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THE SUNDERLAND SITE - PAGE 087
SHIPBUILDERS - PAGE 26

May I suggest that you navigate the site via the index on page 001.PRIOR PAGE / NEXT PAGE

Copyright? Do you want to make a comment? A site guestbook is here.

Corrections in any of the material which follows, however tiny, would be most welcome. And additions, of course! (99 2/3, always 100 - 1/3). Test.

To search for specific text on this page, just press 'CTRL + F' & then enter your search term.

JOSEPH L. THOMPSON & SONS LIMITED

ROBERT THOMPSON (1837/1840)
ROBERT THOMPSON & SONS (1840/1869)
JOSEPH L. THOMPSON & SONS (1869/1894)
JOSEPH L. THOMPSON & SONS LIMITED (1894/ )

(OF NORTH SANDS, SUNDERLAND
)

but beware ROBERT THOMPSON & SONS (another branch of the family)

First a few images. Click to see them in a larger size. Hover your mouse over each thumbnail to read the subject matter.

For ease of understanding, I will number the various Thompsons!

The business seems to have really commenced with Robert Thompson #1, (1797/1860), who as early as 1819 built small ships below Lambton Drops, & in 1820, with seven others, built a vessel of 10 to 12 keels, at North Sands. He went into business in 1837, at Washington Stays, with his three sons Robert Thompson #2 (1819/1910), Joseph Lowes Thompson #1 (1824/1893) & John Thompson (1825/1891) under the name of 'Robert Thompson'. In 1840 the business name became Robert Thompson & Sons, but the business 'had a brief existence owing to depression'. The business recommenced also as 'Robert Thompson & Sons', in 1846 at North Sands, with the same three sons. There were soon to be major changes in the ownership of the enterprise.

In 1854, Robert Thompson #2 left the partnership to form his own shipbuilding business. Robert #1 died in 1860 at the relatively young age of 63, & that same year John retired from the business, which then came under the control of Joseph Lowes Thompson #1, the one son left in the business. In 1869, I previously stated Feb. 1871, the business became 'Joseph L. Thompson & Sons', & his three sons, Robert Thompson #3 (1850/1908), Joseph Lowes Thompson #2 (1853/1903) & Charles Elliott Thompson (1855/1910), joined the business. At about 1893, Joseph Lowes Thompson #2 retired due to ill health, and his 3 sons continued the business under the leadership of Robert Thompson #3. It was incorporated on Jul. 12, 1894, as 'Joseph L. Thompson and Sons Ltd.'.

Robert Thompson #3 retired from the business (when?), & Joseph Lowes Thompson #2 died in 1903. I have not read what happened to Charles Elliott Thompson. The later history, including the significant involvement of James Marr, later Sir James Marr, must come to these pages well 'later', when I understand the history better than I do at this moment.

The principals of the business in its early years. Left to right are Robert Thompson (1797/1860), Joseph Lowes Thompson (1824/1893), Robert Thompson (1850/1908) & James Marr (1854/1932).

The above data essentially comes from the 1946 booklet, next referred to.

In 1946, a brochure entitled 'One Hundred Years of Joseph L. Thompson and Sons Ltd' was published. Of 26 data pages, & 28.1 x 22.2 cm. in size (11.05 x 8.75 in.) Published by the company itself. Now available on site here.

At left is a 'JLT' uniform button, which, per 'southern1954' (thanks!), 'was based upon the house flag. Across the upright of the T is a circle containing what appears to be a bent arm with the hand holding a spear. There is also something hanging from the end of the spear.' The button is not very big (about 25 mm diameter) & the detail is small!

I will add in such data as comes to my attention. In that regard I have read (a large 'pdf' file, page 14) that in 1946, 'J. L. THOMPSON & SONS' took over John Crown & Sons Ltd. That 'Crown' yard remained a separate facility until it was closed in 1958. I think that 'J. L. THOMPSON & SONS' should rather be 'Joseph L. Thompson & Sons Ltd.' I further understand that the 'Crown' yard (Strand Slipway) was a neighbouring yard, located to the immediate west of that of Joseph L. Thompson & Sons Ltd.

Build lists? Firstly there is, on site, a 'Joseph L. Thompson' build list from its earliest days in 1838 & onwards. Here. Miramar lists (highest hull number on page). It used to be that you could click on the links that follow & get to the relevant Miramar page. But no longer! The new procedure must be to go to Miramar (here) & log in (you must be registered to view any page). And once you are logged in, return to this page & all the following links should work for you:- 133, 163, 193, 223, 253, 285, 313, 343, 373, 405, 435, 466, 494, 524, 555, 584, 614, 644, 674, 706, 717.

Names of just a few of the vessels constructed by Thompson's of North Sands, Sunderland - added as I happen to spot references to them. In a table in build date sequence. And alphabetic within a year.

There are more (later) vessels built by 'Joseph L. Thompson' on the 2nd 'Joseph Thompson' page available here.

1 Cromwell
234 tons
Hull 23
1849

A 2 masted, snow rigged sailing ship. The webmaster has a number of 'Lloyd's Registers' available to him ex Google books (see left). 85.0 ft. long, a man's bust as a figurehead, intended it would seem for service to the Baltic. The vessel was initially owned, as to 32 of 64 shares each, by John Cockerill & Burton Brown, both of Sunderland. While the data at left indicates that John Hall was the vessel's sole Master thru 1853/54, I understand that Geo. Charlton & Anthony Cockerill Jr. (son of Anthony Cockerill, ship owner & shoemaker) were also Masters. The vessel is of especial interest to the webmaster, since John & Anthony Cockerill are ancestors of Sunderland author & site contributor Keith Cockerill, whose slide shows are featured on site (1 & 2). Keith advises that Burton Brown, became the owner of all 64 shares on Nov. 20, 1850, & that William Holburn, of South Shields, became its sole owner on Dec. 30, 1851. I cannot tell you today what later happened to the ship, but note that it was not recorded, as Cromwell at least, in the 1854/55 or 1855/56 editions of Lloyd's Register. It is possible that the vessel was lost but it also could have been renamed. If you can add to the record, your contribution would be most welcome. #1765

2 Edmund Graham
887/927 tons
Hull 54

25330
1855

A ship, perhaps later a barque. Per 1 (ref. to Edmund Graham of Newcastle, above the Vencedora image), 2 & 3 (oil painting of Edmund Graham by artist Richard Archibald Ray), 4 (damaged at Bombay in 1865), 5 (insurance claim related to the 1868 loss of Edmund Graham at Mauritius - many similar references), 6 & 7 (1868 hurricane at Mauritius). At top left is a page from the booklet  'One Hundred Years of Joseph L. Thompson and Sons Ltd.' but see other links re such artwork. Built by Robert Thompson (1797-1860) for & named after, I presume, Edmund Graham, ship owner, of Newcastle, who certainly owned the vessel in 1858 per Christie's Shipping Register. At night on Aug. 5, 1865, when at Bombay, India, the vessel, loaded with cotton & ready for sea, was damaged by Innisfallen (built in 1864 at West Hartlepool by Pile Spence & Co.) which broke her moorings in high winds & hit Edmund Graham amidships, causing considerable damage. In 1862/63, A. Sword of Greenock, River Clyde, W. of Glasgow, Scotland, became the vessel's owner for service to Australia. On Jan. 10, 1868, the vessel left Calcutta, India, with a cargo of rice for Port Louis, Mauritius. On Mar. 11, 1868, while still at Port Louis unloading her cargo, a violent hurricane hit the area, as a result of which the vessel 'parted from her anchors', was driven ashore & became 'utterly wrecked'. What a hurricane! Do read the clippings above. The wreck was later apparently auctioned off. The ship would seem to have been then owned by 'Foley', though I have not spotted a reference to that name in Lloyd's Register. It would seem that W. H. Davies was her master at the time. Need help & additional data!

3   Florence Richards
1051 (or 1056) tons
Hull 115

62034
1874

A cargo ship. Per 1 (wreck), 2 ('pdf' p.51 - same vessel I trust), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 221.5 ft. long. I understand that the vessel was built for S. Richards, of Maryport. It would seem that the vessel was later (1876?) purchased by 'Holme Line', of Maryport, UK, (Cumbria coast & Solway Firth - Wilfred & Alfred Hine), and was, indeed, the first steamship in the Holme Line fleet. On Mar. 10, 1890, the vessel foundered 8 miles off Cape Roca, Portugal, while en route from Arzew, Algeria, to Rouen, France, with a cargo of salt. Then owned by 'R. Nicholson & Sons', of London, it would seem, but they may, instead, be the managers. Need your help & your data!

4 Brier Holme
921 (or 894) tons
Hull 127

76136
1876

A 3 masted iron barque. A wool clipper. Per 1 (data), 2 (image), 3 (possibly the Brier Holme), 4 (other museum data including a painting of wreck), 5 ('pdf' file ref. p.14), 6 (data & image), 7 (image of Oscar Larsen & of rescuer Edward Noye. View it in a large size. Larsen is at left.), 8 (extensive page), 9 (Mar. 6, 1905 extensive article), 10 (1905 newspaper reports, many items in 2nd column), 11 (Brisbane 1934 newspaper article), 12 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 62.8 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 206.1 ft. long. Built for Holme Line (Hine Brothers), of Maryport, Solway Firth, Cumbria & registered at Maryport. The vessel travelled to ports in Australia & New Zealand for her entire life, engaged in the wool & wheat trade. Carried passengers also. To San Francisco in 1877 & probably carried troops to the Boer War. 'It was not uncommon for the ship to reach Tasmania in 80 days, and taking only ten days longer to complete the return voyage.' On Jul. 21, 1904, Captain J. H. Rich in command, the vessel departed London for Hobart, Tasmania, but failed to arrive at her destination. On Nov. 5, 1904, she ran aground in severe weather on a reef off Elliott Cove, SW coast of Tasmania, N. of Port Davey. Main & mizzen masts were lost. The vessel then exploded, killing most of the crew - probably caused by dynamite (gelignite) which was part of the general cargo she carried. She also (re Tasmania, 80% down page) carried '₤40,000 in silver plate and jewellery.' Only one crew member, a Danish (have also read Norwegian) deckhand (Oscar Larsen - he is at left. Edward Noye, captain of Britannia, a fishing boat that rescued Larsen, is at right), made it to land, & was rescued over 3 months later on Feb. 13 or Feb. 19, 1905. Seabird, a steamer, had passed the area earlier trying to find the wreck, but saw nothing. 18 lives were lost. It would seem that one other seaman, named Muller, nearly made it to shore. But there was no 'Muller' aboard. Maybe W. Miller? There was an inquiry, it would seem. But perhaps not of the diligence of a 'Board of Trade' inquiry. A model of the ship is available. Can you add anything?

5 Deronda
1688 tons
Hull 130

68958

Trapani
1877

An iron steamer. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 79.4 metres long. Built for 'Culliford & Clark', of Sunderland. On Feb. 29, 1884, an Inquiry was held, (#2099 see left), into damage that the vessel sustained in a hurricane, when en route from 'Dantzig' (Gdańsk, Poland), to Boston, U.S.A., with a cargo of sugar. A life, or lives, were lost - the Master was held to be free from blame. The date of the damage was not indicated but probably was in very early 1884. Then said to have been owned by 'J. H. Culliford and others'. The vessel was sold, in 1893, to Robert M. Sloman & Co., of Hamburg, & renamed Trapani. On Feb. 13, 1901, (or 16th) the vessel broke its moorings at Mazzarelle (or Mazzarelli), Sicily, & was stranded. Salvaged but later scrapped. I think that is what was said. I need your help & your data!

6   Naworth Castle
1750 (or maybe 1713)  tons
Hull 137

68970
1878

An iron steamer. Per 1 (Jan. 26, 1907), 2 (1907 sinking), 3 (Archer), 4 (NY Times archive re Bristol), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 79.4 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 260 ft., triple expansion engines. Built, I understand, for John H. Watson, of Sunderland (however Lloyd's Register & Miramar indicate G. Watson). It would seem that the vessel rescued & landed at Sunderland Captain Harris & the crew of Archer, a clipper which foundered on Feb. 12, 1880, while en route from New York to Le Havre, France. Also in 1880, Naworth Castle towed Bristol, a cargo ship, to Fire Island, a barrier island S. of Long Island, New York. Bristol had had her propeller disabled on Nov. 8, 1880, & limped westward for 11 days under sail power. Naworth Castle, en route from New Orleans to Revel with a cargo of cotton, towed her to safety under adverse weather conditions. Nico Vleggeert answered my earlier question (thanks Nico!) by advising us that Revel is Tallinn, Estonia, Revel being the Russian form of the German name for that city. The vessel was owned, 1893 thru 1896 at least, by J. H. Watson & Co. of Sunderland. And in 1907, when owned by Angus Shipping Co. of Dundee, Scotland, she was sunk, on Jan. 19, 1907, in a collision with Vaderland (Belgian passenger liner en route from New York to Antwerp, Belgium) off the South Goodwin Lightship, Goodwin Sands (off the coast of Kent). There was dense fog at the time. The collision occurred between 2:00 a.m. & 3 a.m. in the morning. Naworth Castle 'was so seriously injured she sank like a stone'. Vaderland suffered bow damage below the waterline & her fore peak became full of water, but her fore bulkhead held & she was able to continue on to Antwerp. Naworth Castle, en route from Newcastle to Pozzuoli, near Naples, Italy, with a cargo of coal, had a crew of 20, 17 of whom were saved. Her 2nd engineer, a steward & a seaman all lost their lives. Need help! An image perhaps?

7 Stakesby
1418 (or 1162 or 1370) tons
Hull 152

81215

Perseveranza
Eugenia
1880

An iron steamer. Per 1 ('pdf' re 1888 stranding), 2 (Rowland & Marwood, Stakesby), 3 (1880 launch report), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 74.1 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 243 ft., launched by Miss Barry. Built for the Mediterranean & Baltic trades for 'John H. Barry and Partners', of Whitby. Rowlands & Christopher, of Whitby, were the managers, at least in 1888. On May 15, 1888, the vessel left Taganrog, (Rostov Oblast, Russia, on the Sea of Azov, extreme N.E. end of Black Sea), bound for London with a cargo of wheat. On May 20, 1888, the vessel ran aground on Gadaro Island, Tenedos Channel, Sea of Marmora, nr. Istanbul, very close to (just 50/100 yards from!) the Gadaro Lighthouse. Next day a salvage company attended with two tugs, & for the handsome fee of Ł2,500, took off part of the cargo & inspected the damage. Vessel was holed in 2 places. The ship got off the rock herself, temporary repairs were effected & the vessel proceeded to Constantinople for further repairs. The cargo was there reloaded & the vessel left Constantinople on May 29, 1888 & delivered its cargo in London on Jun. 17, 1888, only 2 or 3 bags being damaged. Captain William Gribble was held to be at fault at the Cardiff Inquiry & his certificate was suspended for 6 months. The 2nd mate had his licence suspended for 9 months. I am sure that the Inquiry would have recorded the 1888 ownership correctly, a puzzle because link 2 indicates that from 1886/1891 the vessel was owned by Rowland & Marwood's Steamship Co. Ltd. & that the vessel was then sold to Osborn & Wallis. In 1910, the vessel was sold to 'G. Brischitti' (who may be the agents only), likely of Naples, Italy, & renamed Perseveranza. It was sold again, in 1918, to 'F. Dragone & A. Turcio', of Italy, L. Gherardi the manager?, & renamed Eugenia. On Oct. 19, 1921, the vessel 'sprang a leak' & sank 15 miles S.S.E. of Ischia, a volcanic island near Naples. Presumably no loss of life. Can you add to or correct the above? An image perhaps?

8 Glenochil
2424 tons
Hull 179

84948
136858 (USA)

Edith
1882

An iron steamer. Per 1 (1882 launch), 2 (data, item #2, re sinking, image), 3 (Alaska Steamship, Edith), 4 [A. H. Bull, Edith) (1)], 5 (image, Captain Mullen), 6 (Edith, sinking), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 296 ft. 6 in. long overall, launched by Mrs Lindsay related presumably to 'Lindsay, Gracie & Co.' of Newcastle, who ordered the ship. But the ship would seem to have become rather owned by Glenochil Steamship Co., of Leith, Scotland, John Potter & Co., of London, the managers.  In Feb. 1895, part of a cargo of cotton-seed oil-cake was damaged in unloading at London. A modest court case resulted, which case is often referenced as a legal precedent. In Mar. 1896, the vessel arrived 10 days late at New York ex Gibraltar with a cargo of coal. She had encountered a major storm, a hurricane perhaps, en route, consumed her bunker coal & had to replenish her supply at Bermuda. On Nov. 30, 1897, Glenochil stranded on the new breakwater off Delaware Breakwater, Lewes, Delaware, suffered major damage to her forward engine rooms & bottom, & was initially thought to be a total loss. She was later righted, dragged off, & repaired at Philadelphia. The vessel was sold in 1901, to A. H. Bull & Co., of New York, & renamed Edith. Sold again, in 1906, to 'North Western Steamship Co.', of Seattle, Washington, with no change of name. In 1908, the vessel was sold to Alaska Steamship Company, of Port Angeles, Washington, again with no change of name. In late Aug. 1915, Capt. C. B. McMullen in command, en route from Nome, Alaska, to Tacoma, Washington, with a cargo of copper concentrate ex copper mines at LaTouche Island (W. entrance to Prince William Sound, Alaska), the semi-liquid cargo shifted as a result of a heavy storm & the ship was in danger of capsizing. The 37 person crew of the vessel abandoned ship on Aug. 30, 1915, off Cape Hinchenbrook, Alaska. They were rescued by Mariposa - which attempted a tow, but the line broke & towing efforts were abandoned. The vessel later sank. No loss of life accordingly. Have not read the exact location. Can you add to or correct the above? An image perhaps?

9 Toledo
2902 or 2843 tons
Hull 177

85016
1882

An iron steamer. Per 1 (launch of Toledo, ex the Aug. 01, 1882 edition of 'The Marine Engineer') 2 (data incl. wreck data, John Wishart, Captain of Toledo, 1884/1898), 3 ('pdf', Board of Trade Toledo 1898 wreck Inquiry), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The webmaster has a few 'Lloyd's Registers' available to him ex Google books thru 1889/90 - see left. 301.0 ft. long, schooner rigged, signal letters WMJF, launched, on Jul. 15, 1882, by Miss A. Tully, daughter of John Tully, the managing owner of 'J. Tully & Co.', of Sunderland. I have not been able to WWW locate any info. as to the vessel's service & routes. On Jul. 29, 1898, the vessel left Galveston, Texas, with a grain & general 3,424 ton cargo & a crew of 28 all told, bound for Rotterdam, with John Wishart, the vessel's captain since 1884, in command. All went well until Aug. 20, 1898. The vessel's position was established at noon that day, & a course set for a point 8 1/2 miles S. of Bishop Rock, Isles of Scilly. The captain 'was not in the habit of consulting with any of his officers with regard to the navigation of the ship', & the chief officer did not calculate the ship's latitude. It would appear that the vessel's position may well have been incorrectly determined. The vessel continued at full speed in conditions which were in & out of dense fog, apparently without a bow look-out. At 4:25 p.m. on Aug. 20, 1898, proceeding at full speed in dense fog, the vessel struck. At what proved to be Crim Rock, Isles of Scilly. The vessel's hull was ripped open, & soon its stern was in the air & its bow under water - the vessel sank, in 25 fathoms of water, within 10 & maybe within 7 minutes. The crew, some in their night clothes, took to ship's boats but were unaware of their location. At about 8 p.m., the fog cleared, & both Bishop Rock Light & St. Agnes Rock lighthouse became visible in different directions. A pilot saw the boats' blue lights, came to their rescue, & towed them to St. Mary's, St. Martin's Island, arriving at about 10:30 p.m. The Court determined that Captain Wishart was alone responsible for the stranding. In particular he had underestimated the strength of the tide which was setting the ship to the north-east, had not slowed the ship in fog, had not maintained a forward lookout nor used the lead. He was severely reprimanded by the Court but was permitted to retain his master's certificate. Is there anything you can add? An image? #1887

10 Blue Jacket
2205 (or 2090 or 2113) tons
Hull 190

87481
1883

An iron steamer. Per 1 (text & image, 60% down), 2 (data), 3 (brief ref.), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 282.7 ft. long perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters HTFV. Built for 'Blue Jacket Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Cardiff, Wales, & registered there. Hallett Bros & Co., the managers. A data 'snippet' advises that in Jan. 1898, the vessel caught fire loading at Harwich. On Nov. 9, 1898, at about midnight, while en route from Plymouth to Cardiff, in ballast, the vessel grounded at Longships Lighthouse 1 1/4 miles off Land's End, Cornwall. A most unusual incident - actually hitting the rock. It almost hit the lighthouse! It missed it by just 18 metres. The wreck lies on the western side of the rocks in 12 metres of water. A total loss. I would seem that there was no loss of life. The Captain, his wife & the crew were rescued by the Sennen lifeboat. I spotted a reference to negligence being the cause, presumably established by an official inquiry. But ... a brief ref. in 'The Leisure Hour' in 1902 stated there was no adequate reason as to why the collision occurred & the weather was clear at the time. The mate was in command. The weather is also said to have been poor but the light could be seen for at least 2 miles. The wreck sat perched there for over a year, I read. Then, on Nov. 14, 1899, I think that is correct, per Lockett Graham (thanks!), the ship broke her back behind the bridge, her stern disappearing underwater. The forward part of the ship and her machinery were later salvaged. It would seem that Alfred Wallis (1855/1942), (A), a 'primitive' artist, painted the ship, but I have not been able to WWW find an image. Need help!

11   Algoma
2914 tons
Hull 205

91241
1885

A cargo ship. Per 1 (1885 ref. to launch, Algonia, p.78, an 1885 typo!), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 330 ft long. Built for W. Tapscott & Co., of Liverpool & registered there. Per Miramar, vessel was wrecked on Jul. 6, 1904 at Tongmi Point, which seems to be on the coast of China, near Hong Kong. WWW data is essentially non-existent. Can you add anything?

12   Cabo Palos
1697 tons
Hull 213
1885

A cargo ship. Per 1 (1885 ref. to launch, p.246), 2 [Ybarra Line, Cabo Palos (1)], 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 250 ft long. Built for Ybarra & Co. (Ybarra Cia. S.A.), of Seville, Spain. Vessel was wrecked on Jul. 31, 1911, at Avilés, Asturias, Spain. WWW data is essentially non-existent. Can you add anything?

13   Chelydra
2518 (or 2467) tons
Hull 209

91889

Chiyo Maru
1885

A cargo ship. Per 1 (1885 ref. to launch, Chelyara, p.220), 2 (1885 ref. to sea trials, page 301), 3 (Jardine, Matheson & Co., Chelydra), 4 (data available re Chelydra/Indo-China), 5 (Port Arthur, 1904, NY Times archive), 6 (Port Arthur, 1904, p.230/2), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 312 ft long, accommodation for some 1st Class passengers, deck of teak, noted to be with an electric installation, speed of 12 knots attained on trials. Built for Angier Brothers, of London, for their China service. In 1891, sold to Jardine, Matheson & Co., specifically 'Indo-China Steam Navigation Company'. Sold in 1903 to K. Oaki (who may however be the agent rather than the owner) & renamed Chiyo Maru. On Mar. 27, 1904, during the Russo/Japanese War of 1904/05, the vessel (many vessels of the name), loaded with explosives & a mixture of cement & stones, 'so it would stay down for at least a year', together with 3 other ships (including Fukui Maru which link has more data), was scuttled off Port Arthur, Manchuria, to block off the narrow W channel access to Port Arthur & seal Russian vessels inside the harbour. The attack was considered to be a great success even though a gap of 200 ft. was left through which Russian vessel vessels could move with difficulty. Loss of life? - 'the crew and engineers pushed off just in time'. Can you add anything?

