THE SUNDERLAND SITE - PAGE 073
SHIPBUILDERS - PAGE 21

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Copyright? (98 = 98) Test.

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Corrections in any of the material which follows, however tiny, would be most welcome. And additions, of course!

PICKERSGILL & MILLER (1838 to soon after 1851)
WM. PICKERSGILL (soon after 1851 to 1880)
WILLIAM PICKERSGILL & SONS (1880 to 1907)
WILLIAM PICKERSGILL & SONS LIMITED (1907/1957)

OF NORTH DOCK (thru 1851) & THEN SOUTHWICK

First a few images. All clickable. Hover your mouse over each thumbnail to read the subject matter.

The paragraphs that follow have been revised & re-revised over the years as new data has been located. They surely will now need further revision to incorporate data published in 'A & P News', the employee magazine of Austin & Pickersgill Limited, specifically in issue No. 15, of Jul. 1977. Alan Vickers has kindly provided scans of two pages from that issue, a two-page spread about the history of 'Pickersgill', derived from the manuscripts of James W. (Watson) Corder (1867/1953), whose lifetime work is now held in the Sunderland Central Library. These two pages summarise what Corder wrote about the history of the 'Pickersgill' businesses over the years, as you can see here. The 'Corder' data is not yet included below.

'Pickersgill' was founded in 1838, I read. At North Dock. By William Pickersgill (c1823/Sep101880) in partnership with William Miller, though I cannot tell you their business name. Which may however have been simply 'Pickersgill and Miller' (per Miramar & one other source).

The yard moved to Southwick in 1851. On the north bank of the river, just west of where the Queen Alexandra Bridge was later built (in 1909). With three slipways. Soon after the 1851 move, the partnership with William Miller came to an end when he moved away to Gloucester to open a shipyard there. (We thank Michael Hopps, Miller's great-great-grandson, for providing that snippet of data.) The ongoing business then became 'Pickersgill' family solely. Miller, who came originally from Gloucester, formed or later formed 'Miller & Son', located on the Gloucester & Berkeley Canal.

The original William Pickersgill was killed during the building of Stuart in 1880, & William's son, also named William, (William John Pickersgill), took over the business in 1887. I have not read who was in command in the intervening years. Can anybody advise?

In 1907, the yard became incorporated - as 'William Pickersgill & Sons Limited'.

On July 22, 1926, one of the worst accidents in Sunderland shipbuilding history occurred at the 'Pickersgill' yard. 3 shipyard workers ended up losing their lives, & maybe 50 more were injured.

A gangway leading to Cairnglen, due to be launched 4 days later, collapsed (fortunately gradually) under the collective weight of about 100 workmen. 50 or so men were thrown to the ground from heights of 15 to 40 feet.

William Young, then 47 years of age & a father of seven, a 'holder up' at the yard, suffered a fracture of the spinal vertebrae in his fall & died on Aug. 7, 1926. William is at left above, while a memorial erected in Bishopwearmouth Cemetery in his memory, indeed in memory of all who died in Sunderland shipyard accidents, is at right (in a larger size here).

Frederick C. (Crossley) Eggleston, aged 42, died just 90 minutes after his fall.

And Robert Galloway, just 20 years of age, succumbed to injuries he suffered to his back & head. The Monkwearmouth & Southwick Hospital & the Sunderland Royal Infirmary cared for those that were injured that day. A sad day indeed.

In a strange aspect of the accident, many of the men on the gangway were painters carrying open pots of paint. And much of that paint fell on the heads & faces of those thrown to the ground. Nobody was found to be at fault though the gangway would seem to have been overloaded. The deaths were ruled by the Coroner to be 'accidental'. I learn of this sad history thanks to Tom Minogue, of Dunfermline, Scotland. Tom's interest? William Young was his grandfather. You can read more about the accident here, in a Jul. 23, 2008 'Sunderland Echo' article.

I have read that Pickersgill's built furniture in the inter-war years. Can anyone tell us more about that?

During WW2, in 1944, the yard took over the adjacent 'Castletown' yard with the assistance of the Admiralty & constructed two new building berths. That 'Castletown' yard was, I believe, the old 'Priestman' yard, which had closed in 1933 & was located just west of the Pickersgill yard (or maybe quite a bit to the west of it judging by this map. But I believe that that map has the main Pickersgill yard in the wrong spot. It was to the west of Queen Alexandra Bridge & not to the east as depicted in the map). The ex Priestman yard became known as the 'West Yard'. And the prior existing facilities became known as the 'East Yard'.

It would seem that my last paragraph & earlier text also may well need correction. The 'East Yard' was, per 'Billhawk', on the N. bank of the river nearly opposite the Laing, Deptford, yard. Per the second comment to this image.

In September 1954, the company merged with S. P. Austin & Son Ltd. to form Austin & Pickersgill Ltd.

I have been asking whether anybody could provide us with the dates of birth & death of both of the Pickersgills' whose name was William? Derek Holcroft has kindly come to our rescue re the first William Pickersgill, by providing fine images of his gravesite in the churchyard of Southwick's Holy Trinity Church. He died on Sep. 10, 1880 - at the young age of 57 - as you can see here. So his date of birth would be c.1823. Data on the second William Pickersgill will hopefully become available in the future.

A build list for 'Pickersgill' can be found on site here. Miramar lists, (highest hull number on page). It used to be that you could click on the links that follow & get to the relevant Miramar page. But no longer! The new procedure must be to go to Miramar (here) & log in (you must be registered to view any page). And once you are logged in, return to this page & all the following links should work for you:- 76, 106, 136, 166, 196, 227, 256, 315, 348, 378. (378)

Names of vessels constructed by 'Pickersgill'. As I find them. In a table in build date sequence. And alphabetic within a year.

1 Indiana
299 (or 300) tons
Hull 30

68628
1873

A wooden 3 masted schooner, though 'Mystic' describes the vessel as a bark. Have also seen it referred to as a brigantine & a barquentine. Per 1 (data), 2 (Indiana), 3 (Mystic Seaport - many 'ship register' references from 1884 thru 1891), 4 (1891 wreck report ex 5), 6 (1891 loss). 130.1 ft long, signal letters MHGJ. The vessel is not, at this time, Miramar listed. The Pickersgill 'build list' on this site (p.#147) indicates that the vessel was built for The Fleetwood Shipping Co. Ltd. ('FleetwoodShipping'), of Fleetwood, Lancashire. But it would seem that is not exactly so. The webmaster has a few (not all) editions of Lloyd's Register available to him from the time period - at left - & thru the 1874/75 edition, the vessel was registered to T. Seed, of Fleetwood, which surely means Thomas Seed. It is likely, however, that T. Seed was the principal of FleetwoodShipping, which company had many ships built by Pickersgill, including vessels named Thomas C. Seed & William D. Seed. From 1878/79 the vessel was owned by FleetwoodShipping. By the 1877/88 edition, W. (William) C. Jarvis, of Liverpool, has become the owner. Different data is recorded at 3 (search for the vessel name). In early 1891, it would seem that the vessel was acquired by Gregory S. Norris, of Auckland, New Zealand ('NZ'). On Mar. 18, 1891, the vessel was abandoned, about 80 km. S. of the Scilly Islands, while en route from England to NZ. Norris was in command, said to have recently acquired the vessel. Indiana was bound from London (left Mar. 11, 1891) for East London, S. Africa with a full cargo & then intended to visit Mauritius to pick up a cargo of sugar for NZ or maybe for Australia. The vessel sprang a leak in a heavy gale, a gale which badly effected shipping along the U.K. south coast, & the leak was so serious that the vessel had to be abandoned. All aboard were rescued - after 5 days, by Fifeshire. The vessel sank. Can you provide additional data?

2 Coppename
329 (later 274) tons

82302

Raphael
Coppename
Atlantico
1880

A wooden 3 masted barquentine. Per 1 (Univ. of Newcastle SINE, Coppename), 2 (1915 ownership data, Coppename), 3 ('wrecksite.eu', Atlantico, sunk in 1918), 4 ('uboat.net', sinking Atlantico). 137.3 ft. long, signal letters TDWG, later HRKF. The vessel is not, at this time, Miramar listed. The very last wooden ship built by 'Pickersgill' & indeed the very last wooden ship built on the River Wear. Built for A. Pearson & Co. ('Pearson'), of Glasgow. The only reference I can spot to the meaning of 'Coppename' is that there is a river of the name in Suriname, on the Caribbean coast of South America. Could it be that Pearson traded to Suriname? The webmaster has a few editions of Lloyd's Register available to him, visible at left. Pearson was still the owner in the 1885/86 edition. By the 1887/88 edition, the vessel had been sold to J. Malandain, of Fécamp, France, & renamed Raphael. It seems likely that at a later date, a date unknown to the webmaster, the vessel was sold to Sir William Crundall ('Crundall'), of Dover, & renamed Coppename. Crundall owned a fleet of colliers, I read. At an even later date, the vessel was sold to George Nicholls, of Folkestone, Kent. Certainly Nicholls was the owner of the Dover registered vessel in 1915 (link 2), in which year, I read, the vessel was delisted. 'At one time under the Portuguese flag in Oporto trade.' (I read those words here ex 'The Last of the Windjammers', Vol. 2 by Basil Lubbock). I was so grateful for the 'scottbase' data that was once available re his e-Bay listings. What later happened to her, I wonder? In the absence of available Lloyd's Registers for the period of 1890/91 thru 1929/30, the history of the vessel in its later years is difficult to determine. But it now seems certain that the vessel was sold, probably in 1915, to Gouveia Jose Joaquim of Oporto, Portugal, & renamed Atlantico. And that on Sep. 30, 1918, en route from Newport, Wales, to Oporto, with a cargo of coal, Atlantico was stopped by German submarine UB-112, Kapitänleutnant Wilhelm Rhein in command, & sunk by gunfire. At 49.50N/6.35W, 6 miles W. of Bishop Rock, Isles of Scilly. Was there any loss of life? The name of her captain? We thank Celia Gibb for her help in advancing the above listing. Can you provide additional data?

3 Stuart
1380 tons
Hull 48

81483

Adelphi Couppa
Sophia Malandrachi
Emil
1880

An iron steamer. Per 1 (launch & trial refs., p.#215 & #273), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 245.0 ft. (74.68 metres) long perpendicular to perpendicular, attained speed of 8 5/8 knots 'loaded' at her sea trials, signal letters VRHT. The second iron ship built by 'W. Pickersgill & Sons'. Sadly Wm. Pickersgill, the founder of the business, was killed during the course of the vessel's construction. Built for John Bacon of Liverpool & launched by his wife. In 1883, the vessel was sold to R. Couppa, of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Adelphi Couppa. The Lloyd's Register data is quite confusing about the vessel from 1885/86 thru 1889/90 - they recorded what I believe to be two incorrect names, a wrong Official Number & an incorrect owner (Vagliano) - see left. In 1890/91 the owner became 'N. Couppa' rather than 'R. Couppa'. In 1897 the vessel was sold again, to C. (Constantin) G. Malandrachi of Galata, Constantinople, Turkey, & renamed Sophia Malandrachi. Maybe 'Sofhia Malandrachi'. The vessel was sold for the last time, in 1898, to H. Hecht (of Germany possibly?), & renamed Emil. On Apr. 1, 1898, the vessel was wrecked near Gardini, E. Sicily. Ran aground? Any loss of life? Does anybody know the circumstances, cargo & route? Can you provide additional data?

4 Foscolino
1124 tons
Hull 52

84997

Emily
1882

An iron steamer, schooner rigged. Per pages 1 & 2 (data), 3 (1882 launch data, see left), 4 (1885 lawsuit), 5 (1884 collision circumstances, see left), 6 ('pdf' file, Venetia/Foscolino 1884 Wreck Inquiry), 7 ('pdf' file, 1889 grounding Inquiry), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 221.9 ft long perpendicular to perpendicular, maybe 230 ft. overall, speed of 10 knots, signal letters WFQD. The vessel is said to have been built for Wear Steamship Company, Limited ('Wear'), with R. Wrightson & Sayers ('Wrightson') as managers, both of Sunderland. However Wrightson were the registered owners thru 1885/86 in which year the vessel was transferred to Wear. John L. Brown became the manager & was so in 1884 - but Lloyd's spell the name as 'Browne'. On Jun. 18, 1884, in dense fog off Ushant (an island off the French Brittany coast), Foscolino was in collision with Venetia, en route from London to Genoa, Italy. Venetia sank & 2 of its crew lost their lives. Foscolino put into Brest, seriously damaged. It was en route from Bilbao, Spain, to Amsterdam with a cargo of iron ore. Both masters were held to be at fault for 'not reversing their engines in addition to stopping.' Major repairs were effected on the vessel in 1885. On Jul. 11, 1889, the vessel left the Tyne with 1370 tons of coal, bound for Malmö, Sweden. Joseph Watson Thirkell was in command with a crew of 16 all told. At 10:45 p.m. on Jul. 14, 1889 the vessel, still owned by Wear, ran aground off Barsebak (or Barsebäck), a little to the N. of Malmö & just 20 km. away from Copenhagen, Denmark, across the Øresund strait. The next morning, 340 tons of coal were jettisoned, the vessel was floated off & towed to Copenhagen Roads where the vessel's hull was inspected. The vessel discharged its remaining cargo at Malmö, took a cargo of deals & battens from Blanksholm, Sweden (in the Baltic), to Dunkirk, France, & proceeded in ballast to the Tyne to effect repairs. 5 ship's plates had been cracked & 19 more had been bent. The master was found to have misunderstood his correct location & was held to be solely at fault for the grounding. The vessel was laid up in the Tyne in 1893. I read that the vessel became out of register in 1896 - I wonder why - another change of ownership perhaps? In late Oct. 1900, Foscolino was in collision with the Spanish Axpe, off Newarp Lightship, in the North Sea off the coasts of Norfolk & Lincolnshire. Foscolino arrived in the Tyne with her stem broken & her bow stove in. In 1909 the vessel was sold to E. Johnsson (could be the name of the manager only), likely of Sweden, & was renamed Emily. On Nov. 4, 1911, Emily left Grimsby for Ahus, Sweden, & just went missing. The postcard available at left, was mailed in 1922 - stated to be re a vessel which became Emily in 1909 & was lost in 1911. Can you provide additional data?

