THE SUNDERLAND SITE - PAGE 161
JAMES WESTOLL & THE WESTOLL LINE
OF SUNDERLAND (1868/1959)

May I suggest that you navigate the site via the index on page 001.PRIOR PAGE / NEXT PAGE

Do you want to make a comment? A site guestbook is here. Test.

An incomplete summary of the content of this page:-

1

A fine article about James Westoll written by 'Blue Peter'. 'Blue Peter' was the name by which J. W. (Bill) Smith, of Gateshead, was known. While I know very little about 'Blue Peter', he was, I understand, a noted expert on the subject of 19th century North-East shipping & certainly was one of the two authors of 'Where Ships Are Born'. I am advised that he passed away a great many years ago. But his knowledge of the Westolls at least can survive him via this page. The article was, it is believed, originally published in a 'WSS, Newcastle branch news letter' & the editor's comments (also below) at the foot of the article are interesting reading also.

2

A list of the vessels that were owned by 'Westoll' over their many years of operation.

3

Another 'James Westoll' article of unknown origin. Dating from the early 1900s perhaps?

4

Such data as we have about Captain Robert Eggleton, who served Westoll Line for over 40 years.

In due course what else will the page contain? A question impossible of answer today. If YOU have data about any aspect of the Westoll history, you are invited to be in touch.

To search for specific text on this page, just press 'CTRL + F' & then enter your search term.

This page is a bit of a departure from the site's previous practice - a page about one of the famous names in Sunderland shipping ownership - James Westoll & the James Westoll Line. Why?

The webmaster has, on many occasions, tried to find WWW data about 'Westoll' for use in on-site vessel listings, but found that very little data seems to be WWW available.

Many if not most of the 'Westoll' ships were built in Sunderland, by a number of builders, but most particularly by Short Brothers.

Hence this page, to remedy the apparent WWW deficiency, assembled initially from data kindly provided by Clive Ketley.

From what I can see, James Westoll really did not own a shipping company or any ship per se. The ships for a great many years were owned in 1/64 shares by a variety of individual owners, and managed by James Westoll, who was the major 'shareholder' & is correctly then best described as the managing owner. That situation would seem to have changed later on, when what would appear to be a limited company was formed to own the vessels - Westwick Steamship Company ('Westwick'). In the rest of the site however there are ships noted as being owned by names not referred to in 'Blue Peter's article below - 'James Westoll (London) Ltd.', as an example.

A little list of the enterprises. Partial & most probably inaccurate. Can you help tidy it up?

Westoll Steamships Limited
Westwick Steamship Company Ltd. (1916/1941)
James Westoll (London) Ltd. (1917/?)
James Westoll Ltd. (or likely Limited) (1929/). may not be quite fair on his predecessors saying he founded the shipping business. His grandfather was George Westoll (also of Sunderland) who was described as a ship owner in the record of his will.

It would seem, thanks to Iain Hill's guestbook message, that the will of George Westoll of Sunderland, grandfather of James Westoll #1 (1829/1895), states that George was a ship owner. So when I have been stating here that James Westoll #1 founded the Westoll group, that would seem not to really have been so. James Westoll # 1 was followed into the business by his son, also James Westoll, herein #2. There may well have been more & later James Westoll's also! The names of the family members who ran Westwick at present elude me. It would not surprise me to find that the name 'James' continued to be used in the family. (There was indeed another James, born about 1889, the son of #2) Anyway, next are, at left, James Westoll #1 (1829/1895) and at right, his son, James Westoll #2 (1860/1929).

The webmaster has read, in Google 'snippets', in a 1929 reference, 'Mr. James Westoll, a prominent North of England ship owner, died on Sunday morning at his residence, Coniscliffe Hall, near Darlington. Mr. Westoll was 69 years of age, and was a son of the late Mr. James' Westoll. And in a 1930 reference, 'Mr. James Westoll, JP, of The Hall, Coniscliffe, Darlington, and of Sunderland, ship owner, lately chairman of Messrs. James Westoll, Ltd., of the Middle Dock and Engineering Co., Ltd., ...' Both of which are of interest since there was a vessel in the Westoll fleet named Coniscliffe.

I now see that there is extensive data about James Westoll #2 at this fine web page.