14 Raphael
1860 tons
Hull 208

91858

Presidente Bulnes
Ercilla
Antofagasta
Fresia
1885

A cargo ship, 'with auxiliary sail power'. Per 1 (1885 ref. to the launch of Raphael, p.132), 2 [Bolton Steam, Raphael (1)], 3 (data & image, Raphael), 4 (refs. Raphael), 5 (data Bolton, Raphael), 6 (related data), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The webmaster has a few 'Lloyd's Registers' available to him ex Google books (see left). 271.4 ft., speed of 8 knots, signal letters KBHR. The vessel was named, at its launch, by 'Mrs. Thackwray, jun.', of Sunderland. Built for F. (Frederic) Bolton, of London, which, it would appear later became 'Frederic Bolton & Company', & from 1897, 'Bolton Steam Shipping Company Ltd.'. Operators of small cargo vessels (named after artists beginning with the letter 'R'), which often carried Welsh coal to Mediterranean bunkering stations & returned with grain, hemp & cotton seed from the Black Sea. In 1906, the vessel was sold to 'Compańía Chilena de Navigation a Vapores' ('Chilena'), of Valparaiso, Chile, & renamed Presidente Bulnes. Chilena 'did not prosper and soon went into liquidation'. The vessel was then sold, in 1912/13, to 'L. C. Ubeda and J. L. Delano' & renamed Ercilla. In 1914, the vessel was sold again, to 'Ramis Clar Gonzales', probably also of Chile, & renamed Antofagasta. Later in 1914, the vessel was sold to 'R. W. James y Cia.' also of Valparaiso, & renamed Fresia. After WW1 ended, the vessel was sold, for the last time, to 'Telles, Romaguera and Company', of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with no change of vessel name. The vessel was hulked in Q1 of 1930. As you can see from the single Fresia Lloyd's Register listing I can locate, re 1930/31, thanks to 'plimsollshipdata.org'. Hulked at Valparaiso, it would seem. The vessel was, apparently, still afloat in 1942, & her final disposition is unknown to the webmaster. The available data re this vessel is inconsistent. I have chosen to accept as likely to be the most accurate, the data available at links 3 & 4. Can you add anything?

15   Thompsonian
1753 tons
Hull 206

90327

Bavington
1885

A cargo ship. Per 1 (1885 ref. to launch, Thomsonian, p.77), 2 (Board of Trade wreck inquiry report, Bavington), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 260.0 ft. long perpendicular to perpendicular. Built on speculation, it would seem. Launched as Thompsonian but delivered as Bavington, at the cost of Ł16,500, to William Kish, of Sunderland. On Jun. 1, 1887, the vessel left Carthagena (or Cartagena), SE Spain, for Middlesbrough, under the command of George M. (Metcalf) Taylor. With a cargo of iron ore & 19 crew & 6 passengers aboard. On Jun. 8, 1867, the vessel ran aground at 'Pierres Vertes', 3 or 4 miles SE of Ushant (an island in the English Channel off the coast of Brittany, near Brest, France). Since the vessel was sinking fast, all aboard took to the boats, were taken aboard a French fishing cutter & landed at Brest. The Court held that the grounding & loss was solely due to the wrongful acts & defaults of Captain Taylor, in 'a case of reckless and careless navigation'. His master's certificate was suspended for 6 months, during which period it was recommended that he be granted a first mate's certificate. Can you add anything?

16 Hubbuck
2959 (later 2749 & 2834) tons
Hull 211

91912

Eugenio Dutrus
1886

A cargo ship. Per 1 (1886 ref. to launch, p.298 ex 2), 3 (Blue Anchor Line), 4 (extensive history in Spanish, Eugenio Dutrus), 5 (link 4, Google translated into English), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 338 ft. long overall, 325.0 ft. long perpendicular to perpendicular, 3 masts, speed of 11 knots, signal letters KGBP, perhaps later HLWB. Mrs. Hubbuck named the vessel at its launch. Built for Wilhelm Lund of London for his 'Blue Anchor Line' intended for the wool & passenger service to Australia. In 1898, the vessel was sold to Talbot Steamship Co. Ltd., of London (George M. Allan the manager) or maybe also of Swansea, Wales, with, it would seem, no change of name. There were a number of later owners. The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') of 1910 states that the vessel was then owned by 'Egypt and Levant Steamship Co. Ltd.' of London with John W. Straughan the manager. Lloyd's Register of 1911/12 lists 'Numidian S. S. Co. Ltd.' as the then owner, with Olivier & Co. the manager. While the MNL register of 1915 states 'The Franco-British Steamship Co. Ltd.' of London to be the vessel's owners with John W. Thompson the manager. In 1919, the vessel was sold to Dutrus & Carsi, wine & grain merchants & fleet owners of Valencia, Spain, & renamed Eugenio Dutrus. While the vessel carried cargoes of wine, it was primarily engaged in providing service between Gijon, Asturias, Spain, & Mediterranean ports, mainly Barcelona, carrying coal from Cardiff. I read that in 1924 the vessel was in collision with Santofirme, built in 1896, as King Edgar, by Short Bros., of Sunderland. I read also that on Oct. 7, 1925 when at Cardiff loading coal, there was an explosion aboard the ship. One person loading the coal was killed & a Eugenio Dutrus crew member was seriously injured. On Apl. 26, 1926, when under the command of D. Pedro Astoreca Monasterio, the vessel ran aground in fog at Los Cabezos Rocks, W. of Gibraltar, when loaded with coal. The vessel was later freed with the help of tugs, towed to nearby Tarifa, Asturias, & beached at Los Lances beach. It later sank there as a result of a storm & was scrapped. It would appear that there was no loss of life. Much of the above data is thanks to Vicente Sanahuja of vidamaritima.com, who was kindly in touch - & whose fine web page is at link 4 above. Can you add anything?

17   Kaisow
2959 (or 3099) tons
Hull 212

91898

Matsuyama Maru
1886

A cargo ship. Per 1 (1886 ref. to launch, p.297), 2 (ref. 60% down), 3 (Blue Funnel, Kaisow), 4 (Nippon Yusen Kaisha K.K., Matsuyama Maru), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 362 (or 350) ft. long, speed (anticipated at launch) 13 knots, actual 10 knots, accommodation for a limited number of 1st class passengers. Built for China Shippers' Mutual Steamship Company ('Shippers'), of London, which company traded between London & China. Named by Miss Deacon, at the launch. Somehow became owned by 'The China Mutual Steam Navigation Co.', (a subsidiary of Shippers perhaps?), which company was taken over in 1902 by Blue Funnel Line (am not sure of the name of the specific company which as a result owned the vessel). In 1894, sold to Nippon Yusen Kaisha K.K., of Japan, & renamed Matsuyama Maru. In 1923, sold to Kinkai Yusen K.K., of Tokyo. On Jul. 11, 1924, while en route from Keelung, Taiwan, to Yokohama, Japan, vessel was wrecked at Pemboeang, W of Goto Island (an isolated island in E. China Sea off SW end of Japan maybe). Can find no WWW references to the circumstances. Any loss of life? Can you add anything?

18 Rembrandt
1911 tons
Hull 217

90335

Presidente Prieto
1886

A cargo ship, square-rigged on the foremast. Her yards were rigged down early in her career, but she continued to make occasional use of stay-sails for some years. Per 1 (1886 ref. to launch, Rembrandt, p.247), 2 [Bolton Steam, Rembrandt (1)], 3 (data & image, Rembrandt), 4 (refs. Rembrandt), 5 (related data), 6 [data Bolton, Rembrandt (1)], 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The webmaster has a few 'Lloyd's Registers' available to him ex Google books (see left). 271.4 ft. long, signal letters KHST, speed probably of 8 knots. The vessel was named, at its launch, by Mrs. Kenneth, of London. Built for F. (Frederic) Bolton, of London, which company, it would appear later became 'Frederic Bolton & Company', & 'Bolton Steam Shipping Company Ltd'. 'Bolton & Kenneth', of London, may have been the managers, though from 1887 to 1897, Henry Kenneth was a partner, I read. Operators of small cargo vessels (named after artists beginning with the letter 'R'), which often carried Welsh coal to Mediterranean bunkering stations & returned with grain, hemp & cotton seed from the Black Sea. In 1906, the vessel was sold to 'Compańía Chilena de Navigation a Vapores' ('Chilena'), of Valparaiso, Chile, & renamed Presidente Prieto. Chilena 'did not prosper and soon went into liquidation'. The vessel was then sold to A. Puccio, also of Valparaiso, with no change of vessel name. In 1912 (or maybe in 1913) the vessel ran aground, (where I wonder & under what circumstances?) & was badly damaged. The vessel was declared a constructive total loss & was deleted from the lists, per Miramar, in 1912. Can you add anything?

19   Royal Jubilee
2454 (or 2571) tons
Hull 215

94325

Foyle
Miranda
1887

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Marine Engineer 1887/88, ref. to launch, Royal Jubilee, p.21 & Malta p.388), 2 [ref., fleet list, page bottom, Foyle (1)], 3 [A. Kirsten, Miranda (1)], 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 91.4 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 312 ft., speed? Was built 'on speculation' & temporarily named Royal Jubilee at the launch, by Miss Knight, of Sutton, Surrey. Later delivered to Mercantile Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. ('Mercantile'), of London, as Foyle. In Jan. 1888, re JLT, 'The firm are engaged in carrying out extensive repairs to the steamer Foyle (built by themselves), which went ashore near Malta while on her first voyage, and had to be temporarily repaired at Malta before she could be brought home to undergo a thorough overhaul'. Can find no detail as to the circumstances. In 1889, (or maybe in 1888), the vessel was sold to A. Kirsten, of Hamburg, Germany, & renamed Miranda. If 1889, it would need to be early since Mercantile took delivery of another Foyle in Apl. 1889. On Aug. 10, 1895, the vessel ran aground or was stranded at Jument Rocks, nr. Ile D' Quessant, Ushant, (an island off the coast of Brittany, France), & was wrecked & lost. The WWW seems to be silent as to the exact location & the circumstances. Any loss of life? Can you add anything?

20 Lancashire Witch
762 tons
Hull 224

93722

Coogee
1887

A passenger/cargo vessel, 2 masts, rigged as a barque. Per 1 (extensive data), 2 (what I am sure really happened in 1903, 2 images of Coogee, from a 'Peter Plowman' book), 3 (New Isle of Man, 80% down), 4 (data Coogee), 5 (data Coogee), 6 (Marine Engineer 1887/88, at p.22 & p.80/1), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 225 ft. (68.5 metres) long, speed of 12 knots but certainly much faster at her trials (16 1/2 knots). I do try, in these pages, to be 100% accurate. With this vessel that is most difficult indeed. Built for 'New Isle of Man Steam Navigation Co. Ltd.' ('Lancashire Line'), of Liverpool, for the Liverpool/Douglas, Isle of Man, route. When Lancashire Line went bankrupt in 1888, Huddart Parker Ltd., of Melbourne, Australia, bought the vessel & sailed it to Australia (I do mean sailed; the propeller was either (data differs) a) in the hold or b) not removed but 'fixed in place'). Intended for the Melbourne to nearby Geelong (about 45 miles apart) service. Renamed Coogee. A troubled history thereafter! Involved in 2 collisions in 1889 - Excelsior & Griper - & with Pilot in 1891. Vessel modified to serve the 'Bass Strait ferry run', between Melbourne & Launceston, Tasmania. Completed 961 such round trips (each about 700 miles) until involved in an accident on Christmas Day, 1903. In thick fog, Coogee (Captain Carrington) collided with (data differs) Fortuna Figaro or Fortunato Figari, ('Fortuna') a 4-masted Italian sailing ship bound for Newcastle - S. of Cape Schanck, I believe. 'A great gash was ripped in the bow of the SS Coogee. As the larger sailing ship moved past, its jib boom swept along the SS Coogee from stern to stern carrying away everything in its way including deck houses, the bridge, lifeboats, ventilators, and the funnel. The Captain and the man at the wheel were killed. Fortunately all passengers and most of the crew were below deck, otherwise, casualties would have been greater.' The 2nd mate was severely injured. Coogee did not sink, due to its watertight bulkheads. Next day it was either a) towed by Fortuna or b) Coogee towed Fortuna (data conflicts) towards Queenscliff until other vessels took over the tow. I think a) is correct. Coogee was held a) partially responsible or b) responsible in the Inquiry. Version a) sounds to be correct. A 7 year gap in the knowledge. Was later refitted (1910) & resumed Melbourne/Geelong route. The troubled history continued. Ran aground in Feb. 1914 off the Hopetoun Channel having given way to Moorabool. Took several weeks to refloat her. Later that same month, on Feb. 25, 1914, was in collision with Bombala. Collided with Uganda, lying in Corio Bay, in Mar. 1914. Vessel withdrawn from service in 1917, lay idle for 12 months until taken over by Royal Australian Navy (HMAS Coogee) & used as a mine sweeper. Later became Coogee again. In 1921, was chartered by the Telegraph Department to repair damage to the Bass Strait cable. Vessel redundant in 1928 & scuttled 'outside the Heads', 4 km. off shore & W. of Point Lonsdale, at the entrance to Port Phillip Bay (at 38.18.12S/144.35.0W). 8 Coogee postcard etc. images available at Launceston Library Archives (a Word file), but none are WWW available. Confusion re this listing. Can you correct or add to the above?

21 Rubens
2077 tons
Hull 223

94315

Presidente Manuel Montt
Iquique
Souk-Ahras
Sara
Sara Saglimbene
1887

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Bolton, history), 2 [Bolton Steam, Rubens (1)], 3 (data & images, Rubens), 4 (Rubens, sold in 1905?), 5 (refs. Rubens), 6 (related data), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The webmaster has a few 'Lloyd's Registers' available to him ex Google books (see left). 275.0 ft. long, 83.8 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters KNGQ. Built for 'Bolton & Kenneth', of London, which company, it would appear later became 'Frederic Bolton & Company', & 'Bolton Steam Shipping Company Ltd'. Operators of small cargo vessels (named after artists beginning with the letter 'R'), which carried Welsh coal to Mediterranean bunkering stations & returned with grain, hemp & cotton seed from the Black Sea. 3 advises us that after her acceptance trials, Rubens was rammed by a collier at her moorings & sunk - she was soon raised & repaired. I wonder which collier rammed her? - the ship's name would surely have been reported in the Sunderland press at the time. In Jun. 1905, the vessel was reportedly sold for Ł9,000 but the purchaser's name was not stated in 'The Maritime Review', the source of the report. Maybe this 'sale' was never completed? Can anybody explain link 4? The vessel was sold, in 1909, to 'Compańía Chilena de Vapores', of Valparaiso, Chile, & renamed Presidente Manuel Montt. And sold, in 1913, to 'Gonzales Soffia y Cia', probably also of Chile, & renamed Iquique. The vessel was sold again, in 1918, to Argentina (could mean an Argentinian owner or the Government of Argentina), but was soon resold to the State Railway of Algeria & renamed Souk-Ahras, registered at Le Havre & then at Bordeaux, both in France. The vessel was sold again, in 1925 or 1926, to J. de St. Aignan, also of France. And sold in 1926 to 'Soc. Anon. di Nav. Nettuno', renamed Sara, & registered at Catania, Sicily. In 1927, D. Saglimbene became the vessel's manager & the vessel was renamed Sara Saglimbene, registered at Trieste, Italy. The vessel was broken up in Q4 of 1928. We thank 3 & its 'Bolton Steam Shipping' booklet, for much of the above data. Can you add to and/or correct the above!

22 Northumbria
1912 (later 2009) tons
Hull 240

95663

Deutscher Kaiser
Syra
Polwell
1888

A cargo ship, a collier. Per 1 ('pdf' file, extensive Polwell wreck & history data), 2 ('irishwrecksonline', wreck data, Polewell), 3 ('uboat.net', Polwell wreck), 4 (International Lines, of Whitby), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 86.6 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 284.0 ft., signal letters KTNS. Built for International Line Steam Ship Co. Ltd., of Whitby, Christopher Marwood the manager? In 1910, the vessel was sold to 'Emil R. Retzlaff', of Szczecin (Stettin), then Germany now Poland, & renamed Deutscher Kaiser. In 1914, the vessel  was sold to 'DR Union', (which may mean 'Deutsche Reederei Union', renamed Syra, & registered at Hamburg, Germany. The vessel was captured by the British off Gibraltar, while en route from Antwerp to the Levant. I wonder when exactly that was? And was then, in 1914/15, requisitioned by the Ministry of War Transport & in 1915 renamed Polwell, managed by Clyde Shipping Co. Ltd., of Glasgow. On Jun. 5, 1918, while en route from Troon, Scotland, to France, with a cargo of coal, the vessel was hit amidships by a single torpedo fired by submarine U-96, Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Jeß in command, in the Irish Sea off the north Dublin coast. The vessel sank immediately, at 53.33.183N/05.55.867W (have read other coordinates also) - about 6 miles SE of Rockabill lighthouse, 8 miles NE of Lambay Island. I read that the entire crew of 30 made it safely to the Rockabill lighthouse, presumably via the ship's boats. The wreck, owned by 'Nautilus SAC', is, I read, largely intact on the sea floor in about 35 metres of water, festooned with nets, but without its bell. The webmaster tries to maintain accuracy, however, the above text may well need significant correction. 4 seems to state that Northumbria was sold, in 1910, to W. C. Wailes, of Whitby, with no reference to Retzlaff. Which is strange because William C. (Cordner) Wailes, of W. C. Wailes & Co., shipowners of Cardiff, went bankrupt in 1910. Some later Lloyd's Register listings would help greatly. This link (a 'pdf') suggests that the wreck is only 'possibly' Polwell, & was 'possibly' carrying coal. The wreck location may be approximate. Need help! Another image perhaps?

23 Ruysdael
2095 tons
Hull 238

95460

Jeneral Freire
Lautaro
1888

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Bolton, history), 2 [Bolton Steam, Ruysdael (1)], 3 (data, image, Ruysdael), 4 (refs. Ruysdael), 5 (related data), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The webmaster has just 2 'Lloyd's Registers' available to him ex Google books (see left). 275.0 ft long, 83.8 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters KTRV. Built for 'Bolton & Kenneth', of London, which company, it would appear later became 'Frederic Bolton & Company', & 'Bolton Steam Shipping Company Ltd'. Frederic Bolton & Henry Kenneth were partners from 1887 to 1897. Operators of small cargo vessels (named after artists beginning with the letter 'R'), which carried Welsh coal to Mediterranean bunkering stations & returned with grain, hemp & cotton seed from the Black Sea. The vessel was sold, in 1909, to 'Compańía Chilena de Vapores', of Valparaiso, Chile, & renamed Jeneral Freire. (Per 2, General Freire - likely Jeneral Freire is correct, but absent Lloyd's Registers I cannot confirm). 3 advises that in 1914, the vessel was sold to G. Pommerenke, of ?, with no change of vessel name. It was sold again, in 1920, to 'Borquez & Co.', of Valparaiso, & renamed Lautaro. On Jun. 1, 1928, the vessel was wrecked at Valparaiso. I have not been able to read the circumstances. WWW data is really quite limited. Can you add to and/or correct the above?

24   William Branfoot
1962 tons
Hull 241

95275

Kurland
1888

A cargo ship. Per 1, 2, 3, 4 (all 4 re Kurland), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 86.6 metres long. Built for Tyzack & Branfoot Steam Shipping Company, of Sunderland. In 1897, sold to Argo Line, i.e. 'Dampfschifffahrtsgesellschaft Argo AG', of Bremen, Germany & renamed Kurland.  In 1908, sold to 'Ocean SA Belge d’Armement et de Nav.', of Antwerp, Belgium. Early in Dec. 1917, while en route from New York to Calais, France, with a cargo of war supplies (particularly rifles, & also horseshoes) for the Belgian government, was attacked by a German U-boat, defended herself, & escaped unscathed. Later in that voyage I presume, at 5 a.m. on Dec 13, 1917, was rammed amidships by Deventie (2) or Devonia (1) or Deventia (3), off Catherine Point / St. Catherine's Light, Isle of Wight. Cannot yet establish, via WWW, which of the 3 names is correct. Vessel sank a few minutes later. Per 2, 'most of crew survived', also Deventie went astern & steamed off into the night 'either unaware of the serious damage done or choosing to ignore it.' Lies in 32 metres of water, 13 miles off Portsmouth. A dive site today. Need help! An image perhaps?

25   Caledonia
2599 tons
Hull 258

96548

Avanguardia
1889

A cargo ship. Per 1 (International Line), 2 (sinking), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 96.3 metres long. Built for International Line Steam Ship Co. Ltd., of Whitby, Christopher Marwood the manager? In 1915 (or maybe 1912) sold to 'C. Devoto fu G.B.', of Genoa, Italy & renamed Avanguardia. On Mar. 30, 1917, while en route from Bougie (Béjaďa), Algeria, to Cardiff, Wales, with a cargo of iron ore, vessel was captured by submarine UC-69 in the Bay of Biscay, 15 miles from the Contis Les Bains lighthouse, near Contis-Plage, Acquitaine, France. And scuttled. Possibly one life lost (80% down), but 2 states no lives lost. Data is limited. Need help! An image perhaps?

26 Cambria
1957 tons
Hull 251

96541

Ville du Temple
1889

A cargo ship. Per 1 (International Line), 2 (image aground), 3 (Gibson photo list, Ville du Temple), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 90 metres long. Built for International Line Steam Ship Co. Ltd., of Whitby, Christopher Marwood the manager? In 1910, sold to 'Plisson & Co.' (who may have been the managers only), of France, & renamed Ville du Temple. On Nov. 29, 1913, while en route, in thick fog & in ballast, from Nantes, France, to Penarth, Wales, the vessel ran into the 'Runnelstone' (about 1 mile S. of the SW peninsula of Land's End). At 50.01.43N/05.40.28W. I read that the rock used to appear above the waves until Oct. 10, 1923 when the top 20 ft. of it was 'knocked off' by City of Westminster, (an Ellerman Lines steamer of 6094 tons, previously German owned) as it also ran aground there in thick fog, broke in half & sank. What a collision that must have been! No loss of life since all aboard were saved by the Sennen & Penlee lifeboats. I have not spotted yet at what time of day the accident occurred, nor have I read the speed of City of Westminster at the time. An image of City of Westminster, wrecked, was available via eBay but I found the reference, alas, after the listing was deleted. The rocks today rise to within a few metres of the surface, & are marked by a buoy to locate the granite pinnacle & the reef below. Runnelstone is the site of 30 or more shipwrecks & is, I read, the finest dive site in Europe, (but also most dangerous). 'An old fisherman's tale suggests that there is no actual rock at the Runnelstone, just an enormous pile of wreckage'! I digressed! The damage to Ville du Temple was 'plugged' & the vessel proceeded around Land's End, but took on water under her engine & ran aground at Porthmoina Cove, near Pendeen. A total loss. The webmaster is confused as to the linked images, both of which show the vessel aground at the identical spot. The second image, a postcard, says vessel is 'on the Rundle Stone'. I suspect however that the image was not of the vessel 'on the Rundle Stone', which is about 1 mile off shore, but was taken rather later at Porthmoina Cove, near Pendeen. See 3, which states that the 'Gibson' image is 'Near Pendeen'. Can anybody tell us for sure? All said & done, WWW data is limited. Need help!

27 White Jacket
2172 (or 2237 maybe 2287) tons
Hull 248

95176

Olavarria
Oyarzun
1889

An iron steamer. Per 1 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyds Register data, Oyarzun, 1930/31 thru 1932/33), 2 (ownership data, insert 95176), 3 (ownership history at page bottom, thanks to 'FILIPVS', Anglo-Vasca), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 290.0 ft. long (88.39 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, single screw, signal letters LDRN later JBMN. Built for 'The "White Jacket" Steam Ship Co. Ltd.', Geo. Hallett, i.e. George Hallett, of Cardiff, Wales, the manager, (of Hallett Bros & Co. perhaps), & registered there. Most likely a collier. The webmasters sole available 'Lloyd's Register' that includes the vessel, is at left - but now see link 1. In 1912, the vessel was sold to Anglo-Vasca de Navegacion S.A. ('Anglo'), of Bilbao, Spain, Primitivo Ruiz the manager, & renamed Olavarria. Anglo would seem to have been a single ship company, owned by Albert E. Dawson of Cardiff. In 1915, the vessel was sold again, to 'Compańía Marítima del Nervión SA', also of Bilbao, with no change of vessel name. On Dec. 2, 1924, the vessel was sold again, to 'Cia Naviera Bidasoa S.A.' again of Bilbao, A. Candina the manager, & renamed Oyarzun. Both of those names i.e. Bidasoa & Oyarzun, are place names & names of rivers in Basque Country, Spain. It would seem, that 'Cia Naviera Bidasoa S.A.' may have acquired this vessel & also Mar-Cantabrico (ex Coniscliffe, Gray, 1894, the name means Bay of Biscay) for a total price of about Ł25,000. On Apl. 5, 1933, the vessel was sold again, to 'Andrés Vega Gorostegui', of Santander, Spain. The vessel was broken up, at Santander, on Nov. 15, 1933 - I have also read in the 2nd quarter of 1933. Lloyd's Register of 1932/33 notes that break-up, naming the vessel Oyarsun. We thank the site visitor who kindly provided the fine image of Olavarria at left. Need help with additional data! Another image? It would appear that another image of Olavarria, dating from 1912, may be in existence.