5 Samanco
840 (or 815) tons
Hull 71

91167

Sant' Antonio
1884

An iron barque. Per 1 & 2, (Samanco grounded off Carnsore in 1886), 3 (Samanco in the River Avon), 4 (1916/17 refs. to a vessel named Sant Antonio), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 195.0 ft. long, signal letters JRCB. Built, for the South American trade, for S. Wakeham & Son of Liverpool  & registered there. The vessel was named Samanco by Mrs G. Wakeham. Its first voyage would seem to have been to Valparaiso, Chile, Captain Bell in command, with a general cargo. The vessel ran aground in 1886, due to a navigational error, near Carnsore Point, south east tip of Ireland, while en route from Liverpool to Callao, Peru, with a cargo of coal. In 1890 George P. Wakeham was recorded as the vessel's managing owner. And in 1900, Harold Wakeham, also of Liverpool was listed as the vessel's managing owner. A long expired e-Bay item (thanks scott-base!) advised that in 1903 an able seaman on the vessel stabbed the vessel's 2nd mate to death. Thomas E. (Ernest) Wells would seem to have been the 2nd mate's name. I read (insert 91167) that the vessel became out of register in 1904. When, again per scott-base, the vessel was sold to Italian owners & renamed San't Antonio. 5 which lists only one vessel of the name prior to 1943, indicates that the vessel was sold rather in 1914 to 'P. Agostino' & renamed Sant' Antonio, (both names likely associated with Italy). And that that vessel was sunk by gunfire N. of Cape Bougaroni, Algeria, on Dec. 25, 1917 (or maybe wrecked off Cape Passero). 4 adds data re a tiny, 22 ton, sailing ship of the same name but no reference to the sinking of a larger vessel. Can you clarify the facts?

6 Snowdrop
634 (or 588 or 609) tons
Hull 70

90108

Marthe Marguerite
1884

A 3 masted barque. Per 1 (Marthe Marguerite sinking by U54), 2 (English translation of 3, a French page, history data & Marthe Marguerite image), 4 (English translation of 5, a German page, sinking data), 6 (U54, vessels sunk), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 170.7 ft. long, signal letters JPDC. Built for J. Tedford & Co. ('Tedford'), of Belfast. The J. stands for James. I read that the vessel was sold, in 1884, for 83,000 francs, to 'Pitre Rosier' (or Rozier) of Nantes, France, & renamed Marthe Marguerite, but Miramar reference the new name only in 1899. Certainly Lloyd's Register of 1889/90 still records Tedford as being the registered owner. I read (insert 90108) that the vessel became out of register in 1899, presumably when sold to French owners. The vessel became owned by 'Fleuriot Frères', of Nantes, in 1911? On Nov. 10, 1911, while en route from St. Nazaire, France, to Guadeloupe, the vessel nearly sank in a hurricane. The masts were all gone perhaps. It was able to make Funchal, Madiera Islands, on Jan. 12, 1912 & Guadeloupe on Feb. 8, 1912. In 1917, the vessel was owned by Georges Hailhaust, of Nantes - or perhaps by 'Société des affréteurs Réunis' (Fleuriot Frères, managers). On Sep. 19, 1917, with a crew of 17 & under the command of Captain Charles Sautrel, the vessel, en route in ballast from Nantes to Fort de France, Martinique, Caribbean, was sunk by gunfire from U54, Kapitänleutnant Kurt Heeseler in command. U54 ordered the vessel to stop & the ship was evacuated. She was then shelled until she sank. No loss of life. I presume the crew made it to shore in small boats. Sunk at 46.18N/11.25W, about 400 miles out of Nantes. Or maybe at 45.48N/8.00W. The source data is in part in French & the overall data is contradictory & to the webmaster confusing. Are the facts correct as I have recorded them above?

7 Chala
1057 (or 1056 or 1087) tons
Hull 72

91224
1885

A 3 masted iron 'clipper' barque. Per 1 (1885 launch ex 2 at page 106), 3 (data, in Norwegian, ex 4 a 'doc' file #556), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 213.0 ft. (64.92 metres) long, iron masts etc., signal letters JWSP, later WHSJ. Launched on Jun. 15, 1885 for Samuel Wakeham & Son ('WakehamCo'), brewers or maybe distillers of Liverpool, by Miss Blanche Wakeham, daughter of Samuel Wakeham. Ordered for the South American trade. The vessel was initially registered, however, in the name of G. P. Wakeham but soon was transferred into the name of WakehamCo. Possibly named after 'Port Chala' Peru? Captain C. Watson was her first Captain. In 1890 & 1900, George P. Wakeham & Howard Wakeham were recorded as being the vessel's respective managing owners. The vessel was sold, in Sep. 1909, to A/S Chala (Rudolf Hansen the managers?) of Kristiansand, Norway. On Jan. 16, 1914, while en route from Falmouth, Jamaica, to Le Havre, France, with a cargo of 'farvetre' - per wrecksite.eu the word means dyewood - the vessel was dismasted & abandoned in the N. Atlantic. Have not read exactly where it happened, the circumstances, rescue efforts or any loss of life, etc. Can you add to the above?

8 Chepica
1058 (or 1057 or 1060) tons
Hull 73

91251

Bris
1885

A 3 masted iron 'clipper' barque. Per 1 (image, as a fully rigged ship - ex State Library of Victoria), 2 (1885 launch, ex 'Marine Engineer'), 3 (data, in Norwegian, ex 4 a 'doc' file #36), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 213.6 ft. long, iron masts & spars, signal letters KBVR, later KBTG. The webmaster has just a few editions of Lloyd's Register available to him - at left. The vessel was launched on Sep. 9, 1885 for Samuel Wakeham & Son ('WakehamCo'), brewers or maybe distillers of Liverpool, by Miss Taylorson, of Sunderland. The vessel was initially registered, however, in the name of G. P. Wakeham but soon was transferred into the name of WakehamCo. Possibly named after 'Chépica', Chile? In 1890 & 1900, George P. Wakeham & Howard Wakeham were recorded as being the vessel's respective managing owners. An early voyage of Chepica was from Valparaiso, Chile, to Melbourne, Australia (arrived Mar. 24, 1866), via Mauritius, with a cargo of wheat and flour. It returned to Valparaiso. Chepica visited Australia once again, from London in 1881. I read (insert 91251) that the vessel became out of register in 1904, presumably when sold to Norwegian owners. The vessel was sold, in 1904, to A/S Bark Bris (Johan Bang, the manager and/or the true owner), of Grimstad, Norway, & renamed Bris. I have previously referred here to J. Mathiassen of Norway as possibly owning the vessel, and that there were other Norwegian owners also - as per a long expired e-Bay listing. But that e-Bay reference seems to have been incorrect. On Sep. 23, 1919, while en route from Rio de Janiero to Rio Grande do Sul (both Brazil) in ballast, the vessel was sunk after a collision with Durango (of Bilbao, Spain, it would seem) off the mouth of the Rio Grande. 1 life was lost. A snippet 1919 reference, however, states that Bris was rather bound from Baltimore, U.S.A., & that J. Bang of Grimstad was the vessel's then owner. Can you tell us about the collision circumstances or otherwise add to or correct the above text?

9 Prince Edward
149 (or 157) tons
Hull 74

89703

Deauville
1885

An iron cargo ship. Per 1 (1885 ref. to launch, p.50, ex 2), 3 (Lloyd's Register data 1931/32 thru 1937/38, Deauville, now see 2nd left), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 110.0 ft. long, passenger accommodations in 1st & 2nd Class, machinery aft. Signal letters JVTS, later in life as Deauville OFJX & TSPG. Built for Thomas Seed, of Fleetwood, Lancashire. Designed 'to carry passengers in the summer and cargo in the winter between Morecombe Bay, Blackpool, Isle of Man, and the Welsh coast' (or Morecambe Bay). Christened by Mrs Seed, wife of the owner. Captain W. A. Bond, of Fleetwood, was her first Captain. The webmaster has a few editions of Lloyd's Register available to him - at left - & in the 1889/90 edition, the owner had become The Manx Steam Trading Company Limited, of Castletown, Isle of Man. It had been registered to them, I read, on Sep. 9, 1888. Chas. Hy. Bickerstaff, also of Castletown, was the vessel's manager in 1890. Daniel F. Callow was the manager in 1900.  I read (insert 89703) that the vessel became out of register in 1902, presumably when sold to French owners on May 7, 1902, as next follows. I was unable to find any WWW references to the later history of the vessel & Miramar indicate no change of name. However Gildas Le Briquir came to our rescue - thanks so much! Gildas indicated that in May 1902 the Liverpool registered vessel was bought by 'La Compagnie Normande de Navigation à Vapeur', of Nantes, France, & renamed Deauville. Registered at Le Havre, certainly from 1930/31. The vessel linked the harbours of Le Havre, Deauville, & Trouville, all on the lower River Seine. The 1937/38 issue of Lloyd's Register states the vessel to be broken up. Gildas adds that in 2011 there was an exhibition at Cabourg, on the Channel coast, which explored the maritime links between the N. & S. banks of the Seine river. The exhibition catalogue may possibly contain more data about the vessel. Can you add anything? An image?

10 Inca
1059 tons
Hull 84

96313

Sirius
1889

A 3 masted iron barque. Per 1 (1889 launch ex 2 i.e. Industries, Vol. VI, Jan. to Jun. 1889, & also Marine Engineer 1889/90, both Google books), 3 (ref. in Norwegian, Sirius, ex 4, a 'doc' file, ref. #151), 5 (sale in 1915), 6 (Sirius, sunk in 1917), 7 (extensive detail & image, Sirius, in Norwegian & English), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 212.5 ft. long, signal letters LFKN, later KDJV. Built for Samuel Wakeham & Son, of Liverpool, brewers or maybe distillers of Liverpool. In 1890, George P. Wakeham was recorded as being the vessel's managing owner, whilst in 1900, Mrs E. Wakeham was recorded as the owner of the vessel with Howard Wakeham the manager. I read that the registry was closed in 1908, presumably when the barque was sold to Norwegian owners. The vessel was sold, in Sep. 1908, for 54,000 kr., to A/S Sirius (Chr. Trondsen), of Sarpsborg, Norway, & renamed Sirius. In 1915, the vessel was sold again, for 130,000 kr., to A/S Seilskibsrederiet Sirius (L. Severin Skougaard), of Kristiania (Oslo), Norway, with no change of vessel name. On Mar. 22, 1917, while en route from Buenos Aires, Argentina, to Odense, Denmark, with a cargo of wheat, the vessel was stopped & scuttled by U-57, Kapitänleutnant Carl-Siegfried Ritter von Georg in command, in the North Sea, at 58.30N/01.50E. Due E. of northern mainland Scotland. 'Johan Martin Jørgensen, Abel' (maybe Aabel), was in command of Sirius. 1 life was lost - Gustav Jansen, who drowned when the ship's port boat capsized. The remaining crew made it safely to Utsira, Norway. Can you add to the above and/or correct it?

11 Sicilia
1898 (or 1848) tons
Hull 85

142346 later

Cisil
1889

A cargo ship. Per 1 (detailed history of the vessel, in Finnish), 2 (link 1 'Google' translated into English), 3 (data, Cisil), 4 (Lloyd's Register data, 1930/31 thru 1941/42, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 5 (Miramar, you now must be registered to access). We thank the folks at 'http://www.aanimeri.fi/' for their fine & extensive vessel history at the first link above. 270.0 ft (82.3 metres) long perpendicular to perpendicular, later 269.8 ft. & 280.4, signal letters SQMG, later OHAL. The vessel was built for Pierce, Becker & Ilardi, of Messina, Italy. On Sep. 14, 1898 the vessel was sold to Victor Ek, of Helsingfors (Helsinki), Finland. In 1918 the vessel was seized by the British 'from the Russians' & was operated by The Shipping Controller with Gellatly, Hankey & Co. the managers. Then became ON 142346 it would seem. After the end of WW1, the vessel was returned, in 1919, to its owner i.e. Victor Ek, who was apparently killed on Nov. 5, 1922. Soon thereafter, on Jun. 28, 1923, the vessel became owned by Rederibolaget Ek Victor (Victor Ek Steamship Co.) managed perhaps by Anna Ek, Victor Ek's widow. The vessel was sold, on Jul. 14, 1924, to 'Rederi A/B Steam', of Helsingfors, Finland, with G. (Gustaf) B. (Birger) Thordén the vessel's manager, & renamed Cisil. There seem to be a great many companies with 'Rederi A/B' as part of their name. A/B means, maybe, 'Aktiebolag' or maybe 'Aktiebolaget' - a contraction for 'company' perhaps? I am unsure of the meaning of the Finnish texts re 1924 & 1926 at links 1 & 2.  Can anybody provide a good translation/meaning. In mid Dec. 1939, Cisil was at Philadelphia, U.S.A., soon to load scrap iron at Baltimore for delivery to Finland. At 2:10 a.m. on Aug. 23, 1941, Cisil, Isak Ahlmén in command with a crew of 20, was en route from Oxelösund, Sweden, to Danzig, Poland, with a cargo of 2,500 tons of iron ore. The vessel struck a mine laid by Russian/Soviet submarine L-3 & sank in 2 minutes in the Baltic, at 54.18N/15.44E, off Kolberg (Kolobrzeg), Poland. 10 crew members died - a list of their names is at link 1. It would seem that the remaining ten crew members were saved - by Thordénin BJÖRNEBORG - a ship named BJÖRNEBORG owned by Thordénin? - can anybody confirm? Now I have seen references to Swinemünde in NW Poland (today Świnoujście) re that final voyage. Can anybody explain its relevance - Swinemünde & Danzig seem to be quite a distance apart. Corrections are invited to the above text.