Also of interest was a Feb. 2010 e-Bay item. The image, modified by the webmaster, is at left - 'posted in 1909'. 'Frank', who bought the card, advises that the card may have been written by a servant. It says 'this is the Westolls house', meaning that the Westolls lived there.

So it would seem almost certain that the photograph at left is of the house/estate where James Westoll #2 lived, i.e. Coniscliffe Hall, near Darlington. Can anybody tell us what later happened to the house?

Martin Natland has kindly been in touch - in Apl. 2013. And advises as follows:-

I am a distant relative of James Westoll of Coniscliffe Hall near Darlington.My grandmother's sister was Lavinia Preston, who married James & lived at the Hall.When James died, about 1930, Lavinia moved away & the Hall was taken over by the army and converted into barracks and a hospital for soldiers. Through careless treatment, the Hall burned down and was left to go back to nature.I visited the site with a grandson in about 1990 & saw what was left not much. James's son, also James, went to Cumbria, bought a hunt lodge that belonged to the Graham estate on the river Esk.He added greatly to it and called it Glingerbank.It is near Longtown, & Westoll family members still live on the property.


JAMES WESTOLL OF SUNDERLAND
by 'Blue Peter'

Although the name James Westoll will have little significance to the younger generation, the elderly - and especially those reared on a diet of ships and the sea - will doubtless have memories of a fleet of merchantmen whose steamers were known as the 'Swans of the Orient' or the 'Black Sea yachts'. these were the Westoll ships, one of the largest fleets of ships ever owned in the North East and its fame over the years was world-wide.

James Westoll was born in 1829 and, in October 1868 at the age of 39, set up in business as a shipbroker at 213, High Street, Sunderland. Very soon he was 'dabbling' in ships and during the next few years he acquired shares in the ZEALOUS, AUBURN and ADVENT, which were small sailing ships, each around 500 tons deadweight and under the ownership of Adamson's of Sunderland.

Theirs was a family business, old in the craft of shipbuilding and of shipowning because the oldest Adamson yards dated back to 1809. Their building activities terminated when wood was replaced by iron, but in shipowning they continued until 1890 when members of the family were registered with the barques MARY ANN and STANFIELD.

James Westoll took over the management of some of the barques in the late 'sixties and fixed them for trading voyages to the West Indies and to the Far East. He was, however, much more interested in 'steam' and acquired the small iron steamer NATALIAN which had a comparatively short career. She was homeward bound in December 1872 when her engines broke down and she was taken in tow off Whitby by one of her sisters, the WEAR. When the towline broke the NATALIAN set all sail - steamers were all well equipped in those days - and she made good progress on her way to Sunderland. Unfortunately she drifted on to rocks on the East side of Hendon Dock and rapidly broke up. The crew of 17 getting ashore by rocket apparatus.

It is difficult to establish the sequence of events in the early build up of the Westoll fleet as iron steamers were bought second hand and others added new from the launching ways. One of the oldest was the UNITED SERVICE, built in 1865 at the old Haswell yard, (now the site of the Austin & Pickersgill 'Bartram' yard at the South Dock). Her original owner was William Gray, of London and she was bought by Westoll in 1871. Oddly enough, the UNITED SERVICE was equipped with a propeller which could be unshipped when the wind was favourable and probably there were times when she made better speed under sail. This was certainly a ship with a history. She was sold to Norway in 1895 and was renamed NEREUS and, four years later along with Westoll's MERCATOR, became the nucleus of the Witherington & Everett fleet. Both these ships were eventually broken up.

The WEAR (1865) - already mentioned - and the PYRRAHA (1869) were products of the Oswald yard, once famous at Pallion on the Wear. From the 'seventies however, the bulk of the Westoll ships came from the building berths of another Pallion yard, Short Brothers. From here 46 steamers were built for the line. Some of the Westoll ships bore family names like JAMES WESTOLL, LAVINIA WESTOLL and LIZZIE WESTOLL. Others were named after prominent shareholders such as JAMES CAMERON, THOMAS PARKER, W. B. FERGUSON, WILLIAM ADAMSON, JOHN ADAMSON and ROBERT ADAMSON. Then there were two ships with shipyard connections, the J. Y. SHORT and the MARY ADA SHORT.