28 Culgoa
3325 tons
Hull 257

96681
222721

Champlain
1890

A refrigerated cargo or stores ship. Per 1 (data & images re U.S. service), 2 (U.S. Navy history site, images), 3 (Navy Site, vessel history & 7 images), 4 (Spanish American War site), 5 & 6 (1904 collision with Wilson and Hunting, 6 is a large 'pdf' file), 7 (Christmas 1904), 8 (Airlie in Jan. 1900), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 102.1 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 346 ft. 4 in., speed of 13 knots, 3 masts, schooner rigged. There is a lot of data available about the vessel, so my summary will need to be extensive. Built for W. Lund & Sons of London, launched on Oct. 25, 1889 & delivered in Jan. 1890. 'Lund Blue Anchor Line', (Wilhelm Lund), it would seem, served Australian ports for many decades. Hence the name, perhaps. 'Culgoa' is a river in Queensland, Australia. On Jun. 4, 1898, the vessel was purchased by the U.S. Navy at Cavite, the Philippines (metro Manila), & was commissioned on Dec. 3, 1898, Lieutenant Commander J. W. Carlin in command. Between those dates, during the Spanish-American War of 1898, the vessel, still officially a merchant vessel, supplied ice & meat to U.S. naval vessels involved in the naval blockade of Manila, so 'avoiding neutrality laws which would have precluded the sale of such supplies' to the Navy. The war was ended by the Treaty of Paris, signed in Paris, France, (where else!) on Dec. 10, 1898. Crew of 122, armed with two 6 pounder guns. The vessel was overhauled at Hong Kong between Oct. 20 & Nov. 18, 1899. In 1900 & 1901, the vessel made 3 voyages to Sydney & Brisbane, Australia, for fresh stores. On one of those trips, Culgoa landed the passengers of Airlie, stranded on Chapman Island, Torres Straits, off the Queensland coast of Australia. The vessel continued to provision U.S. Naval forces in Far East waters, re Philippine American War, thru Jul. 22, 1901, when she sailed via the Suez canal for New York, arriving there on Sep. 25, 1901. The vessel was decommissioned at Boston, Massachusetts, on Oct. 16, 1901. From Oct. 1, 1902 to Aug. 11, 1905, she was back in commission serving the N. Atlantic Squadron in the Caribbean & in the Gulf of Mexico. At 7 p.m. on Nov. 9, 1904, Culgoa, under the command of Lieutenant Commander Robinson, was in collision with Wilson and Hunting ('Wilson', not referenced at Miramar), a 344 ton schooner, en route from Norfolk to New York, 10 miles off Barnegat Light, New Jersey. A collision? And how! Culgoa ran at full speed into Wilson, whose decks were loaded with pilings, cutting her in two & sinking her, with the loss of 4 lives - Robert I. Walton, Captain of Wilson, his wife, & two sailors. It would seem that Captain Walton & his wife died unnecessarily. At Christmas 1904, the vessel supplied Christmas cheer to every vessel in the U.S. Navy's S. Atlantic fleet. Decommissioned in Aug. 1905, it would seem that the Navy intended to sell the vessel, but did not. She was however struck from the Navy list in May 1906, reinstated in Jun. 1906, & re-commissioned on Sep. 12, 1907. She was loaned to the Panama Railway Co. for a single emergency shipment of beef & returned to New York on Oct. 16, 1907. Then served with the Atlantic fleet. Was a support ship for the 'Great White Fleet' on its round-the-world cruise. The vessel carried relief supplies to Messina, Sicily, Italy, after a giant earthquake on Dec. 28, 1908, in which 100,000 to 200,000 people were killed. For the next nine years, the vessel mainly served in the Western Atlantic & Caribbean areas, with voyages however to Europe, particularly, in 1918 & 1919, with 7 voyages for the Naval Overseas Transportation Service, carrying supplies to England & France during WW1. On Jul. 10, 1918, Culgoa assisted after a collision between Oosterdijk (which sank on Jul. 11, 1918) & San Jacinto, at 39.59N/47.55W, way out in the N. Atlantic, due E. of New York. Culgoa took aboard survivors & towed San Jacinto into Halifax. Then served in Caribbean mainly. In Jun. 1920, the vessel was in the Pacific Ocean again, serving as far west as Hawaii. On Jul. 20, 1920, the vessel was designated 'Provisions Stores Ship' AF-3. Overhauled at New York in Sep. 1920. Out of commission on Dec. 31, 1921, struck from the Naval register, & sold on Jul. 25, 1922 (have also read Jan. 1922) to L. H. Stewart, of New York, & renamed Champlain. The vessel was broken up, at New York, in the 3rd quarter of 1924. Can you refine the above and/or add anything?

29 Queensland
3892 tons
Hull 263

97530

Everita
1890

A cargo ship. Per 1 (launch), 2 (trial trip), 3 (ref. 90% down), 4 (F. Grauds), 5 (R. M. Hudson), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 115 metres (360 ft.) long, speed of 12 knots. Built for William Kish of Sunderland. In 1891, the vessel travelled from Sunderland to Penang, Malaysia, via the Suez Canal, in just 30 days. It would seem that the vessel was sold to R. M. Hudson (or maybe R. M. Hudson & Son), of Sunderland, who in 1915 at least, seemed to own the vessel. The vessel then traded to the Black Sea & Levant, until 1927 when company ceased to own ships. That data may relate to the vessel being sold, in 1928, to F. Grauds (of Riga, Latvia, I believe), & renamed Everita. The vessel was broken up at Savona, Italy, in Nov. 1932. WWW available data re this vessel is most limited. Need help!

30 Port Chalmers
4154 tons
Hull 277

98973

Delmonico
Glacier
Carbella
Presidente Juarez
1891

A passenger/cargo ship, with refrigeration, that had a long life indeed, i.e. 65 years. A most good looking ship. Per 1 [Milburn Line, Port Chalmers (1)], 2 (Federal Steam Navigation, Port Chalmers), 3 [an 1898 New Zealand ('NZ') to London voyage], 4 (Wikipedia coverage, Glacier), 5 (U.S. Navy data & images), 6 (extensive data re U.S. naval service), 7 [Port Chalmers (1), vessel history], 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 113.1 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 388 ft. 7 in., speed of 12.3 (or 11) knots. Built for the passenger & wool service of 'Anglo-Australasian Steam Navigation Co. Limited', of London, William Milburn & Co., both owners & managers, known as 'Milburn Line'. But passengers? 7 states 'completed after the decision to discontinue carrying passengers had been made'. In 1896, the vessel was sold to 'Federal Steam Navigation Company', i.e. Federal Line, of London. 3 refers to an 1898 voyage from NZ to London with cargo which included 7000 bales of wool, 40,000 carcasses (mutton), & a quantity of rabbits. The vessel was sold, in Jul. 1898, to the U.S. Navy, & was converted for Navy service at the New York Navy yard. Four 3 in. guns were installed. Was commissioned for the 1st time at New York on Jul. 5, 1898 as Delmonico, a 'Provisions and Stores Ship', but 6 days later was renamed Glacier. Navy service? The vessel, for 5 months, carried supplies to U.S. ships operating in the West Indies re the 1898 Spanish-American War. Decommissioned Mar. 6, 1899. Later commissioned & decommissioned a number of times. Operated in the areas of Philippines & Hong Kong, & transported supplies there from Australia. Accompanied Dewey, a floating dock, towed to the Philippines in 1905/6. In 1907/8, the vessel accompanied the 'Great White Fleet' on the first half of its cruise around the World. During WWI, she served with the Pacific Fleet transporting cargo to American forces in South America. 3 voyages to Europe in 1918/19. On Jul. 17, 1920, the vessel was designated a 'Stores Ship', AF-4. Do read 6 for more extensive data re her long Navy service. The vessel was decommissioned for the last time in Mar. 1922 & was sold in Aug. 1922, for $22,000, to Barde Steel & Machinery Co. ('Barde'), of Seattle, Washington. No change of name. Her service for Barde? (7 however states that by 1920 she was owned by Northern Fisheries Inc. of San Francisco.) The vessel was sold, in 1941, to 'Carbella Steamship Company', of Panama, & renamed Carbella. Was sold again, in 1944, to 'Compańia Continental de Navegación S.A.', of Vera Cruz, Mexico, & in 1945 was renamed Presidente Juarez. In 1955, the vessel was owned by Compańia de Exportación Mexicana S.A. It would appear that at an (unstated) date & loaded with coal, she suffered engine failure off Hampton Roads & was towed to Bermuda. And then towed from Bermuda to Rotterdam by Tyne, a 'L. Smit & Co.’s Internationale Sleepdienst' ('SMIT') tug, unloaded there & sold for scrap to Thomas Young & Sons, of Sunderland. But, the vessel was not towed to Sunderland but rather to Inverkeithing (Firth of Forth, Scotland) by SMIT's tug Loire & on Apl. 22, 1956, arrived at the Thos. W. Ward facilities there, to be broken up. Can you add to or correct the above? For a ship with such a long history, the available images are few in number.

31 Adelina Patti
3114 tons
Hull 293

99617
1892

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data), 2 (modest Hansard reference), 3 (an 1894 collision), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 100.6 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular. Built for Jennesen, Taylor & Co., of Sunderland. In May 1894, the vessel was in collision with Venice at Nicolaieff in the Black Sea. Adelina Patti suffered no damage, while Venice, holed below the water line, sank at her moorings alongside the wharf. Broken up at Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht (a town in the western part of the Netherlands, noted for its ship breaking facilities) in the 2nd Q of 1910. Named, I presume, after Adelina Patti, 1843/1919, an internationally acclaimed opera singer, who lived at 'Craig-y-Nos' castle, Powys, Wales. There are lots of sites about her, but almost none about the vessel which bore her name. Need help!

32 Blue Cross
3028 (or 2788) tons
Hull 286

99140

Sineus
Suarez No. 1
Alfonso Senra
Simancas
1892

A cargo ship, which had a very long life - 75 years. Per 1 (data & image, Suarez No. 1, page bottom), 2 (Spanish page, data & image, Suarez No. 1), 3 (Wilson Line, managed ships, Sineus), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 98.1 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 9 knots. Built for The Rowland and Marwood Steamship Company, of Whitby. In 1913, the vessel was sold to G. W. Schroder ('Schroder') of Riga, Latvia, & renamed Sineus. In 1918, the vessel was requisitioned for use in WW1 by the Shipping Controller, of London, & managed by Wilson Line. It was returned to Schroder in 1919. In 1921 the vessel was bought by Marítima Suárez, of Vigo, Spain, & renamed Suarez No. 1. In 1927 the vessel was sold again, to Naviera Celta S.A. (G. Suarez the manager?) & renamed Alfonso Senra. The vessel was under Republican control early in the Spanish Civil War, but was seized by Nationalist forces (Basque armed trawlers, called 'bous') & used as an armed transport for the balance of the war. In 1943, the vessel was sold again, to Gumersindo Junquera S.A. & renamed Simancas. Possibly in a collision in 1958. With Bilbao, maybe? On Oct. 18, 1967, the vessel arrived at Avilés, Asturias, Spain, to be broken up. Can you add anything?

33 Romney
2806 tons
Hull 302

102787

City of Amiens
1893

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Bolton, history), 2 [Bolton Steam, Romney (1)], 3 (data & image, Romney), 4 (brief ref. Romney, 55% down), 5 (related data), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 316 ft. long, 96.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular. Built for Frederic Bolton & Co., of London, a partnership which became 'Bolton Steam Shipping Company Ltd.', in 1897. Operators of small cargo vessels (named after artists beginning with the letter 'R'), which carried Welsh coal to Mediterranean bunkering stations & returned with grain, hemp & cotton seed from the Black Sea. In 1915, the vessel was sold to 'Transport & Trading Co.', of London, with no change of vessel name. Per 3, in 1917, the vessel was sold to 'Franco-British Steam Ship Co. Ltd.', managed by 'Olivier & Co.' & renamed City of Amiens. Note however that Miramar record any such ownership & name change as being in 1920. In 1921/22, the vessel was sold to 'Hydra Steam Ship Co. Ltd.', managed by 'G. M. Crussachi' ('Crussachi'), with no change of vessel name - though 'Charles Hocking' indicates that Crussachi was the vessel's owner in 1922 when, on Sep. 22, 1922, while en route from Barry, Wales, to Algiers, Algeria, with a cargo of coal, the vessel ran aground & was wrecked at Bintra Point, Camarińas, Spain. I have not been able to read the circumstances & details of that wreck. But now, thanks to Geoff Soper, we know that the conditions were foggy at the time & that there was no loss of life. Also that on Sep. 30, 1922, 12 of the City of Amiens crew were landed at Liverpool by Ortega, a Pacific Steam Navigation Co. vessel returning from Valparaiso. The names & addresses etc. of the 12 can be read here. Thanks Geoff! Can you provide any more detail? And, can you add to or correct the above listing?

34   Amyl
2474 tons
Hull 311

102965

Heimfeld
Emil Kirdorf
Hans Hemsoth
Ulisse
Anteo
1894

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 91.4 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 311 ft., speed of 8 1/2 knots. Built for William Tulley & Co. ('Tulley'), of Hull - it would seem not 'Tully'. Now there was a company named "Amyl" Steamship Company Limited, clearly related to Tulley. It seems likely that it might have been the registered owner of a ship named Amyl. That company went into liquidation in 1921. In 1900, the vessel was sold to 'Continentale Rhederei', of Hamburg, Germany, & renamed Heimfeld. In 1911, the vessel was sold again, to 'Frachtcontor GmbH', also of Hamburg (I believe), & renamed Emil Kirdorf. Three years later, in 1914, 'W. Hemsoth AG' or perhaps 'Wilhelm Hemsoth, Limited', of Hamburg or maybe of Emden, acquired the vessel & renamed it Hans Hemsoth. When WW1 was declared, the vessel was at Blyth, Northumberland, & under arrest in Admiralty Court as a result of claims by creditors. The vessel was seized as a prize & then used, it would appear, in the carriage of coal from the North East to the Gas Light & Coke Company power station at Beckton, on the River Thames. In 1922, the vessel was the first German ship in nine years to go to Oakland, California, to deliver 6,000 tons of glass sand ex Holland. It would seem to have visited the Canadian west coast also, to load timber. In 1924, the vessel was sold to A. Giuffrida, of Italy, & renamed Ulisse & they renamed the vessel Anteo in 1925. Much of the above is derived from 'Google' data 'snippets', easily misinterpreted - a half a dozen words here, half a sentence there. I wonder why it is that data published in the early decades of the 1900s is not freely available, since it surely is long out of copyright. Do not get me wrong! I am grateful for the vast amount of material that Google does provide but so much material has been scanned by them yet remains essentially unavailable for reasons that I do not understand. So my above text will surely be found to be both incomplete & inaccurate. Example .. The vessel Hans Hemsoth would seem to have been appraised & sold, likely at a public auction, in 1926, as a result of a law suit. But the vessel had been sold & renamed Ulisse in 1924. No comprendo. The vessel was, I read, broken up (where I wonder) in Q3 of 1929.  Need help! Can you provide more data and/or correct the above? An image? There are images of Emil Kirdorf at Photoship, but I think that they are of the later vessel of the name, built in 1922. #1865

35 Ayr
3050 tons
Hull 318

104796
1894

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data, Ayr, near page bottom), 2 (reference), 3 (sinking), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 322.0 ft. long (98.15 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 333 ft. 6 in. overall?, signal letters NMDL Built for Mercantile Steamship Co. Limited, of London, managed by 'J. & C. Dunkerley' or maybe 'John A. Dunkerley and Co.', of Hull. It would seem, however, that 'E. Hain & Son', James Buchanan & Arthur Cooke were later manager of the vessel. On Mar. 8, 1918, while en route from Alexandria, Egypt, to Bizerta, Tunisia, with a cargo of cotton, cotton seed & lead, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by UC 37, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See (Senior Lieutenant) Otto Gerke. And sank. At 36.23N/13.45E, 31 miles N1/2W of Linosa Island, an Italian volcanic island, located in the Pelagie Islands between Malta & Tunis in the Mediterranean. No loss of life. Have not been able to read the circumstances (Captain's name, how crew were rescued, unescorted?, etc.). WWW data is limited. Can you provide more data! An image?

36 Port Stephens
3554 tons
Hull 310

102853
1894

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Milburn Line, Port Stephens (1)], 2 & 3 (sinking reports), 4 (Court of Inquiry), 5 (Rakanoa search), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 105.2 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 345 ft., speed of 9 knots, specially designed for Australian coastal service. Built for Anglo-Australasian Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. ('Anglo'), of London, W. Milburn & Co., the managers & owners. Anglo mainly operated services from U.K. to Australia via Antwerp, Belgium. On Oct. 1, 1906, the vessel, under charter to Union Steamship Co. ('Union'), delivered the 2nd of two cargoes of coal to Oamaru, North Otago, S. Island of New Zealand, ex Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. The vessel left Oamaru in ballast for Newcastle on Oct. 1, 1906, Captain Jolly in command, & on Oct. 3, 1906, when at latitude 45.50S/164.40E, the vessel ran into bad weather, as a result of which the tail shaft sheared. Attempts were made to repair the damage, but with the vessel pitching & rolling, it could not be accomplished. The vessel drifted fast southwards, 229 miles in 5 days to 49.20S, where, on Oct. 8th, it fortunately sighted Ravenscourt, a 1462 ton barque, which was en route from Newcastle to Callao, Peru, & had itself been driven far to the south. It is estimated that repairs would have taken an additional 2 weeks to complete, by which time the vessel would have been in iceberg infested waters. The ship was both low on provisions & out of normal shipping lanes. The decision was made to abandon the ship, at 49.21S/164.48E it would appear. All 33 Port Stephens crew members were taken aboard Ravenscourt & on Oct. 15, 1906, that vessel arrived off Otago Harbour, Dunedin, S. Island of NZ, under the tow of tug Plucky. The survivors, transferred to Plucky, were safely landed. Rakanoa, a Union vessel, searched for Port Stephens without success. And Moeraki tried to find her also. No trace of her was ever found. There was a Marine Court of Inquiry into the loss, held at Dunedin, but I have not read the conclusion. Can you provide more data! An image?

37 Rossetti
2080 (later 2147) tons
Hull 314

102898

Antinoe

Anastassios A. Syrmas
Gerania
Wilhelmina
1894

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Bolton, history), 2 (extensive data, page in Swedish), 2 [Bolton Steam, Rossetti (1)], 3 (data & image, Rossetti), 4 (history ref. Rossetti, 55% down), 5 (related data, Bolton), 6 ('Lloyds Register', data, 1930/31 thru 1941/42, Gerania/Wilhelmina, see left), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 85.34 metres long, 280.0 ft., speed of 9 knots, signal letters KHBF (Gerania) later SHCN. The vessel was built for F. (Frederic) Bolton, of London, a partnership which, it would appear, later became 'Frederic Bolton & Company', &, in 1897, 'Bolton Steam Shipping Company Ltd.'. Operators of small cargo vessels (named after artists beginning with the letter 'R'), which carried Welsh coal to Mediterranean bunkering stations & returned with grain, hemp & cotton seed from the Black Sea. In 1916, the vessel was sold to Cambo (or Cambro?) Shipping Co. Ltd. of London, 'J. P. Cadogan' the manager. And in 1919, was sold to 'Egypt & Levant Steamship Co. Ltd.', T. Bowen, Rees & Co. Ltd. (owned by owned by Thomas Bowen Rees), the managers, & renamed Antinoe. Later? registered at Alexandria, Egypt. The vessel was sold again, in 1923, to T. A. Syrmas, of Andros, Greece, & renamed Anastassios A. Syrmas. And sold, in Dec. 1929, to 'Rederi AB Gerania' (J. J. Malmberg & Emanuel Högberg the managers), of Gävle, Sweden, & renamed Gerania. Thanks to 'plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data from 1930/31 is WWW available - selected listings of Gerania/Wilhelmina are at left. In 1935/36, J. J. Malmberg became the vessel's manager. In Aug. 1939, the vessel collided with Heemskerk at Vlissingen, Netherlands (Flushing). I have not been able to learn the circumstances, however I read that Gerania was very badly damaged & was condemned. In Dec. 1939, the wreck was purchased by 'Rederi AB Fredrika' (Erik Högberg), of Stockholm, Sweden, who repaired the vessel & returned it to service, in 1940, as Wilhelmina. On Dec. 14, 1941, while en route from Brake, Germany, to Gävle, the vessel was wrecked at Kammarbrinken, Sweden, (NW of Utlängen). I have not been able to learn the circumstances but understand that there was no loss of life. The ship broke up a week later. Need help to ensure that the above text correctly translates the Swedish text at 2. And .. can you add to or correct the above listing?

38 Tennyson
2084 tons
Hull 319

104809

Brigitta
1894

A cargo ship, schooner rigged. Per 1 ('wrecksite.eu', wreck data, image), 2 (image, data, Tennyson), 3 (French page, Brigitta), 4 (wreck status, 'Brigitta Teapot'), 5 (wreck status 'T-POT/Brigitta', 7 up from page bottom), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 85.3 metres long, speed? The vessel was built for Glover Bros. ('Glover'), of London. In 1898 she was sold to 'Shakespear Shipping Co., Ltd.', also of London, with Glover the managers. In 1915, the vessel was sold to 'Colonial Coal & Shipping Co. Ltd.', also of London, & renamed Brigitta. On Dec. 4, 1917, H. M. Pinkham in command, while en route from Barry, Wales, to Dieppe, France, with a cargo of coal, the vessel hit a mine laid on Sep. 15, 1917 by UC-63, Karsten von Heydebreck in command. At or approx. at 46.922N/50.38.785W, 6 miles SW of the then Nab light vessel, in the English Channel E. of the Isle of Wight. The vessel sank. 2 lives were lost in the explosion. The wreck has, it would seem, been identified & is still there in 16 metres of water, 'well broken amidships with the stern upside down and the two boilers remaining the highest point'. The wreck still has its propeller. It was hit by a passing ship some years ago. It is known as 'T-POT' because a tea pot was found at the site before the wreck was identified & the name has 'stuck'. Home to one giant conger eel! Can anybody add anything?

39 Whitgift
2925 tons
Hull 321

104838

Nero
1895

A collier. Per 1 (extensive data & many images, Nero), 2 (data & many images, Nero), 3 (extensive Wikipedia data, Nero), 4 (1906 grounding), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 95.1 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 312 ft., speed of 9 knots, crew of 80 & four 6-pounder guns while in U.S. Navy service. Built for Houlder, Middleton Limited ('Houlder'), of London, Glasgow & Liverpool, likely for Whitgift Steam Ship Co., owned by Houlder. Presumably later sold to McCondray and Co. (maybe McCondray and Co. Inc.) ('McCondray'), of San Francisco, California. The following attempts to summarise the detail available via the above links. The vessel was sold by McCondray to the U.S. Navy, for U.S. $215,000, on Jun. 8, 1898 & that day was commissioned as USS Nero. Many sites state that while commissioned on Jun. 8, 1898 she was only purchased on Jun. 30, 1898. Which seems unlikely for a purchased vessel. Anyway, the vessel was converted for U.S. Navy use at Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, California. Saw service on the U.S. Pacific coast & in convoying ships to Manila, Philippines, China & Japan during the Spanish-American War & Philippines Insurrection. She returned to Mare Island & was decommissioned on Jan. 7, 1899. Was commissioned & decommissioned many times in its long Navy service. The vessel took deep sea soundings on a voyage between the U.S. W. coast & the Far East in 1899 & 1900 (Midway & Guam). Served for 3 years as a collier, U.S. Pacific coast, Philippines, E. Coast, S. America, Samoa, Philippines, & back to the E. coast. Served in the Pacific Squadron, & in the N. Atlantic & Asiatic Fleets. On Feb. 1, 1906, the vessel ran aground in thick fog at Devil's Ditch, Block Island, Rhode Island. The sea cocks were opened to minimise movement & damage. And then she was drained & pulled off the rocks on Feb. 8, 1906. Damage only to forward compartment, repaired at New London. From 1906 to 1911, the vessel served in the Atlantic Fleet, & then thru 1917 in the Pacific Fleet. Between May/Nov. 1912, she carried materials & personnel to Alaska re the upgrade of 7 Navy radio stations there. Between Oct. 1917 & Feb. 1919, based at Cardiff, Wales, the vessel carried coal from Wales & Northern Ireland to France for U.S. forces on the Western Front. Returned to Norfolk, Virginia, in Mar. 1919, an extensive overhaul at the Charlestown Navy Yard at Boston, & then saw service E. coast & Caribbean until Dec. 1920, when she returned to the Pacific Fleet for a final re-supply voyage from Mare Island to Samoa. Designated AC-17 in Jul. 1920. Was decommissioned in Sep. 1921 & sold on Jul. 29, 1922 to 'A. Bercovich and Company', of Oakland, California, to be scrapped. Can you add anything?