12 Drumalis
2530 tons
Hull 89

97820
1890

A 4 masted steel barque. 'Rigged with nothing above double top and topgallant sails'. Per 1, 2 & 3 (all data), 4 (image Drumalis, via link at right), 5 (shamrocks), 6 (in difficulty at Wreck Bay, Australia, in Jun. 1900), 8 (The 1901 Wreck Inquiry report), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Lots of references to the vessel at Trove, Australia. 2449.67 registered (net) tons, 310.0 ft. long, signal letters LWGS, said to have been, at the time, the largest sailing vessel built in the NE of England. Built for John Porter & others, (P. Iredale & John Porter), Mr. Porter being the managing owner. Of Liverpool & registered there. The vessel spent most of its life sailing to & from ports in Australia. On its maiden run, Drumalis left Sunderland on Oct. 29, 1890 for Port Pirie, South Australia, with a cargo of coke ex Middlesbrough. Its return voyage was to London with 33,909 bags of wheat valued at £33,999. Drumalis was then the largest vessel ever at Port Pirie & the cargo shipped was then the largest cargo. A difficult voyage from London to Sydney, New South Wales ('NSW'), Nov. 1891/Mar. 1892,  R. Campbell in command, with a general cargo valued at £77,000. The vessel carried coke from Barry, Wales, to Port Pirie, carried coal to San Francisco, U.S.A., & flour back to Sydney. To San Francisco again. In 1898, the vessel is stated to have sailed from Cape Town, South Africa, to Newcastle, NSW, in a record 24 days. Also in 1898, an unusual voyage indeed. Drumalis apparently sailed from Dublin, Ireland, to Newcastle, NSW, with soil from Ireland as its ballast. When they opened the hatches at Newcastle, they were surprised to find a fine crop of shamrocks growing in the soil. The enterprising captain apparently sold the ballast by the pound & raised nearly £2,000. The vessel arrived at Port Pirie in Mar. 1899 with a cargo of coke & iron rails. Then to Antwerp, probably with grain. In Jun. 1900, the vessel, en route from Table Bay, South Africa, to Newcastle, in ballast, ran into difficulties & had to anchor in Wreck Bay, NSW. Champion, a steam tug from Sydney, came to her assistance & towed her safely to Newcastle. In May 1901, the vessel was chartered to carry 120,000 cases of case oil from New York to Sydney or Newcastle. In Aug. 1901, the vessel, under the command of Abraham J. (Joseph) Whelan, with a crew of 34 all told & two passengers (the master's wife & child), was en route from Dunkirk, France, to New York, U.S.A., with 2,020 tons of chalk, either ballast or  a partial cargo. In fact there were more persons aboard, it would seem - the steward's wife was aboard also, I read & maybe more. At about 8:30 p.m. on Aug. 11, 1901, the vessel ran aground in fog, on South West Ledge, Cape Sable Island, Nova Scotia, Canada. The Jan. 1902 Court of Inquiry held that the cause of the wreck was the careless use of the lead, a contributing factor being, however, the 'insufficiently distinct character of the fog signal on Cape Sable'. All aboard left the vessel about midnight & landed safely in a cove to the eastward of Cape Sable Lighthouse. The master & mate returned to the wreck 5 hours later, & found that wreckers had already stripped the vessel of everything that could easily be carried away. The ship's bow was submerged, the stern was up in the air & the holds were full of water. The ship eventually went to pieces. Now we had a mystery re the above account of the loss of the vessel. Melanie Cottreau was in touch (thanks Melanie!) to state that her great grandfather, Howard L. Atkinson, was given a watch by the Government of Canada re his part in the rescue of the crew of Drumalis. The watch he was given states 'Presented by the Government of Canada to Howard S. [sic] Atkinson in recognition of the gallant service rendered by him in assisting to rescue the crew of the British Ship Drumalis when wrecked in August 1902. Dated Ottawa, April 1903.' Thanks again to Melanie Cottreau, it has become clear that all aboard the vessel did not land safely in a cove to the eastward of Cape Sable Lighthouse as the Court of Inquiry report states. What happened was that all aboard took to three boats, only two of which landed safely at that location. The third boat, under the command of first officer William F. (Ferguson) Caine & with 12 of the crew aboard, got separated in the fog & rising wind & was carried to the westward. A landing was attempted on a beach in heavy surf but they put back out to sea considering the place to be too dangerous. Several times they approached the coast but were unable to land. Boats were dispatched from Clark's Harbour, The Hawk, & Stoney Island, to find the missing boat. A rescue boat from Stoney Island, under the command of Howard Atkinson, found the badly leaking boat, 5 miles off Cape Sable. The men were taken aboard & the boat was towed to Clark's Harbour. Hence the award of the watch referred to above, a silver hunting watch. And hence also the grant of a cheque for ten dollars each, then a substantial sum of money, to crew members Moses Atkinson, Horatio Brannen & Harry Ross. What seems not to be explained are i) why Drumalis was 150 miles off course in the first place, & ii) why the ship's log book, which was found & presented to the Captain, was stated to have been lost at the Court of Inquiry. Can you provide additional data?

13 Andrada
2593 (or 2551) tons
Hull 90

97836
1891

A 4 masted barque. 'Rigged with nothing above double top- and topgallant sails'. Per 1 (data), 2 (image at Oakland Pier, California - view resource but see left), 3 (data page), 4 (maiden voyage, at article bottom), 5 (in port for 2 years awaiting a cargo), 5 (Court of Inquiry report re the Mar. 1895 grounding of Andrada), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 304 ft. 5 in. long (92.8 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters MBLG, with hull, masts & yards of steel. Built for 'The Andrada Sailing Ship Co. Ltd.', E. (Edward) F. & W. (William) Roberts, the managing owners, of Liverpool. But per 'wrecksite.eu' the vessel was initially registered in the name of E. Roberts. I wonder why this vessel was even ordered & built in view of the ascendancy of steam power. The vessel was engaged in the grain trade to San Francisco. The vessel's maiden voyage was to Sydney, Australia, said to be under the command of G. E. Adams. It would seem that the vessel was at Martinez, Sacramento River, California, for 2 years thru 1893, early 1893 for sure, awaiting a cargo. How distressing - a brand new vessel no less, but she was not alone there! On Oct. 29, 1894, the vessel left Tacoma, Washington, for Liverpool, with about 3,712 tons of wheat. George A. (Arthur) Adams, the vessel's initial captain, was in command, with a crew of 30 all told. At 7:20 a.m. on Mar. 23, 1895, the vessel was abeam of the Fastnet Lighthouse, SW tip of Ireland. At 8:15 p.m. on the 23rd, the Captain saw what he believed to be the Coningbeg Light (Saltee Islands, County Wexford, Ireland) & set his course accordingly. At 5:40 a.m. on Mar. 24, 1895, the vessel ran aground on St. Patrick's Causeway (Sarn Badrig) at the upper end of Cardigan Bay, Wales. Efforts were made to back the vessel off but without success. The Barmouth lifeboat arrived at noon & took 19 of the crew ashore. A Salvage Association vessel arrived from Liverpool on Mar. 26, 1895 with personnel & pumps. Andrada was taking on a little water, but with the help of the Salvage Association's men, the water was kept under control. The pumps continued to be manned - but there was 6 ft. of water in the holds on Mar. 27, 1895 when the Captain & remaining crew left the ship. The Salvage Association eventually, after 10 days, got the vessel off & brought her to Liverpool. For repairs, I presume. The Court of Inquiry determined that Adams had misidentified the light that he saw (Coningbeg), had set an improper course thereafter, had failed to use the lead & was solely at blame for the grounding. His certificate was suspended for 3 months, during which period he was granted a first mate's certificate. I am puzzled by the stated timings. The ship would seen to have travelled a very long way indeed in 22 plus hours (from Fastnet Lighthouse to the grounding point in Cardigan Bay). In 1897, Andrada sailed from Antwerp to San Francisco in 117 days. On Dec. 11, 1900, the vessel was last sighted off the bar at Astoria, Oregon. 1 states that the vessel was wrecked at Vancouver Island on a voyage from Santa Rosalia, Baja, Mexico, to Portland, Oregon. 3 states she was then in ballast & when last seen, by Jordanhill, was 'on her beam ends and flying distress signals'. It is assumed that she foundered at sea between the Columbia entrance and Vancouver Island. The vessel, in ballast, had taken aboard Peter Cordiner, a pilot, & stood out to sea with the weather threatening. All hands were lost & the wreck has never been found. But is that so? It would seem that the captain's wife & a young son were amongst the lost. Can you add anything? Maybe some of the Lloyd's Register listings?

14 Celtic Race
1874 tons
Hull 96

99348

Concordia
1891

A 3 masted fully-rigged ship. Per 1 (R. Hughes-Jones), 2 & 3 (images Concordia), 4 (Norwegian data ex 5, a Word file, sometimes difficult of access), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 253.0 ft. long (80.2 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters MKWN, WJVH & KGFR. Built for 'Celtic Race' Co. Ltd., of Liverpool, with Robert Hughes-Jones (or R. Hughes-Jones & Co.) the managers. Maybe R. Hughes-Jones & Co. were the true owners? Registered at Liverpool. The vessel's maiden voyage (1 & 2) was from London (left Jan. 29, 1892) to Melbourne, Australia, (arrived Jun. 08, 1892) with a cargo of cement - H. Hughes in command. The vessel went on to Newcastle, New South Wales, to load a cargo of coal for Acapulco, Mexico (arrived mid Dec. 1892). It was back at Newcastle ex Rio de Janeiro on Sep. 2, 1894 to soon leave for San Francisco with a cargo likely of coal. In 1896 the vessel carried Oregon pine from Puget Sound/Tacoma to Sydney. There are many references to the vessel at Trove, Australia, frequently loading coal or grain for many different ports around the world. In 1911, the ship's captain, Captain Owen, died at sea, when 10 days into a voyage from Liverpool to Sydney. The vessel put into Milford Haven where John Henry took command. In Nov 1913, the vessel was reported sold for £6,000 (have also read £5,200). Apparently to J. W. Wroldsen & Co., of Tvedestrand, Norway, & renamed Concordia. Or per Miramar to 'A/S Concordia' of Tvedestrand. But 1 advises that the name change was in 1916. And an expired web site re 'Wroldsen' suggested that the Wroldsen ownership period was 1914/1916. The vessel was sold, in 1915, to Stranger and Co., of Norway (perhaps 'Det Strangerske Rederi A/S' (Stranger & Co.), of Kristiania). It made a number of voyages as Concordia to Australia. Out of register in 1923. I read, however, that in 1924, Concordia, then a Norwegian sail training ship, went to Sydney as part of a round-the-world voyage with a cargo of Baltic timber. It was manned by many cadets. The vessel was broken up in Germany in Q2 of 1924. The ownership detail is a little confusing. Can you provide any of the Lloyd's Register listings or otherwise clarify the ownership facts?

15 Dovenby
1653 tons
Hull 94

99313
1891

A 3 masted steel barque. Per 1 (data, Dovenby), 2 (modest data), 3 & 4 (images), 5 (Mohrmann artwork, lower image), 6 (Peter Iredale ships), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 256 ft. long, signal letters MHDK. Owned by Peter Iredale of Liverpool, or maybe by P. Iredale & Porter. In 1900, & also in 1910 & 1915, John Porter of Liverpool was stated to be the barque's managing owner. In her maiden voyage, Dovenby arrived at Sydney, Australia, on Jan. 27, 1892 ex Middlesborough, with a £12,000 cargo principally of 14382 iron pipes - Captain Barclay in command. It soon left Sydney for San Francisco with a cargo of coal ex Wollongong, New South Wales ('NSW'). The vessel was back in Sydney on Jul. 9, 1894 ex Liverpool & left for Callao, Peru, on Aug. 15, 1894 with a cargo of 2077 tons of coal ex Newcastle, NSW, & 400 tons of shale. On May 26, 1898, Dovenby arrived at Sydney, 84 days out from The Downs. It went on to Newcastle to load coal for San Francisco. On Aug. 9, 1899 the vessel arrived at Melbourne ex Hamburg, Germany, after a voyage with some very bad weather - the chief officer fractured his thigh, the 2nd officer suffered 2 broken ribs & a boy was hurt when swept overboard only to be swept back on with the next wave. It had a very varied cargo! The vessel ran aground, off Wallaroo, South Australia ('S.A.'), in Jan. 1907 & off Adelaide, S.A., in Oct. 1910. Many more voyages & many more storms are recorded at Trove, Australia. The vessel was sunk on Nov. 6, 1914 when Dutch passenger/cargo steamer Sindoro struck Dovenby when off the Nore Lightship in the Thames Estuary. Dovenby was en route from Lobos de Afuera (islands off the coast of Peru) to London with a cargo of guano, with Captain Erikson in command. One Dovenby crew member was drowned as a result. Can you provide any additional data? Or correct the above?