A few were named after master mariners who became shareholders, among them Magnus Mail, whose sponsor was a Shetlander who obtained his master's certificate in 1868 and commanded several of the Adamson barques before coming to Westoll. In the fleet were a host of '.. ent' steamers, which followed a naming system evolved in the 'seventies and retained almost to the end of the company history through the collier BENIFICENT, lost during the second World War. Strangely enough all the '. . ent' titles had a meaning and could be found in a standard dictionary, yet when new ships were coming along, sometimes at the rate of four a year, there were those who believed that the Company employed a man specially to invent new names! There was certainly a modicum of reason in such thinking and no doubt a dictionary was used in the office to check such names as REFULGENT, VIRENT, EIDENT, LUCENT and GERENT, all of them Westoll steamers.

That many of the masters were shareholders and became men of affluence is not surprising, because the owner was generous and not averse to granting his captains a limited hold space for their own profit. Indeed it was often said in Sunderland that Westoll skippers bought a street of homes at the end of every voyage!

Although most of the ships carried coal cargoes in their time, they could not by any stretch of the imagination be regarded as colliers. For something like half a century there were contacts for coal and patent fuel outward to most of the ports in Italy and Egypt, then on to the Black Sea for grain homeward. This was the set pattern in the lives of the James Westoll seafarers year after year. After loading coal and again after discharging these ships were cleaned up until their vast areas of white paintwork gleamed. They were smart ships, especially some of the late Victorian products which were fitted with bowsprits and adorned with fine scroll-work around the bows. One, the J. Y. SHORT (1887) had animals carved around the stern with a carved inscription which read "Safe within the ark forever".

Many of the steamers were broken up or sold abroad, but many others were the subject of disaster headlines. The ARNO (1870) went down in a gale off Southsea with the loss of 13 men. The NEWENT (1882) was posted missing in March 1899 (Webmaster: correctly Feb. 1909) on a passage from Southampton to Blyth. Could such a thing happen to-day? The JAMES CAMERON (1882) sank in a blizzard of snow following a collision off Hartlepool with the collier BEAMISH. Last sight of her she was steaming towards the coast with all lights burning. Her crew thankfully were safe on board the BEAMISH. The COGENT (1884) was further afield when she struck rocks and went down near Cape Finisterre. Her master was Captain Cook, grandfather of Mr. Kenneth Black, one time director of the Albyn Line of Sunderland.

The JAMES WESTOLL (1884) sank following a collision with a Dutch tug. It is interesting to note that the novelist Joseph Conrad, as a youth, admired this vessel when he sailed as a passenger with the Marseilles pilots and he records the events in his writings. The second DILIGENT (1888) sank following a collision and there were no survivors when the GEORGE ROYLE (1892) was driven ashore on Sherringham Shoal. The WILLIAM MIDDLETON (1893) went down in a gale off the North East coast whilst the PRESIDENT of 1907, interned in Germany during the Great War was wrecked at Eyemouth in 1928. One of the last ships to be built for the fleet, the AMENT (launched in December 1929) had the shortest career of all for she was wrecked in the Thames estuary in the following year.

The record of losses in the first World War is colossal. Twenty ships were destroyed by mines, torpedo and gunfire and the Westoll Line never recovered. Many lives were lost, amongst them masters and engineers with long service in the ships. Those of us now 'long in the tooth', but happily rich in memories will always remember the great days of the Westoll ships and the masters and engineers who sailed in them, men like Caldicott (Note), Dobbing, Kircaldy, Muir, Rendall, Ramshaw, McLaren, Proom, Robertson, Savage, Pettinger, Knill and so many more. They came from the towns and villages of the North East and were a credit to that profession of the sea.