40   Holywell
3300 tons
Hull 343

106413
1896

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 110 metres (350 ft.) long, speed of 12 knots. Built for Tyzack & Branfoot Steam Shipping Co. Ltd., (Well Line) of Sunderland. On Feb. 21, 1903, the vessel was en route from Middlesbrough to Delagoa Bay (now Maputo Bay, Mozambique), via London with a general cargo. Was in collision with Martello, (Wilson Line, of Hull), in the North Sea off 'Newark Light', (where is that?) & sank. Martello suffered major bow damage & had to be towed stern-first to the Humber to effect repairs. Data most limited. Need help! An image perhaps?

41 Ovidia
3343 tons
Hull 343

3084

Aspen
Ovidia
1897

A cargo ship. Per 1 (extensive data in Swedish, 2 images), 2 (link 1, 'Google' translated), 3 (2 'British Pathe' video clips re 1930 sinking), 4 & 5 (1930 sinking, Cornell Daily Sun), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 99.1 (or 98.84) metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed? Built for 'Rederi A/B Nord' ('Nord'), of Hernösand, (now Härnösand), Sweden (on Gulf of Bothnia), owned by O. W. Nordin, & Swedish registered. In 1899, Nord moves to Stockholm, Sweden, & later 'G. L. Ahlström', becomes the principal owner. Carried grain from Montreal, Canada, to Havre, France in 1901, but just fragmentary data. In 1908, Georg Lavén takes over Nord. The vessel was sold in 1915 to 'Förnyade Ĺngfartygs AB Viking' ('Förnyade') [a wholly owned subsidiary of 'Rederi AB Transatlantic' ('Transatlantic')], of Göteborg (Gothenburg), with 'J. M. Dannberg' perhaps the manager, & renamed Aspen. In early 1917, en route from Baltimore, U.S.A., to Norrköping, E. Sweden, with a cargo of wheat, it would appear, Aspen was taken over in bad weather in the North Sea by British warship Otway & escorted to Kirkwall, Orkney Islands, for investigation. The same thing happened to sister ship Viken. The vessels were released in May 1917 & in returning to Sweden, Viken was hit by a German torpedo - on May 17, 1917. Aspen sent its lifeboats to rescue the Viken crew & Aspen itself was hit. The submarine surfaced & tried to sink Aspen by gunfire, but did not succeed. Rather the crew was rescued by a British war ship & the vessel was towed to Kirkwall, for temporary repairs. The vessel made Malmö, S. Sweden, under its own power for repairs. In 1919, Förnyade goes into liquidation. Transatlantic takes over the vessel in 1921. On Aug. 23, 1927, the vessel was sold to 'Rederi AB Ovidia' (G. E. Sandström), of Göteborg, & in 1928 the vessel was renamed Ovidia. On Nov. 19, 1930, while en route from New Orleans to St. Nazaire, France, with a cargo of pitch pine, the vessel encountered a severe storm & the cargo shifted. The vessel listed, with a hole in her bottom, & sank at 42.35N/50.45W, about 400 miles roughly S. of Cape Race, Newfoundland. Captain Axel Carlsson, his wife & the crew of 26, were rescued by Mauretania, one of 4 ships which came to her aid, (the others were America, Endicott, & possibly one more) & were landed at New York. They rowed half a mile through the raging seas to reach Mauretania. 'Pytu' the Carlsson's cat, was rescued too, I read! I am grateful for 1 & hope I have understood their data correctly in translation. Data otherwise most limited. Need help! An image perhaps?

42 Reynolds
3264 tons
Hull 359

108340

Chertsey
1898

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Bolton, history), 2 [Bolton Steam, Reynolds (1)], 3 (data & image, Reynolds), 4 (brief ref. Rossetti, 50% down), 5 (related data, Bolton), 6 (sinking, Chertsey), 7 (sinking, Chertsey), 8 (UC 67), 9 (Britain, Watts), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 325.0 ft. long, 99.1 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 9 knots, signal letters QCKM. Built for 'Bolton Steam Shipping Company Ltd.', of London. Operators of small cargo vessels (named after artists beginning with the letter 'R'), which carried Welsh coal to Mediterranean bunkering stations & returned with grain, hemp & cotton seed from the Black Sea. The vessel was sold, in 1916, to 'Britain Steamship Company, Limited', of London, 'Watts Watts & Co.', the managers, & renamed Chertsey. On Apl. 26, 1917, the vessel was en route from the Tyne to Alexandria or Port Said, Egypt, with a cargo of coal. When 4 miles N. of Algiers, Algeria, the vessel was attacked with torpedoes by UC-67, Kapitänleutnant Karl Neumann in command, & sunk. While I have not been able to read the circumstances, Miramar indicates 'tgf', which I believe means was attacked by both torpedoes & gunfire. At 36.52N/03.05E. No loss of life. Can you add anything?

43 Zingara
3463 tons
Hull 362

110022

Djena
Lana
Bona
1898

A cargo ship. Per 1 (1918 torpedo attack, 35% down, hard to find, para commencing 'During the same day'), 2 (Lloyd's Register data, 1930/31 thru 1943/44, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 106.1 metres (348.0 ft.) long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 8 1/2 knots. Built for Turner, Brightman & Co. ('Turner'), of London. The launch of the vessel on Sep. 1, 1898, for Turner, was recorded in Vol. 20 of 'Marine Engineer and Naval Architect', per a 'Google books' data snippet. A Sunderland website that died in late May 2011, however listed 'P E Brightman & E H Turner' as the initial owners of the vessel. Perhaps they were the principals behind the Turner company? Zingara? I have not read the significance of the name - can anybody tell us? But Turner had a great many vessels over the years whose names started with the letter 'Z'. At an unknown date, likely in 1908, the vessel ran aground at Moji (which presumably refers to Moji-ku, now in Kitakyūshū, Japan). It was, I read, bound for Singapore with a cargo of coal, & ran aground while the captain, who had small-pox, was being removed from the vessel. Her cargo was discharged in the course of efforts to re-float her. On Apl. 5, 1918, when in the Irish Sea, a torpedo was fired at the vessel, but the torpedo missed its target. Cyrene, built in 1888 by Short Brothers, was not so lucky. It was sunk 15 miles off N. Bardsey Island, Gwynedd, Wales, on that same day, likely in the same general area in which Zingara was attacked. Zingara was sold, in 1930, to 'Transmarine de Navigation S.A.', & renamed Djena. Note, the following name was previously indicated here to be the new owner 'Cie. Franco-Africaine de Navigation', 'Franco-Africaine Line', of Paris, France. The vessel was sold again, in 1937, to 'S. Farkouh & P. Feret', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Lana. Then a shade shorter i.e. 347.8 ft. The vessel was sold again, in 1939, to 'P. Feret' of Marseilles, France, & renamed Bona. Signal letters FPDU. I can find no WWW data about either of those last two owner names. The vessel was hulked at Rouen, France, in 1941 & was broken up in 1944. Can you add anything additional?

44   Stanfield
3370 tons
Hull 369

110545

Nitsa
1899

A cargo ship. Per 1 (NY Times sinking report, Nitsa), 2 (Spanish page 90% down with an incorrect image), 3 (extensive data in Spanish, also with incorrect image, commencing about 60% down), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). I am advised that the 'incorrect' images referred to above are indeed of a vessel named Stanfield, but rather of the tanker built by Laing in 1943 as Thamesfield & later, in 1955, named Stanfield. This Stanfield, i.e. the one built in 1899, was about 105 metres long, speed of 11 knots. Built for Stanfield Steamship Co. Ltd. (J. Brown), of Liverpool. The vessel was sold, in 1913, to 'S. & A. Pandermaly & E. Yannaghas', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Nitsa. Cypriot flag, it would seem. On Jun. 5, 1916, Nitsa left Norfolk, Virginia, U.S.A., Georges Yannaghas in command, with a cargo of coal bound for Savona, Italy, the coal destined for use by the Italian Army. On Jun. 26, 1916, the vessel, sank at or near Islas Hormigas, NE of Cape Palos, near Cartagena, E. coast of Spain. There are different versions of what happened. The official version is, it would seem, that it was hit by a torpedo, likely by U-35 which was in the general area. But 2 indicates (thanks go to Marie Sanders for a translation) that in fact the vessel, running without lights & in shallow waters to avoid U-boats, simply ran aground. The crew, of 29 all told, took to the boats & were picked up by Alba, Jose Carrascal Llorca in command. Alba apparently had witnessed the grounding. 3 states however, I believe, that the U-boat (U-35) approached the grounded vessel, evacuated the crew & sank Nitsa with a torpedo. ('El submarino alemán lo abordó, hizo evacuar la tripulación, y lo hundió con un torpedo.') No loss of life in either version. The wreck, said to be 'spectacular', lies 6 miles from Cabo de Palos in 48/60 metres of water at approx. 37.37.55N/00.42.07W. Can you add anything? An image perhaps?

45 Montauk
3387 tons
Hull 387

111311

Knockwell
Wiltonhall
1901

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('uboat.net', sinking Wiltonhall), 2 ('wrecksite.eu' data, Wiltonhall), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 104.2 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular. Built for 'Menantic Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Bristol. The vessel was soon sold, in 1902, to 'North Atlantic Steamship Co. Ltd.', also of Bristol, with no change of vessel name. In 1913, the vessel was sold to another Bristol owner - 'Knockwell Steamship Co. Ltd. - & renamed Knockwell. The vessel was sold for the last time, in 1914, to 'Wiltonhall Steamship Co. Ltd.', also of Bristol, managed by 'Guthre Brothers Limited' or 'Guthe Brothers & Co.', of West Hartlepool, & renamed Wiltonhall. On Jul. 16, 1916, the vessel, en route from Bombay, India, to Hull with a general cargo was captured by U-39, the much decorated Kapitänleutnant Walter (or Walther) Forstmann ('Forstmann') in command, & sunk with bombs. At 37.54N/3.50E, in the Mediterranean, 65 miles NW of Algiers, Algeria. I read that there was no loss of life. Forstmann was a most successful WW1 U-boat commander indeed, sinking 149 vessels & damaging 7 others. All said and done, very little data seems to be WWW available about this vessel. Need help! #1873

46 Roma
3634 tons
Hull 390

113729

Nicolaos
Tassos
Salaminia
Argonaftis
1901

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 104.2 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 342.0 ft. speed of 7 1/2 or 8 knots. Built for 'Rowland & Marwood's Steam Ship Co. Ltd.', of Whitby. Sold in 1923 to 'D. L. Politis & D. J. Goulandris', of Andros, Greece, & renamed Nicolaos. In 1924, the vessel was sold to Nicolaos D. Boulgaris, also of Andros, Greece, (something strange about that - they must have been related!) In 1935, the vessel was sold to E. A. Karavias, of Piraeus, Greece & renamed Tassos. In 1938 it was sold again, to 'Const. A. Petroutsis & Tanes Bros.', also of Piraeus, & renamed Salaminia. No WW2 convoy service, it would appear. In 1952 it was renamed Argonaftis & later that year was scrapped at Aviles, Spain. All said and done, very little data seems to be WWW available about this vessel. Need help!

47 Fulwell
3824 tons
Hull 400

114645
1902

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('doc' file re lawsuit), 2 (Anchor Line, Massilia), 3 (wreck listing, Fulwell), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 111.2 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 364.7 ft., likely speed of 9/10 knots. Built for 'Tyzack & Branfoot Steam Shipping Co. Ltd.', (Well Line), of Sunderland, which company served ports in India & Ceylon. A lawsuit resulted from the shipment, in Aug. 1909, of 28,002 bales of jute, from Calcutta, India, to Dundee, Scotland, arriving in Oct. 1909. The case involved 'Tyzack & Branfoot Steamship Company, Limited' (maybe then the registered owner) & 'Frank Stewart Sandeman & Sons'. In 1912, the vessel was transferred to Well Line Ltd., of Sunderland, which company was taken over, in 1916 by 'Thos. & Jno. Brocklebank, Ltd.' (Brocklebank Line). On Jan. 14, 1915, while en route from Calcutta, India, to Hull, with a cargo of linseed & sugar, the vessel was in collision with Massilia, an Anchor Line vessel on India service, 30 miles N. of the Burlings, a group of islands (Berlenga) off Peniche on the W. coast of Portugal, NW of Lisbon. I have not been able to learn the circumstances. At approx. 40N/10W, I read. The crew of Fulwell, all of whom were safe, abandoned the vessel in a sinking condition. There is very little WWW available data about Fulwell, or indeed, about Well Line. Can you add anything? An image perhaps?

48   Lena
4146 tons
Hull 399

115850

Marigo L.
1902

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 105.2 metres long, speed of 9 knots. Built for Mercantile S. S. Co. Ltd., of London. A tramp ship company which came under the control of P & O Line in 1918 & went into liquidation in 1923, its assets being transferred to 'Hain S. S. Co.' which P & O had taken over in 1917. 1923 sold to 'N. G. Lyras' & renamed Marigo L. Broken up at Spezia, Italy, in May 1934. I am grateful, indeed for the data provided by Miramar. Especially since it is the only data I can find on the WWW about the vessel! Need help! Data? An image perhaps?

49 Ramsay
4318 (later 3851) tons
Hull 398

115831

Caithness
Edera
1902

A cargo ship that was launched on Mar. 25, 1902 & completed in May 1902. Per 1 [Bolton, history, Ramsay (1)], 2 [Bolton Steam, Ramsay (1)], 3 (data & image, Ramsay), 4 (brief ref. Ramsay, 60% down), 5 (related data, Bolton), 6 ('Lloyds Register', data, 1930/31, Edera, see left), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 351.5 ft. long, 107.1 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 9 or 10 knots, signal letters TKDS & NLFM (Edera), 330 HP engines by Richardsons, Westgarth & Co.  Ltd. of Hartlepool. Built for 'Bolton Steam Shipping Company Ltd.' ('Bolton'), of London. Operators of small cargo vessels named after artists beginning with the letter 'R' - in this case Allan Ramsay (1713/1784). The vessel carried Welsh coal to Mediterranean bunkering stations & returned with grain, hemp & cotton seed from the Black Sea. Bolton went into voluntary liquidation on Sep. 12, 1917 (was later resurrected), & on Jun. 26, 1917 the vessel was sold to Sutherland Steamship Co. Ltd., of Newcastle, A. M. Sutherland the manager. In 1919, the vessel was renamed Caithness. In 1920, the vessel was sold to 'Anglo-Celtic Shipping Co. Ltd.', of London, Griffiths Payne & Co. Ltd. or maybe J. Griffiths, the manager, with no change of vessel name. In 1926, the vessel was further sold to A. (Achille) Lauro, of Naples, Italy, & renamed Edera. Thanks to 'plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data for Edera re 1930/31 is WWW available - see left. On Sep. 11, 1930, the vessel was stranded on Bollen Hinder, 4 miles NNE of Ouddorp, South Holland, Holland, while en route from Braila, Romania, to Rotterdam with a cargo of grain. The vessel, it would seem, was being salvaged when a storm came up & the 32 aboard had to be rescued by Queen Wilhelmina, a tug, perhaps. It was re-floated on Oct. 15, 1930. In Jan. 1931, the vessel was broken up at nearby Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Holland, noted for its ship-breaking facilities. Much of the above data is thanks to James Smith who has kindly provided this 'pdf' study of Ramsay's history, which includes extensive detail re its WW1 service as a Collier Transport. Can you correct the above and/or add anything additional?

50 Brescia
3235 (or 3255) tons
Hull 409

118021
1903

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Cunard, Brescia (1)], 2 (text re Brescia & Mediterannean trade, 25% down), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 100.6 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 343 ft., speed of 10 1/2 knots. Built for The Cunard Steam-Ship Company Limited, of Liverpool. Engaged in the Mediterranean trade i.e. 'Ships on this service carried no passengers or mails, their cargo outward bound comprised general cargo loaded at Liverpool, coal, tinplate and sulphate of copper loaded at Swansea and other general cargo from outward bound ports in the Mediterranean, Aegean and Black Sea. Homeward bound the ships loaded cargoes which were in the main consumables such as raisins, currants, figs, coffee beans, bagged wheat, cotton, cotton seed, onions, bales of tobacco, live quail and casks of wine.' I read that the vessel was laid up in 1929, & on Jun. 20, 1930 arrived at the T. W. Ward Ltd. ship breaking facilities at Preston, to be broken up. But it would seem that it was actually broken up in 1931. A model of the ship was sold by Christies in 1997, but alas, no image of it is available. Need help! Another image perhaps?

51 Burnholme
3423 (or 3474) tons
Hull 416

113735

Medmenham
1904

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Rowland & Marwood, Burnolme), 2 ('Rowland and Marwoods' history & flag), 3 (crew image available), 4 (Lloyd's Register data, 1930/31 thru 1933/34, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 105.2 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 345.0 ft., speed of 9 knots, signal letters VQJD. Built for 'Rowland & Marwood's Steam Ship Co. Ltd.' ('Rowland'), of Whitby, North Yorkshire. Rowland was, I read, a tramp ship company that traded worldwide. They mainly carried coal outbound from U.K. & returned with grain or timber & many other types of cargo. In 1910, the vessel served on a Java to New York service. Can anybody tell us about her WW1 service? A Google 1920 legal 'snippet' indicates that at about 11.40 p.m. on Oct. 7 (of which year?), Burnholme, with cargo, was in collision with Atlantic. I have not been able to read the circumstances, damage, or the decision of the court, however both vessels were in convoy at the time. On Apl. 1, 1924, the vessel ran aground in the River Plate. Presumably later that year, i.e. 1924, the vessel was sold, for Ł23,350, to 'Britain Steamship Co. Ltd.', of London, which company was owned & managed by 'Watts Watts & Co.', also of London, & renamed Medmenham. In 1933, the vessel arrived at the 'Smith & Co.', ship breaking facilities at Port Glasgow, Scotland, to be broken up. All said and done, very little data seems to be WWW available about this vessel. Need help! An image? #1896

52 Ribera
3500 tons
Hull 419

118484
1904

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Bolton, history, Ribera (1)], 2 [Bolton Steam, Ribera (1)], 3 (data & image, Ribera), 4 (brief ref. Ribera, 50% down), 5 (sinking data, 'Sunday 27 September', 55% down), 6 (Pt. 1 of an Emden operational history on page 2 of a 12 page 'pdf' file), 7 (Wikipedia, Emden), 8 (Wikipedia, Karl von Müller), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 102.4 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed? Built for 'Bolton Steam Shipping Company Ltd.' ('Bolton'), of London, & managed by F. Bolton & Company. Bolton were operators of small cargo vessels [named after artists beginning with the letter 'R' - in this case Jusepe de Ribera (1591/1652)], which carried Welsh coal to Mediterranean bunkering stations & returned with grain, hemp & cotton seed from the Black Sea. When WW1 was declared, Emden, a 3600 ton, 3-funnel, German cruiser, capable of 25 knots, was in the German Asiatic Squadron. The ship was ordered by Von Spee to prey upon merchant shipping. Which Emden did, after adding a dummy 4th funnel, to make the vessel look like a 'Weymouth' class British cruiser. Over the period of Aug. 4 thru Nov. 9, 1914, Emden, under the command of Korvettenkapitän Karl Friedrich Max von Müller ('Müller'), captured or sank  30 or 31 Allied ships in the Indian Ocean. Müller treated well the captains, crew & passengers of the ships that he encountered. On Sep. 26, 1914, Emden captured Gryfevale, 4437 tons, bound in ballast from Aden to Colombo, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). Gryfevale was not sunk, rather ordered to follow Emden. On Sep. 27, 1914, Emden captured Buresk, laden with coal, & captured & sank two ships, Foyle, in ballast & Ribera, also in ballast, John Isdale in command, which was captured shortly after daybreak on Sep. 27, 1914, en route from Glasgow to Batavia (Java) via Alexandria, Egypt. Ribera's sea cocks were opened, scuttling charges placed aboard & at 9.00 a.m., the ship was despatched by gunfire. At or about 07.30N/75.26E, 210 miles WxN of Colombo. The crews of Ribera, Foyle, & 4 other captured ships were placed aboard Gryfevale, which was released on Sep. 28, 1914 & proceeded to Colombo. It would seem that no Ribera lives were lost. Emden's raider career was short. On Nov. 9, 1914, Emden was attacked by HMAS Sydney, hit by over 100 shells & ended up aground, a twisted wreck, with 131 of her crew killed & many casualties. Müller & other crew members were taken as prisoners. The much decorated Müller, (Iron Cross First Class, Pour le Mérite or 'Blue Max'), was held in England for the duration of WW1, was released in Nov. 1918, & returned to Germany. He was promoted, but soon retired due to poor health & died in 1923. Can you correct the above and/or add anything additional? #1882 

53 Endsleigh
3709 (or 3779) tons
Hull 427

119339

Président Bunge
Twyford
Vironia
Twyford
Ciltvaira
1905

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('uboat.net', 1942 sinking, Ciltvaira, image), 2 ('wrecksite.eu', wreck data, Ciltvaira), 3 (Ciltvaira, data), 4 (extensive detail of the events of Jan. 19, 1942), 5 (images of a wreck, believed by some to be Ciltvaira), 6 (identity of Cape Hatteras wrecks), 7 (August 26, 1940, 40% down), 8 (image, Ciltvaira), 9 (Miramar, you now must be registered to access). 105.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 346.7 ft., speed of 10 (or 8 1/2) knots, signal letters MBQG. Built for Endsleigh Steamship Co. Ltd., of Plymouth. I note that 2 seems to suggest that in 1900, the vessel was named Afrikander, & owned by Bucknall SS Lines Ltd., of London. In 1907, the vessel was sold to 'Compagnie Royale Belgo-Argentine', of Antwerp, Belgium, A. Deppe the manager, & renamed Président Bunge. In 1925, the vessel was sold to Britain Steamship Co. Ltd. ('Britain'), of London, Watts Watts & Co. the managers, & renamed Twyford. In 1932, the vessel was sold again, to N. C. Pihlakas, of Talinn, Estonia, & renamed  Vironia. Two years later, in 1934, Britain again acquired the vessel & renamed it Twyford. In 1935, the vessel was sold to 'Johann Feymann, Janis Salcmans and Karlis Jansons', of Riga, Latvia, & renamed Ciltvaira. In 1938, Latvian Shipping Co., i.e. Latvijas Kugniecibas Sabiedriba ('Latvijas'), also of Riga, became the owner with no change of vessel name. No WW2 convoy references re the vessel. During WW2, the vessel was operated by the Latvian Government in exile & managed by Latvijas. On Aug. 26, 1940, Ciltvaira, under charter to Ore Steamship Company, was sabotaged by its Latvian crew who did not wish to go to Murmansk, Russia, with 6,000 tons of manganese, as instructed by the Russian Government. Have I understood correctly the words 40% down 7? If not, can anybody clarify both the meaning & the context? On Jan. 19, 1942, Ciltvaira, Karl Skerbergs in command, with a multi-national crew of 31 all told, was en route, unaccompanied, from Norfolk, Virginia, to Savannah, Georgia, with a cargo of 6200 tons of newsprint ex Corner Brook, Newfoundland. At 5:00 a.m., the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-123, Korvettenkapitän Reinhard Hardegen in command. Ciltvaira was one of four vessels attacked by U-123 that day. At 35.35N/75.23W, close to the Outer Banks of North Carolina, so close to shore that U-123 could see its targets silhouetted against on shore lights. The torpedo hit on the port side of the engine room, pierced the boilers, and flooded the boiler room and No. 2 hold. There was a hole four foot in diameter at the water line. Two firemen were killed - Carl Gustaefssen & Rolf Semelin. Ciltvaira was severely damaged, her back being broken, & the order was given to abandon ship. Coamo, a refrigerated passenger/cargo ship, came by but did not stop fearing it too would be hit. 2 hours later, Bury, a Brazilian freighter, attempted to tow the still floating Ciltvaira, but made little headway & abandoned the effort, taking, however, some of Ciltvaira's crew & landing them at New York. Nine of the crew returned to the damaged ship in an attempt to keep her afloat. At 9:00 p.m., Socony-Vacuum, a tanker, took the remaining crew aboard & landed them at Charleston, South Carolina. You might like to know that they also landed Briska & Pluskis, the ship's pet cat & dog! USS Osprey (AM-56), a minesweeper, stood by until USS Sciota (AT-30), an ocean going tug, tried to resume the tow. What then happened is unclear. It may i) have remained afloat & drifting for two more days, but it may also ii) have sunk while being towed in heavy seas and/or iii) been hit by another torpedo. The vessel is said to have sunk at 35.46N/74.37W, off Nags Head, South Carolina, U.S.A. But ... it would seem that the wreck has not truly yet been found. The sinking was a front page story in the New York Times of Jan. 21, 1942, complete with an image. Can you add to or correct the data above? Another image perhaps?

