:50 p.m. on Mar. 26, 1918, the vessel was torpedoed & sunk by UC17, Oberleutnant zur See Erich Stephan in command, with the loss of 39 lives including the captain. At 49.45N/05.20W, 14 miles SSW of the Lizard. I had not spotted the name of the single crew member whose life was spared. But Tony Bate has been in touch, (thanks Tony!) to advise that that sole survivor was Alfred McMichael, then of Belfast, Ireland, from 1921 Northern Ireland. Tony tells us that one of those lost in the explosion was Arthur J. (James) Meadows, a gunner, the son of Tony's great grandmother Emma J. (Jane) Meadows, of Saffron Walden, Essex. Mrs. Meadows wrote to McMichael enquiring about the circumstances of her son's death, & McMichael wrote a short letter in response. McMichael was most fortunate to survive. Not only did he survive the explosion, he was found clinging to a floating mine - a mine to which he had clung for about 3/4 hour! A tricky rescue since there were many mines floating in the area. The explosion was massive; pieces of the ship were blown hundreds of feet into the air. I have read that in 2009 the wreck, at 49.44.7N/05.20.3W perhaps, (has the wreck identity been proven?) still contained many unexploded mines & detonators. So beware, divers! Can you add anything? #1827

29 Tosto
1755 tons
Hull 236

122846

Panis
Highbury
Nora
Maloja
1906

A self-trimming collier. Per A (Delcampe image, Tosto), 1 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data re years 1930/31 thru 1943/44, see part of data at left), 2 ('wrecksite.eu', sinking 'Maloja') 3 ('Christies' 1995 sale of ship model), 4 ('Wikipedia' page in German, Majola), 5 (link 4 translated), 6 (data), 7 (English detailed history data), 8 (image, Majola, 4 other modest images available via links at page left), 9 (image, Nora, but the correct Nora?), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 81.6 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 267.7 ft., signal letters HGQC later MMGN & HPIG, speed of 9 or 10 knots. On May 11, 1995, a builder's 'mirror back' half model of the ship was sold for £2,925 at a Christies auction at South Kensington, London. Built for Pelton Steamship Co. Ltd. ('Pelton'), owned by R. S. Gardiner & Joseph Reay, 'Gardiner & Reay', the managers, all of Newcastle. I am advised that Pelton owned coal mines & also owned a fleet of colliers trading to the Thames, S. coast & continental ports & to the Baltic, sailing mostly from the Tyne, & returning from the Baltic with a deck cargo of sawn timber & pit props. Tosto certainly carried timber, & it clearly delivered coal to Saint-Nazaire, France. In 1932, the vessel was sold to A. P. Anastassatos ('Anastassatos'), of Argostoli, Cephalonia or Kefalonia, Greece & renamed Panis. In 1937, the vessel was sold again, to 'Highbury Steamship Co. Ltd.', of London, 'J. Vassiliou' the manager, & renamed Highbury. In 1938, the vessel was again owned by Anastassatos, but the vessel, renamed Nora, was registered at Panama. It would seem that on Jun. 9, 1940, the vessel was acquired, for U.S. $221,000, by 'Schweizerische Reederei AG', i.e. 'Swiss Shipping Co. Ltd.' ('Swiss') of Basle (or Basel), Switzerland & renamed Maloja, but still registered at Panama. Only on Dec. 5, 1940 did Swiss take control of the vessel, then at Cork, Ireland, There would seem to have then been a legal impediment to registering the ship in Switzerland, but that was accomplished on Apl. 24, 1941 when the vessel was re-registered at Basle. Do I have all of that correctly? 'Syndikat des Verbandes Schweizerischer Gaswerke' of Zürich, seems to have been involved, in a way presently unclear to the webmaster. On Sep. 1, 1943, the vessel left Lisbon, Portugal, for Genoa, Italy, with a cargo of 1800 tons of copra oil in drums & 220 tons of bagged copra, ultimately destined for Switzerland. Wouters A. J. van Baardwijk was in command with a crew of 23 all told. At 4:15 p.m. on Sep. 7, 1943, the vessel was attacked in waves by 10 aircraft with machine guns, cannon, & torpedoes. The vessel was sunk when one of two aerial torpedoes struck the vessel & exploded. At 42.50N/8.11E, off Cap Revellata, Corsica, 30/40 miles NE of Calvi. The vessel, burning furiously, sank within 13 minutes of the hit. Whose aircraft attacked, in clear visibility, a ship of a neutral country, a ship which had the word 'SWITZERLAND' in giant letters freshly painted on its sides? Miramar indicates that they were German, 2 & 7 state they were British aircraft of Coastal Command, while 4 states, as I read it in translation of a U.S. source, that the aircraft were Beaufighters, which were British aircraft, I believe. A dreadful mistake of course. 3 lives, all Portuguese seamen, were lost in the attack while 7 others were injured, 2 seriously. The 20 survivors used a damaged ship's boat to reach Calvi. That was not the end of their journey. 2 of them were hospitalized at Calvi. The others were first imprisoned at Calvi, reached Algiers on a French ship, & via Casablanca, they finally reached Lisbon about 5 months after the sinking. I have not read what happened to the ship's dog, named 'Maloja', which also survived the attack! The wreck lies, I read, in 2,800 metres of water. Can you add to or correct the above? Another image? #1828

30 President
1945 tons
Hull 240

123947

Neath Abbey
Vneshtorg
President
1907

A collier. Per 1 (wreck), 2 ('pdf' re wreck, says sank Jun. 29, 1928, however. Most sites state Apl. 28, 1928), 3 (image, President), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 85.3 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 280 ft., speed of 9 1/2 knots, signal letters HKJN. Built at the cost of £24,000 for James Westoll Line, of Sunderland, [then would have been owned in 64ths with James Westoll being the managing owner], which 'company' carried coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & was involved also in the Black Sea grain trade. The 'company' later became 'James Westoll (London) Ltd.' ('Westoll), in 1917. On Aug. 4, 1914, the vessel was detained in Germany at the outbreak of WW1. Can anyone tell us about its service for Germany during WW1? It was later returned to the U.K., 'claimed by the War Risk Association', & sold in 1919 to Abbey Line Ltd., of Cardiff, Frederick Jones & Co. the managers, also of Cardiff, & renamed Neath Abbey. It was sold again, in 1921, to 'All-Russian Co-operative Society Ltd.', of London, & renamed Vneshtorg. In 1923, the vessel was repurchased by Westoll & renamed President. On Apl. 24, 1928, while en route from Hamburg, Germany to Methil, Fife, (its cargo?), the vessel sank. At 55.52.185N/02.08.40W, near St. Abbs, Berwickshire, Scotland, specifically at Whapness, near Eyemouth, which is on the E. coast of Scotland, 5 miles N. of the England/Scotland border. No loss of life. The crew scrambled ashore. The wreck lies today at 55.52.185N/ 02.04.400W. I have not read the circumstances, other than it was in thick fog. The wreck is spread over a large area, in 6 to 14 metres of water, with 'two huge boilers' still remaining. Not an easy vessel to WWW search for. Do you possibly have anything to add? Images?

31 Wm. Cory
2660 tons
Hull 249

129029
1909

A cargo ship, a collier most probably. Per 1 (the 1910 wreck scene ex an e-Bay image), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 314 ft. (about 100 metres) long. Had a very short life indeed. Built for W. Cory & Son Ltd., of London, a company noted for its coal shipments to London. On Sep. 5, 1910, while en route from Uleaborg, Finland, to Newport, Wales, with a cargo of pit props, the vessel ran aground in thick fog at the foot of the cliffs near Pendeen Lighthouse, 6 miles N. of Land's End, Cornwall. Close to the Levant Mine workings, I read. Probably no loss of life. Yes? Data is limited. Can you add anything?

32 Largo
1764 tons
Hull 253

129750
1910

A cargo ship, a collier. Per 1 (WW1 loss, Largo), 2 (ref. '27 February 1918') 3 ('uboatnet.org', Largo), 4 (U 105), 5 (1918 wreck), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 80.8 metres long, (265 ft.) perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters H.Q.T.S. Built for Pelton Steamship Co. Ltd. ('Pelton'), owned by R. S. Gardiner & Joseph Reay, 'Gardiner & Reay', the managers, all of Newcastle. I am advised that Pelton owned coal mines & also owned a fleet of colliers trading to the Thames, S. coast ports & to the Baltic, sailing mostly from the Tyne, & returning from the Baltic with a deck cargo of sawn timber & pit props. Can anybody tell us about Largo's WW1 service? On Feb. 27, 1918, defensively armed, while en route from Barry, Wales, to Scapa Flow (Orkney Islands), with a cargo of coal, the vessel was hit by a torpedo & sank. Most sources state that the submarine that fired the torpedo was UB 105, which would however seem, per 'uboatnet.org', to have been active in the Mediterranean. 'Uboatnet.org' states it was rather U 105, active in the Irish Sea & eastern Atlantic, Kapitänleutnant Friedrich Strackerjan in command. At 53.52N/05.02W. In the Irish Sea, 12 miles W. of 'Calf of Man', a small island, today a bird sanctuary, located at the SW tip of the Isle of Man. Have not read any detail as to the sinking (alone or in convoy, weather, time of day, name of Captain, loss of life, etc.). WWW data about the vessel is most limited. Can you add anything? An image?

33 Sir Francis
1991 tons
Hull 254

129102
1910

A cargo ship, a collier most certainly. Per 1 ('uboat.net', Sir Francis), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 85.5 ft. metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, (280.4 ft.) speed of 9 knots. Had a short life. Built for 'Cory Colliers Ltd.', which company was owned by Wm. Cory & Son Ltd., of London, a company noted for its coal shipments to London. Presumably named for Sir Francis Cory-Wright, a partner of Wm. Cory & Son & the 1st Chairman (in 1896) of Wm. Cory & Son Ltd. Became a Naval collier until paid off in Feb. 1917. On Jun. 7, 1917, while en route in ballast from London to the Tyne, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by UB-21. At 54.19N, 00.22W, 2 miles NE of Scarborough. The Captain (name?) & nine crew members lost their lives. Data about the vessel is most limited. It is possible that 2 published books re 'Cory' might have additional data - i) 'Cory Fleet: One Hundred Years', published by World Ship Society in 1960, but not likely since of 20 or 21 pages only, ii) 'Century of Family Shipowning 1854-1954' published by John Cory & Sons Ltd. in 1954. Do you know anything more? If so, do consider contacting the webmaster for inclusion of your data here.

34 Abbas
1430 tons
Hull 260

132628

Kadio
1911

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Kadio, for years 1935/36 thru 1943/44), 2 ('wrecksite.eu', wreck data, Kadio), 3 (image, Abbas), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for Stephenson Clarke and Company, of London, though in 1928 the registered owner became 'Stephenson Clarke & Associated Companies Ltd'. 73.1 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 240.0 ft., speed of 8 1/2 knots, signal letters SZNK. The vessel was sold, in 1935, to Mme K. (Kadio) G. Sigalas (1885/1967), of Piraeus, Greece, managed by 'G. Sigalas Sons', & renamed Kadio. On Oct. 20, 1941 (per Charles Hocking), or Oct. 23, 1941, (per Miramar) the vessel, with a cargo of cased benzine, was at Suez. The vessel caught fire, an explosion followed & the vessel sank. Can anybody provide additional detail as to the circumstances. Any loss of life? It is strange that a vessel, sunk in 1941, was still recorded in later editions of Lloyd's Register, thru 1943/44 certainly & it would seem thru 1944/45. Can you add anything? #1859

35 Minster
2788 (or 2733) tons
Hull 259

132573

Rosehill
1911

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data), 2 (near page bottom, 'Day 2'), 3 (wreck data, Rosehill), 4 & 5 (data & wreck images), 6 (p.77, true p.76,  of large 'pdf' file, re Rosehill), 7 ('uboat.net', Rosehill re UB-40), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for Stephenson Clarke and Company. 314 ft. (95.7 metres) long. The vessel was sold, in 1914, to W. J. Tillett Steam Ship Co. Ltd., of Cardiff, Wales, & renamed Rosehill. In WW1, the vessel was requisitioned by the Admiralty for use as a collier & was modestly armed. On Sep. 23, 1917, while en route from Cardiff, Wales, to Devonport (Plymouth), with a cargo of coal, Philip Jones in command, the vessel was torpedoed by UB-40. At 50.19N/04.18W. Not by U-40, as many sites indicate. U-40 was sunk over 2 years earlier, on Jun. 23, 1915! No loss of life. The 27 aboard took to boats & then, an hour later, 10 of them rejoined the ship to attempt to save her. The vessel was initially towed towards Fowey by 2 private tugs. Then 2 Admiralty tugs arrived, & started to tow it to Plymouth. But it did not make it there. It sank, in 2 pieces, in Whitsand Bay. The wreck is a dive site today, in 100 ft. of water, located 2 miles off Portwrinkle, near Plymouth. Beware - ammunition may be at the site. Can you add anything?

36 Paignton
2017 tons
Hull 258

130181
1911

A cargo ship, a collier. Per 1 ('uboat.net', sinking, & link to U-81), 2 (sinking ref., 14 March 1917), 3 (sinking ref., Paignton), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 85.3 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular. Built for William Steam Shipping Co. Ltd., of Paignton, Devon, 'Renwick Wilton & Co. Ltd.', of Dartmouth & Torquay, coal merchants & ship owners, the managers. The vessel must have been later sold, without change of name, because at the time of her sinking in Mar. 1917, the vessel would seem to have been owned by 'Globe Shipping Co., Ltd.', of Cardiff, with 'Humphries Ltd.' or maybe 'Humphries (Cardiff) Ltd.', also of Cardiff, the managers. The vessel was likely requisitioned by the Admiralty for service in WW1 & modestly armed. On Mar. 14, 1917, while en route from Greece to Glasgow with a cargo of 2,800 tons of magnesite, (magnesium carbonate, MgCO3, a white, yellow, or gray coloured mineral, the source of magnesium), the vessel was captured by U-81, Kapitänleutnant Raimund Weisbach in command, & sunk by gunfire. At 52.01N/11.29W, 40 miles NW of the Skellig Rocks, off County Kerry, SW Ireland. One life was lost. I have not read the circumstances, the name of Paignton's captain, the time of day, who was killed & what happened to the rest of the crew. Can you provide any of that detail? U-81 sank 30 ships in WW1 & damaged 2 others. Can you add anything? An image?