Founder of the line, James Westoll, died in 1895 and was succeeded by James Westoll the second who died in 1929. Some years earlier, in 1916, the Westwick Steamship Company was formed under Westoll management and this firm controlled the last of the ships. When only one remained, the WESTBURN (No 2) dating from 1929 was taken over by a new venture, the Vedra Shipping Company Ltd., formed out of James Westoll Ltd., with Mr. J. Weston Adamson, a long serving Westoll director as principal shareholder. A long and in the end a somewhat complicated shipowning history was terminated in 1959 when this ship, now renamed ELDRA was sold to Greek owners after a long sojourn at the buoys, ending one of the most interesting and important chapters in North East maritime history.

o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o

Thanks are due to our good friend 'Bill' Smith for this interesting story written under his famous 'nom-de-plume' of BLUE PETER. It tells only a part of the Westoll's influence on the Sunderland shipping scene. Not mentioned here, for instance, are the family connections with both the Austin and the Pickersgill shipbuilding companies which culminated in the present members of the family serving as directors of the Austin & Pickersgill Ltd. firm when it was formed in 1954. By then they had transferred their residence to the Longtown area of Cumberland and their business interests to farming. When A & P were taken over by the London Overseas Freighters company a few years later they resigned thus severing active ties with the Wear gong back nearly 100 years . . . . . . but that is another story, Blue Peter?

A 'WESTOLL LINE' FLEET LIST

At left some 'Westoll' uniform buttons! Ex e-Bay.

While I have tried to make the list below both complete & accurate, errors can easily 'creep in' when you access multiple sources for data. Corrections (or additions) are invited.

There are 44 vessels listed below built by Short Brothers. 'Blue Peter' stated above that there were a total of 46 ships built for Westoll by Short Brothers. So there may be 2 more 'Short' ships to identify & add into the following list.

1) VESSELS BUILT AT SUNDERLAND

#

Name

Built

Gross

Built by

Years in fleet

Disposition

1

Roecliff

1860

146

William Adamson

2 days only?