54   Wearmouth
3618 (or 3638) tons
Hull 433

120591

Silverbirch
Salamis
1905

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data item 8), 2 [Silver Line, Silverbirch (1)], 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 346.5 ft. (105.6 metres) long. Built for Evans, Thompson & Co., of London. In 1911, sold to 'St. Helens Steam Shipping Co.', of London, which would seem to have been a Silver Line Ltd. company, & renamed Silverbirch. Note however, that 'Sea Breezes' in an extensive Oct. 1991 article  about Silver Line, rather refers to St. Helen's Steamshipping Co. A tramp ship. In 1914 sold to 'A. & A. Callinicos', of Ithaca, Greece, & renamed Salamis. I am not sure of the full accuracy of the text that follows since I can locate no WWW data that says what exactly happened. It would appear, however, that on Dec. 10, 1916, Salamis was captured as a prize by U-47, south of Fuerteventura, Canary Islands, while en route from Cardiff to Montevideo, Uruguay. On Dec. 12 or 13, 1916, the vessel was shelled & sunk at 27.50N/14.40W. Any loss of life? Need help! Data? An image perhaps?

55 Aboukir
3660 tons
Hull 442

124127
1906

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('uboat.net', sinking data, 1918), 2 ('wrecksite.eu' sinking data, image), 3 (sinking data, Aboukir), 4 ('pdf' file re sinking, Aboukir), 5 (UB-48), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 107.3 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed ? Built for 'Clydesdale Shipowners Co. Ltd.', a subsidiary of Glen & Co. Ltd. ('Glen'), of Glasgow, the vessel's managers. On Feb. 3, 1918, en route, in ballast, from Naples to Gibraltar, the vessel was sunk by UB-48, Kapitänleutnant Wolfgang Steinbauer ('Steinbauer') in command. It would seem that the vessel was captured by UB-48 on Feb. 2, 1918, & attempts were made by gunfire & explosives to sink her. She did not sink however, so she was torpedoed & sunk on the next day. At 42.20N/03.40E, 20 miles ExS of Cape Creus, a peninsula & headland in NE Spain, about 25 km S. of the French border. There was no loss of life, apparently, but the Master (his name?) was taken prisoner. UB-48 was a most successful WW1 submarine, sinking 35 vessels & damaging 8 more. Steinbauer was, in fact, the 8th most successful German WW1 U-boat commander. The available data re this vessel is in conflict - 3 indicates the vessel was rather en route from Genoa to Montevideo, while Miramar state that the relevant dates were Feb. 3 & Feb. 4, 1918. The WWW record for this vessel, other than re the sinking, is modest indeed. Need help! Another image perhaps?

56 Blackwell
4712 (later 4787) tons
Hull 464

123952

Ruysdael
Iris
1907

A cargo ship. Per 1 (launch of Blackwell, ex the Nov. 1, 1907 edition of 'The Marine Engineer and Naval Architect', an 'archive.org' book), 2 (data, Blackwell), 3 (to France in 1915), 4 (Bolton, history), 5 [Bolton Steam, Ruysdael (3)], 6 (data, Ruysdael), 7 (refs. Ruysdael, 70/75% down), 8 ('Lloyds Register' data, Iris, 1930/31 thru 1934/35, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org', see left), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 401.7 ft. long, 122.4 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 13 knots, signal letters HLWS & later NUBF & ICFN (last 2 as Iris). Built for 'Tyzack & Branfoot Steam Shipping Co. Ltd.' ('Tyzack'), i.e. 'Well Line', of Sunderland, 'Tyzack & Branfoot' the managers. Intended for service on the company's routes to India ex Middlesbrough & London. The vessel was 'gracefully christened' by Miss Stobart at its launch on Oct. 5, 1907, 69 days after the laying of her keel. I have read that on Mar. 25, 1905, Tyzack was restyled 'Well Line Limited'. Can anybody tell us about her WW1 service? I have read only that in early 1915, the vessel carried troops of the 2nd Battalion, Eastern Ontario Regiment, Canadian Expeditionary Force, to France for service at Ypres & in many other WW1 battles. In 1916, Well Line would seem to have been acquired by 'Anchor-Brocklebank Limited, of Liverpool. Blackwell would have continued to serve India. The vessel was transferred, in 1919, into the name of 'T. & J. Brocklebank Ltd.', & in 1921, the vessel was sold to 'Bolton Steam Shipping Company Ltd.', of London, a company noted for naming its ships after artists beginning with the letter 'R'. The vessel was renamed Ruysdael, the third fleet vessel of the name (the first is here). In 1929, the vessel was sold to Achille Lauro, of Naples, Italy, & renamed Iris. Thanks to 'plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data for Iris re 1930/31 thru 1934/35 is WWW available - see left. On Jan. 15, 1935, the vessel arrived at the Monfalcone, near Trieste, Italy, ship breaking facilities of 'CR dell'Adriatico', to be broken up. WWW data is really quite limited. The above may well need correction. Additions to & corrections of the above text would be welcomed. An image? #1883

57 Morawitz
4795 tons
Hull 460

149786 (later)

Kermoor
Morawitz
Purley Oaks
1907

A cargo ship. From 1 (data, image, Morawitz), 2 ('Lloyds Register' data, Purley Oaks, 1930/31 thru 1935/36, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 378.0 ft. long perpendicular to perpendicular, single screw, signal letters GMZP. Built for 'Atlantica Sea Navigation Company Limited', of Fiume, Yugoslavia. In 1914, the vessel was laid up at Galveston, Texas. It was sold, in 1917, to Kerr Navigation Corp. ('Kerr'), of New York & renamed Kermoor. On Mar. 14, 1918 the vessel was taken over by U.S. Army but was commissioned on Nov. 1, 1918 at Cardiff, Wales, by the U.S. Navy, Naval Overseas Transport Services. The vessel name was retained. 'Operated by the Navy under Army account, Kermoor served out of Cardiff, carrying coal and military supplies between British and French ports.' The vessel sailed on Mar. 6, 1919 to New York (arr. Apl. 21) via Queenstown & Baltimore. Decommissioned on May 5, 1919 & returned to owner same day - to Kerr? In 1921, the vessel was sold to American Ship & Commerce Navigation Co. Inc. (United American Line Inc.), of New York. And later in 1921 was sold to 'Oceana Sea. Nav. Co. Ltd.' (Atlantic Trust Co. Ltd.), of Budapest, Hungary, & renamed Morawitz. It was sold for the last time, in 1927, to T. E. Evans & Co. Ltd., of London, & renamed Purley Oaks. The vessel was broken up, in 1936, by Metal Industries Ltd. at Rosyth, Firth of Forth. Can you help in any way with additional data?

58 Ariadne Christine
3649 (or 3550) tons
Hull 474

129095

Truth
Vahva
Suerte
Trinity
1910

A cargo ship. From 1 (1918 mining), 2 (Norwegian page, Truth, image Truth), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Suerte), 4 (grounding at Baltasound in Feb. 1940), 5 (Lloyd's Register data, Suerte, 1940/41 thru 1945/46, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 108.5 metres long, 356.0 ft. (or 356 ft. 1 in.), speed of 9 knots, signal letters LDCZ, WMTL, LBTN & HPOI. Built for 'Ariadne Steamship Co. Ltd.' of London (maybe offices also in West Hartlepool), 'G. P. Sechiari', of London, the managers. In 1916, 'P. Samuel & Co. Ltd.', became the managers. On Sep. 2, 1918, the vessel hit a mine, possibly laid by U-75, off the NW Point of Ribachi Peninsula, at the entrance to the White Sea (Barents Sea, N. Russia, near Archangel). The vessel was damaged but survived. And was towed to Murmansk, Russia, & then perhaps towed onwards to the Tees. In 1920, repaired I presume, the vessel was sold to 'Skjelbreds Rederi A/S', of Kristiansand, Norway, O. A. T. Skjelbred, the manager, & renamed Truth. The ownership changes in 1939/1940 are confusing indeed. It would seem that in 1939, the vessel was sold to British buyers - per Miramar 'J. Teng, G. W. Grace & A. B. Grace' ('Grace'), but was registered at Talinn, Estonia. And renamed Vahva. But Roger Jordan advises that 'Compańia de Vapores Ltda.' ('Vapores'), of Panama, P. Wigham Richardson & Co. Ltd., of London, the managers, were the owners of Vahva. They certainly were the vessel's owners in 1940/41 thru 1945/46 per Lloyds Registers (left). 'Convoyweb.org' records no WW2 convoy references for Vahva. I read, however, that on Feb. 6, 1940, Vahva went aground at Baltasound, Island of Unst, Shetland Islands, in an incident described in Story of a Ship: 'The Earl of Zetland', by Adam Robson. Can anybody advise us what the book says? Now Miramar refers, as stated above, re Vahva, to 'Grace' - Vapores may have been associated with 'Connell & Grace Ltd.' The vessel was sold again, in 1940, to 'Thras L. Boyazides & Co.' ('Boyazides'), of Andros, Greece, & renamed Suerte. But it would seem likely that Boyazides were not the owners but rather were the managers for Vapores. Registered at Panama. 74 WW2 convoy references as Suerte, covering the period of Apl. 1940 thru May 1945. Includes at least 10 N. Atlantic crossings, service in Mediterranean (Port Said), service to E. Africa (Freetown), in May 1945 to Havre, France, & many U.K. coastal voyages.  In 1951, the vessel was sold to 'Trinity Compańia de Navigazione S.A.', of Panama, A. Lusi, presumably the manager, & renamed Trinity. The vessel was laid up for a while prior to, on Nov. 16, 1953, the vessel arriving at Savona, Italy, to be broken up. It was broken up at Vado Ligure (Savona) in Mar. 1954. Can you help in any way? Some images, perhaps?

59 Boyne
4445 tons
Hull 473

129121

Ariadne Pandelis
1910

A cargo ship. From 1 (Mercantile history 60% down, Boyne (2) data), 2 (Hain references on page), 3 (Portuguese page re 'Ariadne Pandellis'), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 113.9 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, (about 388 ft.) single screw, speed of 11 knots. Maintained 12 1/2 knots on its trial voyage. Built for 'The Mercantile Steamship Company Ltd.' ('Mercantile'), of London. In 1917, 'Hain Steamship Company' ('Hain'), which company became a P&O & 'British India Steam Navigation Company' company following the death of Sir Edward Hain, became the majority owner of Mercantile & the managers of Boyne. By 1923, Hain owned all of Mercantile & in that year the vessel was transferred to Hain, with no change in the vessel's name. In 1930, the vessel was sold, for Ł22,400, to Marmara Steamship Co. Ltd., of Greece, & renamed Ariadne Pandelis. On Jun. 19, 1936, while en route from Gdynia, Poland, to Mar del Plate, Argentina, with a cargo of coal, the port coal bunker caught fire when the vessel was at Bahia (Salvador), Brazil. Unsuccessful efforts were made to control the fire. With the assistance of tugs Souza & Netuno, the vessel was towed & on Jun. 23, 1936 beached, at Itaparica, Brazil, away from other marine traffic. At 12.52.966S/ 38.41.189W. After an explosion on Jun. 25, 1936, the vessel was purposely flooded to put out the fire & the vessel was abandoned by the crew as a total loss. It would seem that Captain Atanásio Eugenides did not return to his ship or attempt the recovery of any of the cargo. Rather he initiated a claim on the vessel's insurance & presumably departed. It would seem that the vessel was later dynamited - in the 1980s. Little remains today. What there is, located right in front of the Icarai Hotel at Itaparica, is marked with a yellow buoy 50 metres off shore. The webmaster thought that is what happened, but he was really not sure. The WWW translation of Portuguese is most difficult & especially so when a site (3) does not permit text to be copied & pasted elsewhere such as into a WWW translation site. Why ever not, I wonder! But Ivo Miller confirms (thanks!) that my understanding of the story is good. He witnessed the demolition of the ship by the Brazilian Navy & his grandfather owned the Icarai Hotel. Can you help in any way?

60 Collingham
4080 (later 4115 & 4199) tons
Hull 470

129069

Duba
Irish Elm
Leda
Sadiklar
1910

A cargo ship. From 1 (data with image of Sadiklar), 2 (Irish Shipping, Irish Elm acquired 1941), 3 (Lloyd's Register data, Collingham, 1940/41 thru 1945/46, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 4 & 5 (Lloyd's Register data, Duba, 1930/31 thru 1940/41, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 107.2 metres long (351.7 ft.) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 9 knots, signal letters HQJS later JEUX, YTAS & EINS. Built for Harris & Dixon Ltd., of London. The vessel had many different owners in the years that followed, all of the following being of London. To Century Shipping Co. Ltd. in 1910 & to Freear & Dix Steam Shipping Co. Ltd. in 1915. Also in 1915 to Turnbull Bros. Shipping Co. Ltd. In 1920 to Pentwyn Steamship Co. Ltd. and later that year to Bathampton Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. and in 1925 to 'Kingdom Steamships Ltd.', with Jackson Bros. the managers. The vessel was sold in 1930 to 'Slobodna Plovidba Dubrovnik', of Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia, & renamed Duba. Such owner later became 'Slobodna Plovidba Drustvo s.o.j.'. And sold in 1941 to 'Cia. Leda de Vapores SA', of Panama, & renamed Leda. And later that year to 'Irish Shipping Ltd.' of Dublin, Ireland, & renamed Irish Elm. In 1949 'Sadikzade Rusen Ogullari KS', of Istanbul, Turkey, acquired the vessel & renamed it Sadiklar. Have seen the name referred to as Sadýklar, particularly on a Turkish site now long gone. The vessel was broken up in Dec. 1961 at Sibenik, Yugoslavia. Can you help in any way?

61 Cento
3708 tons
Hull 483

131396

Jurko Topic
Wien
Jurko Topic
Hammarland
Karlshamn
Aino Nurminen
1911

A cargo ship. Per 1 (extensive data in Swedish), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 106.2 metres long, speed of 9 knots. Built for Corinthian Shipping Company Ltd. of Liverpool. In 1919 the vessel was sold to 'W. R. Davies Steamship Co.', also of Liverpool (possibly with R. Nicholson & Co. the managers). In 1930, the vessel was sold to 'Slobodna Plovidba Topic D.D.' ('Slobodna'), or maybe 'A Topic', of Sušak, Jugoslavia, & renamed Jurko Topic. And sold in 1934 to 'Austria Schiffahrts A.G.', of Vienna, Austria, & renamed Wien. In 1936 the vessel was acquired again by Slobodna & renamed Jurko Topic. In 1937, the vessel was sold to 'Naxos Prince', of Helsinki, Finland, & renamed Hammarland, Curt Mattson Rederi AB, of Helsinki the likely manager. And in Jan. 1942, it was sold to 'Sven Salén', of Stockholm, Sweden. In Feb. 1942, I think that the vessel was interned at Buenos Aires, Argentina & renamed Karlshamn, S. Salen then the manager? In Oct. 1943, the vessel was transferred to 'Rederi AB Jamaica/ Rederi AB Westindia', of Stockholm. Laid up in 1945? In Aug. 1947 the vessel was sold to 'Laiva Oy Rauma', of Helsinki, Finland, (J. Nurminen manager?) & renamed Aino Nurminen. In 1957, the vessel was sold to Italian ship breakers & in Dec. 1957 arrived at Trieste to be broken up. Am grateful for the data at 1, however the webmaster's ability in Swedish is non-existent, & WWW translation was of limited help. Corrections will surely be needed to the above text. Can you help with corrections and/or data!

62 Manningtry
3869 (or 3807) tons
Hull 477

124297

Arabier
Caldy Light
Rönnskär
Parklaan
1911

A cargo ship. From 1 (re 1944 scuttling, Mulberry Harbour, Gooseberry #3, 50% down, Parklaan), 2 (extensive data, in Dutch, 2nd item), 3 (Lloyd Royal Belge, Arabier), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Parklaan), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 107.4 (or 107.66) metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 352.5 ft., speed of 9 knots. Built for Imperial Steam Ship Co. Ltd., of Manchester, 'Sivewright, Bacon & Co.', the managers. The vessel was sold, in 1916, to 'Brys-Gylsen Ltd.', of  London, & renamed Arabier. The vessel was sold again, in 1917, to 'Lloyd Royal Belge (Great Britain) Limited', of  London. In 1922, the vessel was sold to 'Bristol Channel Steamers Ltd.', of Cardiff, 'J. German & Co.', the managers, & renamed Caldy Light. 'Lewis Lougher & Co. Ltd.' became the managers in 1926. In 1932, the vessel was sold to 'Marjanels Steam Shipping Co. Ltd.', of London, managed by 'F. W. Uittenbogaart', of Rotterdam, with no change of name. In 1934, it was sold to 'O/Y Wasa Steam Shipping Co.', of Wasa, Finland, managed by Marjanels Steam Shipping Co. Ltd., & renamed Rönnskär. A few years later, in 1937, the vessel was sold to N.V. Stoomschip "Hannah", of Rotterdam, managed by F. W. Uittenbogaart, & renamed Parklaan. 53 WW2 convoy references including at least 11 N. Atlantic crossings, Mediterranean (Port Said), W. Africa (Freetown, Casablanca) & many UK coastal. Its final voyage was from Goole to Seine Bay, France, in Jun. 1944. Upon arrival there, it was  scuttled, on Jun. 8, 1944, as part of a temporary 'Mulberry Harbour', on the coast of Normandy, (Gold Beach, Arromanches, Normandy), France. It was re-floated in Jul. 1945, towed to Troon, Scotland, & broken up there in Oct. 1945. Can you add anything?

63 Tenpaisan Maru
5416 tons
Hull 488

14168
1911

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Mitsui Bussan Kaisha, Tenpaisan Maru), 2 & 3 (wreck images, 'Jones Photo Co.'), 4 & 5 (WWW wreck images), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 116.0 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 12 knots. When built, the largest ship that 'JLT' had ever built. Built for 'Mitsui Bussan Kaisha', of Tokyo & Kobe, or maybe of Mikawa, Japan. In 1915, the vessel was 'stuck' at the Pacific end of the Panama Canal, by a massive slide that blocked the canal & delayed at least 83 ships for an extended period.  In late 1927, the vessel was en route from Japan to N. Pacific ports, when it was driven ashore by a massive SW gale, during thick fog, at Copalis Beach, 12 miles N. of Grays Harbor, Washington. Roughly at 47.7.4N/124.10.42W. I believe that it ran aground on Nov. 24, 1927, but not all sources agree. Salvage tug Salvage Queen, of Pacific Salvage Company Limited, of Vancouver, Canada, perhaps, went to her assistance on that day but was recalled as the vessel was already breaking up. No loss of life. The U.S. Coast Guard Service got a line aboard from shore with a Lyle gun, & rescued everybody by a pulley & breeches buoy apparatus. The vessel was a total loss. It would seem that the wreck lay on the beach for a great many years & that children played both in & on it. It was eventually, however (when I wonder?) removed. I have not been able to read any detail as to Tenpaisan Maru's final voyage - the crew number, the Captain's name, its cargo, its course at the time, etc. etc. Nor the exact coordinates of the wreck site. The wreck & rescue was photographed by a photographer of 'Jones Photo Co.', long established in the North West, with studios at nearby Aberdeen, Washington. Can anybody provide large quality scans of contemporary 1927 'Jones' wreck postcards? The scene is dramatic & the images merit better WWW coverage than is today available. Or help with corrections and/or additional data!

64 Chincha
6395 (or 6348) tons
Hull 488

135135

Milena
Gloria
1912

A cargo ship. Per 1 (extensive data Gloria), 2 (Grace Line), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 126 metres long, speed of 10 1/2 knots. Built for 'New York & Pacific Steamship Co. Ltd.', of London,  [a subsidiary of 'W. R. Grace & Co.', which company i) had a long association with Peru hence the vessel name, & ii) became Grace Steamship Company, ('Grace')], of New York ('NY') Grace the managers. In 1918, the vessel was sold to 'Nafra Steamship Co.' of NY, Grace the manager. In 1919, the vessel was sold to 'Green Star Steamship Corp.', of NY. In 1923, it was sold again, to 'Planet Steamship Co.', also of NY. In 1929, it was sold to 'American South African Line Inc.', of NY. And in 1939, was sold to 'Ante Babarovich', of Milna, Yugoslavia ('Petrinovic & Co. Ltd.', of London, the managers), & renamed Milena. In 1941, the vessel was sold to 'Compańia de Vapores Arauco Panameńa', of Panama ('Atlas Trading Corp.', of NY, the manager) & renamed Gloria. Also in 1941 (Jan. 8), the vessel was chartered by the Swiss War Transport Administration ('Swiss'), of Berne, Switzerland. 1st voyage from NY to Genoa. Swiss negotiated to acquire the vessel but the transaction was not consummated - the charter ended on Apl. 16, 1941. In 1948, the vessel was registered, sold I presume, to 'Gloria Compańia Maritima S.A.', of Panama. In Aug. 1950, it arrived at the Baltimore, Maryland, facilities of 'Potapsco Scrap Company' to be broken up. Can you help with corrections and/or additional data!