37 Rudmore
969 tons
Hull 257

132058

Yewhill
Holdernore
1911

A collier. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Rudmore, but I cannot check the link), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 208 ft. long, speed of 10 knots. Built at the cost of £13,900 for James Westoll Line, of Sunderland, [then would have been owned in 64ths with James Westoll being the managing owner], which 'company' carried coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & was involved also in the Black Sea grain trade. The 'company' later, in 1917, became 'James Westoll (London) Ltd.'. In 1937, the vessel was sold to Toft Steamship Company Limited, of Middlesbrough, T. H. Donking & Sons, the manager, with no change of name. 54 WW2 convoy references thru Mar. 1942 as Rudmore, all U.K. local, many to & from St. Helen's Roads which, I think, refers to the river Solent. Yes? It is a puzzle that all the WW2 convoy references are to U.K. local. Why do I say that? Because William Gibson ('Gibson'), who was a sailor aboard Rudmore in Jun. 1940, gives an interesting anecdotal account of his time aboard Rudmore in the Jan. 2010 issue of 'Sea Breezes'. An independent voyage maybe. In Jun. 1940, Rudmore arrived at Tonnay Charente, France (SW France, S. of La Rochelle), with coal from the Bristol Channel, & learned that the German Army was only a few miles away. Rudmore opted for a dangerous escape route i.e. sailing down the Charente river in total darkness. They successfully made it to the river mouth near Rochefort, (the only ship that has ever made the trip in darkness), took aboard some crew from 2 British vessels within the Rochefort locks, & safely made it to Plymouth. The vessel was later damaged in an air raid on London, & had to be beached below Tilbury. And, also later, in the North Sea, Rudmore gunners shot down a German plane & Captain Edward Thomson & the gunner were both decorated. Gibson also refers to the vessel being in collision with an unknown vessel at Plymouth. Such anecdotal material is rare & is most welcome. Do read the full account in 'Sea Breezes', which I believe was earlier, but no longer, WWW available. While I have no detail, it would seem that Rudmore may have had a number of collisions in its lifetime. With Nidd (this one maybe?) & Occident perhaps in 1918 (WW2 legal references but no detail). The vessel was sold, in 1943, to John Stewart & Co., of Glasgow, & in 1945 renamed Yewhill. No WW2 convoy references as Yewhill. It was sold again, in 1946, to 'Holderness Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Hull, & renamed Holdernore. On Apl. 13, 1957, the vessel arrived at the Boom, Belgium, (inland, S. of Antwerp) facilities of N.V. Nijkerk to be broken up. WWW data about this vessel is modest. Do you have anything to add? Images?

38 Tempo
1379 (or 1372 or 1373 or 1380) tons
Hull 261

129787

Polinice
Reborn
1911

A cargo ship, a collier. Per 1 (data in Italian & image, Polinice), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 73.1 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 knots. Built for 'Pelton Steamship Company Limited', owned by R. S. Gardiner & Joseph Reay, 'Gardiner & Reay', the managers, all of Newcastle. Have read nothing about the vessel during WW1. The vessel was sold, in 1931, to 'A. Pollio', of Sorrento, near Naples, Italy, & renamed Polinice. In 1931, the vessel was sold to 'Fleet Lauro', of Palermo, Sicily, with no change of vessel name. In Jun. 1940, Polinice was captured at sea by British Naval Forces, & sent to Malta. Where, on Jun. 11, 1940, the Italian crew managed to scuttle her in the Grand Harbour. I have not been able to read details re her capture & scuttling. (However I have also read some text which I do not understand, i.e. that on May 1, 1940, the vessel was sunk at Malta by German bombing. 'Former Italian steamer POLINICE (1373grt) under Control was sunk by German bombing at Malta. The steamer was later salved.' Can anybody explain that reference.) The above is not the end of the story however. At a date unknown (to the webmaster), the vessel was re-floated, by the Allies, & presumably made seaworthy again. And was sold, in 1946, to 'Emmanuel Schembri', of Valletta, Malta, & renamed Reborn. In Jan. 1965, the vessel was broken up at Malta. The WWW record for all of this is modest, indeed. Can you add to or correct the above?

39 Hillingdon
1926 tons
Hull 264

135130

Corbrae
Nagos
Huelva
Castillo Monforte
Jalon
1912

A cargo ship, a collier. Per 1 (25% down, Spanish text & Castillo Monforte image), 2 (45% down, text & Jalon image), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 81.4 metres long, 267 ft., speed of 10 knots. Built for W. Cory & Son Ltd., of London. During WW1 'was a Naval collier, B.E.F. storeship and Ammunition Carrier'. Sold in 1920 to 'Cory Colliers' (or maybe 'William Cory & Sons' or 'Wm. Cory and Son Ltd.') & renamed Corbrae. The vessel was sold, in 1934, to J. G. Livanos, of Greece, & renamed Nagos. What follows may need correction! I have read that the vessel was seized by the Spanish Navy while blockade running in the Spanish Civil War, became Spanish property & was renamed Huelva. But I cannot confirm that data via the WWW. The vessel was sold or transferred in 1939 to the Spanish Government, operated by Compañía Trasmediterranea & renamed Castillo Monforte. In 1942, the vessel was transferred to 'Empresa Nacional Elcano de la Marina Mercante'. It was sold again, in 1962, to 'Maritima Colonial', (or, per 2, to 'Marcosa'), & renamed Jalon. In 1967, the vessel was sold to 'Naviera de Cantabria, S.A.'. On Mar. 5, 1969, the vessel arrived at Bilbao, Spain, to be broken up (maybe broken up in 1970). Can you add to and/or correct the above?

40 Rondo
1906 tons
Hull 263

129799

Glückauf
1912

A cargo ship, a collier. Per 1 (wreck data, Glückauf), 2 (Katina Bulgaris collision), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 81.4 metres long, 267 ft., speed of 9 knots. Built for 'Pelton Steamship Company Limited', owned by R. S. Gardiner & Joseph Reay, 'Gardiner & Reay', the managers, all of Newcastle. Have read nothing about the vessel during WW1. The vessel was sold, in 1926, to 'Glückauf Kohlen Handelsges GmbH', in English 'Glückauf Coal Trading Co.'?, of Rostock, Germany, & renamed Glückauf. Now on Feb. 8, 1939, Greek owned Katina Bulgaris, outbound from Hull, collided in fog with U.S. owned Meanticut, 5 miles from the Humber Light Vessel. Katina Bulgaris sank quickly - before help including 2 tugs could arrive to assist her. Her crew were all rescued by Meanticut, which would appear to have suffered little damage. Why am I telling you all this? Well, on the very next day, i.e. on Feb. 9, 1939, Glückauf was en route from Immingham to Rostock with a cargo of coal, also in the fog. It hit the wreck of Katina Bulgaris. I have not read if Katina Bulgaris was fully or partially submerged. Does anybody know? The entire crew of Glückauf were taken aboard Rhea, a Finnish rather than French, I believe, steamer, but I have not spotted where they were landed. Some confusion as to the exact location of the wrecks, it would seem. The WWW record for all of this is modest, indeed. Can you add to and/or correct the above?

41 Corton
3405 tons
Hull 266

135192

Corlock
Adana
Corlock
Nan Shan
San Bay
Sanbay
1913

A collier. Per 1 (1918 torpedo attack), 2 (image, Adana, the correct one?), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 103.9 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 341 ft., speed of 10 (or 9) knots. The first 'Cory' vessel to bear the 'Cor' prefix. Built for W. Cory & Son Ltd., of London. In Aug. 1914, I read that the vessel was at St. Petersburg, Russia. And that the vessel served in the Russian Navy during the Russian Revolution. Became a Royal Navy ship, serving as a collier, & then served the British Army, carrying wagons, military transport etc. On Jan. 22, 1918, the vessel, while en route from Le Havre to Portsmouth, (its cargo?), was hit by a torpedo fired by U90. 8 miles S. of Dunnose Head, Isle of Wight. The ship was damaged & three lives were lost, but the ship made it to nearby Portsmouth. Likely transferred in 1920 to 'Cory Colliers'. I have read that the vessel was involved in the Mediterranean trade after WW1 & before her 1938 sale. On Nov. 10, 1934 however, the vessel, bound down river at Northfleet Hope, River Thames, was in collision with the anchored Lady Wolseley. Can anybody advise the webmaster of the detailed circumstances & the result of the ensuing court case? In Oct. 1938, the vessel was sold for £12,750 to, I believe, 'G. E. Marden', with 'Wheelock & Co. Ltd.', of Shanghai, China, the managers. In Oct. 1939, with no change of owners, she was renamed Corlock. British flag. From Apl. 1943 to May 1945, the vessel was bareboat chartered to the Turkish Government. For the duration of the charter, the vessel was renamed Adana, & the vessel's name then reverted to Corlock. In 1947, the vessel was sold to 'San Peh Steam Navigation Co. Ltd.', of Shanghai, & was renamed Nan Shan. In 1949, the vessel was sold to 'Wallem & Co. Ltd.' of Hong Kong & renamed San Bay. Panama flag. Renamed Sanbay in 1952. Also in 1952, the vessel was sold to Hong Kong ship breakers, & arrived at Hong Kong on Sep. 11, 1952 to be broken up. The WWW record for this vessel is most modest. Can you add to and/or correct the above?

42 Hitchin
1933 tons
Hull 269

135270

Corbank
Vilk
La Villa
1913

A collier. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Vilk, but I cannot check the link), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 81.4 metres long, 275.8 ft., speed of 10 knots. Built for W. Cory & Son Ltd., of London. During WW1 the vessel served as a Naval collier. Transferred in 1920 to 'Cory Colliers' (or maybe 'William Cory & Sons' or 'Wm. Cory and Son Ltd.') & renamed Corbank. The vessel was sold, in 1939, for £9,000, to 'Tallinna Laevauhisus A/S' (or 'Laevatihisus' maybe), Tallinn Shipping Co. the managers, of Tallinn, Estonia, & renamed Vilk. In 1940, the vessel was taken over by the Ministry of War Transport ('Ministry'), managed by Hudson Steamship Co. Ltd., of Glasgow. 23 WW2 convoy references, including an eastbound voyage across the N. Atlantic in Jan. 1940 with nitrate soda - to La Pallice i.e. La Rochelle (could that be when the vessel was taken over by Ministry?). To Seine Bay, France, in Jun/Sep 1944 (re Normandy landings?), a voyage to Antwerp, Belgium, & U.K. coastal. In 1950, the vessel was sold to 'Compañía Maritima La Villa S/A', of Panama, 'H. Neuhaus & Co.', the managers, & renamed La Villa. In 1957, the vessel was sold to Belgian ship breakers 'Van den Bossche & Co.' It arrived at Boom, Belgium, on Oct. 24, 1957 to be broken up. Boom is on a very tiny river indeed, inland & S. of Antwerp. The WWW record for this vessel is almost non-existent. Can you add to and/or correct the above?

43 Moto
1941 tons
Hull 268

133536
1913

A collier. Per 1 (wreck data), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 81.4 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 267 ft., speed?, likely about 10 knots. Built for 'Pelton Steamship Company Ltd.' ('Pelton'), of Newcastle. I am advised that Pelton owned coal mines & also owned a fleet of colliers trading to the Thames, S. coast ports & to the Baltic, sailing mostly from the Tyne, & returning from the Baltic with a deck cargo of sawn timber & pit props. Can anybody tell us about Moto's WW1 service? While I have read no detail about the matter, on Aug. 10, 1915, a torpedo was fired at Moto, but missed. On Dec. 10, 1918, the vessel, en route from Methil to the Tyne, was in collision with Galatea, an 'Arethusa Class' Light Cruiser, 20 miles N. of the Tyne. And sank. At 55.22.0N/01.29.0W. I can tell you nothing of the circumstances. Any loss of life? Did Galatea rescue the crew perhaps? The WWW record for this vessel is almost non-existent. Can you add to and/or correct the above?

44 Ladoga
1917 tons
Hull 273

135098
1914

A cargo ship. Per 1 (William Thomson, Ladoga), 2 (ref., 25% down above Eastward), 3 ('uboat.net', re sinking), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 83.8 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, (275 ft.), speed of 9 knots. Built for 'William Thomson & Company' ('Thomson') of Leith, Edinburgh, Scotland, which company later (1919) became Ben Line Steamers Ltd., known as Ben Line. At the outbreak of WW1, in 1914, Ladoga, just 4 months old, was in a large group of ships detained at Saint Petersburg (previously Petrograd & Leningrad), in the Baltic. It escaped from such detention in 1917 & was soon (1918) requisitioned by the British Government for service as a collier during the balance of WW1, managed by Thomson. On Apl. 16, 1918, while en route from Bilbao, Spain, to Maryport, Cumbria, with a cargo of iron ore, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by UB-73 & sank in the Irish Sea. 15 miles SE of the South Arklow Light Vessel, which was located in St. George's Channel at 52.39.0N/05.58.0W. The Light Vessel, the Guillemot, was itself later sunk by UC-65, a mine laying U-boat on Mar. 28, 1917. Guillemot was boarded by UC-65 crew who placed explosives on board. The explosives failed to sink the vessel & she was then sunk by gunfire. Sorry, I digressed! 29 lives aboard Ladoga were lost, including the Master. But the detail of exactly what happened I have not read. The WWW record for this ship is quite limited. Can anybody add anything? Dave Philp has kindly written in (thanks!) to indicate that the name of the Master was Arthur W. (William) Reid, who is buried at Torryburn, Fife, Scotland.

45 Lesto
1940 tons
Hull 279

133588
1916

A collier/coaster. Which had a life of just 6 months. Per 1 ('u-boat.net', 1917 sinking), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 81.4 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed? Built for 'Pelton Steamship Company Ltd.' ('Pelton'), of Newcastle. I am advised that Pelton owned coal mines & also owned a fleet of colliers trading to the Thames, S. coast ports & to the Baltic, sailing mostly from the Tyne, & returning from the Baltic with a deck cargo of sawn timber & pit props. Have WWW read nothing about the vessel's short service life. On May 23, 1917, under the command of Captain Robert R. (Reuben) Bishop, in a 5 vessel convoy escorted by Cobra & Pivoine, & en route from Bilbao, Spain, to Garston, Liverpool, Merseyside, with a cargo of 3200 tons of iron ore, the vessel was attacked by German submarine UC-21, & sunk near St. Nazaire, France. 8 miles W. of Île du Pilier, a tiny island, with a lighthouse, in the Bay of Biscay. 2 explosions just before midnight tore the ship apart. At 46.57N/02.30W, but the wreck seems to lie at 47.02.039N/02.33.723W. 25 or 26 crew were saved (data differs), 6 of them seriously injured, & landed at St. Nazaire. 4 lives were lost. Can you add anything?

46 War Drum
2352 tons
Hull 302

142753

Ashwin
Trotsky
Andre Marti
1918

A 'D' type cargo ship. Per 1 (data, War Drum (2), 50% down), 2 (data & 'D' type model image), 3 (polar bears), 4 (data), 5 (data, incl. re WW2 service, 50% down), 6 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty thru Jan. 31, 1943, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Andre Marti, but I cannot check the link), 7 (WW2 convoy PQ.18), 8 (image, Andre Marti), 9 (Wikipedia, André Marty), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 86.9 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 285 ft., speed of 11 1/2 knots. The vessel was built for the Shipping Controller, i.e. the British Government, managed by 'Donald & Taylor', for service during WW1, armed with a single 4.7 inch gun & paravanes for protection against mines. In 1919 the vessel was sold to Ashwin & Co., of London, & renamed Ashwin. In 1920, the vessel was sold to 'Essex Line', Meldrum & Swinson the managers I presume, but maybe also the owners, with no change of vessel name. In 1921, the vessel was sold to 'All-Russian Co-operative Society Ltd.', of London, likely known as Arcos Steamship Company, & renamed Trotsky. Some (related?) changes of ownership - in 1923 to Arcos Ltd., managed by Russo-Norwegian Navigation Co., & in 1924 to Arcos Steamship Co., both of London. An interesting story at 3. On Aug. 3, 1923, Trotsky, Captain Cole in command, left Grimsby for the Yenisei River, in Siberia, with a general cargo. On the vessel's return journey, a cargo of pulpwood was loaded at Arkhangelsk (Archangel) for Barrow-in-Furness. Included in her cargo unloaded at Barrow were 2 polar bear cubs, captured, in May 1923, by an Admiral B. A. Vilkitzky expedition. The 7 month old cubs ended up at the Edinburgh Zoo, it would seem. In 1925, the vessel was acquired by 'Sovtorgflot', of Leningrad, Russia, a company which owned by the Soviet State. In 1929, the vessel was renamed Andre Marti. Named, I trust, after André Marti or Marty, a leading figure in the French Communist party, noted for his role in a mutiny of the crews of French battleships Jean Bart & France, in the Black Sea, in 1919, sentenced to a long prison term but released in 1923. See the link above for more data about him. 13 WW2 convoy references, thru Jan. 31, 1943. On Sep. 2, 1942, Andre Marti was in convoy PQ.18, en route from Loch Ewe, Scotland, to Archangel, Russia, with supplies for the Soviet Union's war effort. 13 of the 40 merchant vessels in the convoy did not make it to Archangel. There clearly were other voyages not referenced at 'convoyweb.org'. On Feb. 17, 1943, with Boris M. (Mihajlovich) Hirhasov in command, the vessel, likely with a crew of 29 & 8 gunners, & armed with 4 machine guns & 3 20mm anti aircraft guns, was attacked by 4 German bombers in the Barents Sea, near Kinarroden. The vessel manoeuvred to avoid 12 bombs, successfully shot down one German aircraft & damaged another. 5 advises that the vessel towed Sukhona, whose screw had been damaged by ice. Have not figured out when that was, but in that regard, Sukhona was sunk in Sep. 1942. I gather that the vessel was deleted from the registers in 1960. Can you add anything?