16 Lodore
1670 (or 1667 or 1668) tons
Hull 98

99369

Carla
1892

A 3 masted steel barque. Per 1 (Lodore), 2 (limited data), 3 (Carla sinking), 4 (Peter Iredale ships), 5 (data in Norwegian, #57, 25% down 6, a 'doc' file), 7 (fine data page, in Norwegian & English, Carla, with three images), 8 (Lodore, image, capsized in Nov. 1900, click 'view online' at right, but now see left), 9 (Lodore capsized at Newcastle, NSW, in Nov. 1900), 10 ('uboat.net', Carla), 11 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 257.8 ft. long, signal letters MLKC later KFGN. It would appear that the vessel had many owners. Its plans are held in the Tyne & Wear Archives, I read. The vessel was built for P. Iredale & Porter (Peter Iredale) of Liverpool. Its first voyage was to India, returning to the U.K. On Feb. 17, 1894 the vessel arrived at Sydney, Australia, under the command of H. G. Lee, with a varied cargo. It left Sydney on Mar. 4, 1894 for Antofagasta, Chile, via Newcastle, New South Wales, at Newcastle presumably to load a cargo of coal. On May 18, 1898 the vessel arrived at Port Pirie with a cargo of coke ex Barry, Wales. On Jul. 9, 1898 the vessel left Port Pirie for Swansea with a cargo of sulphides. And in Apl. 1899 Lodore left Newcastle for Valparaiso,Chile, with coal. In 1900 the vessel returned to Sydney with a cargo of tiles & marble ex Marseilles, France, in a voyage in which an apprentice fell from the maintopsail yard & broke his thigh. The vessel put into Carthagona (presumably Carthagena, Spain) so the boy could receive care but he died there. In 1900, John Porter of Bebington, Cheshire was stated to be the vessel's managing owner. Times were tough in 1900 - Lodore was at Newcastle, NSW, for close to 4 months awaiting a cargo of coal, having arrived there on Aug. 9, 1900. It was, in fact, scheduled to soon load a cargo of coal for Callao, Peru, when on Nov. 30, 1900, a most extraordinary event occurred - Lodore was blown over at its mooring & capsized! Thanks to Trove, Australia, I can show you one of their many stories about it.  A violent thunderstorm occurred, with the sky pitch black & with enormous gusts of wind. The first gust blew the vessel over but it righted itself. The second blew it over completely & the vessel ended up on its side with its masts & rigging resting on the muddy bottom of the harbour, fortunately shallow there, which shallowness kept the vessel from turning upside down. There was no loss of life though a few crew members had difficulty in escaping the hull. Local steamers soon ran excursion trips around the fallen barque for paying sightseers! A Court of Marine Inquiry hearing was held - nobody was found to be at fault. Peter Callan was contracted to raise the vessel. He, along with two other firms, removed the masts & with the help of powerful winches succeeded in refloating the vessel on Jan. 27, 1901 - at a cost of £3,750. The vessel was taken to Mort's Dock where repairs were effected - the hull however had not been damaged. The vessel was towed to Sydney & rerigged while it was loading a cargo of wheat & flour for London. It left Sydney on May 6, 1901. This page advises that 'The underwriters paid a total loss. Mr Porter bought the underwriters rights in the hull, went out to Australia and salved the barque, which when refitted and trigged up he sold.' The page also explains why the vessel may have blown over. I rather doubt, however, if Mr. Porter physically made it to Newcastle, but it might have been possible in view of the May 1901 departure date ex Sydney. On Nov. 15, 1901 the vessel was reported sold to British owners for something over £12,000 while en route from London to Sydney. Those purchasers would seem to have been 'The Ship "Lodore" Co., Lim.' of Liverpool, with G. M. Steeves, also of Liverpool, the manager. The vessel continued to serve Australia at least thru 1907. In 1910, 'The Ship "Lodore" Co., Lim.' of Liverpool, was recorded as the vessel's owner with Gilbert M. Steeves, also of Liverpool, the vessel's manager. On May 17, 1910 the sale of the vessel, for about £3,220, to Norwegian owners was reported. The vessel went out of register in 1910, presumably when then sold to A/S Lodore (Alex. Bech.) of Tvedestrand, Norway.  And sold again, in 1912, to A/S Westfalen, (H. Berntsen) also of Tvedestrand, for £5,250 it would seem, & renamed Carla. In 1915, Carla was sold, for 220,000 kr. to Jens Samuelsen, of Farsund, Norway. In early Mar. 1918, Carla was en route, in ballast, from Le Havre, France, to Hampton Roads, Virginia, U.S.A., Captain G. Larsen ('Larsen'), in command. On Mar. 14, 1918, when S. of the Isle of Wight & off Cherbourg, France, Carla was sunk by UB-33, Oberleutnant zur See Fritz Gregor ('Gregor') in command, by gunfire. The exact location? Per Miramar 56 miles NW & 3/4 miles N. of Le Havre. While 7 indicates that no lives were lost, Jens Emanuelsen advises (thanks!) that Larsen was in fact drowned, (see image at left), while the rest of the crew survived. As now confirmed at Trove. Jen's grandfather, Harry Hansen, correctly 'Harry Bengt Poul Alexander Ølting Hansen', (1897/1976), together with another crew member, were rescued a day later, the other crew member unfortunately later becoming insane as a result of the experience. Jens adds i) that his grandfather's family in Copenhagen, told that he had died, came home from a Temperance Society meeting to find him fast asleep in bed!, & ii) that a month later, UB-33 hit a mine SW of the Varne sandbank, & the entire crew of 28, including Gregor died. Can you provide additional data, Lloyd's Register listings or an image perhaps?

17 Mowhan
2873 (or 2817) tons
Hull 99

99405

Oceana
then Nostra Signora della Misericordia that's all one name!
1892

A 4 masted steel barque. 'Rigged with royal sails over double top & topgallant sails.' Per 1 (data, Mowhan), 2 (painting, Mowhan), 3 (data, Mowhan, partial list of captains), 4 (image, Mowhan), 5 (fleet list, 'Rhederei Akt. Gesellschaft von 1896'), 6 & 7 (fine images, Oceana), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 317.6 ft. (96.77 metres) long perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters MPTK later RLND. Built for P. Iredale & Porter, of Liverpool. It would seem that her maiden voyage, presumably with Captain F. R. Patey in command, included visiting Portland, Oregon, U.S.A., likely to load timber. On Jul. 9, 1894 the vessel carried 2,418,000 ft. of Oregon pine from Port Gamble, Puget Sound, Washington, U.S.A., to Port Pirie, South Australia, where it arrived on Oct. 17, 1894. On Jan. 20, 1895 the vessel left Port Pirie for the U.K. with a cargo of 4,237 tons of wheat, then the largest cargo of wheat ever shipped from South Australia. Likely in late 1895, Mowhan left Belfast with 2,000 tons of Irish soil as ballast. The crew put the soil to good use & the vessel enjoyed fresh vegetables of all sorts until they arrived at Portland, Oregon, where the ballast was unloaded. They had fresh pork too - pigs were aboard the vessel also. Mowhan was a frequent visitor to Australia - Trove has many references to the vessel over the years (few references re Oceana). When the freight markets came under great pressure, the vessel was sold, on Mar. 21, 1900, to 'Rhederei Akt. Gesellschaft von 1896', per Miramar '1896 Co.', likely W. Dahlstrom the principal, of Hamburg, Germany, & renamed Oceana - New German measurements were 94.85 metres long & 2,817 gross tons. In 1900, presumably before such sale, John Porter of Liverpool was stated to be the vessel's managing owner. An e-Bay item stated that the vessel 'probably spent WW1 interned in a South American port'. Which port would seem to have been Antofagasta, in northern Chile, where she remained undamaged. Oceana was, I read, delivered to Italy as war damage compensation & renamed Nostra Signora della Misericordia. It was broken up at Alicante, Spain, in 1921 (or maybe in 1922). There is a model of the vessel in the Sunderland Museum, I am advised. Is it possible that any site visitor can confirm that the vessel was truly renamed as indicated above when it became Italian owned as a war reparation? I am unable to access any data to confirm such renaming. Maybe Lloyd's Registers or Italian sources might confirm the name change? 'Nostra Signora della Misericordia' is a church & related buildings, located near Savona, Italy. With a magnificent interior. Can you provide additional data?

18 Naworth Castle
1895 (or 1799 or 1871) tons
Hull 97

99421

Tarpenbek
Tamara XII
1892

A 3 masted fully rigged steel ship. Per 1 (1895 voyage to Sydney, Australia, Naworth Castle), 2 (model, Naworth Castle), 3 (data, Tamara XII), 4 & 5 (1904 crew images, Tarpenbek, at Puget Sound, Washington, U.S.A., do see them both 'Full Browser'), 6 (image Tamara XII), 7 (possibly the Tamara XII wreck, low on page), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 265.0 ft. long, signal letters RBPF. Built for 'Naworth Castle Ship Co. Ltd.', of Liverpool, J. Chambers & Co., the managers & likely the real owners. A crew of 29 (& 2 stowaways) on an 1894/5 voyage of 94 days from Liverpool to Sydney, Australia. The vessel continued on to Newcastle, New South Wales ('NSW') & soon departed for Antofagasta, Chile, with a cargo of coal. The vessel was back in Australia in 1896 - at Adelaide for orders - it left Adelaide on Nov. 15, 1896 for New Caledonia to load ore for the U.K. The vessel was sold in 1899 to 'Knöhr & Burchard Nfl. GmbH', of Hamburg, Germany, & renamed Tarpenbek. I read that Tarpenbek traded mainly in the North Atlantic between Amsterdam & Antwerp & Newfoundland. However, on Aug. 22, 1904 the vessel departed Newcastle, NSW, for Tocopilla, Chile, with a cargo of coal. And was at Newcastle again in Aug. 1896 to carry coal to Junin, N. Chile. In 1921, the vessel was sold to 'Nordische Handelsgesellschaft Hachfeld, Fischer G.m.b.H', of Hamburg, & renamed Tamara XII. Registered at Hamburg. From quite a number of data 'snippets' it would seem that Tamara XII arrived in ballast at San Francisco, U.S.A., from Chinwangtao now Qinhuangdao, NE China, to fulfill a 40/- grain charter to either Strouse Company or The Northern Grain & Warehouse Company. At San Francisco it loaded a cargo of Australian grain & in early Aug. 1922 (have read Aug. 2nd, 6th & 7th), left for Falmouth, U.K., via Queenstown, Ireland. The voyage apparently took 149 days - it was, I read, the last west-east passage of Cape Horn from a west coast port by any sailing ship. It presumably would have arrived at Falmouth soon after Jan. 1, 1923. The vessel then sailed to Leith, Scotland, to load a cargo of coal for Hamburg. What seems then to have happened is that on Feb. 6, 1923, the vessel left Leith for Hamburg with its cargo of coal & a crew of 16 or 18, under the command of Captain Magnus F. J. (Fredrich Johann) Allwardt. She ran into a gale off the Orkneys, went missing & presumably was wrecked in mountainous seas on or about Feb. 18, 1923. On Feb. 20, 1923, a lifeboat with one body was 'picked up ... below Scofferland, near Start Sound', Sanday (an outer inhabited Orkney island). Also 'A ships boat marked ''Tamara XII, Hamburg'' with the body of a young man aboard wearing a lifebelt, was picked up by Mr Donald Tulloch, Fish house, below Scofferland, near Start Sound at 10 am this morning. The boat was badly damaged.' And 'Lifebelts belonging this vessel washed ashore Deerness yesterday.' Forgive me please, a 'land-lubber', when I say that I do not understand this. Leith is on the S. shore of the Firth of Forth, just N. of Edinburgh, & is therefore on the east rather than west coast of Scotland. Why would Tamara XII, bound for Hamburg, Germany, far to the south be in the Orkney area 12 days after leaving Leith presumably headed southbound? The vessel was driven that far off course by the elements? Can anybody explain? At link 7 the wreck is possibly now located. Can you correct the above and/or provide additional data or images.

19 Conway Castle
1694 (or 1591) tons
Hull 102

101959
1893

A 3 masted steel barque. Per 1 (data re sinking), 2 (a fine crew image, c.1904, do view it in 'Full Browser'), 3 (R. Thomas & Co. fleet), 4 (1897 painting of Conway Castle by Reginald Arthur Borstel (1875/1922), likely the correct vessel of the name), 5 & 6 (NY Times, Mar. 13 & 14, 1915 reports), 7 & 8 (Dresden, in English & German, data & link to many images. The German page seems to be the more comprehensive), 9 (Willy Stöwer painting, Dresden & Conway Castle, as book cover), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 78.6 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters MWHL. Built for "The Ship 'Conway Castle' Co. Ltd.", of Criccieth, Carnarvon, Wales, & of Liverpool, with Robert Thomas, maybe R. Thomas & Co., the managers & surely also major owners. In 1910 & 1915 Robert Rees Thomas was listed as the vessel's manager. Conway Castle must have traded with Washington State, U.S.A., certainly in 1907, presumably to load Oregon pine. It certainly traded frequently with Australia. There are many references to the vessel at Trove, Australia. The first Australian voyage I can spot was in 1897 when it arrived at Newcastle, New South Wales ('NSW'), on Jul. 16, 1897 from Capetown, loaded a cargo of coal & departed, on Aug. 5, 1897, for Antofagasta, Chile. In 1898 the barque left Maryport, Wales, for Townsville, Queensland, with a cargo of rails. It went on to Sydney & also to Newcastle, NSW, before sailing to Rotterdam, presumably with another cargo of coal. In 1899, the vessel left Barry, Wales, for Callao, Peru. It also carried cargoes ex Newcastle over the years thru 1904 to Port Elizabeth, (South Africa?), & Carrazal & Valparaiso, both in Chile. On its last visit to Australian waters, it left Newcastle, NSW, on Sep. 11, 1914 for Valparaiso where it arrived on Nov. 28, 1914 - John Williams in command. On Feb. 27, 1915, while carrying a cargo of barley ex Valparaiso (left Feb. 17), bound for Queenstown & Liverpool, the vessel was captured by Dresden, a German cruiser, 560 miles SW by W ½ W, of Valparaiso. At 37.21S/81.58W or maybe at 37.21S/76.15W. Have also read off Isla Mocha, & off Corral. None of those locations seem to agree with one another! So I feel unable to tell you where it actually happened. Can anybody help me be more accurate? Anyway, Captain Williams & his crew were taken aboard Dresden, as were some supplies (no coal of course) & Conway Castle was scuttled. Dresden had her own problems, the cruiser was hunted, almost out of coal, low on ammunition & with a demoralised crew. She tried to make it to a Chilean port, Chile being then a neutral country. En route, the entire crew of Conway Castle was, perhaps 8 days after capture, transferred to Lorton, a Peruvian barque & landed at Talcahuano, Chile. Not Larton as per link 6. Lorton is presumably not the barque of the name that was owned by P. Iredale & Porter. The Conway Castle crew, who had been well treated aboard Dresden, would appear to have arrived at Valparaiso on Mar. 12, 1915. The Conway Castle's ship's bell was kept by Kapitän zur See Fritz Emil von Lüdecke, the Dresden captain, as a souvenir. That bell was later recovered (by Francisco Ayarza) from the wreck of Dresden, itself sunk on Mar. 14, 1915 in Cumberland Bay, Robinson Crusoe Island, the 2nd largest island in the Juan Fernàndez (Chilean) group. Dresden, badly damaged by gunfire - the neutrality of Chile being ignored - was scuttled by charges set by its crew. WWW data about the Conway Castle sinking appears to be limited & a little confusing. The sinking is covered in a number of books, none of which I have yet been able to read. Mike Jagoe, of Tasmania, seeks a good image of the 'Borstel' artwork. Mike's father, Charles 'Bill' Jagoe, was a midshipman aboard Conway Castle & was taken prisoner by Dresden. Can you provide such image, additional data and/or correct the above?