Reverted to Adamson

2

Zealous

1863

292

Gardner

1863/1875

Burned 1875

3

Advance - a limited history is here

1864

608

T. R. Oswald

1864/1870

Went missing 1870

4

Natalian - a limited history is here

1865

620

George Haswell

1869/1872

Lost 1872

5

United Service

1865

910

George Haswell

1871/1895

Sold to Norwegian owners

6

Wear

1865

699

T. R. Oswald

1865/1898

Collided & sank 1898

7

Ardent

1867

358

Bartram Haswell & Company

1867/1879

Sold

8

Auburn

1867

346

Bartram Haswell & Company

1867/1880

Sold

9

Mariner

1868

355

R. Thompson

1868/1878

Sold

10

Pyrrha

1869

1089

T. R. Oswald

1869/1890

Wrecked Dec. 1890

11

Abana

1871

725

James Laing

1871/1906

Sold

12

Arno

1871

1083

James Laing

1871/1898

Foundered 1898

13

Mercator

1871

1099

James Laing

1871/1899

Sold to Witherington & Everett

14

Tabor

1871

811

Short Brothers

1871/1881

Went missing 1881

15

Thomas Parker

1871

1152

Short Brothers

1871/1879

Sold to Russian owners

16

John Adamson

1872

1685

Short Brothers

1872/1900

Sold to Spanish owners

17

Supernal

1873

1186

Bartram Haswell & Company

1873/1904

Sold to Swedish owners

18

Advent

1876

895

Short Brothers

1876/1905

Sold

19

Fervent

1876

901

Short Brothers

1876/1883

Went missing 1883

20

Britannia

1877

973

Short Brothers

1877/1920

Foundered

21

Prudent

1877

1428

Bartram Haswell & Company

1877/1895

Sold to Norwegian owners

22

Diligent

1878

1414

Bartram Haswell & Company

1878/1878

Sunk in collision

23

Ambient

1879

1033

Short Brothers

1879/1891

Collision & sank

24

Consent

1879

1478

Bartram Haswell & Company

1879/1912

Sold

25

Lucent

1879

1478

Bartram Haswell & Company

1879/1917

Sunk by gunfire 1917

26

Salient

1879

1432

Bartram Haswell & Company

1872/1891

Wrecked Mar. 09, 1891

27

Eident

1880

1624

Short Brothers

1880/1902

Sunk

28

Virent (an iron steamer) a partial history of the vessel is here

1880

1725

Short Brothers

1880/1890

Wrecked Mar. 22, 1890

29

Beneficent

1881

2024

Short Brothers

1881/1917

Hit mine 1917

30

Refulgent

1881

991

Short Brothers

1881/1901

Sunk

31

Birch

1882

1807

Strand Slipway

1899/1910

Collision & sank

32

James Cameron

1882

1807

Short Brothers

1887/1910

Collision & sank

33

Newent

1882

994

Short Brothers

1882/1917

1909 collision & sank

34

Obedient

1882

1051

Short Brothers

1882/1898

Collision & sank

35

Cogent

1883

2051

Short Brothers

1883/1919

WW1 interned. To Spanish owners in 1919

36

W. B. Ferguson

1883

1612

Short Brothers

1883/1897

Wrecked

37

James Westoll

1884

1990

Short Brothers

1884/1911

Broken up after collision

38

William Adamson

1884

1986

Short Brothers

1884/1910

Sold to French owners

39

J. M. Smith

1885

2055

Short Brothers

1885/1907

Collision & sank

40

J. Y. Short

1887

2217

Short Brothers

1887/1916

Sunk by U-43

41

Diligent

1888

2184

Short Brothers

1888/1917

Collision & sank

42

Gerent

1888

2283

Short Brothers

1888/1928

Broken up in 1928

43

Magnus Mail

1889

2317

Short Brothers

1889/1916

Sold

44

George Allen

1890

2309

Short Brothers

1890/1917

Sold

45

Joseph Davis

1890

2282

Short Brothers

1890/1919

Sank off Ushant in 1919

46

Robert Eggleton

1890

2308

Short Brothers

1890/1917

Torpedoed by U-91 in 1917

47

F. D. Lambert

1892

2214

Short Brothers

1892/1917

Torpedoed

48

George Royle

1892

2540

Short Brothers

1892/1915

Foundered in 1915

49

John Fothergill

1892

2730

Short Brothers

1892/1908

Collision & sank in 1908

50

Munificent

1892

3273

Short Brothers

1892/1917

Sunk by mine or torpedo

51

Westburn

1893

3320

Short Brothers

1893/1916

Sunk by Mwe prize crew in 1916

52

William Middleton

1893

2539

Short Brothers

1893/1927

Sold to Italian owners

53

Gladys Royle

1894

3287

Short Brothers

1894/1917

Sunk by Seeadler in 1917

54

Maggie Macnair

1894

3265

Short Brothers

1894/1899

Collision & sank

55

Roecliffe

1894

3265

Short Brothers

1894/1897

Collision & sank

56

Lavinia Westoll

1895

3151

Short Brothers

1895/1916

Hit mine & sank

57

Lizzie Westoll

1895

2858

Short Brothers

1895/1917

Torpedoed by UC-42 in 1917

58

Robert Adamson

1895

2992

Short Brothers

1905/1916

Sunk by UB-16 in 1916

59

Mary Ada Short

1896

3605

Short Brothers

1896/1915

Sunk by Prinz Eitel Friedrich in 1915

60

T. R. Thompson

1897

3538

Short Brothers

1897/1918

Sunk by UB-57 in 1918

61

Roker

1898

3499

Short Brothers

1898/1933

Broken up in 1933

62

Coniscliffe

1901

3920

Short Brothers

1901/1912

Stranded & wrecked in 1912

63

Virent 1, 2, Note 3

1902

3771

Osbourne & Graham

1902/1918

Torpedoed

64

Regent

1903

3281

Bartram Haswell & Company

1903/1928

Sold

65

Ambient

1904

1517

S. P. Austin & Son Ltd.

1904/1917

Hit mine & sank in 1917

66

Salient

1905

3879

Short Brothers

1905/1936

Sold to be broken up

67

Barnby

1906

3838

Sir J. Priestman & Co.

1910/1911

Wrecked

68

Excellent

1907

1944

S. P. Austin & Son Ltd.

1907/1917

Sunk by gunfire

69

President

1907

1945

S. P. Austin & Son Ltd.

1907/1921 & 1924/28

Sank in 1928

70

Fulgent

1910

2008

Short Brothers

1910/1915

Sunk by submarine

71

Fluent

1911

3659

Sir J. Priestman & Co.

1911/1917

Torpedoed or hit mine 1917

72

Intent

1911

1564

William Pickersgill & Sons Limited

1911/1918

Torpedoed 1918

73

Rudmore

1911

969

S. P. Austin & Son Ltd.

1911/1937

Sold in 1937

74

Westcove

1912

2734

S. P. Austin & Son Ltd.

1927/1940

Sunk

75

Nascent (a steamer) a partial history of the vessel is here

1915

3720

Sir J. Priestman & Co.