47 War Almond
2434 (or 2429) tons
Hull 303

140644

Mardinian
1919

A cargo ship. Per 1 (War Almond), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Mardinian, but I cannot check the link), 3 ('uboat.net', 1940 sinking, image, Mardinian), 4 ('wrecksite.eu', data re sinking, image, Mardinian), 5 (image & data Mardinian, but you must be registered to access it), 6 (image Mardinian, also -01), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 92.4 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 303 (or 313) ft., speed of 10 knots. Laid down as War Almond for The Shipping Controller. But delivered as Mardinian to Ellerman Lines Limited, of London. In 1937, the vessel was transferred to 'Ellerman & Papayanni Lines Ltd.', of Liverpool. 10 WW2 convoy references, incl. service into Mediterranean (Alexandria, & Katakolo, Greece), & into Black Sea (Constanza), & at least 1 N. Atlantic crossing, in which, on the return voyage, the vessel was sunk. At 4:47 a.m. on Sep. 9, 1940, Joseph Every in command with a crew of 38, en route, in convoy SC-2, from Sydney, Nova Scotia, to London via Methil, with a cargo of 3500 tons of pitch ex Trinidad, the vessel was hit under the bridge by a single torpedo fired by German submarine U-28, Korvettenkapitän Günter Kuhnke in command. The vessel sank 30 minutes after the hit. At 56.37N/09.00W, about 100 miles NNW of Bloody Foreland, Donegal, Ireland, i.e. off the NW coast of Ireland. 6 lives were lost & 32, including the Master, survived - 21 were rescued by HMS Apollo, a trawler & convoy escort vessel, & landed at Belfast, while 1 was rescued by HMS Aurania (F28). 10 were able to reach i) Leverburgh, on the Island of Harris, or ii) the island of South Uist, both places in the Outer Hebrides, presumably in a ship's lifeboat. Can you add anything?

48 Alice Marie
2206 tons
Hull 292

144924
1920

A cargo ship, a coaster. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Alice Marie, but I cannot check the link), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 85.3 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 280 ft., speed of 9 1/2 or 10 knots. Built for 'Rodney Steamship Co. Limited' ('Rodney'), of Newcastle. Which company, I suspect, transported coal from the NE to the S. of England. Do tell me if that is wrong. Later on in life, I see 'Grainger Shipping Co. Ltd.', also of Newcastle, are mentioned re the vessel. Were they perhaps the vessel's managers? The WWW record for this ship is modest indeed. I can see nothing of her duties in her 20 years of life. There are however 34 WW2 convoy references, in the period from Sep. 1939 to Nov. 1940, all U.K. coastal, from Methil, Firth of Forth, Scotland, or from the river Tyne, to Southend & back. Almost certainly carrying coal. The last such reference was in convoy FS.342 which left Methil on Nov. 22, 1940 for Southend, where it arrived on Nov. 24, 1940. Presumably later that day, the vessel hit a mine, eight cables 255° from Knob Light Vessel, Barrow Deep, in the Thames estuary. The vessel was beached, & broke her back, I understand. No loss of life. Can you add anything?

49 Flashlight
934 tons
Hull 291

144598
1920

A cargo ship, a 'flat-iron' (see lower in listing) collier/ coaster. Per 1 (Lloyd's Register data, 1930 thru 1940, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org', see left), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Flashlight, but I cannot check the link), 3 (sinking ex Trove, Australia), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). As this page is updated, another image of the ship is e-Bay available. But I invite you to find it for yourself. I choose not to reward with a link e-Bay vendors who use intrusive logos. 216.5 ft. long (66.0 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 225.5 ft. long (68.73 metres) overall, signal letters KFTS & MJZX. Built for 'Gas Light & Coke Co.', Britain’s largest gas manufacturer, of London, with 'Stephenson Clarke & Associated Companies Ltd.', the managers. An expired e-Bay listing referred to the vessel being an early 'flat iron' collier, a low-profile vessel designed to be able to pass under low bridges, such as those on the River Thames at London, with a funnel which tilted for that purpose. Ian Morgan advises (thanks Ian!) that William H. (Henry) Morgan (1902/1980), Ian's grandfather, served aboard the vessel as a fireman on at least 2 voyages from Jun. 24 to Aug. 30, 1937, 'seemingly between Sunderland and London'. 39 WW2 convoy references, all up and down the east coast between Methil (Firth of Forth) & the Tyne and London. On Mar. 7, 1941, the vessel was attacked by German aircraft & sunk, at 53.31N/00.49E, in the North Sea, off the coast from Grimsby. The vessel had left Methil on Mar. 5, 1941 for London (Southend) in FS.29, a small convoy of 5 unescorted ships. 2 of the ships were sunk - Togston was torpedoed. Trove, Australia advises at the link above that Flashlight was machine-gunned & bombed. 'The engine room and stokehold were flooded and the engines were stopped. She was taken in tow but it soon became necessary to abandon ship and the vessel foundered.' Not an easy name to WWW search for! Can you add anything?

50 Lys
1830 (later 2253) tons
Hull 290

144520

Refrigerator No. 3
1920

A collier/coaster, which later became a fish refrigeration ship. Per 1 (Lloyd's Register data, 1930/31 thru 1934/35 ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 79.2 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 260.0 ft., speed of 10 knots, signal letters KFLJ. Built for 'Normandy Shipping Co. Ltd.', of London, ('Stephenson Clarke', the managers). In 1923, the vessel was sold at a price of £13,500 to Westwick Steamship Company Ltd., James Westoll Ltd. the managers, i.e. James Westoll Line, of Sunderland. In 1935, the vessel was sold to 'Sovtorgflot', the Russian state shipping agency, used as a fish carrier at Vladivostok, (Russian E. coast on Sea of Japan), & renamed Refrigerator No. 3, (which would seem to be the translation into English of Рефрижератор No. 3). However, Miramar now refer also to Refrizherator No. 3. In 1946, the vessel was in service for 'the Murmansker shipping fleet', (presumably the fleet at Murmansk, NW Russia on Barents Sea) with a crew of 84. Was totally rebuilt in 1952/3 at 'VEB Schiffswerft 'Neptun' Rostock', of Rostock, Germany, including a brine refrigeration system with 3 holds. Gross tonnage became 2253. It would seem that sea trials were held on Nov. 18, 1953 & the ship was returned to her owners at Vladivostok on Dec. 13, 1953. The vessel was deleted from the Soviet ship registers (Lloyd's also?) in 1970. Not an easy name to search for! We thank Wolfgang Kramer for his two images, previously available at a webpage which now is gone. A page from which much of the above history was sourced. Can you add anything? Images?

51 Corsea
2764 (or 2765) later 2787 tons
Hull 294

146178

Nylandia
1921

A collier/coaster. Per 1 (1938 collision with Ruahine, 80% down, The "Corsea"), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Corsea, but I cannot check the link), 3 (data, Nylandia), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 95.2 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 312.5 ft., speed of 10 knots (or maybe 9 or 9 1/2 knots), signal letters OFTG. Built for W. Cory & Son, or Cory Colliers Ltd., of London. Used to carry coal from North-East ports to London. John Dobson advises (thanks!) that Corsea was involved in the rescue of the crew of Georgia, (5, 6 & 7), a 5,106 or 5,111 ton tanker owned by M.V. Dutch Tanker & Oil Company Ltd., of Amsterdam, which in Nov. 1927 was en route from Abadan, Iran, to Grangemouth, Scotland, with a cargo of crude oil. Just before midnight on Nov. 20, 1927, Harry Kissing in command, Georgia lost its steering gear in a sudden major storm in the North Sea, a storm so sudden & violent that the wireless aerials were swept away & no distress call could be broadcast. Georgia went aground at Haisborough Sands, off the coast of Norfolk, and, pounded by the battering of immense seas, broke into two pieces, with 15, including the Captain, huddled aboard the bow section, & 16 in the stern section. Her sirens were sounded, that is all they could do. The stern section drifted away in the storm. Many ships were involved or stood by in the heroic rescue over the next days - Trent, which rescued the 16 from the stern section & landed them at Cromer, H. F. Bailey, the Cromer lifeboat (Henry Blogg (1876/1954) the coxswain), which rescued the 15 from the bow section at about 4:30 p.m. on Nov. 22, 1927, landed them at Great Yarmouth, & was severely damaged in the rescue, John and Mary Meiklam, the Gorleston lifeboat, (Billy Fleming, the coxswain) which 5 times attempted rescue of the 15 but had to leave the scene with engine trouble, George Jewson & Tactful, both Yarmouth tugs, HMS Thanet, & apparently Corsea. Do however read at 5 & at 6 the story of the rescue - my brief words here do it no justice. And do also read, via the above link & here, about Henry Blogg who served the Cromer lifeboat for an amazing 53 years, 38 of those years as coxswain. What a record! His service puts the average citizen, including yours truly, to shame. But ... John Dobson needs your assistance. An exhibition, to be held at Cromer, Norfolk, this (2010) summer, will feature the Georgia rescue & John wishes, for that exhibition, additional data including detail as to the role which Corsea played in the rescue. If you have data, particularly re Corsea, do please be in touch, either directly with John Dobson, or via the webmaster who will pass the data on. I read that both sections of Georgia sank in the following days - the stern section at 52.58.36N/01.21.37E & the bow section at 52.52.54N/01.46.16E, a very long distance apart! It would seem that on Jan. 15, 1938, Corsea, while crossing from the S. side of the River Thames to Gallions Jetty on the N. side, was in collision with Ruahine in Gallions (or maybe Long) Reach. There was contact between the port side of Corsea & the stem of Ruahine. Visibility was limited at the time due to Nalon being moored near mid-channel. Inadequate look-outs the cause it would appear. Can anybody tell us about fault in the case? 51 WW2 convoy references, all U.K. coastal except for i) 5 voyages in Jun./Sep. 1944 to Seine Bay, France, re the Normandy landings I believe, carrying petrol in cans, & ii) a Jan. 1945 voyage to Antwerp, Belgium. On Nov. 11, 1940, the vessel was attacked by a Stuka bomber & damaged, while en route from Methil to Southend. The vessel was returned, to Wm. Cory & Son Ltd., in 1945. Vessel repaired at Blyth in 1952. In 1953, the vessel was sold, for about £30,000, to Rederi A/B Uleå, of Helsinki, Finland, 'A/B Edv. Björklund O/Y' the manager, & renamed Nylandia. On Jan. 23, 1958 the vessel arrived at the Antwerp facilities of 'Van Loo & Co.', to be broken up. Can you add anything?

52 Zelo
2294 tons
Hull 293

145457

Kyriakoula
Pitsa
1921

A collier/coaster. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Zelo, but I cannot check the link), 2 (sinking of Thetis), 3 (illustration of the raising of Thetis), 4 (Lloyd's Register data, 1930/31 thru 1945/46, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org', image soon at left), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 93.9 metres (308.0 ft.) long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 1/2 knots, signal letters KJSV later GCLP. Built for 'Pelton Steamship Company Ltd.' ('Pelton'), of Newcastle. I am advised that Pelton owned coal mines & also owned a fleet of colliers trading to the Thames, S. coast ports & to the Baltic, sailing mostly from the Tyne, & returning from the Baltic with a deck cargo of sawn timber & pit props. Likely used as above. There are many references to court cases involving Zelo which struck the wreck of Merkur, in Barry Roads, on Sep. 19, 1920. The Zelo involved was not this vessel, rather an earlier vessel (now listed here) of the name built for Pelton by 'Swan Hunter' at Southwick in 1917. A most interesting chapter in 1939. HMS Thetis, a 'T' Class submarine & the pride of the Royal Navy, was on its sea trials in Liverpool Bay, when, on Jun. 1, 1939, it sank with the loss of 99 lives. Only 4 escaped. Zelo was chartered to lift the Thetis, & was both modified as necessary & supplied with the necessary hawsers. On Jul. 22, 1939, the first attempt at raising the submarine failed - two lifting baulks or beams aboard Zelo broke & had to be replaced & strengthened. In late Aug. 1939, Zelo was back on site. It wrapped cables around Thetis at low tide & as the tide came in, floated up bringing the submarine with it. Zelo then sailed towards shore - a move made several times, until the submarine was successfully beached at Moelfre Bay, Anglesey, North Wales, on Sep. 3, 1939. 45 WW2 convoy references, all U.K. coastal except for 6/7 voyages in Jun/Sep 1944 to Seine Bay, France, likely re the Normandy landings. In 1955, the vessel was sold to Greek owned 'Santa Barbara Cia. de Nav. S.A.', of Puerto Limon, Costa Rica, J. & E. Katsoulakos, the manager, & renamed Kyriakoula. Registered at Puerto Limon. In 1956, the vessel arrived at London from Kotka, Finland, (Baltic), with a deck cargo of timber & a list to starboard. A frequent visitor, it would appear, to Barrow-in-Furness, in the late 1950s & early 1960s, carrying iron ore from Setubal, Portugal. In 1964, the vessel was sold to 'Conisen Shipping S.A.', of Panama, & renamed Pitsa. In Apl. 1965, the vessel arrived at Perama (Athens), Greece, to be broken up. Can you add anything?

53 Andelle
1832 tons
Hull 298

146229
1922

A collier/coaster. Per 1 (death of Captain Rendall in 1937), 2 (WW2 mine warfare ships, Andelle), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 79.2 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 260 ft., speed of 9 knots. Built for 'Normandy Shipping Co. Ltd.', of London, ('Stephenson Clarke', the managers). Engaged in the carriage of duff coal (i.e. coal dust) from the Newport, Wales, coal mines of 'Powell Duffryn' to patent fuel works at Rouen & Rochefort, both in France. On Oct. 30, 1925, the vessel was sold at a price of £13,500 to Westwick Steamship Company Ltd., (James Westoll Ltd., the managers) i.e. James Westoll Line, of Sunderland. On Jun. 10, 1937, Robert Rendall, the vessel's Captain, died from natural causes aboard the ship, at age 74, while en route from London to the North-East. W. J. Tait & P. J. Brown, represented James Westoll Ltd., at the funeral. The vessel was damaged in 1942 & repaired. It would seem that such damage was to the vessel's propellers when leaving the 'Pelaw Main Collieries Ltd.' berth at the River Tyne. But... on Oct. 18, 1939, the vessel was requisitioned for WW2 service. It was, I believe in Oct. 1940, converted into a mine destructor vessel. Had a 300-t electric magnet on bow to initiate German magnetic mines. Arie de Lange advises that such a magnet is a big spool of electric wire in the bow of a ship. It makes a large electric field in front, at both sides & below the ship, which field causes magnetic mines to explode. Have not read where she served. In Jul. 1945, the vessel arrived at Briton Ferry, Wales, to be broken up. Not a particularly easy vessel to search for! Can you add anything? An image?