20 Wilderspool
2804 (later 2810) tons
Hull 105

102175

Onton
Begoña VI
Erandio
Antequera
SAC Lerida
1894

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data, also 2nd & 3rd images on page, Sac Lerida), 2 & 3 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register listings, Erandio & Antequera, 1930/31 thru 1945/46), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 310.0 ft. long (94.49 metres), maybe 98.0 metres long overall, speed of 8 knots, signal letters HDQV later EAEG. Built for Wilderspool Steamship Company Limited of Liverpool, with Japp & Kirby, likely the managers. Lloyd's Register listings for the vessel were closed in 1899, presumably when the vessel was sold to Spanish owners - to Ontón Steamship Company, 'Garteiz Mendialdua', of Bilbao, Spain, likely the vessel's owner & manager, & renamed Onton. It would seem that ownership may have been transferred, in 1900, to Olázarri Navigation Company, a new Spanish holding company. Did that in fact occur? The vessel had four later name changes - in 1921 the vessel was sold to J. M. Urquijo & Co., also likely of Bilbao, & became Begoña VI, - in 1923 it was sold to 'Cia Maritima Elanchove', of San Sebastian, Spain, & became Erandio & in 1939 it was sold to 'José de Navas Escudor', of Bilbao, & became Antequera. We thank Miramar for their ownership detail. The vessel was sold in 1950 to TAC (Transportes, Aduanas y Consignaciones SA), of Barcelona, Spain, & renamed SAC Lerida. John G. Kincaid & Co., of Greenock, re-boilered the vessel, in 1956. The vessel was still operating in the early 1960s. It was broken up at Barcelona, Spain, in Feb. 1965. Can you correct and/or add to the above?

21 Banderas
2053 (or 2140 or 2255) tons
Hull 121
1899

A cargo ship. Per 1 (extensive Banderas history, in Spanish, image, crew images etc. Do visit the page), 2 (link 1, 'Google' translated into English), 3 ('uboat.net' Banderas sinking), 4 (Spanish page, 25% down), 5 (Spanish page, 75% down), 6 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register listings, Banderas, 1931/32 thru 1938/39, see left), 7 (U-53, Wikipedia), 8 ('Vascongada' company history, in Spanish), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 286.0 ft. (87.2 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 8 1/2 or 9 knots, signal letters HDMS later EABZ. Built for 'Compañia Naviera Vascongada S.A.' ('Vascongada'), Felix de Abasolo (image) the owner & manager, both of Bilbao, Spain. Vascongada served ports in U.K., in NW Europe & in the Mediterranean & also carried grain to Europe from Rio de la Plata, Argentina. The vessel, I read, frequently carried iron ore from Bilbao to the U.K., returning with coal. On Dec. 28, 1916, while en route from Huelva, Andalusia, Spain, to France with a cargo of iron pyrites, Banderas, under the command of José Antonio Madariaga Zabala ('Zabala'), two images at links 1 & 2, was attacked by a German submarine off Corunna (la Coruña), Galicia. Being then close to Spanish waters, Banderas did not stop as ordered, rather ran for the Spanish coast & took refuge in Punta de la Vega. The vessel had been hit 17 times, underwater, by German gunfire. In 1918, I think on Feb. 1, 1918 (translation is difficult), Banderas, en route to Liverpool with a cargo of oranges & onions collided with an unknown Swedish vessel. Banderas, which needed extensive repairs to fix the resulting damage, made it to La Rochelle, France. I read that during the Spanish Civil War (1936/1939) the vessel, managed by Mid-Atlantic Shipping Co. of London, was on the Republican side. However, it would also seem that most Vascongada vessels were moored in the U.K. for the duration - Banderas was moored at Preston, U.K. during the period of 1938 thru Apl. 1939. At 4:20 a.m. on Feb. 18, 1940, Banderas, a vessel of a neutral country (Spain) showing running lights, was torpedoed & sunk by U-53, 8 miles NW of Cape Villano, near the NW tip of Spain. There was a major explosion & 22 of the 29 total crew died. At 42.25N 09.08W. The ship was en route, from Bona (Bone), Algeria, to Pasajes (San Sebastian), Spain, via San Juan de Nieva, Asturias, with a cargo of phosphates. It would seem that U-53, Fregattenkapitän Harald Grosse in command, had sighted French convoy 65-KS/10-RS, bound from Gibraltar to Brest, France, on the afternoon of Feb. 17, 1940. At dawn on Feb. 18, 1940, U-53 torpedoed the Spanish steamer, thinking it was a straggler from that convoy. He would appear to have ignored the vessel's running lights. The 7 survivors, including the 2nd officer & a seriously injured sailor, were rescued by Tritonia, a Corunna fishing vessel. The names of those who were lost is low on the page at links 1 & 2 - the list includes Zabala, the ship's captain. A few days later, on Feb. 23 or 24, 1940, U-53, then on patrol north of Scotland in the broad area of the Faroe & Shetland islands & the Orkneys was attacked by HMS Gurkha & sunk by depth charges - with the loss of its entire crew of 42 or 45. Can you correct and/or add to the above? Or improve the translations.

22 Frank Parish
2893 (or 2904, 2905 or 2908) tons
Hull 128

112764

Ben Corlic
Olga Topic
Jela Topić
Neti
Šibenik
1900

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Morrison, Ben Corlic (2)], 2 & 3 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register listings, Olga Topic, Jela Topić & Neti, 1930/31 thru 1945/46, see left), 4 (Frank Parish & Watt in 1918, in Polish), 5 (link 4 'Google' translated), 6 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Neti, but I cannot check the link), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access).  324.0 ft. long (98.755 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 9 (or 7) knots, signal letters JOHR later YTDE, YTFL & YTTA. Built for 'Buenos Ayres Great Southern Railway Co. Ltd.' ('Buenos'), of London, with Arthur Holland or Arthur Holland & Co. Ltd., also of London, the managers. Frank Parish was the Chairman of Buenos, hence the vessel's name. Likely used to carry coal for the company's Argentinean railways. A sister to Tandil. On Mar. 26, 1918, Frank Parish was in an Allied convoy N. of La Galite (the main island of the 'Galite Islands'), off Cape Serrat, Tunisia, in the Mediterranean. The convoy was attacked by UB-50, a German submarine under the command of Kapitänleutnant Franz Becker. One of the ships in the convoy, Volturno, an Italian cargo ship en route from Portland, Maine, to Naples, Italy, was torpedoed & sunk, & UB-50 submerged & made its escape. A short time later, Jeanette II, a convoy escort vessel, thought it had seen the German submarine & attacked with depth charges. The damaged submarine had to surface, & both Frank Parish & USS Winonah fired on that submarine killing Navy Lieutenant Paul J. M. A. (Jean Marie André) Bourély its commander, & injuring 5 others. One of the 5, a gunner, later died. The submarine they both fired upon proved, unfortunately, not to be UB-50 but rather Watt, an Allied French submarine, which had been hunted by mistake. In 1922, the vessel was sold to Morrison Steamship Co. Ltd., of London & renamed Ben Corlic. I read that Lloyd's Register listings for the vessel were closed in 1928, presumably when the vessel was sold to Yugoslavian owners - to 'Slobodna Plovidba Topić D.D.', of Sušak, Yugoslavia, with Ant. Topić the manager, & renamed Olga Topic. The vessel was renamed Jela Topić in 1935. In 1939, the vessel was sold to 'Parobrodarsko drustvo "Marovic" S.o.j.', of Sušak, with G. J. Marović the manager, & renamed Neti. 84 WW2 convoy references, including at least 9 N. Atlantic crossings, extensive service on the eastern seaboard of North America, service to France in late 1939, to W. Africa (Freetown), & U.K. coastal. In 1946, the vessel was sold for the last time, to 'Jadranska Slobodna Plovidba', of Rijeka, Yugoslavia, & renamed Šibenik. It was scrapped, in Yugoslavia, in Q1 of 1952. There seems to be little WWW data available about the vessel & its service. Can you correct and/or add to the above?

23 Tandil
2897 tons
Hull 126

112712
1900

A cargo ship. Per 1 & 2 (wreck data, Tandil), 3 ('uboat.net', Tandil sinking), 4 (French data, Tandil, with names of the 4 lost), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Now there used to be a Spanish language page at 'www.histarmar.com' re Tandil but it seems to no longer be available. I cannot find a replacement for this old link. 324.0 ft. long (98.755 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 9 (or 7) knots, signal letters RQLT. Sister to Frank Parish. Tandil? A city in Argentina located 220 miles SSW of Buenos Aires. Built for 'Buenos Ayres Great Southern Railway Co. Ltd.', of London, Arthur Holland or maybe Arthur Holland & Co. Ltd., also of London, the managers. Likely used to carry coal for the company's Argentinean railways. On Mar. 12, 1917, while en route from Barry, Wales, to Portland, near Weymouth, Dorset, with a cargo of coal, the vessel was struck by a torpedo fired by a German submarine. 4 lives were lost. At 50.30N/3.00W, when 20 miles W by N ½ N from Portland, in the English Channel. Why was it delivering coal to Portland? A staging area perhaps for France? Many references indicated that the submarine was U-85, but Michael Lowery at 1 indicates:- 'Latest research suggests that U 85 probably wasn't responsible; I'd rate it as extremely likely that UC 68 was the U-boat that sank Tandil.' Also here. The submarine, whichever it was, did not make it back to home base so no data is available from German U-boat records. UC-68 was commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans Degetau. Can you correct and/or add to the above?

24   Zarifis
2896 (later 2904) tons
Hull 130

 
1901

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data, 25% down, ref. '06-04-2010' at right), 2 (U-33), 3 (wreck data), 4 (sinking, New York Times), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 98.8 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular. The webmaster has not been able to access any relevant editions of Lloyd's Register, alas. Built for Leonidas Zarifi (1840/1923 or 1929) ('Zarifi'), of Piraeus, Greece, but read on .... Zarifi, it would appear, was a well established merchant & banker from Constantinople, now Istanbul, which was then the capital of the Ottoman Empire, today’s Turkey. The Zarifi family originated from the village of Vori on the island of Paşalimanı in the Sea of Marmara where, until the end of the 19th century, they were known as wine producers. Apparently a move into transportation & into the trading of wine brought Yannis Zarifis to Constantinople. Fears of repercussions because of the Greek revolution in 1821 drove some Greeks to leave. The Zarifis took refuge in Odessa, Ukraine - on the Black Sea - where a Greek community mostly from the island of Chios was thriving. With the situation calming down almost a decade later, Yannis Zarifis’ son Georgios Y. Zarifi at the helm of the family, brought the family back to Constantinople, married the daughter of his father’s trading partner Zafiropoulos & eventually became the most prominent banker, financier & benefactor of the Ottoman Empire. Shipping operations may have been conducted under the name of 'Zarifi Brothers & Co.'. Zarifi owned ships himself, & had a close association with the 'Embiricos' ship-owning family. Zarifi also financed ships & retained ownership of them until their captains were able to repay the related loans. Link 1 mentions that the vessel was involved in a 'mishap' on May 13, 1901 & in another on Jun. 6, 1913, but provides no detail. In the original the page has a link which the webmaster cannot access. Can anybody tell us what exactly happened on both occasions? In 1915, the vessel was, it would seem, still owned by Zarifi, then managed by 'Michalinos Maritime & Commercial Co.', of Piraeus. On Nov. 29, 1915, while en route from Alexandria, Egypt, to Hull, with a fruit & general cargo, the vessel was sunk by the gunfire of German submarine U-33, Kapitänleutnant Konrad Gansser in command. I have read no detail as to the circumstances, but have seen the sinking described as 'another regrettable mistake', presumably because the ship's owners were Greeks of the Ottoman Empire rather than Greeks of the Kingdom of Greece which was at war with Germany. Gansser, in his WW1 career, sank a total of 58 ships - while U-33, with its various commanders, sank a total of 85 vessels. It would appear that no lives were lost in the Zarifis sinking - its crew were landed at Malta. The sinking occurred at 35.11N/16.33E, in the Mediterranean, about 100 miles ESE of Malta & SE of Sicily. Much of the above data is thanks to George Bonanos, great grandson of Leonidas Zarifi. Can you correct the above and/or add anything? An image of the ship, perhaps. #1907

25 Saint Michael
3796 (or 3694) tons
Hull 158

124050

Aboukir
Spartivento
1907

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register listings, Spartivento, 1930/31 thru 1945/46, see left), 2 ('wrecksite.eu', Spartivento), 3 (image, Spartivento), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 361.0 ft. long (110.03 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 372.0 ft. long overall maybe, speed of 10 (or 8 only) knots, signal letters HKJW later PIDV & ICIB. Built for 'British & Foreign Steamship Co. Limited' ('British'), of Liverpool, Rankin & Gilmour & Co., likely the managers. Was engaged on the 'Cardiff-Barbados-Rio de Janeiro to New York service'. In 1910, & also in 1915, however, Thomas F. Harrison of Liverpool was the manager. In 1919, the vessel was transferred to Saint Line Ltd. ('Saint'), also of Liverpool, with no change of vessel name or manager. I say 'transferred' because I read that Sir William Dingwall Mitchell Cotts (1871/1932) owned both collieries & ships, & particularly owned both British & Saint - indeed British was renamed Saint in 1919. In 1922, the vessel was sold to 'Clydesdale Shipowners' Co. Ltd.', of Glasgow, & renamed Aboukir. Out of register in 1928, I read, presumably when sold that year to Italian owners - 'Navigazione Carlo Martinolich S.a.g.l.', of Trieste, Italy, & renamed Spartivento. In 1935, 'Ditta Marino Querci', of Genoa, Italy, became the owners, with no change of vessel name. On Sep. 13, 1943, the vessel, southbound from Ancona, was bombed by aircraft of the German Luftwaffe. The ship was, I read [Aboukir (3)] scuttled to avoid capture - at Calamotta Bay. I have not figured out exactly where Calamotta Bay (or maybe Kalamata Roads, per Charles Hocking), is located, but it may be N. of Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia (now Montenegro). Had the vessel become an Allied vessel, I wonder? I presume that it must have been so. Was the vessel later raised? It is possible that it was since the vessel was Lloyd's Register listed thru 1945/46 at least. But that may have been so for other reasons, I presume. A most difficult vessel to WWW search for, in all of its three names. Can you correct and/or add to the above?