65 Curaca
6386 tons
Hull 489

135178
1912

A cargo ship. Per 1 (extensive data, Halifax explosion), 2 (Wikipedia, Halifax explosion), 3 (more explosion data), 4 (data, Curaca, Halifax explosion), 5 (Grace Line), 6 (Lloyd's Register data 1930/31 thru 1933/34 ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 7 (repair of Curaca, after Halifax explosion, ex Popular Science Monthly of Sep. 1927), 8 (monument to Curaca crew members lost), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 122.8 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular (403.0 ft.), speed of 10 1/2 knots, signal letters JBKN. Built for 'New York & Pacific Steamship Co. Ltd.' ('NYPSCo'), of London,  for use on their New York to Chile service. NYPSCo was a subsidiary of 'W. R. Grace & Co.' ('GraceCo') of New York, a company with a long trading association with South America. The operations of both companies, known as 'Grace Line', came together & in 1922, the vessel was, in fact, transferred into the name of GraceCo. But I am getting ahead of the story. Curaca? A senior official in the Incan Empire - a likely origin of the name. It seems likely that the vessel was stranded off Charleston Harbour, perhaps in 1917, but the data is sketchy. On Dec. 6, 1917, the vessel was at Pier 8, in Halifax Harbour, loading horses or mules to be shipped to Europe for WW1 service. Or did it have grain only aboard & was awaiting the arrival of the livestock? The vessel was then under the command of Captain E. Peck, with a crew of 55 & also 12 horsemen to look after the animals. Now the Halifax Explosion is really too large a subject to cover here in depth - you are directed to the many other sources for greater detail. But in a 'relatively speaking' nutshell ...
Entering Halifax Harbour that morning was Mont Blanc, a 3279, or maybe 3121 gross ton, cargo ship built in 1899 by Sir Raylton Dixon & Co., at Middlesbrough, for 'Société Générale de Transports Maritimes ŕ Vapeur', of Marseilles, France. On Dec. 1, 1917, Mont Blanc, had left New York for Halifax to join an eastbound convoy to Europe with Bordeaux, France, as her destination. It was then owned by 'Compagnie Générale Transatlantique', registered at Saint Nazaire, & was carrying explosives including 250 tons of TNT, 2,366 1/2 tons of 'highly unstable' picric acid, &, on the deck, 250 tons of benzol in barrels. Captain Aimé Le Medec was in command with a crew of 41. And a pilot named Francis MacKey was aboard. I have read that an ammunition ship was required to fly a red flag (is that correct?) but Mont Blanc apparently did not do so. Exiting the harbour was Imo, 4833 gross tons, a livestock carrier built in 1899 for White Star Line as Runic by Harland & Wolff of Belfast. In 1917, Imo, then a supply ship owned by 'South Pacific Whaling Company' of Christiana, Norway, was a 'neutral' ship, under charter by 'The Commission for Relief in Belgium', & was leaving for New York to load relief supplies there. Captain Haakon From was in command with a crew of 39. William Hayes was aboard as pilot. Early on Dec. 6, 1917, in clear weather, the vessels were in 'The Narrows', the narrow (300 to 500 metres bank to bank) access to 'Bedford Basin', the inner harbour of Halifax. In the confines of The Narrows also was Stella Maris, a tug, (previously a mine-sweeper) pulling two scows. Imo, going quite fast, tried to overtake or avoid Stella Maris & its towed vessels, & strayed out of its correct channel. Mont Blanc & Imo collided at 8:45 a.m., not a giant collision in fact, but sparks from the collision caused Mont Blanc to catch fire. Its crew tried to combat the fire & then took to the boats & they rowed (like hell, I would have thought!) for Dartmouth, leaving the ship to drift towards Halifax. Efforts were made to tow the burning vessel away - a tender from HMCS Niobe, a Royal Canadian Navy depot ship, attached a hawser to it & Stella Maris tried to tow the vessel. But the hawser broke & a stronger one was en route to the scene when Mont Blanc blew. The entire tender's crew died in the subsequent explosion, while Stella Maris was severely damaged & 19 of her crew, including Brannen her captain, were killed. Petty Officer Albert C. (Charles) Mattison, in command of the tender, was awarded the prestigious Albert Medal for his brave efforts. Mont Blanc came to rest at Pier 6, in the north end of Halifax. Sorry! I got ahead of the story. Just before 9:05 a.m., 20 minutes after the collision, Mont Blanc exploded. And what an explosion! A brilliant flash of light, a shock wave felt 270 miles away, much of the city of Halifax flattened, over 2,000 killed & 9,000 injured (many lost eyes or total eyesight), much shipping destroyed & damaged, a giant wave like a tsunami. Mont Blanc ceased to exist - bits of it were blasted miles away - a large part of its cannon, as an example, landed 3 1/2 miles away. Due to their rowing prowess perhaps, Mont Blanc's crew all survived, (they landed near protective woods), except for one sailor, who was, it would seem, hit by falling debris & later died. (A human interest story concerning some of the Mont Blanc crew). Imo was driven against the northern or eastern Dartmouth shore, substantially damaged. Captain From, 5 crew members & its pilot were killed. It was repaired, & later, as Guvernřren, a whale-oil tanker, ran onto rocks & was abandoned at Cape Carysfort, Cow Bay, East Falklands, on Dec. 3, 1921. Who was at fault? Mont Blanc or Imo? The matter was addressed by a number of courts, & the final court, the Privy Council, in London, England, determined that the vessels were, in fact, both at fault. The above summation may well need correction since the various disaster accounts differ in their detail.
And Curaca? It was moored just a few hundred feet from the exploding Mont Blanc, was torn from its moorings & driven across to Tufts Cove, Dartmouth, where it sank, stern pushed in, her masts & smokestack blown away. She lay with her bow out of the water. I read that of its crew, 7 or 8 were ashore at the time & survived while 46, aboard at the time of the explosion, were all killed except for one. The words seem not to account, however, for the 67 referenced above? Captain Peck clearly survived - he filed paperwork re crew members of Curaca who lost their lives, including John McGaddock, fireman, & J. Boyle, seaman. A list of 54 names, which includes both crew members & horsemen who lost their lives aboard Curaca, is here. The vessel was later, in 1918, raised, & towed to New York. She was badly damaged, her superstructure having been blown away, & she was buckled - she apparently sagged 8 feet in the middle. She was rebuilt with great skill & was put back into service with no change of vessel name. In 1922, the vessel was transferred into the name of GraceCo, & registered at Panama. In 1931, the vessel was sold to 'Curaca Shipping Corp.', also of Panama, 'Argonaut Steamship Line Inc.', of Panama, the managers, again with no change of vessel name. In late Mar. 1931, the vessel started a service from Baltimore to Buenos Aires, Montevideo & Rosario. Norton Lilly & Co. of New York were the local agents at the time, it would appear. However a 'blotter' indicates that the service was direct from New York to the above ports & also to Santa Fe. On Feb. 28, 1934, the vessel arrived at Osaka, Japan, to be broken up. Can you help with corrections and/or provide additional data? Another image? Was there an official Inquiry into the Halifax Explosion, separate from the court actions? #1843

66 Southern
4769 (or 5977 or 6065) tons
Hull 487

132714
44573

Maasdijk
Rhymney
Macdonald
Pei Foo
Kitafuku Maru
1912

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Holland America Line, Maasdijk), 2 (data, Rhymney), 3 [Morel Limited, Rhymney (2)], 4 (Southern, in 1915, ex 'The Argus', Melbourne), 5 (data in Dutch), 6 (link 5 translated), 7 (2 images, Maasdijk), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 118.5 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 403.0 ft. overall?, 388.7 ft., speed of 10 (or 9 1/2) knots. Built for 'Lunsford Shipping Co. Ltd.', of London, Harris & Dixon the managers. But the 'JLT' build list elsewhere in these pages indicates that it was built for Century Shipping Co. Ltd. ('Century'). It would seem that in the immediately following years, the vessel was owned by a number of related companies, including, in 1914, Century of London. The vessel was requisitioned by the Commonwealth Government ('Commonwealth') of Australia, from Century. The vessel left Albany, Western Australia, on Nov. 15, 1914, carrying 7 officers, 145 men & 328 horses across the Indian Ocean as part of the Australian Imperial Force to the WW1 campaign in Europe. And, it would seem, New Zealand forces also. Rather slowly, apparently! On Feb. 3, 1915, Commonwealth relinquished control of the vessel, which was, on Jan. 29, 1915, (dates modestly wrong somewhere it would seem), sold for Ł88,000 to 'Nederlandsch-Amerikaansche Stoomvaart Mij', i.e. 'Holland America Line' ('Holland'), of Rotterdam, & renamed Maasdijk. Have seen the name referred to also as Maasdyjk. The vessel's first voyage for Holland was on Feb. 18, 1915 to the E. coast of North America. Crew of 44. On Dec. 1, 1922, the vessel was sold to 'Congueil Steamship Company Ltd.', (or maybe Conguel), of London, 'Morel Limited' of Cardiff, the managers & renamed Rhymney. In 1923, the vessel became owned by Rhymney Steamship Co. Ltd., of Cardiff, with no change of vessel name. In 1928, or 1929, it was sold again, to 'Dowlais Steamship Company Ltd.' ('Dowlais'), also of London, Morel still the managers, again with no change of vessel name. Dowlais went into bankruptcy in late 1936 & the vessel was sold to 'Guardian Line Ltd.', of London, C. A. Roberts the managers, & renamed Macdonald. In 1937, the vessel was sold, for Ł50,000, to 'Chang Shu Chang', of Tsingtao, China, & renamed Pei Foo. And in 1938, the vessel was sold to 'Kitagawa Sangyo Kaiun KK', of Osaka, Japan, & renamed Kitafuku Maru. A data 'snippet' seems to state, however, that the vessel was instead captured by the Japanese in 1938. On Mar. 17, 1940, the vessel ran aground & was wrecked. At 26.20N/126.56E, on Luchu Island, E. of Kumesima, Japan, NE of Taiwan. I have not read the circumstances. Can you help with corrections and/or additional data!

67 North Pacific
3931 (or 3938) tons
Hull 497

132072

Csikós
Vinlake
1913

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data, Vinlake, 50% down), 2 (data & image, Csikós), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Csikos), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Vinlake), 5 (WW2 convoy, CORNCOB.3), 6 (French page, ships scuttled in 'Gooseberry 3'), 7 (extensive French 'pdf' file, '46 Vinlake', 65% down), 8 (image, Csikós), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 115.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 393 ft. 10 in., speed of 10 (or 9 only) knots. Built for 'Pacific Shipping Ltd.', of Sunderland, who just 3 years later, in 1916, sold the vessel to 'Felix Steamship Co. Ltd.', also of Sunderland, 'G. E. Ambatielos' the manager. In 1920, the vessel was sold again to another Sunderland owner, i.e. 'Newfoundland Maritime Co. Ltd.' 'Japp, Hatch and Co. Ltd. were the managers but in 1921 E. H. Mundy and Co., assumed the role. In 1923 the vessel was sold to Exmouth Steamship Co. Ltd., of Cardiff, Wales, Anning Bros. the managers. All of those changes of ownership were with no change of vessel name. In 1934, the vessel was sold to  'Magyar Hajózási Részvénytársaság', i.e. Anglo-Hungarian Shipping Co. Ltd. ('AngloHungarian'), of Budapest, Hungary, 'G. Barta' the manager, & renamed Csikós. 39 WW2 convoy references re Csikós, with just one of those voyages when registered in Hungary, i.e. HX.20 from Halifax, Canada, to Liverpool in Feb. 1940, en route to Le Havre, France. I read that in 1941, the vessel became registered at Panama, however it would seem that that re-registration must rather have taken place in Mar. or Apl. 1940. 38 WW2 convoy references when Panama registered, including 5 N. Atlantic crossings, at least 3 of them with grain, & U.K. coastal. If I understand correctly the French text at 7, as it relates to other available data, Kabalo, a Belgian cargo ship, was sunk on Oct. 15, 1940 by an Italian submarine & the Kabalo crew were at Lisbon, Portugal, in Mar. 1941. As were Csikós & Csarda, also an AngloHungarian fleet vessel. Isidore Mesmaekers, the first officer of Kabalo, was asked to bring Csikós to England, & was placed in command (I presume that the captain of Kabalo took command of Csarda). Csikós joined a convoy from Gibraltar on Apl. 3, 1941 & en route was attacked & damaged by German aircraft, 2 crew being killed in the attack. Csikós was repaired at Londonderry & safely reached Ardrossan, Scotland, on Apl. 29, 1941. In 1942, the vessel was sold again, to Kentships Ltd., of London, Craggs & Co. the manager, & renamed Vinlake. Became British flag. Now 7 states the ship was renamed Vinriver & then Vinlake, but the reference to Vinriver looks to be in error - it was Csarda which was renamed Vinriver. Just a single WW2 convoy reference re Vinlake. On Jun. 7, 1944, Vinlake left Poole Bay, Dorset, in convoy 'CORNCOB.3', for Seine Bay, France, arriving there the next day. The vessel had been taken over by the Ministry of War Transport, managed by Christian Salvesen and Co., & taken to France in order to assist re the Normandy Landings. To assist? In a most important way, yes indeed! The ship was old & provided valuable service when scuttled, on Jun. 9, 1944, as part of 'Gooseberry 3', one of 5 'Gooseberries', i.e. lines of ships scuttled to create sheltered waters, within which two 'Mulberry' harbours were built on the coast of France. Vinlake, a 'corncob', the military code term for such a block ship, was scuttled at Gold Beach, where 'Mulberry B', used by the British, was constructed at Arromanches. Two other 'JLT' built vessels were similarly scuttled there - Sirehei & Parklaan, built 1907 & 1911 respectively. 'Mulberry B' lasted much longer than anticipated - 10 months I read, & in that period 2.5 million men were landed along with 500,000 vehicles & 4 million tons of munitions & stores. The other 'Mulberry', i.e. 'Mulberry A', was constructed at Omaha Beach, for the use of the Americans, but was largely destroyed in a storm on Jun. 17, 1944. That is not the end of the story! Vinlake was re-floated in 1946, & taken, via Falmouth, to Milford Haven, to be broken up at the 'Bisco' T. A. Ward Ltd. ship breaking facilities there. En route it 'leaked badly' & had to be beached at St. Maws, Cornwall. I am grateful for the detail available at the above links. My text may well prove to include errors, so corrections would be most welcome, as would additional data.

68 Batsford
4782 tons
Hull 503

136641

Hamdale
St. Mellons
Tozan Maru
1914

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Canadian Pacific, Batsford), 2 ('wrecksite.eu', wreck of Tozan Maru, image Hamdale), 3 (image, Batsford, but you must be registered to view it), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 118.5 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 12 knots. Built for 'Century Shipping Co. Ltd., of London, owned by Harris & Dixon Ltd., also of London. I see that an image of Batsford appears in 'Ships of the Panama Canal' (by James L. Shaw, published in 1985), the first ship in a convoy transiting the canal, on a voyage from Antofagasta, Chile to Colon, for orders, with 7900 tons of nitrate. Perhaps the same image is at 3? In 1918, the vessel was bought by Canadian Pacific Railway Company, also of London, with no change of vessel name. That likely means 'Canadian Pacific Ocean Services Ltd.', which in 1921 became 'Canadian Pacific Steamships Ltd.' Presumably provided service to Canada (yes?) though I saw a brief reference to the vessel being engaged on a Portland to New York service in 1918. In 1927, the vessel was sold to  'Turnbull Coal & Shipping Co. Ltd.' ('Turnbull'), of Cardiff & renamed Hamdale. In 1934, Turnbull was restyled as 'Turnbulls (Cardiff) Ltd., also of Cardiff, of course. On Apl. 12, 1937, the vessel was sold to 'Barry Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Cardiff, i.e. 'South American Saint Line', 'B. and S. Shipping Co. Ltd.' the managers, & on Apl. 29, 1937 was renamed St. Mellons. A few days later that same year, in May 1937, the vessel was sold to 'Okada Gumi KK', of Osaka, Japan, with delivery in Jun/Jul. 1937, & renamed Tozan Maru. It was sold for Ł47,000 or perhaps for Ł42,500. On Mar. 6, 1938, while en route, in ballast, from Yawata, now Kitakyūshū, Japan, to Keelung, Taiwan, (then under Japanese rule), the vessel was wrecked. At 33.20N/129.10E, which is, I believe, in the Gotō Islands, in the East China Sea off the western coast of Kyushu Island, Japan. Have also read near to Sasebo on the island of Kyushu. Can anybody tell us the circumstances? Or otherwise add to or correct the above text.

69 Foyle
4703 (or 4739 or 4815) tons
Hull 510

139093

Delphoi
Volodda
1915

A cargo ship. Which had a long & interesting life. Per 1 (Mercantile Steamship history, 60% down, & extensive data Foyle near bottom of fleet list. Thanks!), 2 (See 'Horror at Bari', 90% down, Volodda), 3 (Bari attack), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 121.9 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, (414 ft 10 in.) speed of 10 knots. Built for Mercantile Steamship Co. Ltd. ('Mercantile'), of London. In 1917, Hain Steamship Co. ('Hain') became the owner of the majority of the shares of Mercantile & became Foyle's manager. By 1923, Hain owned all of the shares of Mercantile & Foyle was transferred to them. ln 1934, the vessel was sold, for Ł9,750, to 'Rethymnis & Kulukundis (Hellas) Ltd.', and D. E. & M. Lemos, both of Greece, with 'Rethymnis & Kulukundis Ltd.', as managers, & renamed Delphoi. In 1936, 'owners restyled D.P., M.G. & E.P. Lemos and Rethymnis & Kulukundis (Hellas) Ltd.'. On Nov. 9, 1938, while en route from Gdynia, Poland, to Chekka, Syria, with a cargo of coal, the vessel was stranded at Chekka. Cannot find any detail about the circumstances. The vessel was re-floated 'and reported sold to Italian shipbreakers who resold her to F. A. Bertorello' ('Bertorello'), of Genoa-Sampierdarena, Italy, who repaired her & renamed her Volodda (in 1939). No WW2 convoy references it would appear. 1 indicates that the vessel, in Sep. 1943, was scuttled at Bari, Italy. It would seem however, that Volodda was at Bari, Italy, when, on Dec. 2, 1943, German Ju-88 aircraft mounted a fierce bombing attack against allied ships assembled there re the allied advance up the Italian mainland. I read that 17 ships were sunk & 6 more were damaged but the list seems to total to 41 vessels. I think that Volodda was sunk in the attack but the data WWW available is a bit confusing. Can someone explain an Italian ship being at Bari, as part of the Allied advance? Later, in 1947, it was raised, repaired & returned to service. Bertorello was in 1958 restyled as 'Febo Amedeo Bertorello fu Giacomo'. In 1960, the vessel was sold to British Iron and Steel Corporation (Salvage) Ltd., of London, & 'allocated' to 'P. and W. McLellan Ltd.', ship-breakers of Glasgow. But on Aug. 10, 1960, the vessel arrived at Bo'ness, (i.e. Borrowstounness, Scotland), to be broken up. The break up actually commenced on Nov. 1, 1960. All most interesting. I am grateful for the fine data at 1. Can you help with corrections and/or additional data!

70 Holbrook
6655 (or 6668) tons
Hull 524

140409

Bredon
Brandon
1917

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Canadian Pacific, Holbrook), 2 (Christian Salveson & Co., Brandon), 3 (builder's half model, Holbrook, lot #166), 4 (data, & earlier related messages), 5 ('uboat.net', Brandon, sinking), 6 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Brandon), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 125.7 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 427 ft. 0 in., speed of 12 knots. Built for 'Century Shipping Co. Ltd.', 'Harris and Dixon, Limited' the owner/managers, both of London. Named after Lt. Norman D. (Douglas) Holbrook, RN, VC, a friend of Frank Dixon, & the recipient of the first naval Victoria Cross in WW1 (he dived his submarine under five rows of mines & torpedoed & sank the Turkish battleship Mesudiye). Employed as an ammunition carrier in WW1. In 1918, the vessel was sold to Canadian Pacific Railway Co. ('CP') & renamed Bredon. Was renamed Brandon later in 1923. Can anybody tell us on which routes she served for CP? In 1928, the vessel was sold to 'Salvesen's Mediterranen and Deep-Sea Trade', owned by Christian Salvesen & Co., of Edinburgh, with no change of name. Used as a freighter re their Antarctic whaling activities. Just a single WW2 convoy reference, OB-48 ex Liverpool on Dec. 6, 1939. Just before noon on Dec. 8, 1939, while en route in ballast from Cardiff to Port Everglade, Florida, a straggler in convoy OB-48, Captain Richard B. (Black) Chisholm in command, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-48 & sank. At 50.28N/8.26W, 150 miles W. of Lands End & 80 miles SW of Fastnet. 9 lives were lost. 43, including the Captain, were saved by Belgian trawlers Marie Jose Rosette & Tritten & landed at Milford Haven. 'Convoyweb.org', indicate, I think, that the vessel was waiting at RV (rendezvous) when hit by U-48. Have I read that reference correctly? Can you add to and/or correct the above?

71 Mesna
5424 (or 5425) tons
Hull 514

140308

Abercorn
Mesna
1917

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Wilhelmsen), 2 (data & fine image), 3 (Furness/ Norfolk), 4 (data in Norwegian), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 385 ft. (117.3 metres) long, triple expansion engines, speed of 11 knots. The vessel was launched, as Mesna, for 'D/S A/S Den Norske Afrika & Australlinje' of 'Wilm. Wilhelmsen' ('Wilhelmsen'), Třnsberg, Norway. It was requisitioned, in 1917, by the Shipping Controller, London, (at price of 1.508.533,40 NOK i.e. krona) renamed Abercorn, & placed under management of Furness, Withy & Co. Ltd., of London (registered to 'Norfolk & North American Steam Shipping Co. Ltd.'). In 1920 the vessel was returned to Wilhelmsen & the vessel's name reverted to Mesna. On Sep. 4, 1924, while en route from Haiphong to U.K. with a cargo of zinc ore & copra, the vessel went ashore on the Hakaufisi Reef, near Nukualofa, Tonga (at 20.09S/174.55E). Need help with more data! And an image.

72 War Tulip
5283 tons
Hull 514

142654

Ethelfreda
Evros
1918

An 'A' type cargo ship. Per 1 (War Tulip), 2 (West Hartlepool, managed ships at page bottom, War Tulip), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Evros), 4 ('uboat.net', sinking Evros, image), 5 ('wrecksite.eu', sinking, Evros, image), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 121.9 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 412 ft. 8 in., speed of 11 (or 10 only) knots, signal letters JVDC later SVLN. Built for the Shipping Controller, London, with 'West Hartlepool Steam Navigation Co.' the managers. In 1919, the vessel was sold to Harrowing Steamship Company Ltd., of Whitby, Robert Harrowing & Co. likely the owner/manager, & renamed Ethelfreda. In 1933, the vessel was sold to John G. Livanos, of Piraeus, Greece, managed by John Livanos & Sons Ltd., of London, & renamed Evros, (ΕΒΡΟΣ or Εbpoσ in Greek). Just 7 WW2 convoy references, including one completed N. Atlantic crossing, with a general cargo - the vessel was sunk on the 2nd return crossing. The vessel was at Osaka, Japan, in Apl. 1940 then voyaged to Fremantle, Australia, & spent time in the Indian Ocean. In S. African waters in Mar/Apl 1941 (Cape Town, Durban etc.). On Oct. 5, 1941, the vessel left Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada, in convoy SC-48, en route from Vitoria, Brazil, to Ardrossan, Scotland, with a cargo of 7,000 tons of iron ore. I have not read who was in command - can anybody tell us his name? A crew all told of 32. At about 3:45 a.m., on Oct. 17, 1941, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-432, Kapitänleutnant Heinz-Otto Schultze in command. At 57.00N/24.30W in mid-Atlantic S. & slightly W. of the tip of Iceland (800 miles W. of the Hebrides). 'Uboat.net' states clearly that there were, in fact, no survivors & that reports that 2 crew members were saved proved to be in error. The vessel, hit amidships, broke in two & sank immediately. Need help with more data! More images?

73 War Wager
5230 (or 5059 or 5152 or 5179) tons
Hull 530

142401

Elzasier
Humanitas
Kalliopi S.
1918

A tanker, that was soon converted into a dry cargo ship. Per 1 (War Wager), 2 (Lloyd Royal Belge, Elzasier), 3 (Compagnie Maritime Belge, Elzasier), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Kalliopi S), 5 ('Plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Elzasier, 1930/31 & 1931/32), 6 ('Plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Kalliopi S. plus, from 1932/33 thru 1940/41), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 400.3 ft. long (122.0 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 413 ft. 1 in. long overall, speed of 11 (or 10 only) knots, signal letters MEOZ, later NTHW & SVBG. Built for the Shipping Controller, i.e. the British Government, for WW1 service, managed by Anglo Saxon Petroleum Co., of London. I have read little about its WW1 service - only a brief reference to it being stopped for 2 hours on Jun. 22, 1918, with machinery defects, while in convoy HH59 from the U.S.A. (at p#119 of 'Naval Review, 1917', a giant 'pdf' file). In 1919, the vessel was sold to Lloyd Royal Belge, & renamed Elzasier. And converted into a dry cargo ship. Now it would seem that it was in 1919 acquired by 'Lloyd Royal Belge' of London, & that the vessel became owned by 'Lloyd Royal Belge S.A.', of Antwerp, Belgium, only in 1923. Engaged on the Antwerp to New York service. In 1930, 'Lloyd Royal Belge S.A.' was taken over by 'Compagnie Maritime Belge S.A.' with 'Agence Maritime Internationale' the managers. In 1932, the vessel was sold to 'Mare Nostrum S.A. di Nav.', of Genoa, Italy, P. Ravano likely the manager, & renamed Humanitas. (The above is what most WWW sites advise. Two quality WWW sites advise however, in data 'snippets', that the vessel was  renamed Humilitas in 1933, & was renamed Humanitas only in 1934. I cannot WWW locate additional confirmatory data. Miramar do not refer to Humilitas). Also in 1934, the vessel was sold to J. Stavrou & Co. Ltd., of Coumi, Greece, later Piraeus, Greece & maybe London also & renamed Kalliopi S., (ΚΑΛΛΙΟΠΗ Σ. in Greek). 6 WW2 convoy references, but the record is, I find, a little confusing. The vessel made 2 round trip voyages across the N. Atlantic, returning with grain. The vessel did not complete its 3rd such trip, returning, also with grain, either in convoy SC3 or HX70. On or about Sep. 2, 1940, the vessel left Halifax (or maybe Sydney) for Limerick, Ireland, with a cargo of grain ex Sorel, Quebec, Canada. When NW of Inishtrahull Island, she separated from the convoy & headed S. for Limerick. On Sep. 17, 1940, while 11 miles SW of Tory Island (off the NW coast of Donegal, Ireland), the vessel was hit by bombs & machine gunned by German aircraft (1 Staffeln, KG40). The vessel, engulfed in flames, drifted ashore & broke in two, at 55.11N/07.50W, in Dowines Bay, Sheephaven, County Donegal. A total loss. A dive site today, I wonder? There were 29 aboard, I read, & no loss of life. Can you add anything?