54 Stesso
2290 tons
Hull 299

145495
1922

A cargo ship, a collier. Per 1 (sunk, Jun. 20, 1940), 2 (20.06.40 ref.), 3 (06.06.1940), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Stesso, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 93.9 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots. With a 'Woodbine' funnel. Built for 'Pelton Steamship Company Ltd.' ('Pelton'), of Newcastle. I am advised that Pelton owned coal mines & also owned a fleet of colliers trading to the Thames, S. coast ports & to the Baltic, sailing mostly from the Tyne, & returning from the Baltic with a deck cargo of sawn timber & pit props. The company later, in 1961, went into voluntary liquidation. Only 1 WW2 convoy reference. In 1940, the vessel was attacked by German aircraft in the East Dock at Cardiff & sank. But exactly when it happened is confusing. I have read Jun. 6, & Jun. 20, 1940. The vessel was later presumably raised since Miramar indicate that in Jan. 1941, the vessel was broken up at Briton Ferry, near Swansea, Wales. Not an easy name to search for! Can you add anything?

55 Corchester
2374 tons
Hull 308

149801
1927

A cargo ship, a collier. Per 1 ('Ships Nostalgia' page, City of Sydney & Corchester), 2 (Convoy KMS 054), 3 (image, correct flag?), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Corchester, but I cannot check the link), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 285 ft. long. speed of 10 knots. Built for Wm. Cory & Son, noted for shipping coal into London. 56 WW2 convoy references, mainly U.K. coastal but including at least 1 N. Atlantic crossing, & service in Mediterranean (Alexandria, Port Said, Naples, Augusta, Tunis, etc.) Have read that the vessel served re the transport of petrol in cans in the Mediterranean.  'Narrowly missed by bombs at Naples'. At 7:30 a.m. on Feb. 19, 1956, while en route from London to Hartlepool in ballast, Corchester, under the command of Captain George Northcott, was in collision with City of Sydney, 6,986 tons of Ellerman Lines Ltd., off Haisboro Light on the coast of Norfolk. The weather conditions were, I read, appalling - high rough seas, blizzard conditions, & zero visibility. It would seem that it was still dark. A collision? And how! At 52.56N/1.35E. City of Sydney apparently cut Corchester in two, at No. 1 hold, wiping out everything forward of that point, including 6 crew in their accommodation in the forecastle. It would seem that the survivors (how many?), were picked up by Cormull & landed at Gravesend. 8 lives were lost. The vessel sank by the bow & its remains lie in 26/28 metres of water. 'Sea Breezes', of Dec. 1983, included an article entitled 'Last Voyage of the Corchester' written by G. R. Ney. There was an inquiry, it would seem, which might indicate that City of Sydney was travelling too fast for the conditions. A memorial service was later held, aboard Cormull, at the scene of the disaster. The Corchester captain was amongst the survivors. Robert Moffat, was a steward aboard Cormull, that day long ago. You can read his words here. Philip Winterburn was also aboard Cormull, & his description of the scene can be read here. We thank both Robert & Philip! Can anybody provide the report of the Court of Inquiry? Alas, though it puzzles me greatly, the report, paid for by public money in the U.K. over 55 years ago, is not freely WWW available today. Why is that so? Is not the dissemination of such data a part of the inquiry's mandate? Why do such official reports become private property, only available at a hefty fee? If the applicable authorities will give me it & other such reports, I personally will make them available via this site. Such data 'snippets' as I have read suggest that Northcott, Captain of Corchester, had his certificate suspended, but that he had not been found guilty of any wrongful act or default & maybe was improperly charged or served, & therefore appealed. But those words are mine alone, derived from 'Google' data 'snippets', & may prove to be incorrect. They certainly do not speak to the result of the appeal. And do not reference Sydney, the name of whose captain I cannot spot. Can anybody add anything?

56 Lady Olga
1266 tons
Hull 312

149913
1927

A cargo ship, a 'flat-iron' collier. Per 1 ('Tom Puddings' coal barges), 2 & 3 ('Ships Nostalgia' images, #4 is believed to be Lady Olga, but you must be registered to access them), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Lady Olga, but I cannot check the link), 5 (Lloyd's Register data, 1930/31 thru 1945/46, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org', see left), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 225.0 ft. long (68.6 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 234.0 ft. long (71.32 metres) overall, speed of 9 1/2 knots, signal letters KWNL later MNWT, a 'flat-iron' low-profile vessel designed to be able to pass under low bridges, such as those on the River Thames at London, with a funnel which tilted for that purpose. Specially designed to serve the new jetty at Fulham Gas Works, at Fulham, London. Named after the wife of Sir David Milne-Watson, then Governor of GasLight. Built for 'Gas, Light & Coke Co.' ('GasLight'), of London, which company became, on May 1, 1949, 'North Thames Gas Board'. Stephenson Clarke & Associated Companies Ltd., later Stephenson Clarke Ltd., the managers. 43 WW2 convoy references, all U.K. coastal, covering the period of Sep. 1939 thru Sep. 1941. Which is a puzzle. You would have thought that there would be many later such voyages - see following data. It would seem, per 'i-law.com', that the vessel was involved in two collisions in 1943. The vessel was in collision, in the North Sea, with Quaysider as Lady Olga, heading north, turned towards Sunderland. The stem of Quaysider hit the starboard side of Lady Olga. And also, upbound in Woolwich Reach, River Thames, the vessel was in collision, in foggy conditions, with the down-bound Dalewood. It would seem that a ferry boat was crossing the river from N. to S. at the time of the incident. Lady Olga dropped her port anchor. Dalewood likely hit the anchored Lady Olga - Dalewood's speed being part of the cause. L. B. Anderson, the ship's master, was awarded the Lloyd's War Medal for Bravery at Sea, for an incident on Feb. 24, 1944. He was granted an MBE also. There are many WWW references to the award, but none to the circumstances. But it must have been respecting Lady Olga's rescue, in Feb. 1944 of 11 crew members of Philipp M., a collier, torpedoed & sunk while in convoy. Philipp M. was, I learn, torpedoed near Hearty Knoll Buoy, off Yarmouth, while en route from the Tyne to London with a cargo of coal. On May 16, & Sep. 18, 1957, the vessel was reported as being laid up at Sheer's Quay, Sunderland. On Dec. 27, 1957, the vessel arrived at the 'O. Bulens' ship breaking facilities at Hoboken, Antwerp, Belgium, to be broken up. Break up commenced in Feb. 1958. There are many gaps in the data above. Can you add anything? Perhaps about the Lloyd's Medal & the vessel's later WW2 service?

57 Corbridge
1703 tons
Hull 313

149973

Arion
Antonios Ventouris
1928

A cargo ship, a collier. Per 1 & 2 (images, Corbridge, also -02), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Corbridge, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 77.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 264 ft. long overall, speed of 10 knots. The last collier built for 'Cory' with machinery amidships. Built for 'Cory Colliers Ltd.', noted for shipping coal into London. 49 WW2 convoy references, mainly U.K. coastal, but including 4 voyages to Seine Bay, France, in Jun/Aug 1944, carrying ammunition, re the Normandy landings I presume, & a later voyage to Ostend. In 1954, the vessel was sold, for £20,000, to 'Compania Naviera y de Comercio Arion Ltda.', of Costa Rica, ('N. Papalios' the manager?), & renamed Arion. In 1966, it would seem with no change of owner, the vessel was renamed Antonios Ventouris. Miramar refers to 'C. G. Ventouris', the manager perhaps, which means 'Constantinos Ventouris' with the vessel was named after his son Antonios. On Dec. 29, 1966, the vessel ran aground, blew up & was wrecked. At 39.23N/26.13E. On a reef 3 miles W. of Molyvos, N. of the island of Lesbos (Lesvos) in the Aegean. The vessel was en route from Piraeus to Varna (Black Sea coast of Bulgaria), with a cargo of fertilizer. The crew of 12 abandoned the vessel & there was no loss of life. We thank Aris Bilalis for data re this listing. Aris adds that if the vessel did blow up, as Miramar advises, it must have been after her evacuation. Can anybody add to the record?

58 Corminster
1703 tons
Hull 314

160366

Coralia III
Zakynthos
1928

A cargo ship, a collier. Per 1 & 2 (images, Corminster), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Corminster, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 77.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 264 ft. long overall, speed of 10 knots. The last ship built for Wm. Cory & Son Ltd. ('Cory'), or Cory Colliers Ltd., with engines amidships. Cory were noted for shipping coal from the north-east into London & the S. of England. The vessel was the first to load at the new automated Dover Harbour coal bunker facility in ? year. The vessel would seem to have been requisitioned by the Admiralty, on Apl. 28, 1940, for service as a Dockyard Replenishment collier. 44 WW2 convoy references all of which are U.K. coastal except for 3 voyages to France in Jul/Sep 1944 (presumably re the Normandy landings). I am unable to access, however, the vessel's independent voyages including one perhaps in Mar. 1941  in which the Chief Officer lost his life (Mar. 16, 1941). The vessel would seem to have served at Narvik, in northern Norway. In Mar. 1946, the vessel was returned to Cory. It was sold, in 1958, for about £15,000, to 'Domestinis Steamship Lines', of Piraeus, Greece, (Captain John & N. Domestinis the principals?) & renamed Coralia III. It was sold again, in 1965, to 'Dionyssios Zambasas & Co.', of Greece, & renamed Zakynthos. On Nov. 23, 1967, the vessel arrived at Split, Yugoslavia, to be broken up. Can you add anything?

59 Westburn
2842 (later 2874?) tons
Hull 318

160315

Eldra
Delos
1929

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Westburn launch image), 2 (image, Westburn launch party), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Westburn, but I cannot check the link), 4 (image, Delos, but the correct one?), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 95.1 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 312 ft., speed of 10 knots. Built, at a cost of £45,437, for 'Westwick Steamship Co. Ltd.', which company was owned by 'James Westoll Ltd.' ('Westoll'), of Sunderland, a company noted for transporting coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & also also their involvement in the Black Sea grain trade. The second fleet vessel of the name, the other (1893) also being built at Sunderland. Now the Adamson family was a major investor in Westoll ships & in that regard it is interesting to note that 'Westburn' was the name of John Adamson's house in Sunderland. 60 WW2 convoy references, mainly U.K. coastal, but the list includes 5 return voyages to Seine Bay, France, in Jun/Sep 1944 & 2 voyages to Le Havre, France, in Dec. 1944 & Apl. 1945. The vessel was the last 'Westoll' fleet vessel when it, (and it would appear the owning company also), was sold, on Sep. 16, 1957, to Vedra Shipping Company Limited ('Vedra'), of Sunderland, & renamed Eldra. Now Vedra was owned by J. Weston Adamson (the principal shareholder) & his wife Elgie Emily Adamson, of the Adamson family, ship owners of Sunderland, whose ships had originally, from the 1860s, been managed by James Westoll, founder of Westoll, & by his son of the same name. In 1960, the vessel was sold, for 'over £30,000' to 'George Th. Sigalas', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Delos. Registered in Lebanon. In Nov. 1970, the vessel was broken up at Perama, Greece, near Piraeus & Athens. Can you add anything?

60   Livingstone I
1959 (or 1958) tons
Hull 322

Marpesia
Tiuri
Coconica
Costas
1930

A freighter. Per 1 (T. C. McCobb), 2 (Marpesia), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 84.1 metres long. Laid down as Livingstone I for C. Mathiesen. But bought after completion as Marpesia, by 'A/S Mabella' (Karl Bruusgaard), of Drammen, Norway. On Apl. 10, 1942, rescued 19 survivors off the coast of Surinam, Dutch Guiana, ex a lifeboat of T. C. McCobb, an American Esso tanker. The tanker had been sunk Mar. 31, 1942 by Italian submarine Pietro Calvi. On Oct. 2, 1942, vessel was attacked by U-201 at 08.53N/60.20W, but suffered no damage. Submarine, itself attacked and damaged, did not renew the engagement. Sold 1954 to Seppinen & Kemppi of Rauma, Finland, & renamed Tiuri. Sold 1964 to A. I. Romano & renamed Coconica. Sold 1965 to 'K. D. Galatis et al' & renamed Costas. In early Jan. 1967, vessel wrecked off Shabla, near Mangalia (Black Sea coast of Romania). I think that I have the name and ownership sequence correctly above. Can you add anything?

61 Dalewood
2774 (or 2793 or 2795) tons
Hull 324

162534

Dale
Armonia II
Bahamas Gem
Antonios D.
Mar Glauco
Ciro Palomba
1931

A collier. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Dalewood, but I cannot check the link), 2 (Lloyd's Register data, 1930/31 thru 1945/46, es 'plimsollshipdata.org'). 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 93.3 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots, signal letters LGTC & GLNQ. Built for William France, Fenwick & Co. Ltd., of London, noted for the carriage of coal from the NE of England to London & other places in the S. of England. An amazing 244 WW2 convoy references, all U.K. coastal except for 7 return voyages to Seine Bay, France, (6 from Barry, Wales & 1 from Southend), in Jun/Oct 1944 re the Normandy landings. The vessel must have been 'lucky' indeed. In 1943, down bound in Woolwich Reach, River Thames, the vessel was in collision, in foggy conditions, with the up bound Lady Olga. It would seem that a ferry boat was crossing the river from N. to S. at the time of the incident. Lady Olga dropped her port anchor. Dalewood likely hit the anchored Lady Olga - speed part of the cause. The vessel was sold, in 1958, to E. N. Vintiadis, of Lefkas, Greece, (Lefkada, Ionian Islands) & renamed Dale. There were many later changes of owners & vessel names. The vessel became Armonia II when sold in 1960 to 'A. Angelicoussis etc.' (per Miramar), which may well mean Antonis Angelicoussis & D. Efthimros & Co. (or a name most similar to that - my eyesight is good but I cannot read the amazingly miniscule Google 'snippet' data text), possibly of Piraeus, Greece. And became Bahamas Gem when sold, in 1961, to Lincoln Chartering (of where I wonder?). In 1963, the vessel was sold to 'D. Discruz' (who were they & where were they from?) & was renamed Antonios D. And in 1964, the vessel was sold again, to M. Maresca & Co., of Genoa, Italy, & renamed Mar Glauco. In 1967, the vessel was sold for the last time to G. Palomba, & renamed Ciro Palomba. Now G. Palomba may have been the manager only. I say that because in Feb. 1972, the vessel was sold to be broken up by 'Antares Soc. di Armamento', of Italy, & arrived at the La Spezia, Italy, ship breaking facilities of C.N. "Santa Maria", to be scrapped. It is most difficult to identify correctly many of the later owners of the vessel since WWW references seem not to exist. Can you add to or correct the above?