26 Pelica
2144 later 2116, 2111 & 2124 tons & maybe 2323  tons also)
Hull 163

128495
7450

Clayton
Mongolia
1909

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's register data, 1930/31 thru 1940/41), 2 ('wrecksite.eu', Swedish text, sinking, image, Mongolia), 3 ('Wikipedia', Swedish page, Mongolia), 4 (link 3 translated), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 286.0 ft. (87.17 metres) long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 9 1/2 knots or maybe 8 knots only, signal letters HPJL later KGNP & SMTA. Built for 'Ogmore Steam Ship (1899) Co. Ltd.', of Cardiff, with George Chitham, maybe 'G. Chitham & Co.' the managers. In 1918, the vessel was sold to 'Scarisbrick Steamship Co. Ltd.', also of Cardiff, 'Eldridge and Morgan' the managers, with no change of vessel name. In 1919, the vessel was renamed Clayton. In 1920, Carl S. Morgan is recorded as the vessel's manager. In 1920, the vessel was sold to 'Claymore Shipping Co. Ltd.', also of Cardiff. Were there corporate changes perhaps? Out of register in 1927, I read, presumably when sold that year to Swedish owners - for £18,500, to 'Rederi A/B Arild' of Arild, (near Helsingborg in southern Sweden), J. A. Thore the manager, & renamed Mongolia. In Aug. 1940, the vessel was en route from Gävle, Sweden, (E. coast, on the Baltic) to Oslebshausen, near Bremen, Germany, with a cargo of iron ore. The vessel passed the Fehmarnbelt lightship & anchored for a short time at 5:15 p.m. on Aug. 13, 1940 before resuming her journey. At about 6:45 p.m. that day, the vessel hit a mine - at 54.34N/10.38E (or at 54.34N/10.30E), in the Kiel Bight (Kieler Bucht) at the western end of the Baltic. It would seem, if I understand the data correctly in translation, that as a result of the explosion, the ship broke amidships from the deck level downwards but did not immediately sink. It did sink later, 8 hours after the explosion, in which 3 crewmen were injured. The entire crew took to an undamaged ship's lifeboat, & were i) picked up by Pollux, a Danish ship, ii) transferred to Nautilus, a German minesweeper, & iii) landed at Kiel, where the injured received medical care. It is not particularly easy to WWW translate Swedish texts. Can you correct and/or add to the above? #1829

27 West Quarter
1548 tons
Hull 169

129752

Regfos
1910

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('Sunderland Echo' re 1947 grounding), 2 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Regfos, 1930/31 thru 1945/46, see left), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Regfos, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Convoy FS66, 'Saturday, 6 January', 1940), 5 (FTC.32 Convoy), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 245.0 ft. long (74.68 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 9 1/2 knots, signal letters HRFC later GRTW. I had read that the vessel was built for 'Tyneside Line Ltd.' ('Tyneside'), of Newcastle, with 'J. Ridley Son & Tully', the managers. But it was owned by 'The Screw Collier Co. Ltd.' ('Screw'), of Newcastle - a company related to Tyneside. Can anybody provide the Lloyd's Register entry in 1910 or 1911. Certainly Screw owned it in 1915. In 1915 & in 1920, James E. Tully is recorded as the vessel's manager. Can anybody tell us about her WW1 service? It would seem, (modest snippet image below), that the vessel was seized at Hamburg, Germany, on Aug. 4, 1914. The vessel served Germany as a naval collier during WW1. Something happened to her at Libau, Latvia? Returned to British owners on Dec. 17, 1918 perhaps.
Data re 'West Quarter', ex a Book in German.
In 1920, the vessel was sold or transferred to Tyneside Line (1920) Ltd., of Newcastle, the successor to the company of similar name above. In 1929, the vessel was sold to 'Tyne and Wear Shipping Co. Ltd'., also of Newcastle, & renamed Regfos. Edwin Edwards was recorded as the vessel's manager in 1930. 33 WW2 convoy references, all U.K. coastal, with the exception of 2 voyages to Seine Bay, France, in Jul. 1944, re the Normandy landings. There must have been independent voyages & many of them. The following convoy, appears not to be included in the 33. The vessel is advised to have been in Convoy FS.66 which departed the Tyne for Southend, on Jan. 6, 1940. En route, destroyer/escort vessel Vega collided with Regfos. Both would seem to have completed the voyage, but Vega may have been the more damaged - her later repairs took 12 days. On Jul. 10, 1944, in Convoy FTC.32 from Seine Bay, France, to Southend, Regfos arrived under tow by tug Empire Sinew. And, about a week later, similarly arrived at Southend, in FTC.39, in the tow of tug Krooman. Have not read the circumstances in either case. In 1942/43, F. Dawson was stated to be her manager. Fast forward ... The winter of 1947/48 was a ferocious winter in the U.K., with abnormal cold, snow storms etc. You can read about it 60% down this page. Early on Mar. 8, 1947, Regfos was approaching Sunderland from London, in ballast, with John S. Gardner (awarded the OBE - when I wonder, not for this matter!) in command, & a crew of 18. Visibility was poor due to both fog & a blinding snowstorm. The ship missed the entrance to the Wear, & soon after 8:00 a.m., drove ashore on the rocks at White Steel Rocks, Whitburn, 2 miles to the north. Thanks to Harold Appleyard, we have a dramatic image of her on the rocks (at left). The ship stayed upright, did not take on water, & while the Sunderland lifeboat stood by, Regfos awaited the assistance of tugs despatched from Sunderland. By noon that day she was re-floated, & made it safely into Sunderland to have her hull inspected. And there, I presume, to load her cargo of coal for London. A large image of Regfos aground in 1947 can be seen here on the 'Facebook', 'Sunderland Tugs and Shipbuilding in pictures' site, thanks to Linda Roy. Do see it in 'Photo Viewer'. On May 14, 1950, the vessel arrived at Dunston on Tyne (Gateshead), to be broken up at the Clayton & Davie yard. The WWW record for this vessel is modest. Can you add to and/or correct the above? Another image of the vessel aground, maybe?

28 Carterswell
4308 tons
Hull 186

133566
1914

A cargo ship. Limited data is available. The vessel had a short life, about 8 months only it would appear. Per 1 (the launch of Carterwell). 2 (Aug. 20, 1915), 3 ('uboat.net', Carterswell sinking), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 365 ft. long (111.25 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters JHGR. Built for 'The Northern Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Newcastle, with George N. Patterson, or G. N. Patterson & Co., of Newcastle, the managers. Were they the owners also? On Aug. 20, 1915, en route from Galveston & Newport News, U.S.A., to Havre, France, with a cargo of wheat, the vessel was captured by U-38 (Kapitänleutnant Max Valentiner in command) & sunk by gunfire when 65 miles NW of Ushant (island in English Channel off coast of Brittany, near Brest). No lives were lost. I wonder how the crew made a safe landfall. Max Valentiner was the 3rd most successful U-boat commander in WW1 - during his career he sank 144 ships & damaged a number of other vessels also. The image at left relates to a beautiful painted wooden model of the ship, sold at Edinburgh, Scotland, on Jun. 1, 2007 (by Lyon & Turnbull) ex 'Keith Skeel, The Private Collection' (lot #481). In a mahogany case 150 cm. long (5 ft.). It sold for GBP 2,600.00 (approx. U.S. $5,147) to a bidder on the auction floor. Need help in tracking The Northern Steamship Co. Ltd.

29 Oakmore
4269 tons
Hull 194

140549
77

Clydemede
Harpagus
Marouko Pateras
1917

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Johnston Line, Oakmore (2)], 2 [Harrison, Harpagus (2)], 3 (to Argentina in 1929), 4 (1940 court case), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Marouko Pateras, but I cannot check the link), 6 (WW2 Convoy SC52. See footnote), 7 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Marouko Pateras, 1930/31 thru 1944/45, see left), 8 (loss of Marouko Pateras), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 390.0 ft. long (118.87 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 401.0 ft. long (122.225 metres) overall, speed of 10 (or 9) knots, signal letters JRVN later JHBL & SVKJ. Built for Johnston Line Limited, of Liverpool, a subsidiary of Furness, Withy & Co. In 1920, Robert Sargeant was the vessel's manager. 'Ellis Island' advises two voyages to New York, one in 1918 from Gibraltar & the second in 1920 from Liverpool. In 1920, the vessel was sold to 'Canute Steamship Company Limited' ('Canute'), Dr. T. G. Adams, of Liverpool, the owner/manager?, & renamed Clydemede.  In 1923, it would seem that Canute went into involuntary liquidation & in 1924, the Canute fleet including this vessel was taken over by J. & C. Harrison, maybe by 'J. & C. Harrison (1920) Ltd.'. One 1924 voyage at least from Marseilles, France, to New York. In 1925 the vessel was renamed Harpagus. Per Miramar owned by Willis Steamship Co. Ltd. of London. Out of register in 1928, I read, presumably when sold that year to 'D. A. Pateras' of Chios, Greece, & renamed Marouko Pateras (Marouko Pateras was Anastassios Pateras's wife). Certainly D. A. Pateras was the ship's owner in 1930/31. On Oct. 20, 1929, the vessel collided with Oil Skipper, in the Port of San Nicholas. Argentina? 'Both boats were slightly damaged'. On Nov. 1, 1929, the vessel arrived at Buenos Aires, Argentina, with immigrants from Europe. On Aug. 4, 1933 the vessel ran aground in the Paraná River, Brazil. It was refloated on Aug. 9, 1933. In 1937/38, 'Anastassios Pateras & Sons', became the registered owner with 'Lemos & Pateras Ltd.', of London, the managers. On Aug. 9, 1940, the vessel was chartered to 'Mitsubishi Sheji Kaisha, Ltd.', for the carriage of scrap metal from 2 U.S. Gulf ports to Japan. The vessel was described as being 'in appearance old and rusty, and its loading equipment was not in good condition'. When loading at Mobile, Alabama, the vessel's mast was damaged & the matter was the subject of a court case. Just 2 WWW convoy references, a) from Casablanca to Brest in Apl. 1940 & b) the convoy next referred to. On Oct. 23, 1941, Marouko Pateras left Sydney, Cape Breton, Canada, for London in convoy SC51/52 with a cargo of sugar. More specifically from Probolingo (or Probolingoo), East Java, to Loch Ewe. On Nov. 3, 1941, the vessel ran aground in thick fog on Double Island, near Battle Harbour, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. No loss of life. At 52.15N/53.33W, but ... those co-ordinates seem to be in error. Maybe 55.33W? The vessel was re-floated on Nov. 5, 1941 but it sank that same day 2 miles SW of Double Island. It would seem that the whole convoy returned to Cape Breton. If the vessel indeed was lost on Nov. 5, 1941, it is a puzzle that the vessel continued to be Lloyd's Register listed thru 1944/45 (see left). Can you correct the above and/or add anything additional? 

30 Westhope
5705 tons
Hull 195

137267
241

Taygetos
Efploia
1918

A cargo ship. From 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Taygetos, but I cannot check the link), 2 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Westhope, 1930/31 thru 1935/36, see left), 3 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Taygetos, 1935/36 thru 1945/46, see left), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 405.0 ft. long (123.44 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 1/2 knots, signal letters JTNG later GPTM & SVSX. Built for Westwick Steamship Company Limited ('Westwick'), owned by James Westoll Esq. i.e. James Westoll Line, of Sunderland. Westwick & James Westoll Line were noted for the carriage of coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & for their involvement in the Black Sea grain trade. The vessel was sold in 1935, to 'J. A. Coulouthros & N. N. Embiricos', of Andros, Greece, & renamed Taygetos. The owner had become 'J. A. Coulouthros & Sons' by 1940/41. 22 WW2 convoy references including 5 voyages across the N. Atlantic, one at least carrying grain, service in the Indian Ocean (Colombo/ Calcutta/Chittagong), to Durban & Freetown in Africa, & U.K. coastal. The vessel was sold, in 1951, to G. Ch. Lemos, of Chios, Greece, & renamed Efploia. On May 24, 1952, the vessel arrived at Trieste, Italy, to be broken up. The WWW record for this ship is most limited. Can you add anything!