74 War Rock
3072 (or 3092) tons
Hull 539

142851

Syrian Prince
Welsh Prince
Dea Mazzella
1919

A cargo ship. Per 1 (75% down, Syrian Prince), 2 [War Rock (2)], 3 [Prince Line, Syrian Prince (2)], 4 (data in German, but WWW translation is difficult), 5 (Sokol), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 101.0 metres (342 ft. 6 in.) long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 (or 10) knots. Laid down for the Shipping Controller, i.e. the British Government, as War Rock but delivered to Prince Line Ltd., of Newcastle, (Furness Withy & Co.), as Syrian Prince. Sister to Algerian Prince (also Sunderland built - by 'Priestman'). Was renamed Welsh Prince in 1936 (to free up the prior name). And later that year, the vessel was sold to 'Ditta Pasquale Mazzella', of Naples, Italy, & renamed Dea Mazzella. On Sep. 2, 1941 the vessel was bombed by British aircraft & damaged at 'Cotrone' (means 'Crotrone', I believe), Sicily. On Sep. 8, 1943, the Germans seized the vessel at Venice, Italy, & used it to supply German forces in Yugoslavia. On Sep. 30, 1943, the vessel was shelled by Yugoslav partisans at Primošten, S. of Sebenico (Šibernik). On Oct. 4, 1943, it was wrecked, per 2 hit by a torpedo fired by Polish submarine Sokol, near the Isle of Grbavac. I could only find a single ref. to the sinking by Sokol, which was however in the Adriatic at the time. The sinking is not recorded at 5. WWW data is limited. Can you add anything?

75 Michigan
6419 (or 6549) tons
Hull 526a

Evanthia
Republika
1920

A cargo ship. Per 1 [French Line, Michigan (1)], 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 125.8 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 130.25 metres, speed of 12 (or 10 1/2) knots. Built for Compagnie Générale Transatlantique ('French Line') & registered at Le Havre. Maiden voyage was in 1920. After the occupation of France by German troops, the vessel was laid up from Jun. 25, 1940 at New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.A. On Feb. 6, 1942, the vessel was seized by the U.S.A. & transferred to the U.S. War Shipping Administration, of Washington, DC., & registered at Panama. A succession of managers, initially 'Waterman Steamship Agency', then 'Blidberg, Rothschild & Co.' & finally 'New York French Line Inc.', the last two both of New York. In 1945, the vessel became French registered & 'Lykes Bros. Steamship Co. Inc.' of New Orleans became the managers. On Jul. 28, 1945 the vessel was returned to French Line & re-registered at Le Havre. The vessel was sold, in 1950, to 'Cia. Maritima Atychides S.A.', of Panama, & renamed Evanthia. And in 1951 it was transferred to 'P. Atychides', also of Panama. In Sep. 1951, the vessel was sold to "Metrans“ Gesellschaft für Internationale Spedition und Seeschiffahrt, ("Metrans“ Society for International Forwarding and Shipping), of Prague, Czechoslovakia, (now the Czech Republic). Through to Nov. 1, 1952, when it re-entered service, the vessel was in extensive overhaul/conversion by Stocznia Gdynia, of Gdynia, Poland. In 1952, the vessel was transferred or sold, to 'Cechofracht Shipping Corp.', of Prague,  i.e. the state line of the Government of Czechoslovakia & renamed Republika. During the summer of 1952, the vessel ran aground while homeward bound from China. Temporary repairs were effected at Shanghai, China, & final repairs were effected in the summer of 1953. On Apl. 1, 1959, the vessel was transferred, with no change of name,  to 'Ceskoslovenska Narmorni Plovidba', i.e. Czechoslovak Ocean Shipping, also of Prague. The vessel was sold to shipbreakers in 1962 & broken up at Trieste, Yugoslavia, in Aug. 1962. WWW data is most limited. We thank Hans Meyer, of Ratingen, Germany, for almost all of the above data. Can you add anything additional?

76 Aslaug Haaland
4655 (or 4709 or 4747) tons
Hull 541

145491

Ellaroo
1921

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Melbourne Steamship, Ellaroo), 2 & 3 ('Melbourne' history, with data & 4 images, Ellaroo), 4 (Lloyd's Register data, Ellaroo, 1931/32 thru 1945/46 ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 111.1 metres (378 ft. 11 in.) long perpendicular to perpendicular, 364.5 ft., speed of 10 1/2 knots, signal letters KMLN & VJCT. Built for 'D/S A/S John K. Haaland Rederi', of Haugesund, Norway. The vessel was sold, in 1922, to 'Melbourne Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Melbourne, Australia, for Ł63,000 (the value came from a 'Google' snippet of a very small type size & may be incorrect). Somehow 'Interstate Steamships Co. Ltd.' was involved - not sure how or when. In 1936, the vessel was chartered by 'The Broken Hill Pty. Co. Ltd.' ('BrokenHill') for the carriage of iron ore ex the Whyalla mine. A long term arrangement, through 1959, when the vessel was sold to 'Scott Fell Shipping Pty. Ltd.', of Sydney - no change of vessel name. The vessel was again chartered by BrokenHill 'for specific service run from Newcastle and Port Kembla to Melbourne and Adelaide with cargoes of limestone, dolomite and scrap metal as required.' In 1960, the vessel was sold to Hai An Shipping Co. Ltd. (or Hai An Steam Ship Co. Ltd.), & then resold to Japanese ship breakers. On Apl. 23, 1961, the vessel arrived at Nanao, Ishikawa, Japan, to be broken up. Can you help with more data!

77 Cubano
5800 (or 5810) tons
Hull 533
1921

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Wilhelmsen, Cubano (2)], 2 (comprehensive data re sinking, & image), 3 (data & image), 4 (page in Norwegian, data), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 120.4 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 395.1 ft., speed of 12 knots. Built for Wilh. Wilhelmsen Line of Třnsberg, Norway. In 1930/31 was registered to 'A/S Norge-Mexico Gulflingen' with Wilh. Wilhelmsen the managers. Just 2 WW2 convoy references but also 4 independent voyages, including to S. America (Buenos Aires), Caribbean & Eastern US. On Oct. 19, 1940, while en route, in ballast, from Manchester to Montreal, Canada, the vessel was sunk by U-124 SW of Iceland. At 57.55N/24.57W. The torpedo struck amidships & the vessel sank next morning. 2 engine-room crew were lost. Master Hĺkon Martinsen & the remaining crew of 29 took to two boats & on the morning of Oct. 20, 1940 rescued a survivor from Sulaco, also hit by U-124, 1/2 hour after Cubano was struck. The boats stayed together, set course for Scotland, were rescued on Oct. 21, 1940 by Saguenay (D 179), a Canadian destroyer, & landed at Greenock. A number of sites state total crew was 35. Can you help with more data!

78 Tello
4676 (or 4626 or 4513 or 4520) tons
Hull 542

151803

Cycle
Cape Wrath
Everelza
1921

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Howard Smith, Cycle (2)], 2 [data & image, Cycle (11)], 3 ('uboat.net', 1942 sinking, Everelza), 4 (1942 sinking account, 25% down), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Everelza), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 111.1 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 364.5 ft., speed of 10 knots. The vessel was laid down as Tello for J. Lindvig of Kragerř, Norway, but was laid up upon its completion. It was later sold to & delivered as Cycle to Howard Smith Limited, i.e. Australian Steamship Property Ltd., of Melbourne, Australia. The vessel was 'held up' at Melbourne for 3 months after her arrival in Apl. 1922. The vessel was engaged in the Australian coastal trade until 1934, when the vessel was sold to Lyle Shipping Co. Ltd., of Glasgow. They renamed the vessel Cape Wrath in 1936. In 1937, the vessel was sold again, to Fricis Grauds, or F. Grauds Shipping Co. Ltd., of Riga, Latvia, & renamed Everelza. Just 2 WW2 convoy references, both Caribbean & the E. coast of U.S.A. Presumably there were also independent voyages, which data I am not permitted to access. At 9:48 a.m. on Aug. 13, 1942, while en route, in convoy TAW-12, from Trinidad to Key West, Florida, (the voyage ex Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, bound for Baltimore, U.S.A.), the vessel was sunk by a torpedo fired by U-600, Korvettenkapitän Bernhard Zurmühlen in command, 18 miles S. of Cape Maysi, the easternmost point of Cuba, or, as you will, off the NW tip of Haiti. At 19.55N/73.49W. The first 2 torpedoes that U-600 fired did not hit any vessel, while his 4th & 5th shots hit & sank Delmundo. The torpedo that sank Everelza was U-600's 3rd shot. Now I read that the ship was carrying a cargo of manganese ore, but in view of the explosion that resulted, that seems unlikely. 'Kelshall' at 3 advises - The third hit the Latvian freighter Everelza with its cargo of ammunition. She "exploded with a six hundred foot tower of flame" and sank in less than a minute. All told there were 37 aboard, & 23 of them lost their lives. I have not read who rescued the 14 who were saved but it likely was another convoy vessel. Can you help with more data! 

79 British Lord
6098 tons
Hull 547

146658
1922

A tanker. Per 1 (Apl. 21, 1941 attack, data & image), 2 (1941 attack, ref. 'Monday, 21 April'), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert British Lord), 4 (complete WW2 service detail, British Lord), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 125.6 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots. Built for British Tanker Co. Ltd. ('Tanker'), of London. Tanker was the maritime transport arm of the 'Anglo-Persian Oil Company', & the ship owning & operating subsidiary of British Petroleum Company, Ltd., later (1956) restyled as 'BP Tanker Company Ltd.' While I have not been able to read the detail, it would appear that the vessel grounded in the River Mersey, with her forward section fast on rocks, likely in Aug. 1925. Water ballast was moved aft to lighten the vessel forward, & she was freed, apparently with some difficulty. 74 WW2 convoy references. Would seem to have been in the Persian Gulf / Indian Ocean area for much of the war (Bandar Abbas, Aden, Bombay, Colombo, Trincomalee) but also 2 N. Atlantic crossings, (one returning with 'FFO' & the other with 'Sun Fuel'), service in the Mediterranean (Augusta, Bari, Port Said. Alexandria, Piraeus etc.) & U.K. local. 'FFO' means 'fuel furnace oil', I learn, while 'Sun Fuel' is, I believe, kerosene. On Apl. 20, 1941, the vessel left Piraeus, Greece, in convoy AS-26, bound for Alexandria, Egypt. The convoy was attacked by German bombers, & at 7.25 p.m. on Apl. 21, 1941, British Lord was severely damaged such that the ship had to be abandoned. At 34.35N/23.32E, S. of Gavdhos Island, the most southerly European island, located S. of western Crete. 1 indicates that the aircraft that attacked British Lord, was, in fact, an Italian aircraft piloted by Lt. Robone. One life was lost in the attack. Vampire, an Australian destroyer, took off the crew. Auckland, a sloop, took the vessel in tow. Later Protector, a netlayer, took over the towing duties. The vessel arrived, under tow, at Alexandria on Apl. 25, 1941, & at Port Said on the 29th. I presume that after temporary repairs were effected, British Lord was towed to Bombay, India, for permanent repairs. The vessel visited Auckland, New Zealand, on Sep. 15, 1944. I have read no word aboBut her peacetime service history. In 1953, the vessel was sold to BISCO, (British Iron & Steel Company, then an arm of the British Government, but now owned by Tata, of India) & allocated to T. W. Ward Ltd., of Sheffield, for demolition at their Milford Haven, Wales, ship breaking facility. The vessel arrived at Milford Haven on May 22, 1953, from Dunkirk, France, to be broken up. Actual break-up commenced on Jun. 8, 1953. Anything you can add?

80 Stakesby
4537 (or 4767) tons
Hull 544

137082

Starck
Marisa Thordén
Bushranger
1922

A freighter. Per 1 (Bushranger & image), 2 (data, Bushranger), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 377 ft. long (about 115 metres). Built for Rowland & Marwood's Steamship Co. Ltd. of Whitby, maybe with Headlam & Rowland, the managers. In 1929 or 1930, the vessel was sold to Olson & Wright (same comment) & renamed Starck. In 1935, the vessel was sold to Gustaf B. Thordén, of Thordén Lines, Uddevalla (or maybe Kulosaari), Finland, & renamed Marisa Thordén. Operated under Danish flag, it would seem. On Jun. 6, 1941, the vessel was seized by the U.S. Government & renamed Bushranger. 'Handed over' to Alcoa SS Co. & operated under Panamanian flag. On May 31, 1942, while unescorted, Bushranger was torpedoed by U-107 while en route from Paramaribo, Dutch Guiana, (Suriname), via St. Thomas to Key West, Florida, with a cargo of bauxite. At 19.15N/81.25W. The ship sank rapidly. 18? lost, 26 survivors (19 saved by USCG Nike & landed at Key West, Florida, & 7 saved by Catalina aircraft & landed at Kingston, Jamaica). Need help with more data!

81 Age
4718 tons
Hull 543

151805
5191139

Kazan
Lensovet
Castillo Bellver
Kogo
1923

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Howard Smith, Age (2)], 2 (Kogo image & data 40% down), 3 (Spanish page, 'la Gerencia de Buques Incautados' with 2 images, Castillo Bellver), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 364.5 ft. (about 115 metres) long, speed of 10 1/2 (or maybe 9) knots, 2 masts. Built for 'Australian Steamships Proprietary Ltd.', with 'Howard Smith Limited', of Melbourne, Australia, the managers. Registered Australia. In 1935 sold to the Government of USSR & renamed Kazan. Renamed Lensovet in 1936. Those last dates may not be perfect since data differs. I have no ability in Spanish, but it would seem that the vessel was seized in 1937 as restitution by the Spanish Government for activities during the Spanish Civil War & the vessel became owned by 'La Gerencia de Buques Incautados' (which company became 'Empresa Nacional Elcano' in 1943). But 4 indicates that vessel was renamed Castillo Bellver only in 1939. Sold in 1961 to 'Maritima Colonial' or maybe 'Marcosa' & renamed Kogo. Broken up in Spain '1971-2' which probably means 1971 or 1972 but could mean other dates also. 2 states that the vessel was still in the 1979 registers. Need help!

82 Fylingdale
3918 tons
Hull 553

137086

Susanne
Capetan Manolis
1924

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Headlam's of Whitby), 2 ('Rowland and Marwoods' history & flag), 3 (Fylingdale image & data, but you must be registered to access it), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Fylingdale), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 111.1 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 366 ft. 10 in., speed of 11 (have also read 9 only) knots. Built for 'Rowland and Marwoods Steamship Company Limited' ('R&M'), with 'Headlam & Marwood' the managers, both of Whitby. Later, managed, it would seem, by 'Headlam & Sons', the owners of R&M - the webmaster is confused with such ownership history & my text may well need correction. 135 WW2 convoy references, including 11 N. Atlantic crossings returning mainly with grains but occasionally with lumber, in Norwegian waters in late 1939 thru to early 1940, many U.K. coastal voyages & a great many Canadian local voyages also, to Wabana & to Corner Brook, both Newfoundland, re iron ore & lumber perhaps. In 1952, the vessel was sold to W. Rostedt, of Turku, Finland, & renamed Susanne. The vessel was sold again, in 1961, to 'Sigalas & Platis Bros.', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Capetan Manolis. Registered at Lebanon. On Mar. 15, 1962, the vessel, en route from Constantza, Romania, for Monfalcone, Italy, with timber, ran aground at Akbunar, Kara Burnu, Bulgaria. At 42.18N/28.48E - since I believe the reported 41.18N reference is incorrect. I have read little about the circumstances, but have read that ships came to her assistance, that heavy seas pushed the vessel further on shore, & that the salvors gave up trying to re-float her. The crew then abandoned the ship. And, via 3 (thanks!), that on Mar. 20, 1962, the vessel broke in two. The ship, in pieces it would seem, was sold to Spanish ship breakers. If you can add additional data, please do consider doing so. Your contribution would be most welcome.

83 Silveray
4535 tons
Hull 554

148621
1925

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Silver Line, Silveray), 2 ('uboat.net' re sinking, modest image), 3 ('pdf', cost at page 5 of 10), 4 (Silver Line brief history), 5 (3 torpedoes?), 6 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Silveray), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 120.6 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 1/2 knots. Built at the cost of Ł151,119 for 'Silver Line Limited', of London, 'Stanley & John Thompson, Limited' the managers. Named after 'Ray', one of the daughters of Alfred Clegg, a U.S. 'Silver Line' director. But ... Miramar advises that the vessel was rather first owned by Way Shipping Co. Ltd. (a Google snippet ex The Far Eastern Review of 1925) of London (related to Silver Line Limited maybe?) but became owned by Silver Line Limited later in 1925. It would seem that, in 1927, the vessel linked San Francisco & Calcutta, India, in the name of Kerr Steamship Company, which Silver Line managed. It apparently served the Far East in conjunction with Rotterdam Lloyd & Stoomvaart Maatschappij Nederland as part of 'Silver Java Pacific Line'. 12 WW2 convoy references including 4 N. Atlantic crossings. On Feb. 4, 1942, the vessel, defensively armed, was in Convoy ON-53 (or maybe ON-55), bound from Liverpool to New York via Halifax with a general cargo. It would seem that the vessel arrived at Halifax & left for New York, when it was hit by two torpedoes fired (a third one failed) by U-751 (Korvettenkapitän Gerhard Bigalk) & sank. At 43.54N 64.16W, S. of Halifax & quite close to the Nova Scotia coast. 8 lives were lost (7 crew & a gunner). 35 survivors including Harry Green, the Master, were rescued by U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Campbell (I think previously the George W. Campbell), on Feb. 5, 1942, & landed at Argentia, Newfoundland. Campbell, I read, actually sank Silveray by gunfire. 6 more were rescued by Lucille B, a fishing vessel, & landed at Lockeport, Nova Scotia. I read that 7 of the 8 who were lost took to a ship's boat but were never seen again. But a book referenced at 'Google Books' (search term 'Silveray'), ('Bloodstained Sea' by Michael G. Walling) clearly says that the 8 rather died instantly & that 3 torpedoes hit the vessel. And that the 35 rescued by Campbell spent 3 days in the boats. They were, it would seem, torpedoed early on Feb. 4 & were rescued on Feb. 5, so 3 days in the boats? I was not there! I can only report what I read! Need help accordingly! Does anybody have a good image?

84 Silverash
5299 (or 5311 or 5441) tons
Hull 555

149720

Tjisondari
1926

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Silver Line, Silverash (3)], 2 [Java Line, Tjisondari (2)], 3 (Silver Line, brief history, but you probably need to register to access), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Now there used to be a fine 'pdf' file WWW available, with the vessel's plans & a fine, sideways, image on p.112 of the vessel after its launch in Sep. 1926 (image at left). 10 or so pages, a sample, ex a 2009 volume by Martin Barraclough entitled 'Looking for the Silver Lining: A British Family's Shipowning Century 1875-1975' - The Barraclough family, I read, had a long ship-owning history in West Hartlepool, & thru Dene Shipping, took over Silver Line Limited in 1950. That 'pdf' file used to be here but is, alas, no longer there. Hopefully the 'pdf' will become available again at another site - or you might acquire the book. 129.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, (441 ft. 10 in.) speed of 13 1/2 knots, 2 masts. Built for 'Silver Line Limited', of London, 'Stanley & John Thompson, Limited' the managers, the 3rd fleet vessel of the name. In 1955, the vessel was sold to 'Koninklijke Java China Paketvaart Lijnen' (KJCPL) or 'Royal Interocean Lines' or 'Java Line', of Amsterdam, & renamed Tjisondari. The vessel arrived at Hong Kong on Jul. 02, 1957, to be broken up. Need help!

85 Bantria
2402 (or 2407) tons
Hull 563

160500

Giorgina Celli
Sacrum Cor
1928

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Cunard Line, Bantria), 2 ('pdf' file, Bantria, p.30), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Bantria), 4 ('Costa Line', but maybe the wrong one, since Giorgina Celli not listed), 5 (Lloyd's Register data, Bantria, 1930/31 thru 1945/46 ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 89.1 metres (292.3 ft.) long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots, 2 masts, signal letters LBVR & GSLV. Built for 'America Levant Line Ltd.' (America Levant Line), managed by S. & J. Thompson. One of 4 vessels acquired for the Mediterranean trade, all built by Joseph L. Thompson (Bosnia, Bactria & Bothnia are the other three). In 1931, the vessel became owned by Cunard. 58 WW2 convoy references, with extensive service, often ex Liverpool to & also within the Mediterranean (Alexandria, Tobruk, Piraeus, Augusta, Malta, Dardanelles, etc.), & what looks to be 3 westbound N. Atlantic crossings but are not, in fact, so. In 1953, the vessel was sold to Costa Line, of Genoa, Italy, 'M. Celli' likely the manager, & renamed Giorgina Celli. In 1955, the vessel was sold to 'Lauro & Montella' ('Lauro'), of Naples, Italy, & renamed Sacrum Cor. The vessel was later sold or transferred to 'Gennaro Montella', of Naples, a director of Lauro. The vessel arrived at Vado, which I think means Vado Ligure, Italy, in Feb. 1968 to be broken up. The above may well need correction. Need help

86 Bosnia
2402 (or 2407) tons
Hull 560

160388
1928

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Cunard Line, Bosnia), 2 (Bosnia), 3 ('uboat.net', Bosnia), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 89.1 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, (292.3 ft.), speed of 10 knots. Built for 'America Levant Line Ltd.' (America Levant Line), of London. On Sep. 5, 1939, two days after the outbreak of WW2, while en route from Licata, Sicily, to Manchester, U.K., with a cargo of sulphur, the unescorted vessel was hit by gunfire & soon sunk by a torpedo fired by U-47, Korvettenkapitän Günther Prien in command, in the Bay of Biscay, NNW of Cape Ortegal, NW of Ferrol, Spain. At 45.29N/9.45W. One life was lost, & 32 were saved. The survivors were landed at Lisbon by Eidanger. Have read that Bosnia was the first British freighter & the second British ship lost in WW2. The passenger/cargo ship Athenia was the first ship lost, it would seem, sunk on Sep. 4, 1939, the day before. Can you add anything?

87 Helmstrath
4214 (or 4292 or 4555) tons
Hull 564

148302

Sardinien
Lošinj
1928

A freighter. Per 1 (image Lošinj), 2 (Part of Lošinj crew at Rijeka in 1947, but you must be registered to view it), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 117.5 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 399 ft. 6 in., speed of 10 or maybe 12 knots. Built for 'Strath Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Cardiff, ('E. C. Downing' & later 'C. Chambers and Company Ltd.' & 'E. R. Management Co. Ltd.', the managers). The vessel was sold, in 1937, to 'Rob. M. Sloman Jr.' (Mittelmeer Linie) of Hamburg, Germany, & renamed Sardinien. The ship was involved in Germany/Norway service during WW2 (Baltic & along the coast of Norway, both military & commercial) & was seized by the Allies in May 1945, at Bergen, Norway. The vessel was returned to Germany in late 1945, & repaired at the 'Howaldtswerke AG', yard, (owned by the German government), at Kiel, Germany, which yard later became 'Kieler Howaldtswerke AG' (& in 2009 was owned by 'Thyssen Krupp Marine Systems', of Essen, Germany). On Nov. 25, 1946, the Tripartite Merchant Marine Commission (U.S.A., Great Britain & Russia) directed that the vessel be 'handed over' to Yugoslavia. In 1946, the vessel became Lošinj of the Yugoslav state-owned fleet, State Enterprises Yugoslav Line, (Jugoslavenska Linijska Plovidba), of Rijeka, Croatia. Registered at Sušak (Rijeka). In Apl. 1963, the vessel was scrapped by 'Sv Kajo', at Split, Yugoslavia. We thank Hans Meyer who kindly provided much data for inclusion above. Do you have anything to add?