62 Tyndall
1314 tons
Hull 325

162766
1932

A collier. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Tyndall, but I cannot check the link), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 69.2 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 knots. Built for London Power Co. Ltd. A 'flatiron' to permit passage under the low London bridges across the River Thames. Carried coal from the North East to London power stations including Battersea. 42 WW2 convoy references, all U.K. coastal other than trips to Seine Bay, France, in Aug. & Sep. 1944, ex Barry & Southend - re the Normandy landings perhaps? Big time gaps in the dates so there must have been many independent voyages. As a result of the nationalisation of the U.K. electricity industry, the vessel would have become owned by 'British Electricity Authority'. Which became 'Central Electricity Authority' in 1954 & 'Central Electricity Generating Board' ('Central') in 1958. The vessel was sold by Central later in 1958. And on Jul. 12, 1958, the vessel arrived at Dutch ship breakers at Delfzijl (NE Netherlands, Germany is across the River Ems), to be broken up. The WWW is essentially silent about this vessel. Can you add anything?

63 Corhampton
2495 tons
Hull 328

163398
1933

A collier. Per 1 (image, Corhampton), 2 (sinking data), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Corhampton, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 89.0 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 292 ft., speed of 10 knots. Designed & built as the result of 'exhaustive hull & propeller experiments' in the tanks at the  National Physical Laboratory at Teddington, Middlesex. Built for Cory Colliers Ltd., of London, presumably to carry coal from the NE to the S. of England. On Mar. 3, 1938, Corhampton, proceeding down river in Sea Reach, River Thames, was in collision with up-bound Sway, a 105 ft. long motor barge owned by 'J. J. Prior (Transport) Limited' ('Prior'), of London & Colchester. The webmaster's memory suggests that Prior was in the sand & gravel business & had, & maybe still has, ready-mix concrete facilities at Deptford Creek, Blackwall, in E. London. Sway sank as a result. I have read that Corhampton was on her correct side of the river, i.e. the S. side, & that Sway was also on the S. side. There was contact between the bow of Sway & the stem of Corhampton. The 'snippet' that I read seems to say that Sway was found to be at fault, but can anybody advise the full circumstances & outcome. 49 WW2 convoy references, all of which are U.K. coastal. The end, for the ship, came on Nov. 15/16, 1941, but I cannot tell you definitively what then happened. I have read that the vessel was en route from Hartlepool to Rochester (River Medway, Kent) with 3,650 tons of coal, but have also read the ship was en route from Blyth (NE of Newcastle) to London with cargo unstated. 'Convoyweb.org' advises, however, that the ship was in Convoy FS.647, of 7 ships without escort, which left Methil (Firth of Forth, Scotland) on Nov. 14, 1941 for Southend. So we appear to have 3 routings. It does look, however, as though the vessel hit a mine on Nov. 15, 1941, 26 miles NE of Spurn Head (E. Yorkshire at the mouth of the Humber River). A total complement of 24 including four gunners - no loss of life. It was taken in tow (to where & by which ship?). On Nov. 16, 1941 it was bombed by German aircraft while under tow & sank. At 53.53N/00.26E. But 2 also advises another nearby location, i.e. 53.52.45N/ 00.26.45E. And advises also that the vessel may have survived the bombing, slipped its cable, drifted & then sank. Can anybody tell us what really did happen? Or otherwise add anything?

64 Corhaven
991 tons
Hull 328

163384
1933

A collier that had a quite short life. Per 1 ('Thursday, 25 July', 60% down), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Corhaven, but I cannot check the link), 3 (Lloyd's Register data, 1933 thru 1940, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 63.4 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 208 ft. Built for Cory Colliers Ltd., Wm. Cory & Son Ltd. the managers, presumably to carry coal from the N.E. to the S. of England. 28 WW2 convoy references, all U.K. coastal. On Jul. 25, 1940, while en route from the Tyne to Portsmouth in convoy CW.8 with a cargo of coal, Corhaven was attacked by German Stuka dive-bombers & sunk off Dover. The convoy was attacked by waves of 20 to 40 German aircraft launched from airfields based in France (& by motor torpedo boats also). 2 does not reference the attack. I have not read the exact site of the sinking. The entire crew was rescued so no loss of life. The air battle, in which 5 ships were sunk (including Portslade & Henry Moon, both Sunderland built) & 5 more were damaged, was, I have read, watched by scores of people from Abbott's Cliff, Dover. Can you add anything?

65 Corfell
1802 tons
Hull 332

163532

Evangelia II
1934

A collier. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Corfell, but I cannot check the link), 2 (image, Corfell), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 78.3 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 265 ft. overall, speed of 10 knots. Built for Wm. Cory & Son Ltd., or maybe Cory Colliers Ltd., (collectively 'Cory'), presumably to carry coal from the NE to the S. of England. 68 WW2 convoy references, almost entirely U.K. coastal, up & down the east coast to Southend (London), but including service in the Mediterranean, as far east as Alexandria but mainly in the western Mediterranean (Augusta, Bari, Naples, Oran, Brindisi etc). An able seaman was, I read, killed aboard the ship on May 9, 1941. I read also that during WW2, at a date unstated, Corfell engaged with gunfire a German aircraft laying mines, & later, while 'Commodore' ship for a convoy off Lowestoft,  was credited with sinking an E-boat. From Jul. 1943, I read that the vessel was fitted out to carry petrol in cans in the Mediterranean area. Returned to Cory, (Cory Maritime Ltd.), in Apl. 1945. In 1958, the vessel was sold, for £20,000 (or about £20,000), to 'Domestinis Steamship Line', of Piraeus, Greece, (Captain John & N. Domestinis the principals?), & renamed Evangelia II. The vessel arrived at Split, Yugoslavia, in Feb. 1968, to be broken up. WWW data re this vessel is most limited. Can you add anything?

66 Corfirth
1803 tons
Hull 330

163476

Capetan Manolis
Patrick M.
Vassos
1934

A cargo ship, a collier. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Corfirth, but I cannot check the link), 2 (model of Corfirth), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 78.3 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 265 ft. overall, speed of 10 (or 8) knots. Built for Wm. Cory & Son Ltd., or more likely Cory Colliers Ltd. (collectively 'Cory'), presumably to carry coal from the N.E. to the S. of England. 41 WW2 convoy references, mainly U.K. coastal but including limited service into Mediterranean (Tunis (not Port Said) & Casablanca) & W. Africa (Freetown). I read that she carried petrol in cans (OS.56 from the Clyde to Horta, Azores, in Oct. 1943). On Feb. 12, 1944, when entering Ajaccio, Corsica, the vessel struck a mine. The vessel was beached. Any loss of life? Some crew members at least would seem to have been taken off by Tautra, a Norwegian merchant ship also built at Sunderland, but Roger Griffiths at 'Ships Nostalgia' suggests that was not so (90% down here). The vessel was only re-floated on Feb. 25, 1945 (by Gamtoos?) & repaired at Leghorn (Livorno), Italy. In Apl. 1946, the vessel returned to Cory service. In 1958, the vessel was sold, for £15,000 to 'Magiora Cia Naviera', of Costa Rica, 'L. Nomicos', of Piraeus, Greece, the manager, & renamed Capetan Manolis. Liberian flag. On Feb. 26, 1959, or on Mar. 9, 1959 per Collier's, the ship's cargo of potash, fruit juices & cement, destined for Ceylon & Malaya, was impounded by the Egyptian authorities at Port Said, the cargo being ex Haifa, Israel. In 1961, the vessel was sold to 'Compania de Navigation Patricio Ltda', of Beirut, Lebanon, (Mooringwell Steamship Co. Ltd., of Cardiff, the manager) & renamed Patrick M. And, in 1966, the vessel was sold to 'Komi Shipping S.A.' ('Kalamotusis', of London & Greece, the manager), & renamed Vassos. Also Liberian flag. The 4th image at left, ex e-Bay, shows the vessel aground at Sutton Harbour, Plymouth. Can any advise the circumstances & what happened? The vessel arrived at Savona, Italy, on May 28, 1967, to be broken up. Can you add anything?

67 Corfleet
1803 tons
Hull 331

163484

Eliza
Bruce M.
Grace
1934

A collier. Per 1 (history data), 2 (image, Corfleet), 3 ('pdf' file, Nov. 1937 newspaper re Mongolia collision - page bottom, 'Three-Day London'), 4 (Mongolia/ Rimutaka at Wikipedia), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Corfleet, but I cannot check the link), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 78.3 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 265 ft. overall, speed of 10 knots. Built for Cory Colliers Ltd., of London. Used to transport coal from the N.E. to power stations on the Thames & Medway rivers in the S. of England. On Nov. 27, 1937, during a dense fog which blanketed 1/2 of England for 3 days, a fog described as one of the heaviest in London's history, the vessel collided with Mongolia off the Nore (a sandbank at the mouth of the Thames estuary) & was badly damaged. That collision is a real puzzle. Most WWW references are to the collision being exactly a year later, on Nov. 27, 1938, & with Rimutaka rather than Mongolia, (be aware Mongolia was renamed Rimutaka). But 3 clearly has the data as I have recorded it above. 45 WW2 convoy references, all U.K. coastal. A number of ownership changes within the 'Cory' group it would seem (1), i.e. to Wm. Cory & Son Ltd. in 1946, to Concrete Maritime Ltd. in 1947, & to Cory Maritime Ltd. in 1948. In 1959, the vessel was sold to Compania de Navigation Louteflodini, Ltda., of Costa Rica, & renamed Eliza. (Lebanese flag). I have read references to L. D. & N. Nomicos, of Piraeus, Greece, re that sale. They may have been the managers or the owners behind the scene, or maybe both. Eliza was given a new funnel, & 'a more modern profile'. In 1961, the vessel was sold to Compania de Navigation Patricio Ltda, of Beirut, Lebanon, Mooringwell Shipping Ltd. of Cardiff the managers, & renamed Bruce M. In 1965 the vessel was sold again, to Quadros Compania Naviera S.A., also of Beirut, A. Tountas & Co., of Piraeus, the managers, & renamed Grace. In 1969, the vessel was broken up at Perama (Athens/Piraeus), Greece. WWW data re this vessel is limited & contradictory. Can you add to or correct the above?

68 Anglian Coast
594 (later 599) tons
Hull 335

164270
513637
5136373?

Griqua Coast
1935

A coaster. Per 1 ('wrecksite.eu', data, 2 images, Griqua Coast), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Anglian Coast, but I cannot check the link), 3 ('pdf' file, p.#1, scuttled in 1968), 4 (image, Anglian Coast, also -02), 5 (image, Anglian Coast), 6 (Callister award), 7 (Lloyd's Register data, Anglian Coast, 'plimsollshipdata.org', 1937/38 thru 1945/46), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 196.3 ft. long (59.83 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, later 195 ft. 10 in., 205 ft. 0 in. long (62.48 metres) overall, twin screw, speed of 9 1/2 knots, signal letter GYNK. Built for Coast Lines Limited ('CoastLines'), of Liverpool, 'Powell, Bacon & Hough', the managers. CoastLines provided coastal, short-sea & ferry services around most of the British Isles, both in its own name & through about 20 owned or controlled coastal shipping companies. The group, whose vessels were all named 'something Coast' was said to have been the largest coaster company in the world. Just 4 WW2 convoy references including a voyage in late 1939 from Bristol to the River Loire, France. On Mar. 4, 1941 (or maybe on  Apl. 3, 1941), the vessel was damaged by a mine, off Bar Lightship (River Mersey at Liverpool). On Jun. 15, 1945, Thomas H. (Henry) Callister, Captain of Anglian Coast,  was awarded an OBE (Order of the British Empire), (I think that is what the above link indicates), presumably for war service. In Oct. 1955, the vessel was renamed Griqua Coast, in anticipation of being, in 1956, taken from Liverpool to Port Elizabeth, South Africa, to serve in that area for CoastLines' South African subsidiary, 'Thesen's Steamship Company (Pty) Ltd.' of 'Cape Town',  which company was later, in 1967, acquired by 'Unicorn Shipping (Pty) Ltd.'. Certainly, in 1955, the vessel was equipped with radar. In early 1966, the vessel, which had been laid up at Cape Town's No. 5 Quay, & had become a derelict, was donated to the South African Navy ('Navy'), & was towed by Pondo Coast to Salamander Bay, Saldanha Bay, NW of Cape Town, South Africa, to be scuttled for diving exercises by the Navy. Not an easy tow - en route the tow line parted & had to be reconnected & Xhosa Coast passed over the tow line, &, it would seem, fortunately did not snag it. The vessel was  scuttled, off Saidanha Bay, on Mar. 5, 1968. Is it still there, I wonder? WWW data re this vessel is quite limited. We thank Robert Young for correcting this listing - as a very young man he was 'riding crew' aboard the derelict Griqua Coast when it was towed to Salamander Bay in 1966. Can you add anything? #1762

69 Gasfire
2972 (later 3001) tons
Hull 338

164730
1936

A collier. Per 1 (data & image), 2 (Lloyd's medal, Umpleby), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Gasfire, but I cannot check the link), 4 (WW2 data), 5 (Sunderland Echo, Apl. 2010 article), 6 (Hermann Büchting), 7 (Lloyd's Register data, Gasfire, 1937/38 thru 1943/44, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org', see left), 8 (vessel history ex Trove, Australia), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 97.1 (or 97.02) metres (318.4 ft.) long perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters GZCT, speed? Sister to Mr. Therm. Built for Gas Light & Coke Co., Britain’s largest gas manufacturer, of London, Stephenson Clarke & Associated Companies Ltd., the managers. 32 WW2 convoy references, all U.K. local, to & from London (Southend). On Oct. 17, 1940, the vessel left Southend for Methil, Firth of Forth, as part of Convoy FN.11 or FN.311. The vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by S27, of the German 1st S-Flotilla, Oberleutnant zur See Hermann Büchting in command, 6 miles NNW of Smith's Knoll (E. of Yarmouth), but was not sunk, rather badly damaged. Her stern had to be replaced (see image at 1). It would seem that 11 were killed in the attack. I have WWW spotted the names of 2 of those killed, B. Dennis, a fireman & A. Hoad, an able seaman. And there are 6 additional names here (in addition to Dennis). Three ships in the convoy were hit (Hawley & PLM 14 were the others) & there were 23 deaths between them. Can anyone help me track S27, to which I have so far found few references. It may have been a small German submarine, known as an 'E-boat'. Gasfire was, I read, beached at Spurn Head, taken to Hull & then to Sunderland. The vessel's repairs, on the 'Austin' pontoon, were completed on May 3, 1941. It would seem that as a result of those repairs, the vessel's gross tonnage increased from 2972 to 3001 tons. Just a few weeks later, on Jun. 21, 1941, she left Southend in ballast for Sunderland, but was sunk en route when it hit a mine 11 miles E. of Southwold, Suffolk. At 52.19N/1.59E. No loss of life - all 26 were rescued. T. A. Umpleby, a donkeyman, was awarded the Lloyd's War Medal for Bravery at Sea, & a King's Commendation re the sinking. The 'Trove Australia' article linked above advises that 'the fore part of the vessel was blown away, the fore-mast crashed on to the upper bridge and the cabin accommodation amidships was wrecked. The Gasfire was towed out of the swept channel and sunk about six miles east of Southwold.' I wonder why the ship was Lloyd's Register listed long after the vessel was sunk. Can you add more?