1915/1917

Torpedoed 1917

76

Okement

1915

4349

William Pickersgill & Sons Limited

1915/1917

Torpedoed 1917

77

Westwick

1916

5694

William Pickersgill & Sons Limited

1916/1918

Hit mine & sank

78

Westhope

1918

5705

William Pickersgill & Sons Limited

1918/1935

Sold in 1935

79

Lys

1920

1830

S. P. Austin & Son Ltd.

1923/1935

Sold in 1935

80

Andelle

1922

1832

S. P. Austin & Son Ltd.

1925/1945

Broken up in 1945

81

Westburn

1929

2874

S. P. Austin & Son Ltd.

1929/1957

Sold

82

Westavon

1929

2842

S. P. Austin & Son Ltd.

1929/1941

Hit mine & sank

83

Ament

1930

2798

William Pickersgill & Sons Limited

1930/1930

Wrecked 1930

84

Benificent

1931

2944

William Pickersgill & Sons Limited

1931/1940

Hit mine & sank

2) VESSELS NOT BUILT AT SUNDERLAND

#

Name

Built

Gross

Built by

Years in fleet

Disposition

1

Aldworth

1893

3369

William Gray & Co., W. Hartlepool

1897/1928

Broken up

2

Alette

1896

2769

William Gray & Co., W. Hartlepool

1898/1900

Wrecked

3

Sir Walter Scott

1908

1465

Blyth Shipbuilding Co., Blyth, Scotland

1912/1936

Sold

4

Barmoor

1909

2225

Wood Skinner Co., Newcastle

1923/1936

Sold

5

May Scott

1909

2769

Blyth Shipbuilding Co., Blyth, Scotland

1912/1918

Sold


CAPTAIN ROBERT EGGLETON

A number of the above fleet vessels link to detailed listings in the various shipbuilder pages. Those listings in many cases refer to Captain Robert Eggleton, & indeed, one of the fleet vessels was named Robert Eggleton.

Stephen Crunkhorn, of Long Sutton, Lincolnshire, advises (thanks!) that Robert Eggleton, was his great great uncle. And that Patricia Jakes, his aunt who recently passed away, was most interested in Eggleton family history with a particular interest in Robert Eggleton. Do read the touching story about Patricia Jakes & the Westburn coal here. Her records about the Captain have been the source & inspiration for Stephen's search for more data about his distinguished ancestor. And for the data next presented.

What do we know about Robert Eggleton?

Robert Eggleton (Born Wisbech, Nov. 11, 1833 was his date of baptism Note/Jan. 15, 1902) worked with & for Westoll's for over 40 years, &, likely in his later years, was a shareholder in a number of the fleet ships. He was in Westoll's employ while studying to become a Master Mariner, became a ship's Captain & commanded many of the fleet vessels over his long career at sea. He died in harness, if you will. He suffered from diabetes & in 1902, when Captain of Coniscliffe, he died of the disease when that ship was at Odessa, (Ukraine, Black Sea). As is confirmed in this contemporary newspaper article. He is, I understand, buried in the British Cemetery at Odessa.

The following, as best can be determined, is a summary of his commands of Westoll fleet ships. What an amazing record of service! List modified with additional data provided (thanks!) by John Oliver.

1865/1868

Advance

1869/1871

Wear

1871/1873

Thomas Parker

1873/1875

Supernal

1875/1878

John Adamson

1878

Diligent (built 1878) - he was its captain when it sank in 1878.

1878/1880

Consent

1880/1881

Salient & Virent

1882

Beneficent

1883/1884

Cogent

1884/1885

William Adamson

1885/1887

J. M. Smith

1887/1888

J. Y. Short - its first Captain.

1888/1889

Gerent

1890/1893

Robert Eggleton - its first Captain

1893/1896

Westburn

1897/1901

T. R. Thompson

1901/1902

Coniscliffe - his last command. He died at Odessa in 1902 when in command.

If you can add more data about Captain Robert Eggleton, do please be in touch.

JAMES WESTOLL LIMITED LETTERHEAD

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