88 San Casto
2446 (later 2526) tons
Hull 559

149989
1928

A tanker. Per 1 (data & images), 2 (image, but you must be registered to view it), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert San Casto), 4 (Lloyd's Register data, 1930/31 thru 1945/46, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). There may be many images of San Casto on 'Flickr' but it seems to be impossible to identify the vessel depicted in each image. 93.2 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, (305 ft. 6 in.), machinery aft, twin screw, speed of 9 1/2 knots, signal letters LBDK later GNMJ. Built for The Eagle Oil Transport Co. Ltd., ('Eagle') of London, (or maybe 'The Eagle Tanker Co. Ltd.'), certainly later 'Eagle Oil & Shipping Co. Ltd.'. A Dutch Shell tanker it would appear, chartered to them? For use as a shallow-draft tanker operating a shuttle service between Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela, & Aruba. For 21 years. Few WW2 convoy references accordingly, just 5 including a return to U.K. (HX291) in May 1944 & the vessel's return to Trinidad (KMS72) in Dec. 1944, I believe to resume her Lake Maracaibo service. Major repairs in 1949 perhaps. In 1951 the vessel was transferred back to Europe, where, in 1952, her aft accommodation was extended resulting in an increased (2526) tonnage. Served the U.K. west coast (Heysham, Lancashire). I have seen a 'snippet' reference to San Casto being sold to 'British Iron & Steel Corporation (Salvage), Ltd.' for demolition. The vessel was allocated to 'West of Scotland Shipbreaking Co. Ltd.' of Troon, Scotland, to be broken up, & arrived there for demolition on Aug. 8, 1960. We thank Michael Pryce for his assistance re this listing. Do you have anything to add?

89 Thistlebrae
4747 tons
Hull 565

148360

Altkirch
Inster
1928

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('Albyn Line', Thistlebrae), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Thistlebrae), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 122.9 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 420.0 ft. or 403 ft. 2 in., speed of 9 1/2 or 10 knots. Built for 'Albyn Line Ltd.' owned by 'Allan, Black & Co.' of Sunderland. Just 4 WW2 convoy references, incl. a single N. Atlantic crossing, in Feb. 1940, carrying grain. Independent at South Africa in Sep/Oct 1939. On Mar. 9, 1940, the vessel left Methil for Norwegian waters, presumably including Trondheim, Norway. On Apl. 4, 1940, the vessel was involved in a collision at Trondheim, & was in drydock being repaired when it was seized, on Apl. 9, 1940, by the Germans who renamed it Altkirch. 33 of the crew became prisoners of war, while 6 would seem to have been repatriated. On Jan. 5, 1944, the vessel was renamed Inster. On May 3, 1945, the vessel was attacked by Royal Air Force Beaufighters off Laboe, Germany, (N. of Kiel, in 'Kieler Bucht' or Kiel Bay, in the western Baltic). At 54.30.42N/10.22.58E. The vessel was hit, caught fire & sank. Any casualties? Is the wreck still there? Do you have anything to add? There is an image of Thistlebrae at Australia's 'emuseum' but I am unable to access it. And possibly the vessel was painted by Laurence Dunn.

90 Runswick
3970 (or 4008 or 4024) tons
Hull 570

161016

San Salvador
Eugenio
1930

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Runswick, but beware, the page includes other vessels also), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 111.2 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 379 ft. 2 in., single screw, speed of 11 (or 9) knots. Built for 'Rowland and Marwood Steamship Company Ltd.' ('Rowland'), of Whitby, 'Headlam and Sons', the managers. Rowland was, I read, a tramp ship company that traded worldwide. They mainly carried coal outbound from U.K. & returned with grain or timber & many other types of cargo. About 80 WW2 convoy references, incl. at least 8 N. Atlantic crossings, service in Mediterranean, (Port Said), E. coast of U.S.A. & Caribbean, plus U.K. coastal. Many independent voyages also, incl. voyages to South America (Buenos Aires) & W. Africa (Freetown). In 1955, the vessel was sold, to Costa Rican owners?, & renamed San Salvador. Registered at Puerto Limon, Costa Rica, & managed, it would seem, by 'S. Tuillier'. In 1959, the vessel was sold to 'Compańia de Navigatión San Rocco SA', of Panama, with no change of manager, & renamed Eugenio. In 1962, the vessel was converted from coal to oil burning. The vessel arrived at Bilbao, Spain, on Jul. 17, 1971, to be broken up. Do you have anything to add?

91 Helmspey
4764 tons
Hull 569

162092
1931

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('uboat.net', 1943 sinking), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Helmspey), 3 (first hand account of 1943 sinking), 4 ('wrecksite.eu', 1943 sinking, image), 5 (in New Zealand in 1933), 6 (early vessel history ex a 'Trove', Australia, Sep. 23, 1934 article), 7 (image), 8 (image, Helmspey propeller damage), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 122.2 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 401 ft., speed of 10 knots. Built for 'Strath Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Cardiff, (E. R. Management Co. Ltd., the managers, in WW2 most certainly). The vessel was built in difficult times, at the time of the Depression, & lay idle at Sunderland for three years after completion. Her maiden voyage was under charter, likely to Yamashita Kisen Kaisha, of Japan, to carry cargo to Australia. En route she suffered a fire in her coal bunkers, suffered propeller damage also & travelled the last 600 miles to Fremantle, Western Australia, with one propeller blade only remaining. The propeller was replaced but the new one was lost on her return journey from Dairen (now Dalian, NE China) to U.K., where, upon arrival, she was dry docked for extensive repairs. On her next voyage a fireman died in the stokehold 2 days before arriving at Hong Kong. 5 advises that in 1933, the vessel was on charter to Japan, mainly saw service in the Far East, but also traded to Gulf of Mexico & Indian Ocean ports. The vessel suffered a second coal bunker fire, in 1934, when about to leave Vancouver for Melbourne, Australia, with a cargo of timber. The fire, which took 3 days to extinguish, caused her to depart for Australia 12 days late. 47 WW2 convoy references, including it would seem at least 5 N. Atlantic crossings, returning most frequently with flour or grains, service in the Caribbean (Trinidad), service to Freetown, Sierra Leone, & U.K. coastal. And presumably independent voyages also, which voyages I am not permitted to access. In early Feb. 1943, the vessel, was en route, Harry Jones in command, from Colombo, Ceylon, now Sri Lanka, to London, with a varied cargo - '2772 tons of tea, 2000 tons of manganese ore, 1457 tons of rubber and 464 tons of general cargo'. The vessel bunkered at East London, Eastern Cape, South Africa, & being a slow ship was proceeding independently to Cape Town. At 6:52 a.m. on Feb. 11, 1943, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-516, Fregattenkapitän Gerhard Wiebe in command, when 11 miles S. of Cape St. Francis, Cape Colony, South Africa. At 34.22S/24.54.30E, about 40 miles WSW of Port Elizabeth, South Africa. The vessel listed slightly to port, but did not sink. The engines were stopped, the crew launched the 2 main lifeboats & abandoned ship. A few minutes later, at 7:12 a.m., U-516 fired a second torpedo, which hit the ship under the port lifeboat, then alongside the hull. The submarine then submerged having sighted an aircraft. The 4 who were killed were all in that lifeboat. The other 42, including Captain Harry Jones, were saved 4 hours later by R4, a South African Air Force crash launch, & landed at Port Elizabeth. During that wait, they watched the vessel break her back & sink. It is clear that more than 4 died as a result of the attack, since others, who were rescued & landed at Port Elizabeth, died there later from their injuries. Thomas Edge, a steward, was one such crew member. Malcolm Turner, of Port Elizabeth, tells me in May 2014 (thanks!) that he regularly finds bales of rubber washed onto local beaches, especially after a bad storm. Presumably from  the Helmspey. Do you have anything to add?

92 Starcross
4662 tons
Hull 576

162115
1936

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data, Starcross), 2 (Italian Wikipedia page, Otaria), 3 (Link 2, Google translated), 4 (Otaria, incl. Starcross sinking), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Starcross), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 125.3 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 411 ft. 0 in., single screw, speed of 10 knots. Built for 'Exmouth Steamship Co. Ltd.' ('Exmouth'), of Cardiff, 'Anning Brothers' ('Anning'), the managers, also of Cardiff. Exmouth was a small tramp ship company, with Starcross being their only ship. Can anybody clarify the relationship between Exmouth & Anning? - James Scott, of Newcastle, advised (thanks James!) that the vessel was in Nov. 1936 insured in the name of Anning Brothers, per a Starcross insurance policy/certificate that James owned. 13 WW2 convoy references, mainly U.K. coastal but including service to W. Africa (Freetown) & a 1939 voyage to Narvik, Norway. On Apl. 27, 1941, the vessel left Freetown for Liverpool in convoy SL.73, a convoy of 38 merchant ships, with a cargo of West African produce & a crew of 40 all told. I have not read the name of her Master. At 4:20 a.m. on May 20, 1941, the vessel was hit by two torpedoes fired by Otaria, an Italian Glauco-class submarine commanded by Lieutenant Commander Giuseppe Vocaturo. At 51.45N/20.45W, about 400 miles W. of Valentia Island, County Kerry, Ireland. The vessel was badly damaged, & it would seem that the crew did all that was possible to save the ship. The entire crew was rescued by the Canadian HMCS St. Francis, a Town-class destroyer which was then one of the escort ships. Starcross was later (when?) scuttled by a convoy escort (which one?). Can you add anything? An image?

93 St. Helena
4313 tons
Hull 573

162140
1936

A cargo/passenger ship. Per 1 ('uboat.net', St. Helena, sinking, image), 2 (St. Helena, 'Plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data), 3 [South American Saint Line, St. Helena (1)], 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert St Helena. But beware! The page you come to includes also St. Helena, a Royal Navy patrol frigate, acting as an escort ship), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 121.6 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 414 ft. 3 in. or 399.0 ft., speed of 10 knots, capacity for 12 passengers (6 double cabins), signal letters GYWL. Built for 'St. Quentin Shipping Co. Ltd.',  'B. & S. Shipping Co. Ltd.' the owners & managers, of Cardiff, (or maybe of Newport), Wales, known as 'South American Saint Line'. Her maiden voyage was to Brazil, completed at an average speed of 10.6 knots. Just 11 WW2 convoy references (since SL.72 appears to be in error), mainly U.K. coastal but including voyages to Freetown, Sierra Leone. In early Apl. 1941, the vessel was en route, unescorted, from Montevideo, Uruguay, to Hull, via a number of Brazilian ports, with 7600 tons of grain & a varied cargo which included canned meat, cotton, rice & 'wet hides'. Percy J. (John) Reavley was in command, with 41 aboard, all told, including 3 passengers & 2 gunners. At 5:09 a.m. on Apl. 12, 1941, the vessel was hit by a single torpedo fired by U-124, Korvettenkapitän Georg-Wilhelm Schulz in command. At 7.50N/14.00W, about 100 miles SW of Freetown. The submarine apparently surfaced & questioned the survivors - who presumably then took to the boats, & were all picked up by HMS Wishart & landed at Freetown. Can you add anything? Another image?

94   Corabella
5682 tons
Hull 581

165561
1937

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data & sinking), 2 & 3 (both U-515), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Corabella), 5 & 6 (more WW2 convoy duty), 7 & 8 (Lloyd's medal awards re Byatt & Newton), 9 (names of 8 of the 9 lost, 15% down), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 409 ft. 3 in. (about 130 metres) long, speed of 10 knots. Built for Tenax Steamship Co. Ltd., (Muir Young, the manager), of London. Was requisitioned for service during WW2. On Aug. 18, 1942, while in convoy SL-118, vessel picked up 88 of the 108 survivors from Hatarana (7522 tons, owned by British India Steam Navigation Co. Ltd., of London) which had been sunk in the N Atlantic by U-214. Corabella was owned by Saguenay Terminals Limited, of Montreal, Canada, when, on Apl. 30, 1943, in convoy TS-37 en route from Takoradi (Sekondi-Takoradi, Ghana) to Freetown, Sierra Leone, with a cargo of manganese ore, it was hit by a torpedo fired by German submarine U-515. At 7.14N/13.48W, about 130 miles SW of Freetown. 4 ships, including Corabella, were sunk in the attack. 9 Corabella lives were lost. The Captain (Peter Leggett), & 38 others (30 crew & 8 gunners) were picked up by HMS Birdlip, a trawler, & landed at Freetown the next day. S. Byatt, 3rd radio officer, & G. R. Newton, 2nd steward, both of Corabella, were awarded the 'Lloyd’s War Medal for Bravery at Sea' re the attack along with an MBE & BEM respectively. Do you have anything to add? An image?

95 Loch Dee
5252 tons
Hull 578

164122

Cape Ora
1937

A freighter. Per 1 (Patrick J. Hurley, ref. 'Oct 2, Fri.'), 2 (sinking, Patrick J. Hurley), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Loch Dee), 4 ('Thursday, 2 Jan), Jan. 1941 aerial attack at Cardiff), 5 (Jan. 1941 aerial attack at Cardiff), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 128.0 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 437 ft. 2 in., speed of 11 (or 10 1/2) knots. Built for 'Steamship Induna Co. Ltd.', Maclay & McIntyre Ltd., of Glasgow, the managers. 64 WW2 convoy references including, it would seem, 11 N. Atlantic crossings, service in Mediterranean (Augusta, Bari, Algiers, Oran), in Indian Ocean (Bombay, Aden, Trincomalee, Kilindini), in the Caribbean (Guantanamo, Trinidad), to Africa, (Freetown, Takoradi, Durban, Cape Town), & many U.K. coastal  voyages. On Jan. 2, 1941, the vessel was struck by aerial bombing at Cardiff, Wales. The bomb was a delayed action bomb & it exploded at 1:50 a.m. on Jan. 3, 1941, one crewman being killed in the explosion. On Oct. 2, 1942, the vessel rescued, from a lifeboat, 23 survivors of Patrick J. Hurley, a U.S. tanker sunk by U-512 on Sep. 12, 1942, 950 miles NE of Barbados. The survivors were landed at Charleston, South Carolina. On Apl. 28, 1945, the vessel arrived 'with defects' at Gibraltar, ex Hampton Roads in convoy UGS.86. Have read some words which suggest that at some time in its life the vessel carried iron ore from West Africa to U.K. The vessel was sold, in 1955, to 'Galaro Cia. Naviera SA' ('Galaro'), maybe of Puerto Limon, Costa Rica, but have also read of Piraeus, Greece, 'G. Georgilis' the manager?, & renamed Cape Ora. In 1959, the vessel was sold, by Galaro, for about Ł52,500, to Hong Kong ship breakers, & on Nov. 4, 1959, arrived at Hong Kong to be broken up. Anything to add or correct?

96 Royal Sceptre
4853 tons
Hull 583

165757
1937

A cargo ship that had a very short life indeed, sunk a day or so into WW2. Per 1 ('uboat.net', 1939 sinking), 2 ('wrecksite.eu', sinking detail & image), 3 (data), 4 (Lloyd's data, 80% down), 5 (U-48), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 126.5 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 431 ft. 10 in., speed of 11 knots, signal letters GFFY. No WW2 convoy service, of course. Built for 'Hall Brothers Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Newcastle, 'Hall Bros.', the managers. On Sep. 5, 1939, just 2 days after WW2 commenced, the vessel, unescorted & unarmed, with a crew of 33 all told, under the command of James W. (William) Gair, was en route from Rosario, Argentina, to Belfast, Northern Ireland, with a cargo of wheat & maize. The vessel was sighted by U-48, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Herbert (‘Vaddi’) Schultze. A shot was fired across her bow but she did not stop. Rather she tried to escape & distress messages were sent. U-48, attempting to silence the radio, at 12.00 noon shelled the bridge for 25 minutes, killing Captain Gair & wounding nine. (But 3 states that Captain Gair survived & it was a crewman that was killed). All of the crew abandoned the ship, with the exception of the radio officer, who continued to broadcast. His name? All at 46.23N/14.59W, about 300 miles N. of Cape Finisterre, Spain, or 600 miles SW of Ireland. U-48 boarded the vessel, took off the radio officer, & honoured his courage by delivering him to the Royal Sceptre lifeboats. Royal Sceptre was despatched by a 'coup de grâce' torpedo, at 1.38 p.m. At 3.05 p.m., U-48 stopped Browning & the Browning crew abandoned ship. U-48 ordered them to re-board their ship & rescue the survivors of Royal Sceptre. So the survivors were accordingly all picked up by Browning & later, on Sep. 26, 1939, were landed at Bahia, Brazil. Two other vessels, Petrofina & Erria arrived later on the scene & found no survivors. Korvettenkapitän Schultze sent, I read, messages to Winston Churchill advising of the location of the sinking. Churchill, told perhaps that no survivors were found, described (p.#3 here) the sinking as 'an odious act of bestial piracy on the high seas'. During her career U-48 sank 51 merchant ships of 306,874 tons, sank a corvette, & damaged 3 other merchantmen. Indeed, under its 5 captains, it was the most successful submarine of WW2. I have read some WWW references that Royal Sceptre was carrying passengers including women & children, but might those references be in error? A site visitor seeks data about a builder's model of the ship, a model that he believes was sold at a public auction, possibly in Gateshead. If you know anything about the matter, do be in touch, & I will pass your information along. Anything to add?

97 St. Rosario
4312 (or 4298) tons
Hull 582

162145

Katia
Katia Banck
Ypermachos
1937

A freighter. Per 1 (Katia Banck, data in Swedish & image), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert St Rosario), 3 (St. Rosario, page in Spanish), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 126.22 metres long, speed of 10 1/2 knots. Built for Barry Shipping Co. Ltd. (or maybe Barry & Sons Shipping Co. Ltd.), of Newport, Wales, & registered there. Sold in 1939 to 'South American Saint Line', of Cardiff. 55 convoy references in WW2 including at least 5 east bound voyages ex N. America, service to Freetown, Sierra Leone, & into Indian Ocean (Aden, Bombay, Colombo, Calcutta, Durban), & many U.K. coastal voyages. On Mar. 9, 1940, the vessel was in collision with Maindy Hill near Heugh Lighthouse, Tees Bay, Hartlepool. The vessels were crossing courses. There was contact between the stem of St. Rosario & the port side of Maindy Hill, which sank as a result of the encounter. In OB.287, a Feb. 16, 1941 convoy, vessel left Liverpool but was damaged & returned. Sold in 1952 to 'Otto Banck Rederi AB', of Helsinki (Helsingfors), Finland, & renamed Katia. Renamed Katia Banck in 1958. Sold in 1963 to 'Erik Banck Rederi AB', (Percy Banck, the owner or manager perhaps?), of Helsinki, Finland, (or possibly of Stockholm, Sweden - an eBay item referred to the vessel being Swedish. Was it in fact Swedish?). Sold in 1963 to 'Ypermachos Co. Nav.', of Panama, (G. Lemos Bros. Co., the managers), & renamed Ypermachos. On Aug. 4, 1969, arrived at Whampoa (Huangpu), S Guangdong, China, to be broken up. Anything to add or correct?

98 Welsh Trader
4974 (or 4832) tons
Hull 584

166372

Beteigeuze
Peppino Palomba
1938

A freighter. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Over 130 metres long, speed of 9 knots. Built for Trader Navigation Co. Ltd., (Trader Line), of London. Involved in convoy work in WW2. There are a couple of WWW references to convoys, one from Freetown, Sierra Leone, & the other from Sydney, Nova Scotia, both to the Clyde. Sold in 1951 to 'Orion Schiffahrts' or maybe in full 'Orion Schiffahrts-Gesellschaft Reith & Co. GmbH.', of Hamburg, Germany, & renamed Beteigeuze. Sold in 1961 to 'Palombo D´Amato, S.p.A.', of Torre del Greco, Naples, Italy & renamed Peppino Palomba. On May 22, 1970, arrived at La Spezia, Italy, to be broken up. Anything to add?

99 Argyll
4897 (later 4779) tons
Hull 594

165774
5161615

Saint Henri
Inkeri Nurminen
Someri
1939

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data & 1967 image as Inkeri Nurminen), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Argyll), 3 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, 1940/41 thru 1945/46), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 431 ft. 10 in. long (131.62 metres) overall, 415.1 ft., later 405 ft. 0 in., long (123.4 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots, signal letters GBWB, later OFUP. Built for B. J. Sutherland & Co. Ltd. ('Sutherland'), of Newcastle. 5 WW2 convoy references as Argyll, thru May 28, 1940, including 1 North Atlantic crossing, carrying wheat & lumber. Was 'independent', on the W. coast of North America, in early 1940. Became owned, in Jul. 1940 by the French Vichy Government & was renamed Saint Henri. I note that Lloyds's Registers of the time, & also that of 1957/58,  state St. Henri. Neil Porter advises (thanks Neil!) that Argyll, along with 5 other vessels, was captured by Vichy French naval units either at or off Dakar, Senegal, on Jul. 5, 1940, in retaliation for the  Jul. 3, 1940 Royal Navy attacks on the French fleet at Oran & Mers el Kébir, in French Algeria, (A & B). I wonder what she did while Vichy French owned? The vessel was later requisitioned by the Allies, it would seem, reverted to Sutherland in May 1943 & was renamed Argyll. 30 WW2 convoy references, from May 15, 1943. Service in Mediterranean (Augusta, Bari, Brindisi, Casablanca), to W. Africa (Freetown, Takoradi, Lagos), Caribbean, & U.K. coastal. On Feb. 5, 1944, the vessel ran aground in a gale, likely at Bari or Brindisi, but was soon back in service. A N. Atlantic crossing while independent. From Nov/Dec 1944, the vessel was independent in the Indian Ocean (Durban, Colombo, Cape Town). In 1954, with no change of vessel name, the vessel was sold to 'Savolax Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Newcastle. Later in 1954, the vessel was sold to J. Nurminen O/Y, of Helsinki, Finland, & renamed Inkeri Nurminen. And sold again, in 1967, to 'Ilmari Tuuli', of Rauma, Finland, & renamed Someri. On Dec. 26, 1971, the vessel arrived at the Split, Yugoslavia, ship breaking facilities of Brodospas, to be broken up. Anything you can add?

100 Port Quebec
5800(or 5936, or 6294) tons
Hull 593

167532

Quebec
Deer Sound
Port Quebec
1939

A minelayer, then an 'aircraft component repair ship' & eventually a cargo ship. Per 1 (Port Line, Port Quebec), 2 (image & extensive data, Port Quebec), 3 (data, page bottom), 4 (New Zealand), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 142.6 metres long overall, 468 ft., speed of 13 or 14 knots, signal letters GWGQ. The vessel was laid down, as Port Quebec, for Port Line Ltd. ('Port'), of London, intended for use on their Montreal/Australia/New Zealand ('MANZ') service. However the vessel was requisitioned, on Nov. 25, 1939, incomplete, by the Admiralty, moved to Furness Ship Building, at Haverton Hill, Stockton-on-Tees, & there completed, in Jun. 1940, as a Royal Navy minelayer - HMS Port Quebec, (M 59). The vessel is said to have cost Ł207,783 which would seem to have been Port's original cost. The vessel, which was able to carry 550 mines, was deployed as part of the 1st Minelaying Squadron & saw 'strenuous' service in the North Sea & in European waters. In 1943, the Admiralty bought the vessel from Port, & changed her role. She was converted into an aircraft maintenance repair vessel by John Brown & Co., at Clydebank, & renamed HMS Quebec. I have read little as to her duties, but it would appear that, in 1944, she served with the British Pacific Fleet in the Far East.  In 1944 or 1945, the vessel was renamed HMS Deer Sound, (F 99). On Dec. 20, 1947, the vessel was re-purchased by Port, converted back to her original form, i.e. a refrigerated cargo ship, by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, of Newcastle &, perhaps in 1947, renamed Port Quebec. As 2 notes, 'surely one of the few ships to have gone through four ship builders prior to delivery to her owners'. It would seem that the vessel resumed MANZ service. In that regard the New Zealand ('NZ') site references her visiting Auckland, NZ, 12 times between May 7, 1950 & Dec. 7, 1967. 'Blueport' became the vessel's managers on Mar. 10, 1968. On Jun. 23, (have also read Jun. 28) 1968, the vessel arrived at the Kaohsiung, SW Taiwan, ship breaking facilities of Chou's Iron & Steel Co. Ltd., to be broken up. Break up commenced in Dec. 1968. I have also read, however, that the vessel was rather broken up at Keelung (Jilong or Chilung) which is in the NE of Taiwan, so perhaps the vessel was moved there? 2 was particularly helpful in preparing the above text which, however, includes data snippets from many websites. It may well need correction, which is invited. Anything you can add?


There are more (later) vessels built by 'Joseph L. Thompson' on the 2nd 'Joseph Thompson' page available here.

TO END THE PAGE

For your pleasure and amusement.

An interesting trade card for 'Drury & Son', of Drury's Corner, of a subject matter so appropriate for a site shipbuilding page. A 'Raphael Tuck and Sons', 'Oilette', postcard, mailed at Sunderland on Oct. 27, 1905. An eBay item which was sold for U.S. 19.00 on May 3, 2010.

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