70 Icemaid
1964 (or 1954) tons
Hull 340

164670

Papeira M.
1936

A collier. Per 1 (image, Icemaid), 2 (ref. Icemaid, Saturday, 11 October), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Icemaid, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Sagacity collision, 52% down), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 82.3 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 279.7 ft., speed of 9 1/2 knots. The prototype of 'Icemaid' type colliers. Built for Gas Light & Coke Co., (which later became 'North Thames Gas Board'), of London, Stephenson Clarke & Co., the managers, to serve Beckton Gasworks & Regent's Canal Dock. 44 WW2 convoy references, all U.K. local, to & from Southend. There may have been independent voyages also, but the webmaster is denied access to 'convoyweb.org' independent voyage data. On Oct. 11, 1941, Icemaid was damaged by a mine off Orfordness near Shipwash Light Vessel off Harwich. It arrived at Harwich, under tow, on Oct. 12, 1941. The vessel may also have been hit by enemy aircraft during WW2 but the reference the webmaster saw provided no detail. In 1947 (or maybe a bit earlier), Icemaid, proceeding downriver, collided in fog with Sagacity, upbound, in Woolwich Reach, River Thames. The legal reference that I saw does not give enough data to provide detail as to what exactly happened & the full circumstances. The ship was 'adopted' in the 1950s by a North Shields school, I read. In 1958, the vessel was sold to Cia. Matsas & Drossus, of Panama, or Greece perhaps?, & renamed Papeira M. Miramar advises (thanks!) that the vessel was wrecked at Mogadishu, Somalia, on Jan. 28, 1963. It must have been later re-floated & towed, since it arrived at Split, Yugoslavia, on Oct. 5, 1965, to be broken up. Can you add more? Another image?

71 Mr. Therm
2974 tons
Hull 337

164634
1936

A collier. Per 1 (image), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Mr. Therm, but I cannot check the link), but am unable to check the link), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 97.0 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 316 ft., speed of 9 knots, crew of 23. Sister to Gasfire. Named after the advertising character, i.e. Mr. Therm, created in 1931 by illustrator Eric Fraser. Built for Gas Light & Coke Co. ('GLCC'), of London, Stephenson Clarke & Co., the managers. 37 WW2 convoy references, almost all U.K. local, from the NE to & from Southend (for London & the Beckton Gas Works at East Ham), other than 3 round-trip voyages to Seine Bay, France, in Jun. & Jul. 1944, re the Normandy landings. I read, indeed, that the vessel was one of the first ships to discharge off the Normandy beaches. On May 1, 1949, GLCC was nationalised & became the North Thames Gas Board. A law suit involving the vessel was reported in Jul. 1951 - have not read any detail. On Apl. 21, 1959, the vessel arrived, under tow, at the ship breaking facilities of Clayton & Davie, at Dunston, River Tyne, to be broken up. Can you add more? #1706

72 Goodwood
2796 tons
Hull 343

165553
1937

A collier. Per 1 (data, ref. 'Sunday, 10th September 1939'), 2 ('wrecksite.eu', re 1939 sinking), 3 ('The Daily Telegraph', 1939 article), 4 (Sep. 1939 report in a New Zealand paper), 5 ('uboat.net', sinking), 6 (Middlesbro', ref. 'Friday, 8 December'), 7 & 8 (images Goodwood, but the correct vessel?), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 93.4 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed? Built for William France, Fenwick & Co. Ltd. at a cost of £56,000. The vessel is said to have had a short life, sunk when it hit a mine in Sep. 1939 - one of the earliest allied vessels to be sunk in the North Sea (some say the first such vessel). So this listing might well be expected to be short. Whatever can there be to say? Well there are two versions of what happened - read on. Goodwood was en route from the Tyne to Bayonne, France, Captain Harold S. (Stevendale) Hewson in command, a crew of 21 (or maybe as many as 23) all told, with a cargo of coal. When 1 mile N. (or SE) of Flamborough Head, Yorkshire, close to shore & in convoy, & at 6.10 a.m. on Sep. 10, 1939, there was a giant explosion. I cannot today tell you exactly where, but roughly at 54.10N/08.30W. Crowds gathered on the nearby cliffs to watch the crew escape the ship & the ship sink by the bow. Survivors were picked up by a fishing boat & landed at nearby Bridlington. It would appear that one life was lost - Don Kindell suggests that he may have been a passenger rather than a crewman - but the WWW data is confusing. Captain Hewson suffered two broken legs & he & two crew members ended up in hospital. The Captain had been thrown into the water. Two of the crew jumped after him & kept him afloat until the one usable lifeboat could reach him. But what actually happened? Many sites including 'u-boat.net', & books also, state that the ship hit a mine laid by U-15, Korvettenkapitän Heinz Buchholz in command, (though U-13 is also referenced). But I also read that the ship was sunk by a torpedo fired by U-15. Such 1939 data as I can see, (3 & 4), seems to indicate that the vessel was, in fact, torpedoed. However, & it is an important however, Don Kindell of 'convoyweb.org' states that when those articles were written, in Sep. 1939, it was not known that the area had been mined. And the explosion was assumed to have been the result of a torpedo. The ship sank most quickly. About 3 months later, on Dec. 8, 1939, Middlesboro', of 989 gross tons, built by Hawthorn Leslie at Hebburn-on-Tyne, (a vessel not listed at Miramar), ran into the wreck & it sank - its crew were rescued by Runeborg, also not listed at Miramar. I read that the submarine involved in the Goodwood sinking was later sunk by an escort vessel & that important papers were recovered from her. Now U-15 would seem to have been sunk on Jan. 30, 1940 when rammed unintentionally, at Hoofden, (Netherlands?), by another German vessel (Iltis). While U-13 was sunk, on May 31, 1940, SE of Lowestoft, by depth charges of HMS Weston. A confusing story overall! Our Goodwood, i.e. the wreck, would seem to be still on the sea bottom today & owned by a group of local divers - that data from a website now gone & only available in cache as this listing is finalised. Can you add more?

73 Elizabeth Lysaght
1037 tons
Hull 347

166439
539752

Rino Esposito
Zaffiro
1938

A collier. Per 1 (modest reference re Feb. 3/4, 1943), 2 (image), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Elizabeth Lysaght, but I cannot check the link), 4 ('plimsollshipdata.org'. Lloyd's Register data, 1937/38 thru 1945/46), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 211.3 ft. long (63.7 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 220.5 ft. long (67.2 metres) overall, speed 9 1/2 or 10 knots, signal letters MMSJ, later ISPP. Built for Stephenson Clarke & Associated Companies Ltd. 85 WW2 convoy references, almost entirely U.K. coastal, but including 4 voyages to Seine Bay, France, in Jul., thru Sep. 1944, presumably re the Normandy invasions. It would seem that the vessel must have been extensively modified - see the 3rd image at left, as Rino Esposito. The vessel was sold, in 1958, to 'F. Esposito' & became Rino Esposito. It was sold again, in 1961, to 'C. Giovagnoni' & renamed Zaffiro.  I think that C. Giovagnoni was likely the manager since  in 1968/69 the vessel was owned by 'Michele Scotio di Mase' of Naples, Italy. The vessel was wrecked at Cape Bengut (near Algiers, Algeria, in the Mediterranean), on May 12, 1970. I have not read the circumstances. Can you add more?

74 Monkwood
1591 tons
Hull 345

166343
1938

A collier. Per 1 & 2 (images), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Monkwood, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 77.8 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots. Built for William France, Fenwick & Co. Ltd., of London, noted for the shipment of coal to the south of England ex the North East. 25 WW2 convoy references, all of which were U.K. coastal. Which is a rather small number of references for a collier that would have likely been up & down the U.K. east coast every few days carrying coal to London (Southend). On Apl. 9, 1959, the vessel arrived at the Dunston, River Tyne, ship breaking facilities of 'Clayton & Davie Ltd.' to be broken up. Howard Snaith advises (thanks!) that his grandfather, Thomas Newby Beaton, MBE, was, during his career, the vessel's Master. Howard seeks vessel plans to be able to complete a model of the ship that his grandfather commenced but did not complete. WWW data available for this vessel is quite modest. Can you add more?

75 Lea Grange
2969 (or 2993) tons
Hull 351

165776

Costicos
1939

A collier. Per 1 (my main source so far. Ron Mapplebeck, I thank you!), 2 (image Costicos), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for Tanfield Steamship Co. Ltd., of Newcastle. The vessel was sold, in 1953, to Stephenson Clarke Ltd. It was sold again, in 1959, to A. Halcoussis & Co. (they may however have been the managers) & renamed Costicos (Lebanese registry). On Jun. 9, 1973, the vessel arrived in tow at Istanbul. And on Oct. 1, 1973, demolition of the vessel commenced at Halic (i.e. Golden Horn, lstanbul). 3 says broken up Jun. 1973 - at 'Mehmet Zeki Verel'. Can anybody possibly tell us more?

76 Cornwood
2777 tons
Hull 354

168008

Aris
Gabriele
Firmino
1940

A collier. Per 1, 2 & 3 (all similar data), 4 ('pdf' Lloyd's Register 1940-41), 5 (1953 image, at North Sydney, Nova Scotia), 6 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Cornwood, but I cannot check the link), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 98.1 metres (311.4 or 321.9 ft.) long, speed of 9 1/2 knots. Built for Wm. France, Fenwick & Co. Ltd., of London. 22 convoy ref. in WW2, all coastal U.K. voyages. The vessel was sold, in 1959, (or maybe in 1960) to  'Ithaca Marine Transportation' (of Greece most probably), renamed Aris & registered at Liberia. It was sold again, in 1961, to  'E. Canale di Pietro' or 'Emilio Canale', probably of Naples, Italy, & renamed Gabriele. And sold again, in 1971, to Euronavi S.p.A., also, I think, of Naples, Italy, & renamed Firmino. The vessel was broken up at La Spezia, N. Italy, in Mar. 1972. WWW data is most limited. Can anybody possibly tell us more?

77 Moorwood
2056 tons
Hull 352

167413
1940

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data), 2 (brief reference), 3 (11th June 1941), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Moorwood, but I cannot check the link), 5 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Moorwood, 1940/41 thru 1944/45), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 273.3 ft. long (83.30 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 283.6 ft. long (86.44 metres) overall, signal letters GDWW. Built for Wm. France, Fenwick & Co. Ltd., of London. 41 WW2 convoy references, all of which were U.K. coastal. On Jun. 11, 1941, while in ballast & en route from London to Blyth, in convoy EC-31, the vessel was hit & badly damaged by an aerial torpedo fired by enemy aircraft off '19C Buoy, N. Whitby', Tees, (have not read the exact position yet). Moorwood opened fire, but sank within 1/2 hour. No loss of life, but do read the citation at 1. For his bravery in the attack, Chief Engineer, Sydnery Bell received 'a King's Commendation for Brave Conduct' & a 'Lloyd's War Medal for Bravery at Sea' - likely a medal like this. Do read what he did. I now learn that the Chief Engineer's first name was correctly Sydney. His daughter has kindly been in touch to advise us that he passed away in 1946 as a result of war service. Can anybody possibly tell us more?

78 Sea Fisher
2950 tons
Hull 353

167736

Malcom
New Country
1940

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Sea Fisher, but I cannot check the link), 2 (brief data), 3 (image, Sea Fisher), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 99.3 metres long overall, 325.5 ft., speed of 9 knots. Designed specifically to carry 14 inch gun turrets for the largest class of battleships then under construction, the King George V class, - from Barrow & Elswick to the various ship builders' yards. Built for 'Fenwick, Fisher Steamship Co. Ltd.' ('Fenwick'), of Barrow. 19 WW2 convoy references, all of which are U.K. coastal including, I think, one convoy, referenced Gibraltar, MKS.75G, in Jan. 1945, which Sea Fisher seems to have joined late. In 1945, when, it would appear, Fenwick was liquidated, (can you tell us more about that liquidation?), the vessel was transferred to 'James Fisher & Sons Ltd.', also of Barrow, with no change of name. In 1956, the vessel was sold, for £150,000, to 'Shamrock Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Northern Ireland, & renamed Malcom. In 1959, the vessel was sold to 'Great Ocean Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Keelung, Taiwan, 'An Kuo Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Taiwan, the managers, & renamed New Country. In 1966, the vessel was sold to 'China Merchants Steam Navigation Co. Ltd.', of Taipei, Taiwan. In Dec. 1967, the vessel was broken up at Keelung. Can anybody tell us more?

79   Goodwood
2780 tons
Hull 356

168053
1941

A collier. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Goodwood, but I cannot check the link), 2 ('wrecksite.eu', re sinking, but modest data), 3 & 4 (images Goodwood, but the correct vessel?), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 94.9 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed? Built for William France, Fenwick & Co. Ltd., presumably to replace Goodwood which was lost in Dec. 1939. Just 10 WW2 convoys, all U.K. coastal, & mainly in the period of Jan/Sep 1941. But with one convoy in Sep. 1944 & Convoy FS.1734 in Feb. 1945, during the course of which she was sunk. That number of WW2 convoys (10) is unusually low for a coaster that would have been up & down the U.K. E. coast every few days delivering coal to London. But ... I am not permitted to access, at 'convoyweb.org', the vessel's independent voyages. Those records may well indicate what service the vessel saw between Sep. 1941 & Sep. 1945. I should explain. 'Convoyweb.org' regards the webmaster as 'mining their data', so I am not permitted to access the independent WW2 voyages of any vessel & am permitted limited access period. I must live with that. It is certainly not due to Don Kindell, who has always been & remains most welcoming & supportive. Anyway, on Feb. 22, 1945, while en route from Blyth to London, (FS.1734 was Methil to Southend), with a cargo of coal, the vessel was hit & sunk by a torpedo fired by a German E-boat. Off Lowestoft, per 'The Empire ships .....' or off Southend, per the 'Sunderland Echo'. Miramar advises that the sinking was approx. at 52.53.18N/2.08.15E, which is best described as NE of Great Yarmouth (rather than off Lowestoft). There is virtually no WWW data available about this vessel, however I read that as many as 22 German submarines were operating off the E. coast of the U.K. that night & the vessel would have been sunk by an E-boat of the 2nd or 5th flotillas. Lives lost? I didn't know, but Capt. Howard N. Snaith advises (thanks so much!) that his grandfather, Captain Thomas Newby Beaton MBE, was the Master on that final voyage & that his family tradition says that 'Tommy' Beeton was the last to leave the ship having ensured all hands were safe. Who rescued the survivors? Don't know. The wreck today? Don't know. The WWW record for this vessel is scant indeed. I should add that as this listing is finalised, for 9 of the 10 convoys listed at 1, the earlier Goodwood is incorrectly referenced (1937 & 2796 tons). Can anybody tell us more?