31 War Verbena
5332 tons
Hull 201a

141918

Cranfield
1919

A cargo ship, a collier. From 1 (British India, Cranfield), 2 ('pdf' file, British India, Cranfield), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Cranfield, but I cannot check the link), 4 (sinking data, I-166, '23 November 1942:'), 5 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Cranfield, 1930/31 thru 1944/45, see left), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 400.0 ft. long (121.92 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 412.0 ft. long overall, speed of 10 or 11 knots, signal letters KCJT later GBQS. Laid down as War Verbena for The Shipping Controller, of London. But delivered on Sep. 4, 1919, to British India Steam Navigation Co. Ltd., of London, as Cranfield. Registered at Glasgow. In 1920, & also in 1930, Sir Duncan Carmichael, also of London, was recorded as the vessel's manager. By 1940, Hon. Alexander Shaw had become the manager. I have found no data about the vessel's service thru to WW2. Just 5 WW2 convoy references. The vessel was independent in the Indian Ocean for virtually all of WW2 until, that is, the vessel was sunk in 1942, though on a couple of occasions, it would seem to have entered the eastern Mediterranean. It visited such ports as Aden, Suez, Chittagong, Colombo, Calcutta, Madras, Rangoon etc. In Nov. 1942, the defensibly armed vessel was proceeding independently from Calcutta, India, to Suez. The vessel left Madras on Nov. 19, 1942, & 4 days later, on Nov. 23, 1942, the vessel was hit by two torpedoes fired by I-166, a Japanese submarine, commanded by Lt.Cdr. Tanaka Makio. Both torpedoes hit their target with the second 'causing vital damage to the engine room'. Cranfield sank - at 08.26N/76.42E, in the Arabian Sea, roughly between the S. tip of India (Cape Comorin) & the Maldives. I read that 9 of the crew, all Indian seamen, lost their lives. 64 crew members & 3 gunners took to the boats & safely reached the coast of Travancore, India. I have read no detail however - the cargo, the circumstances, the name of the Cranfield captain, etc. Did Cranfield's captain survive? The WWW record for this ship is truly most limited. Can you add anything!

32 War Spirea
5227 tons
Hull 203a

142865

Ashworth
1920

A standard 'A' class cargo ship. From 1 ('uboat.net', sinking data, Ashworth, image), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Ashworth, but I cannot check the link), 3 (convoy SC-104), 4 (select SC-104 at left), 5 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Ashworth, 1930/31 thru 1944/45, see left), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 400.0 ft. long (121.92 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, maybe 412 ft. 8 in. long overall, speed of 11 knots, signal letters KFGP later GDPM. Launched as War Spirea for 'The Shipping Controller', of London. In Apl. 1920 however, the vessel was delivered, as Ashworth, to 'Dalgliesh Steam Shipping Co. Ltd.', owned by R. S. Dalgliesh Ltd., of Newcastle. In 1930, Robert S. Dalgliesh is recorded as the vessel's manager. Have found no data about its service thru to WW2. I read that in 1940, the vessel was transferred to 'Watergate Steam Shipping Co. Ltd.', a Dalgleish company, managed by Robert S. Dalgliesh or maybe by R. S. Dalgliesh Ltd. & R. I. James. But it clearly must have been earlier - in 1938 it would seem. In 1944/45 R. S. Dalgliesh Ltd. alone was the manager. 52 WW2 convoy references, including 8 completed Atlantic crossings (it was sunk on the 9th crossing), many of the voyages being independent. Also service to S. America (Montevideo, Buenos Aires), Caribbean, & many U.K. coastal voyages. The vessel carried such varied cargoes as grains, steel, lumber, scrap iron, iron ore, bauxite etc. In early Oct. 1942, the vessel left Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, for Belfast Lough, Northern Ireland, with a cargo of 7,300 tons of bauxite ex Trinidad. William Mouat was in command with a crew of 48 including 7 gunners. It joined convoy SC-104 which had started at New York, a slow convoy of, when complete, 57 vessels. That number may be a little off, the matter is not that simple! Soon after 6:00 a.m. on Oct. 13, 1942, in conditions of high seas & winds, rain squalls & poor visibility, U-221, Kapitänleutnant Hans-Hartwig Trojer in command, fired torpedoes at two of the convoy vessels, which proved to be Senta & Ashworth. At 53.05N/44.06W, about 500 miles E. of Belle Isle Strait, Newfoundland, & due S. of Greenland. Ashworth sank in 20 minutes, while Senta caught fire & was abandoned. Fagersten was also hit & sunk. The convoy escort vessels were, in the poor conditions, unaware of the attacks, so all hands were lost on both Ashworth & Senta. An appalling loss of life - all 49 aboard Ashworth were lost as were 19 aboard Fagersten. The number of lives lost ex Senta seems not to be known. The WWW record for this ship is quite limited. Can you add to or correct the above?

33 Larpool
3872 tons
Hull 212

137087
1924

A cargo ship. From 1 ('Rowland and Marwoods' & Headlam), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Larpool, but I cannot check the link), 3 ('uboat.net', sinking, image), 4 (image, Larpool, also -02), 5 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Larpool, 1930/31 thru 1944/45, see left), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 363.5 ft. long (110.795 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots, signal letters KRVB later GKST. Larpool? A community on the River Esk, just up river from Whitby. Built for 'Rowland and Marwood Steamship Company Ltd.' ('Rowland'), of Whitby, North Yorkshire, 'Headlam and Rowland', the managers - but likely much more than the managers since William Headlam was the sole managing director of Rowland & surely its owner. Rowland was, I read, a tramp ship company that traded worldwide. In 1930, William A. Headlam & Leonard Headlam were recorded as the vessel's managers. In 1940, William Headlam alone was the manager. 17 WW2 convoy references including at least 3 voyages across the N. Atlantic, carrying grain. The other voyages were principally U.K. coastal. On Oct. 16, 1941, the vessel left Liverpool in convoy ON.27 for North America, with Charles Patton ('Patton'), in command. I read that Patton was (later?) awarded the OBE. The vessel may however have joined the convoy later, on Oct. 18, 1941 at Loch Ewe. En route to Demerara, Guyana, via Barbados with a general cargo. The convoy dispersed on Nov. 2, 1941, presumably close to the North American coast. At 5.26 a.m. on that day, Larpool, a convoy straggler, was hit by a torpedo fired by U-208, Kapitänleutnant Alfred Schlieper in command. No exact location is given but it was about 250 miles ESE of Cape Race, Newfoundland. Two further shots, at 7.17 a.m., sank the vessel. 26 lives were lost including 4 gunners. I presume that the survivors took to lifeboats since the master & 5 crewmembers landed at Burin, Newfoundland, on Nov. 10, 1941, while 11 others were picked up by HMCS Bittersweet, a Canadian corvette, & landed at Halifax, Nova Scotia. Does anybody have a quality version of the image at 4? Can you add to the above and/or correct anything!

34 Newton Ash
4619 later 4625 tons
Hull 213

148123
1925

A cargo ship. From 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Newton Ash, but I cannot check the link), 2 & 3 (convoy SC.118), 4 ('u-boat.net', Newton Ash), 5, 6 & 7 (images, Newton Ash), 8 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Newton Ash, 1930/31 thru 1944/45, see left), 9 (model, Newton Ash, via Tyne & Wear Museum page), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 372.8 ft. long (113.629 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots, signal letters KSLG later GFMP. Described at 10 as 'corrugated'. Perhaps built based on the 'Monitor corrugated design'? I had asked here if anybody could explain the meaning of those terms as they relate to this vessel. But now I can show you what such a ship looked like - the 3rd thumbnail at left & the related text here. Also here. Built for Tyneside Line Ltd. ('Tyneside'), with 'John Ridley, Son & Tully' ('Tully'), of Newcastle, the managers. Tully were a Newcastle firm of ship owners & coal exporters. It would seem that Tully owned Tyneside, 'The Screw Collier Co. Ltd.' & Tyneside's successor, 'Tyneside Line (1920) Ltd.', & were also the vessel's managers. The vessel needed engine work, done at Barry, Wales, in Mar. 1933. The vessel was sold, in 1941, to 'Charles Strubin & Co. Ltd.', of London, with no change of vessel name. Registered at Newcastle. 34 WW2 convoy references including 6 voyages across the N. Atlantic, service in the Caribbean, to Norway, & to W. Africa (Freetown), & U.K. coastal. On Jan. 24, 1943, the vessel left New York, James Purvis in command, with a complement of 38 all told, including 4 gunners. In Convoy SC.118, of 61 merchant ships, bound for Liverpool (Newton Ash ultimately bound for Hull) with a cargo of grain, military stores & mail ex Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada. At 1:42 a.m. (have read an earlier time also) on Feb. 8, 1943, the vessel was hit, on the starboard side, by a torpedo fired by U-402, Korvettenkapitän Freiherr (i.e. Baron) 'Siegfried von Forstner' ('Forstner') in command. Newton Ash's gun ammunition exploded in a fireball, & the vessel sank, 400 or so miles S. of Iceland, at 56.25N/22.26W. 34 lives were lost including the Captain. A number of the crew escaped the ship in a boat & U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Ingham, WPG35, rigged boarding nets to bring them aboard. 'As it came alongside, a huge wave capsized the boat. The next wave smashed it against the side of the ship, crushing twelve men'. Four men only survived & were landed at Reykjavik, Iceland. U-402 had sunk, on Feb. 7/8, 1943, in about 24 hours, 6 merchant vessels & 1 additional merchant ship serving as a convoy rescue ship. U-402 had been hunted, I read, in 7 prolonged depth charge attacks. For his actions, Forstner was awarded the Knight's Cross. Much of the above text was derived from 'Google snippets', easily misinterpreted. Can you add anything!

35 Newton Beech
4644 later 4651 tons
Hull 215

148139
1925

A cargo ship. From 1, 2 & 3 (extensive sinking data & images), 4 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Newton Beech, 1930/31 thru 1938/39, see left), 5 (Admiral Graf Spee), 6 (Admiral Graf Spee, images galore), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 372.8 ft. long (113.629 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 387.1 ft. long (117.99 metres) overall, speed of 10 knots, signal letters KTHM later GLTF. Described at 7 as 'corrugated'. See here re 'corrugated'. Built for Tyneside Line (1920) Ltd. ('Tyneside'), however the name of 'John Ridley, Son & Tully' ('Tully'), of Newcastle, is also referenced. Tully were a Newcastle firm of ship owners & coal exporters, which owned Tyneside & its predecessor, 'Tyneside Line Ltd.' also 'The Screw Collier Co. Ltd.', & were the vessel's managers. There are no WW2 convoy references for the vessel. On Oct. 5, 1939, Newton Beech was in the S. Atlantic, off the coast of Angola, en route from Cape Town, South Africa, to London, U.K., via Sierra Leone, with a cargo of maize. Captain J. Robison in command, a crew of 34 all told. A cruiser flying the French flag approached & when about a mile away dropped that flag & raised instead the German ensign. Presumably Newton Beech had thought she was a French battleship. A distress signal was broadcast, with the vessel's position, but it would seem the signal was not acted upon. Had it been acted upon, Admiral Graf Spee, a 12,000 gross ton German heavy cruiser & raider, under the command of Kapitän zur See Hans Wilhelm Langsdorff, i.e. the German vessel concerned, might have had a shorter WW2 career as a raider. A prize crew boarded Newton Beech, recovered the ship's papers (but... I read also that all they in fact recovered was a single ship's paper that was not destroyed due to lack of time), & took the crew prisoner. Three days later, on Oct. 8, 1939, the Newton Beech crew was transferred to Admiral Graf Spee (as also was the crew of Ashlea, captured Oct. 7, 1939 - they had been placed aboard Newton Beech) & Newton Beech was scuttled just before midnight, with two charges. (I have also read that a bomb was exploded alongside Newton Beech). Approx. at 09.35S/06.30W, about 550 miles ESE of Ascension Island. On Oct. 18, 1939, most of the crews of Newton Beech (30) & Ashlea were transferred to Altmark &, on Feb. 16, 1940, they, along with the crews of many other captured vessels, were rescued at Jøssingfjord, Norway. The other 4 Newton Beech crew members, i.e. Captain Robison & three of his officers, were held aboard Admiral Graf Spee, & were released at Montevideo, Uruguay, when that vessel was scuttled, on Dec. 14, 1939, after the Battle of the River Plate. Can you add anything!