80 Cormull
2865 tons
Hull 375

168300

Coldharbour
Cormull
Christakis
1942

A collier. Per 1 & 2 (data, Cormull), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Cormull, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Muttitt, 25% down), 5 & 6 (images, Cormull), 7 (Lloyd's Register data, 1941/42 to 1945/46, thanks to 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 317.3 ft. long, 328.5 ft. overall, speed probably about 10 knots, fitted with 4 3-ton derricks, signal letters BDZT. Built for Cory Colliers Ltd., presumably to carry coal from the NE to the S. of England. Was registered in the name of Wm. Cory & Son Ltd., by 1945/46. Registered at Newcastle. There is no recorded WW2 convoy data, but maybe there were independent voyages? I have read that on May 25, 1942, while en route from Blyth to London, the vessel was badly damaged in an explosion. That date is however suspect. The vessel was only launched on May 28, 1942 & was not delivered until July of that year. I think that May 25, 1942 should have read May 15, 1943 as next. On May 15, 1943, when en route from Blyth to London, with a cargo of coal, she struck a mine while 14 miles NE of Yarmouth but reached port safely. It seemed at first likely that Frederick J. (John) Muttitt, was then its Master & he was later awarded the Order of the British Empire & commended for his brave conduct in the action. But it would seem that is not so. Muttitt was however awarded the MBE (Member) re an action involving Cormead on Sep. 11/12, 1941. In Jun. 1946, the vessel was 'transferred' or maybe sold to Coastwise Colliers Ltd. ('Coastwise'), & renamed Coldharbour. In 1949, Coastwise was wound up & the vessel 'reverted' to Wm. Cory & Son Ltd. & was re-named Cormull. The vessel was on the scene on Feb. 19, 1956, when Corchester was cut in half & sank off Haisboro Light on the coast of Norfolk. Survivors of Corchester were taken to London & later a memorial service took place aboard Cormull at the scene of the disaster. The vessel was involved in collisions on Nov. 13, 1958 (with which vessel?) & was repaired at Austin & Pickersgill's. In 1960, the vessel was sold to 'Dos Hermanos Corp.', of Greece, G. Vlassis, also of Greece, the managers, & renamed Christakis. In Oct. 1965, the vessel was en route from Galatz (Galaţi), Romania, to Alexandria, Egypt, with a cargo of superphosphates. Early in the morning of Oct. 30, 1965, the vessel collided in fog with Mairoula, 984 tons, off Nara Burnu, Turkish Asian coast, Dardanelles. Christakis was beached 5 miles S. of nearby Çannakale, & the cargo was discharged. While I have been unable to read the detail, it would seem that the vessel was badly damaged & was declared a total constructive loss. It would appear, however, that the vessel must have been later re-floated & towed since I read that it was broken up at Piraeus, Greece. However, I have also read that it arrived at 'Ambelaki' on Dec. 1, 1965 & was broken up there - which is a puzzle because Ambelaki seems to be inland in Greece. The above is in part created from snippets of sometimes confusing WWW data. Can you add to and/or correct the above?

81 Bowcombe
2760 tons
Hull 367

168412

Colwyn
Bowcombe
1943

A collier. Per 1 (data & image, Bowcombe, 30% down), 2 (image, Bowcombe, also -02), 3 (image, Bowcombe, 80% down), 4 ('convoyweb.org', where WW2 convoy duty of Bowcombe would usually be found. But there are no records there. I cannot check the link), 5 (Lloyd's Register data, 1942/43 to 1945/46, thanks to 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 98.1 metres long overall, 311.4 ft., speed of 10 knots, signal letters GCMW. Built for Stephenson Clarke & Associated Companies Ltd. ('Stephenson'), of London, presumably to carry coal from the NE to the S. of England. No WW2 convoy references - which is a puzzle. In 1946, the vessel was transferred to 'Coastwise Colliers Ltd.' ('Coastwise'), of London, Wm. France Fenwick & Co. Ltd. ('Fenwick') the managers & renamed Colwyn. Coastwise was a company formed by Fenwick and Stephenson for the purpose of carrying out long-term charters with the County of London Electricity Supply Co. Ltd. It had a very short life however, due, it would seem, to the nationalisation of the British coal industry, & in 1949, the company was wound up, the vessel reverted to Stephenson & the vessel's name reverted to Bowcombe. Possibly managed by R. S. Dalgliesh (or R. S. Dalgliesh Ltd. or R. S. Dalgliesh & Company Ltd.), of Newcastle. On Oct. 30, 1964, Bowcombe, ex Hartlepool & bound for London, likely with a full cargo, was in collision with Dvinoles, a 4638 ton Russian cargo ship. The collision was in the River Thames, but I have not read i) exactly where it occurred nor ii) the circumstances & what damage resulted. Do you possibly have that data? In 1966, the vessel was sold to Skrot & Avfallsprodukter ('Skrot'), of Göteborg, i.e. Gothenburg, Sweden, who were, it would seem ship breakers. Now Torsten Johannisson, also of Gothenburg, was the manager of Skrot. So when I read that in 1967 the vessel was converted into a lighter for Torsten Johannisson, I wonder whether it may have been rather for Skrot's account that the conversion was made. There the 'data trail' ends. I can find no later word. I read (here) that Hugh Harper Bowman, 'Chief Engineer Officer' of Bowcombe was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire on Jan. 1, 1945. Which sounds like it might well relate to service during WW2. There is really very little WWW data about this vessel. Can you add to or correct any of the above?

82 Cormead
2867 tons
Hull 369

169666

Panormitis
1943

A collier. Per 1 (image, Cormead), 2 (image, Panormitis), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Cormead, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 100.1 metres long overall, 328.5 ft., speed of 9 1/2 knots. Built for Cory Colliers Ltd., presumably to carry coal from the NE to the S. of England. 36 WW2 convoy references, all of which are U.K. coastal. The vessel was transferred to Wm. Cory & Son Ltd. in 1946. In 1964, the vessel was sold to 'Nafs Compañía Naviera SA', of Panama, 'K. & M. Shipbrokers Ltd.', of London, the managers, & renamed Panormitis. I presume that the true owners were likely Greek since 'Panormitis' is the name of a Greek Orthodox monastery on the Greek island of Simi (or Symi), 41 km NW of Rhodes. On Feb. 28, 1971, the vessel arrived at the Antwerp, Belgium, facilities of 'J. de Smedt', to be broken up. There appears to be essentially no WWW data about this vessel. Can you add anything?

83 Empire Judy
738 tons
Hull 370

169116

Stream Fisher
Ramaida
1943

A coaster. Per 1 (image, Stream Fisher, also -02 & -03), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire Judy, but I cannot check the link), 3 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data 1942/43 thru 1945/46, Empire Judy), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 185.0 ft. long perpendicular to perpendicular, 192.6 ft. long overall, speed of ? knots, signal letters MCRR. Built for the Ministry of War Transport, for use re coastal cargo movements & for the carriage of heavy gun (parts?). With James Fisher & Sons Ltd. ('JamesFisher') the managers. Just 9 WW2 convoy references, all coastal except for 2 voyages to France in Jul. 1944. In 1946, the vessel was sold to JamesFisher  (now James Fisher & Sons PLC), of Barrow-in-Furness & renamed Stream Fisher. The vessel was converted, at Workington in 1965, to carry irradiated atomic fuel from Anzio, Italy, to Barrow-in-Furness. In 1969, the vessel was sold to Grandport Shipping, of Panama, J. H. Ramagge the manager, & renamed Ramaida. In Sep. 1977, the vessel arrived at Lisbon, Portugal, to be broken up. There seems to be limited WWW data about this vessel. Can you add anything?

84 Amberley Castle
1010 (or 1060) tons
Hull 377

Weather Advisor
Admiral Fitzroy
1944

A Castle class corvette (Royal Navy). K386. May have later become F286 (a frigate number) - but am not sure about that. Can anybody possibly tell us? Per 1 (data), 2 & 3 (images, Amberley Castle), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 76.81 metres long, speed of 16 1/2 knots (max.) 10 knots (cruising), complement of 112. Served as a convoy escort. At end of WW2, the vessel was put into reserve at Portsmouth until 1952, & then at Penarth, Glamorgan, Wales, until 1957. The vessel was converted in 1957 at Blyth (NE of Newcastle upon Tyne) into a weather ship - Weather Advisor. Renovated in Jul. 1976 & renamed Admiral Fitzroy. The vessel was scrapped at Troon, Ayrshire, Scotland, in 1982. Can you add anything?

85 Cormount
2871 tons
Hull 375

180027

Chriluck
Marianik
1944

A collier. Per 1 (image, Cormount), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Cormount, but I cannot check the link), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 317.3 ft. long, 328.5 ft. overall, speed of 10 knots. Built for Wm. Cory & Son Ltd., presumably to carry coal from the NE to the S. of England. 47 WW2 convoy references, all of which were U.K. coastal. In 1966, the vessel was sold to Chriluck Shipping Co. Ltd. ('Chriluck') of Liberia, G. & A. Vlassis of Piraeus, Greece, the managers, & renamed Chriluck. Chriluck may have been a subsidiary of 'Chriluck Compania Naviera S.A.', of Liberia. In 1972, the vessel was sold to 'Sissini Navigation Co. Ltd.', of Cyprus, 'N. J. Nomikos', of Greece, the managers & renamed Marianik. In Oct. 1974, the vessel arrived at Split, Yugoslavia, to be broken up. There seems to be virtually no WWW data about this vessel. Can you add anything?

86 Rogate
2850 (or 2871) tons
Hull 373

169928
1944

A cargo ship that did not make its first birthday. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Rogate, but I cannot check the link. And beware. Only one of the many voyages you will see is Rogate), 2 (an image of Rogate. & -03. But the correct one? There also was one built in 1946), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for Stephenson Clarke Limited, of London. Likely a collier? Just a single WW2 convoy reference. On Mar. 19, 1945, while en route from Sunderland to Southend (London), ex Methil it would seem, in Convoy FS.1759, the vessel was torpedoed by a German E-boat near Lowestoft, with 2 lives lost. At 52.31.9N/02.01.4E. The E-boat was a part of the 6th Flotilla, (Lt. Cdr. Matzen) which laid many mines in the area & attacked convoy FS.1759. 'Convoy-web' simply records the vessel as sunk. What was her cargo? And does anybody know the details of the attack & rescue? Miramar refers to No. 4 Buoy, but the significance of that ref. is at present unclear. WWW data is limited. Anything to add?

87 Moorwood
2034 tons
Hull 379

180659
515529

Horsted
1945

A collier. Per 1 & 2 (images, Horsted), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). As this listing is created, images of Moorwood are available via e-Bay. I trust you will forgive my inviting you to find such listings for yourself. The images bear intrusive logos & I prefer not to effectively reward the e-Bay vendor by linking to his items. 86.4 metres long (283 ft. 7 in.), overall, speed of 9 1/2 or 10 knots, in 1947 was equipped with 'Decca Navigator' radio navigation equipment. Built for William France, Fenwick & Company Ltd. A 3rd fleet vessel of the name (all 3 built in Sunderland), presumably to replace the 1940 Moorwood which was lost in Jun. 1941. The vessel was built too late to see WW2 convoy service. The vessel likely carried coal from the NE to cities in the S. of England, including London. Robin Bobbin, the vessel's 2nd engineer, was awarded the 'Order of the British Empire' (MBE) in the Jun. 1946 Birthday Honours list. In 1960, the vessel was sold to Stephenson Clarke Ltd., also of London, & renamed Horsted. In 1966, the vessel was sold to 'Metaalhandel Sloopwerken HP Heovelman NV', of Ijssel, Holland. I read that in Nov. 1966, the vessel was, in fact, hulked. The WWW record for this vessel is scant indeed. Can anybody tell us more? #1707

88 Brixton
1635 tons
Hull 385

180913

Brunetto
Iginia Zeta
Piero M.
1946

A self-trimming 'flat-iron' steam collier. Per 1 (image, Brunetto), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 78.5 metres long overall, 74.7 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 247 ft. 3 in., speed of 10 knots, crew of 18. Built for 'South Metropolitan Gas Co.', of London, which company became, upon nationalisation in 1949, part of 'South Eastern Gas Board'. Designed with a funnel that lowered to permit her to pass under River Thames bridges. The vessel carried coal from the NE to gas plants on the S. side of the River Thames at London, most likely including Woolwich Gas Works. While I have been unable to read the detail, it would appear, from Google 'snippets', that Brixton, up-bound in the River Thames with a cargo of coal, was in collision, on Feb. 6, 1954, with Planter headed down river accompanied by two Sun tugs. Planter, possibly travelling too fast, veered off course & hit Brixton, which had to be run aground on the S. side of the river, at Blackwall Point. Planter, with stem damage, was towed to South West India Docks - to effect repairs perhaps. The two tugs may have collided also. A court case resulted. Can anybody provide i) the court's conclusion & ii) better detail as to the circumstances. In 1962, the vessel was sold to 'Emilio Canale S.p.A.', of Genoa, Italy, & renamed Brunetto. In 1976, the vessel was sold to 'Trasporti Mare-"Co. Si. Mar" SpA', (which may mean 'Compagnia Siciliana Trasporti Mare SpA'), of Palermo, Sicily, with no change of vessel name. In 1978, the vessel was sold again, to 'O.M.S.A. SpA', also of Palermo, & renamed Iginia Zeta. And sold again, also in 1978, to 'San Gavino SpA di Navigazione', of Genoa, & renamed Piero M. On Jul. 7, 1981, the vessel arrived at the La Spezia, Italy, ship breaking facilities of 'De.Co.Mar s.r.l.', to be broken up. WWW data is most limited. Can anybody add anything? An image? #1733

89 Keynes
1563 tons
Hull 382

180839

Granita IV
1946

A collier. Per 1 (data), 2 (image, Keynes, but you must be registered to see it), 3 (image, Keynes), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for Stephenson Clarke Limited, of London. 82.3 metres long (270 ft.) overall, 78.5 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 1/2 knots. The vessel carried coal from the NE to the S. of England, most particularly to Newhaven, Sussex. In 1966, the vessel was sold to 'Torsten Johannisson' ('Johannisson'), of Gothenburg, Sweden, & renamed Granita IV. The vessel arrived at Gothenburg on Jul. 3, 1969, to be broken up. I have seen references that seem to link 'Skrot-og Avfallsprodukter' & Johannisson together & references also to Johannisson being a ship breaker. Could the vessel then have been laid up from 1966 to the end? Can anybody elaborate? WWW data is limited. Anything to add?

90 Sir Alexander Kennedy
1714 tons
Hull 384

180862
1946

A 'flat-iron' steam collier. Per 1 (image), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for London Power Co. Ltd. ('LondonPower'), of London, which company owned power stations at Deptford & Battersea. Sir Alexander Kennedy? A leading British civil, marine & electrical engineer & academic, (1847/1928) - a consultant to LondonPower - you can read about his varied career at many sites incl. here. A matter of interest to the webmaster - he was a keen photographer & was one of the first to document the archaeological site of Petra in Jordan. 82.4 metres (270 ft. 6 in.) overall, speed of 9 knots. The vessel carried coal from the NE to London power stations - I have seen Battersea power station in W. London referenced in that regard. Designed with a funnel that lowered to permit her to pass under River Thames bridges. As a result of the nationalisation of the electricity industry, the vessel was taken over, in 1948, by 'British Electricity Authority'. Which became 'Central Electricity Authority' in 1954 & 'Central Electricity Generating Board' in 1958. On May 3, 1968, the vessel arrived at the Willebroek, S. of Antwerp, Belgium, ship breaking facilities of 'Scrapping SA', to be broken up. WWW data is quite limited. Anything to add? #1697

91 Laverock
1209 tons
Hull 386

181632

Chania II
1947

A cargo ship. Per 1 [General Steam Navigation, Laverock (3)], 2 (4 images, Laverock, re 1963 grounding, but you must now be registered to access), 3 (image, Laverock), 4 (image, Laverock, also -01), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 79.0 metres long overall, 75.2 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, twin screw, speed of 12 (or maybe 13) knots. Sister to Auk & Seamew. Laverock? The Scottish & northern English word for a skylark - General Steam Navigation Company Limited ('General'), of London, were noted for naming their ships after birds. Built for General then. Largely from data 'snippets' it seems likely that the vessel was on the London/Tilbury to Leixões, Oporto, Portugal run, & on to Italy perhaps, bringing back casks of port wine. General made similar runs to Bordeaux, France, & Cadiz, Spain, it would seem. On Apl. 14, 1963, the vessel would appear to have gone aground at Oporto, was re-floated by the Bugsier salvage tug Atlantic on Nov. 20, 1963 & on Nov. 28, 1963 was towed to a Lisbon, Portugal, shipyard by salvage tug Praia da Adraga to effect repairs. Is it possible that that all relates to a 'snippet' I read that states that on Nov. 15 (1964, I believe), the vessel ran aground at Oporto, when caught by a wave created by a dam bursting 56 miles up on the river Douro. No casualties but the vessel was presumably damaged. Can anybody clarify matters? In 1965, the vessel was sold to 'S. Marcantonakis', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Chania II. In 1974, the vessel was sold again, to 'Ormi Shipping Co. Ltd.', also of Piraeus, with no change of vessel name. In May 1980 the vessel was broken up at the 'José Laborda González S.A.' ship breaking facilities at Murcia, Spain. Anything to add?

92 Seaford
1062 tons
Hull 388

181770

Ciciliana
Georgios A
Alexis Athans
Panaghia Kastrou
1947

A collier. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for Stephenson Clarke Limited, of Newcastle. The vessel was sold, in 1971, to 'Efti Sg Co.' & renamed Ciciliana. It was sold again, in 1972, to 'P. Alogoskoufis' & renamed Georgios A. And sold again, in 1981, to 'N. Theoharopoulos' & renamed Alexis Athans. Was renamed Panaghia Kastrou in 1984. Laid up in 1988. Broken up at Alexandroupolis (NE Greece near Turkish border) in 1992. I am grateful for a now expired e-Bay listing for data & particularly for Miramar. WWW data is most limited. Anything to add?

93 Seamew
1220 or 1209 tons (later 1595 tons)
Hull 387

181696

Marigo
Capetan Chronis
1947

A cargo ship. Per 1 [General Steam Navigation, Seamew (3)], 2 (ref.), 3 (image, Seamew), 4 (image, Seamew, also -02, -04, -06), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 79.0 metres long, 245 ft., speed of 12 or 13 knots. Sister to Auk & Laverock. Built for 'General Steam Navigation Company Limited' ('General'), of London. It would seem that for many years, years 1947/1952 are referenced, the vessel was on the London/Tilbury to Oporto, Portugal run, bringing back casks of port wine. General made similar runs to Bordeaux, France, & Cadiz, Spain, it would seem. On Jun. 30, 1950, while taking on bunker coal at Middlesbrough, a crew member was injured when he was knocked into the vessel's hold. Have read no details as to the circumstances or outcome. On Aug. 19, 1956, Seamew rescued the crew of Traquair, 567 tons, (en route from Leith to Terneuzen, the Netherlands, with coal slurry), which foundered in the North Sea - & landed them at Hamburg. That info thanks to the lead from R396040, here, who advises 'My part was frying sausages for survivors and lending a survivor a dry shirt & pants.' The vessel was sold, in 1966, to 'Adamantios Bousses & Co.', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Marigo. The vessel may have been modified since Miramar advises the gross tonnage became 1595. It was sold again, in 1972, to 'Kavadas Bros' of Greece, & renamed Capetan Chronis. On Jun. 3, 1974, the vessel, en route from Benghazi, Libya, to Piraeus, Greece, in ballast, was in collision with Hartford Express, at 34.05N/20.45E, about 150 miles due N. of Daryanah, Libya. Capetan Chronis sank in about 2,100 ft. of water. Any loss of life? Alistair Kerr has advised (thanks Alistair!) that he served aboard Seamew for 6 months commencing with her maiden voyage. You can read Alistair's words here. Anything to add?

94 Branksome
1438 tons
Hull 391

181832
5397551

Zagara
Pinetta
Tjra
1948

A collier. Per 1 (image, Branksome, also -02 & -03), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 77.1 metres metres long overall, 73.2 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots. Built for 'Stephenson, Clarke Ltd.', of London. It may have earlier been intended that the vessel be named Pompey Heat. Presumably used to carry coal from the NE of England to cities in the south & maybe to Portsmouth. The vessel was sold, in 1962, to "Floramar" Cia di Nav. SpA, of Palermo, Sicily, Italy, & renamed Zagara. In 1964, it was sold again, to Silvio Bonaso, of Genoa, Italy, & renamed Pinetta. The vessel was sold, in 1966, to 'African Shipping & Trading Co.', of Monrovia, Liberia, & renamed Tjra. On May 23, 1959, the vessel arrived at the Bilbao, Spain, ship breaking facilities of D. Martin. to be broken up. WWW data is non-existent re this vessel. Is there anything you can add? #1699

95 Coleford
2852 tons
Hull 392

181884
5382659

Bestwood
Vitocha
1948

A collier. Per 1 (image, Coleford), 2 (image, Bestwood), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 100.1 metres metres long overall, 95.2 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 317 ft. 6 in., speed of 9 1/2 or 10 knots. Built for 'Coastwise Colliers Ltd.' ('Coastwise'), of London, a company formed by 'Wm. France Fenwick and Co. Ltd.' ('WmFrance') & 'Stephenson Clarke Ltd.' re the chartering of vessels to 'County of London Electric Supply Co. Ltd.', for the purpose of transporting coal to the London power stations of Barking & Littlebrook, respectively on the N. & S. banks of the River Thames. Coastwise was managed by WmFrance. But, with the nationalization of the U.K. electricity industry in 1948, Coastwise went into liquidation. WmFrance acquired the vessel, in 1948, & renamed it Bestwood. The data may not in any way relate, but I see that there was a colliery named Bestwood, at Nottingham, owned by Bestwood Coal and Iron Co. When the generating stations switched from coal to oil, colliers such as Bestwood became redundant. The vessel was sold, in 1961, to 'Navigation Maritime Bulgare', which would seem to have meant the Government of Bulgaria, of Varna, Bulgaria, & renamed Vitocha. A Russian or maybe it is rather a Bulgarian site seems to refer to the vessel as Vitosha. On May 17, 1972, the vessel arrived at the Split, Yugoslavia, ship breaking facilities of Brodospas ('Brodospas Offshore Towage & Salvage Co.'?), to be broken up. The available WWW data re this vessel is modest. Is there anything you can add? #1755

96 Auk
1238 tons
Hull 397

183008
5030725

Ouranoupolis
1949

A cargo ship, a coaster. Per A (e-Bay image, Auk), 1 [General Steam Navigation, Auk (3)], 2 ('pdf' file, p#5, Auk featured in a 2 minute 'British Film Institute' film, as a collier perhaps), 3 (image, Auk, also -02, -03 & -04), 4, 5 & 6 (images, Auk), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 79.1 metres long overall, 74.8 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 245 ft., twin screw, speed of 12 knots (13 knots at her trials). Built for 'General Steam Navigation Company Ltd.', of London. Sister of Laverock & Seamew. The vessel was sold, in 1965, to 'D. Dragonas & others', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Ouranoupolis, (a village in northern Greece, near Mount Athos). There were three later sales of the vessel, with no change of vessel name, & with all the purchasers being of Piraeus. In 1972 to 'Hasba Shipping Co. S.A.', in 1974 to 'Z. D. Kritsas & Alwahabi Suleiman Ebeid',  & in 1976 to 'G. Tsamis & S. Karidakis'. The vessel suffered leaks during a voyage from Chalcis or Chalkis, Greece, to Yenbo, Saudi Arabia, & was laid up, as a result, at Port Said, Egypt, on Mar. 14, 1977. It was later moved, in 1982, to the Great Bitter Lake (Suez Canal), & laid up there pending sale by creditors. The vessel arrived at Port Said ship breakers on Apl. 20, 1982, to be broken up. I am grateful for the ownership data at Miramar since WWW data about the vessel is most limited. Anything to add? #1803

97 Elisabeth Nielsen
2441 tons
Hull 398

Bore V
Evandros
1949

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 98.5 metres long, speed of 12 1/2 knots. Built for 'D/S A/S Progress' (M. Nielsen & Son), of Copenhagen, Denmark. The vessel was sold, in 1961, to 'Ångfartygs A/B Bore' (correct name?), of Åbo, Finland, (Bore Line) & renamed Bore V. There are WWW pages re Bore Line, but I cannot spot this vessel in any of them. The vessel was sold, in 1967, to 'J. P. Hadoulis' & renamed Evandros. Broken up at Inverkeithing, Firth of Forth, Scotland, in Jun. 1968. WWW data is most limited. Anything to add?

98 Pompey Light
1428 tons
Hull 395

182726
5528176
1949

A collier. Per 1 (brief ref. Pompey Light, 45% down), 2 (image Pompey Light, also -03 & -01), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 76.8 metres long overall, 72.6 metres perpendicular, 252.1 ft. perhaps, speed of 10 knots. Sister to Pompey Power. The two vessels were 'the first ships of their type to have AC auxilliaries including provision for taking shore supply'. Ordered by City of Portsmouth. But as a result of the nationalisation of the electricity industry, the vessel was delivered to 'British Electricity Authority'. Which became 'Central Electricity Authority' in 1954 & 'Central Electricity Generating Board' in 1958. The vessel was operated by Stephenson, Clarke Ltd. It carried coal from the North East to coal-fired power plants at Portsmouth. In Oct. 1968, the vessel arrived at the Antwerp, Belgium, ship breaking facilities of 'J. de Smedt', to be broken up. Pompey Light was featured in 'Mining Review 2nd Year No. 3: Shipyard For Colliers', a 1948 'short' 35 mm film, not available for viewing by the public, however. Anything to add?

99 Pompey Power
1428 tons
Hull 394

182724

Tandik
Hamen
1949

A collier. Per 1 (Hamen, 2nd item, 30% down), 2 (image Pompey Power), 3 (image Pompey Power), 4 (13 images, Hamen) & 5 (extensive data, under Hamen image), but you must now register to see both of them, alas, 6 (68 images, Hamen, & a slide show of a few of them), 7 (image, Hamen, related to previous link), 8 & 9 (data & images, in Norwegian), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 252.1 ft. (76.8 metres) long. Sister to Pompey Light. The two vessels were 'the first ships of their type to have AC auxilliaries including provision for taking shore supply'. Built for the City of Portsmouth, U.K., but with the nationalization of the U.K. electricity industry, the vessel was taken over by The British Electricity Authority ('BEA'), & operated by Stephenson, Clarke Ltd. BEA became 'Central Electricity Authority' in 1954 & 'Central Electricity Generating Board' in 1958. Carried coal from the North East to coal-fired power plants at Portsmouth. In 1960, the vessel was sold to 'A/S Orion-Tandberg & Möinichen' of Norway & renamed Tandik. The vessel's deck machinery & masts were modernised. In 1962, the vessel was sold to Hans Utkilen of Bergen, Norway, & (in 1963) renamed Hamen. The steam engine was removed & a diesel engine was installed. Operated as tramp ship for many years. In 1986, the vessel was laid up N. of Bergen. Efforts were made to preserve the vessel in Norway. Later (in 1996?), the vessel was sold to Lupin Shipping Ltd. (owned by Alvar Olsson, of Varberg, Sweden) of St. Vincent. The vessel was towed to near Strömstad, Sweden. And sat there, it would seem. A foundation (1) was established to preserve her, which foundation purchased the vessel in 2005. Not sure of the correct name of that foundation - maybe 'Stiftelsen MS Hamen ex MS Tandik'? The vessel was painted by artist Lawrence Bagley (53 x 78 cm. oil), which painting sold for GBP 75.00 via Bonhams, Bath, in Nov. 2005. No image of the artwork seems to be available. Pompey Power was featured in 'Mining Review 2nd Year No. 3: Shipyard For Colliers', a 1948 'short' 35 mm film, not available for viewing by the public, however. Anything to add? I regret my inability in Norwegian - the vessel's current status?

100 Bodmin Moor
1362 (later 1280) tons
Hull 403

183246

Devon Moor
Villamar
1950

A collier. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 71.7 metres long, speed of 10 knots. Likely used to carry coal from the North East to London power stations. A 'flatiron' possibly, i.e. a vessel whose funnels & masts could be lowered to permit passage under low bridges, such as on the River Thames. It was built for 'British Electricity Authority'. Which became 'Central Electricity Authority' in 1954 & 'Central Electricity Generating Board' in 1958. The vessel was sold, in 1960, to Renwick, Wilton & Dobson Limited, coal exporters of Newcastle, (with associations in the SW of England) & renamed Devon Moor. In 1963, the vessel was sold to 'Villamar S.p.A. di Navigazione', or maybe 'S.p.A. Villamar' of Cagliani, Sardinia, Italy, & renamed Villamar. In 1964, the vessel was converted into a chemical tanker, (where I wonder?) & became 1280 tons gross. The vessel had many later changes of Italian owners but not of name. The vessel was sold in 1974 to 'Misano di Navigazione SpA', also of Cagliani, in 1979 to 'Francesco Saverio Salonia', of Rome, in 1980 to 'Pompa M. Pia', of Ravenna, & in 1981 to 'Sa. I. Mar. Srl' ('Sa'), also of Rome. On Aug. 20, 1981 the vessel 'sprang a leak', developed a list, & was beached while in Piraeus Roads at Ambelaki, near Piraeus, Greece. Sa must have had financial problems, because the vessel was sold at auction, by the creditors of Sa, to N. Kontrafouris & G. Velizelos, who, on Dec. 14, 1983, began the scrapping of the vessel at the 'Splilliopoulos Iraklis Shipyards' at Perama, Piraeus, Greece. Much of the above data was found in 'snippets'. And WWW confirming the many names above is most difficult. Can you add to or correct the above?

There are more (later) vessels built by 'Austin' on the 2nd 'Austin' page available here.

Tony Frost advises (thanks!) that further vessels were constructed at the Wear Dockyard, after S. P. Austin & Son Ltd. became part of Austin & Pickersgill Limited in 1954. Specifically hull numbers 419 through 436. See here. The last hull number for S. P. Austin & Son Ltd. was, I am advised, #418.

TO END THE PAGE

A delightful example of the use of the 'Lake Applet'.

Now it is possible that on your computer screen, the image box below is just an empty space. If so, and you are using Windows 7 as the webmaster does, fixing the problem is most simple. Print the image you will come to here & follow the few instructions. In other browsers I presume that you would follow the same approach i.e. get to the 'Java' program on your computer & fix the security level.

Of course you do need to install 'Java' to be able to see it. Easily done! It installs quickly & it is free. Just click on 'Free Java Download' here.

Occasionally the problem seems to be with Windows & your or their security settings. In the past the issue has corrected itself within a day or so. But that may not help you at this very moment.

A magnificent copyrighted image, appearing here courtesy of photographer Tess Campbell. The particular image used above can be seen on page 7 of her large image archive, specifically here. Tess told us that the image was taken at Crystal Lake in Wisconsin.

This is just one example of the use of the 'Lake Applet'. It comes from this page from which you can access many hundreds more, via the yellow box at page bottom.

May I suggest that you navigate the site via the index on page 001 PRIOR PAGE / NEXT PAGE

To Thomas M. M. Hemy Data Page 41. All of the other Thomas Hemy pages, including image pages, are accessible though the index on Thomas Hemy page 05. [ ] £

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