36 Sandsend
3612 tons
Hull 214

137089
1925

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('uboat.net', 1940 sinking, image), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Sandsend, but I cannot check the link), 3 ('wrecksite.eu', 1940 sinking data, 2 images), 4 (image Sandsend), 5 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Sandsend, 1930/31 thru 1940/41, see left), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 348.0 ft. long (106.07 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 361.5 ft. long (110.185 metres) overall, speed of 9 or 10 knots, signal letters KSLD later GKSW. Built for 'Rowland and Marwoods Steamship Company Limited' ('Rowland'), (Headlam and Sons Ltd., the managers - but likely much more than the managers since William Headlam was the sole managing director of Rowland & surely was its owner), both of Whitby. Sandsend? A coastal village located 3 miles N. of Whitby. In 1930, William A. Headlam & Leonard Headlam were recorded as the vessel's managers. In 1940, William Headlam alone was the manager. I have not read of her service prior to WW2. 21 WW2 convoy references including 4 crossings of the N. Atlantic, returning with either grain or sugar. And some U.K. coastal voyages. All 4 westbound voyages were, it would appear independent. In mid Oct. 1940, Sandsend, William Armstrong in command & 39 aboard all told, was on its 5th westbound crossing, en route from Liverpool to Quebec, Canada, with a cargo of 4,350 tons of anthracite ex Port Talbot, Wales. She left Liverpool on Oct. 13, 1940, in Convoy OB-228, which convoy dispersed on Oct. 17, 1940. Sandsend & two other ships were headed west, in close proximity to one another. Soon after 8.00 a.m. on Oct. 18, 1940, U-48, with Korvettenkapitän Heinrich Bleichrodt in command, fired 2 torpedoes at Sandsend, but both torpedoes missed their targets. At 10.25 a.m., a third torpedo hit the ship, which sank by the bow. At about 58.12N/21.29W, in the N. Atlantic, S. of Iceland, about 250/300 miles WNW of Rockall, a tiny uninhabited island in the N. Atlantic, NW of Ireland. The crew abandoned ship in 3 lifeboats. The Sandsend master & 33 crew members were picked up by HMS Hibiscus, a corvette, & landed at Methil, Firth of Forth, Scotland. However five crew members (names) were lost, when their boat got separated in the mist. Some anomalies in the WWW data - i) Bernard Ireland, in 'Battle of the Atlantic', states that Sandsend was in ballast rather than carrying anthracite, ii) There are many WWW references, including Hocking, which state the 5 crew members were 'killed', which seems to mean that they were killed in the torpedo attack & did not make it into any lifeboat, iii) I read that Sandsend & its two companion ships were convoy stragglers, but that seems not to be so - 'convoyweb.org' advises that the convoy had dispersed on the day prior to the sinking. A strange coincidence if you will, is that an 1899 built Sandsend was sunk by a submarine of almost identical number, (UC-48), in WW1. Can you add anything!

37 Cairnesk
5007 later 5033 tons
Hull 216

149412

Zermatt
Aurora P
1926

A refrigerated cargo ship with accommodation for 12 passengers. From 1 [Cairn Line, Cairnesk (3)], 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Cairnesk, but I cannot check the link), 3 (data), 4, 5 & 6 (image or images, Cairnesk), 7 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Cairnesk, 1930/31 thru 1945/46, see left, many years re refrigeration), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Am advised there is an image in this Norman Middlemiss volume. 401.8 ft. long (122.47 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 418.8 ft. later recorded as 418 ft. 10 in. long (127.65 metres) overall, speed of 12 knots, strengthened for navigation in ice, signal letters KVFR later GMKR. Built for The Cairn Line of Steamships Ltd. (Cairns, Noble & Co., Ltd., the managers) i.e. Cairn Line, of Newcastle. In 1930, Sir William J. Noble and Thomas R. Cairns were stated to be the vessel's managers. In 1940 Thomas R. Cairns alone was listed as the manager. Must have been a 'lucky' ship. 141 convoy references in WW2 including at least 28 voyages across N. Atlantic, & many U.K. coastal voyages. The vessel made, I read, a total of 208 round trip voyages to Canada before sale in 1956 - which is a puzzle because many of the WW2 voyages were ex New York - & Cairn Line apparently served Canada (Quebec & Montreal) in the summer & Portland, Maine, in the winter. The vessel was sold, in 1956, for £150,000, to 'Vamar Compania de Navegacion S.A.', of Panama, which company was owned by Italian owners, & renamed Zermatt. Likely managed by 'Agenzia Generale Navalmarittima SrL', of Genoa, Italy. And sold in 1959 to 'Compania de Navegacion Tortuga S.A.', also of Panama, & renamed Aurora P. 'Understood she will be taken to the Far East for resale, probably demolition'. On Nov. 25, 1959, the vessel arrived at Osaka, Japan, to be broken up. Can you add anything! Or correct the above?

38 Cairnglen
5019 tons
Hull 217

149417
1926

A refrigerated cargo ship with accommodation for 12 passengers. From 1 [Cairn Line, Cairnglen (2)], 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Cairnglen, but I cannot check the link), 3 (sinking, 10% down 'Tuesday, 22nd October 1940 D416'), 4 (iceberg), 5 (Huna grounding), 6 (1934 article re Huna grounding), 7 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Cairnglen, 1930/31 thru 1940/41, see left, many years re refrigeration), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 401.8 ft. long (122.47 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 418.8 ft. long (127.65 metres) overall, speed of 12 knots, strengthened for navigation in ice, signal letters KVJD later GBKQ. A major accident occurred during the construction of the vessel, as a result of which 3 shipyard workers lost their lives, & maybe 50 more were injured. As you can read here & following. Built for The Cairn Line of Steamships Ltd., of Newcastle, (Cairns, Noble & Co., Ltd., the managers), i.e. Cairn Line which served Canada. In 1930, Sir William J. Noble and Thomas R. Cairns were stated to be the vessel's managers. In 1940 Thomas R. Cairns alone was listed as the manager. In Mar. 1934, while returning from Canada with a general cargo, the vessel ran aground at Huna, Caithness, off the northern coast of Scotland near John o' Groats. She had a crew of 30 aboard & 2 passengers - it was the first voyage aboard the ship for her then captain. His name? Three Hull based tugs & local boatmen from Stroma were needed to free her after 5 days, & she was towed first to Longhope in the Orkney Islands for repairs & later to Leith, Scotland. Yewforest & Kinnaird Head helped, by taking part of her unloaded cargo. It would seem that Cairnglen suffered minor damage when it hit an iceberg on Jul. 17, 1937 in the Strait of Belle Isle (which separates Newfoundland from Labrador to the north). 30 convoy references in WW2 including at least 6 voyages across the N. Atlantic, & U.K. coastal voyages. On Oct. 21, 1940, Cairnglen left Methil (Firth of Forth) for Southend, Essex, in a small convoy - FS.316. With a varied cargo that had originated in Montreal, Canada, which cargo included butter, bacon, wheat, engines & tyres & maybe Ford trucks. On Oct. 22, 1940, the vessel was wrecked in fog at Marsden, near Souter Point, 1 mile south of the mouth of the River Tyne - due to a navigational error, a misidentified buoy. In calm seas, the vessel ran onto a reef close to Camel Island, ripping plates for almost all of her length. Later that day, the incoming tide brought heavy weather & the vessel was lifted by a giant wave & dropped bow first onto rocks, breaking her back. 20 of the crew, who had been at the stern of the ship, reached land in a lifeboat & 'by a miracle', the others were rescued by bosun's chair. Thanks to the efforts of the 'South Shields Volunteer Life Brigade', & the similar brigades of Roker & Sunderland. An image at left shows that rescue - but surely what is depicted is not a bosun's chair, is it? Per a site now long gone, some different numbers - 14 crew reached the shore by boat & the others (35) by bosun's chair. Interestingly, that same long gone site stated that the incident is said to have inspired Winston Churchill's famous wartime Parliamentary address when he referred to 'pulling together to save the country's bacon.' Much of the cargo was, I read, saved - was the bacon saved, I wonder! The wreck lies today in 8 metres of water at 54.59.12N/01.22.42W. Can you correct the above and/or add anything! Your contribution would be most welcome.

39 Streonshalh
3895 tons
Hull 222

137090
1928

A cargo ship. Per 1 (6 wonderful images of the sinking of Streonshalh), 2 (Dec. 22, 1939 newspaper article re sinking, crew names), 3 (31 of the 32 Streonshalh crew names aboard Admiral Graf Spee), 4 (sinking location), 5, 6 & 7 (data, Admiral Graf Spee), 8 (data & image, Langsdorff), 9 & 10 (archive data available), 11 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Streonshalh, 1930/31 thru 1938/39, see left), 12 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 349.4 ft. long (106.50 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 9 knots, signal letters LCBM later GSNL. Built for 'Rowland and Marwood's Steamship Company Limited', ('Rowland'), (Headlam and Sons Ltd., the managers - but likely much more than the managers since William Headlam was the sole managing director of Rowland & surely was its owner), both of Whitby, Yorkshire. Streonshalh? A Benedictine monastery built by Oswy in 657 AD at what would later become Whitby - effectively the Saxon name for Whitby. In 1930, William A. Headlam & Leonard Headlam were recorded as the vessel's managers. In 1940, William Headlam alone was recorded as the manager. No WW2 convoy references re the vessel at 'convoyweb.org'. On Nov. 26, 1939 Streonshalh, Captain J. J. Robinson, OBE (1899/1972) in command, with a crew of 32 all told, left Montevideo, Uruguay, for Freetown, Sierra Leone, with a cargo of wheat ex Rosario, bound ultimately for London. On Dec. 7, 1939, the vessel was found by Admiral Graf Spee, a German heavy cruiser, often termed a 'pocket battleship', Kapitän zur See Hans Langsdorff (1894/1939) in command. The crew of Streonshalh were ordered to abandon ship & were taken aboard Admiral Graf Spee, which then placed scuttling charges aboard Streonshalh & shelled her at the waterline. Streonshalh of course sank, at 25.01S/27.50W in the South Atlantic, 1,200 miles E. of Rio de Janeiro. A few days later, the 32 were aboard Admiral Graf Spee at the 'Battle of the River Plate', on Dec. 13, 1939. Admiral Graf Spee anchored at neutral Montevideo after that battle. At 8 p.m. on Dec. 17, 1939, Langsdorff, who had landed his prisoners & most of his crew, scuttled his ship about 6 miles SW of the port, beyond the 3 mile limit. And on Dec. 20, 1939, Langsdorff committed suicide. Highland Chieftain carried the crew of Streonshalh, who had been well treated indeed by Langsdorff, as had all of his many prisoners, back to Britain. An A. Duncan image of the ship exists - a modest version of it is here. Can you add or correct anything!

40 Temple Moat
4427 tons
Hull 221

160481
1928

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('u-boat.net', sinking data, image), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Temple Moat, but I cannot check the link), 3 (collision with Maunalei), 4 (U-69, data), 5 (Stanhall sinking, '30 May 1940', 3rd item), 6 (Stanhall, 2nd para), 7 (image Temple Moat), 8 (many names of those lost in the Temple Moat sinking. But beware the data. A mixed up page 'vessel-name' wise, which, as I read it, includes Thomas Ludlow as being master of Manistee), 9 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Temple Moat, 1930/31 thru 1940/41, see left), 10 (U-95 data), 11 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 391.2 ft. long (119.24 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 1/2 knots, signal letters LBTH later GNQM. Built for 'Temple Steamship Company Limited', a company owned & managed by Lambert Bros. Ltd. of London. On Oct. 28, 1936, the vessel was in collision with Maunalei, a cargo/passenger ship, in fog west of Race Rocks, W. coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia ('B.C.'), Canada. I had read that the damage to Maunalei was slight, but that Temple Moat suffered extensive damage & that tugs escorted her to Seattle, Washington. She would seem, however, to have been later repaired at Esquimalt, B.C., by Yarrow's Ltd., at the cost of $21,475. 3 suggests there was no significant damage to Temple Moat - a preliminary report maybe. Part of what I read is here ex a site most difficult of access. The vessel visited Australia many times, from 1929 thru 1937 (see 'Trove', Australia) arriving at the eastern cities, & loading cargoes of wheat at Fremantle, Western Australia, or at Lincoln, South Australia generally for the U.K. A few items ex Australian newspapers - i) probably in late 1934, the vessel was struck by a bolt of lightning when in the Bay of Biscay. The compasses were totally put out of commission & the magnetism persisted aboard for a long time, ii) a strange Russian stowaway, iii) on Jan. 6, 1937, the vessel arrived at Sydney with a cargo of timber ex Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, & with a 'decided list' (image). The vessel visited Auckland, New Zealand, on Oct. 9, 1938. In 1940, William P. Thurston was stated to be the vessel's manager. 18 WW2 convoy references including at least 3 Atlantic crossings, carrying grain on at least two of such crossings, service to S. America (Buenos Aires, Montevideo, Rio de Janeiro), to Norway early in the war, & many U.K. coastal voyages. Frequently a straggler it would appear. On May 30, 1940, the vessel rescued & landed at Weymouth 36 survivors from Stanhall, sunk by U-101 at 48.59N/5.17W, 35 miles NNW of 'Ile d'Ouessant' (i.e. Ushant, a small rocky island in the English Channel off the coast of Brittany, near Brest, France). One Stanhall life was lost in the sinking. On Jan. 2, 1941, the vessel, left Oban, Scotland, with Buenos Aires its destination, & joined convoy OB.268. The convoy dispersed on Jan. 4, 1941, & on the next day, i.e. Jan. 5, 1941, when at 55.29N/18.55W, the vessel was bombed & damaged by German Condor aircraft. Hocking advises that one crew member was killed & the vessel put into Gareloch, Scotland. It returned, repaired, to the Clyde. On Feb. 18, 1941, the vessel left Liverpool in convoy OB-288 bound for Buenos Aires with a cargo of 6,130 tons of coal ex Blyth. The crew, which included two gunners, was of 42 all told (Miramar states 41), with Thomas Ludlow, MBE, in command. The convoy dispersed & Temple Moat continued independently. At 1:45 a.m. on Feb. 23, 1941, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-95, Korvettenkapitän Gerd Schreiber in command. At 59.27N/20.20W, almost due S. of Iceland. There are a great many WWW references that state that the date was, instead, Feb. 24, 1941. And that she was rather sunk by U-69, which also attacked convoy OB-288. Hocking does not refer to either submarine & simply says that Temple Moat had sighted a submarine & that nothing further was heard from the vessel. Temple Moat sank fast by the bow & all lives, 41 or 42, were lost. Can you clarify the U-95/U-69 matter or otherwise add to or correct the above?

41 Aldington Court
4891 tons
Hull 224

161230
1929

A cargo ship. Per 1 (extensive data, images, names of 25 of the lost), 2 ('uboat.net', extensive sinking data), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Aldington Court, but I cannot check the link), 4 ('uboat.net', the names of 44 who were aboard), 5 (1941 WW2 service), 6 (image, also -02), 7 (Spanish page, sinking data 65% down - you can view it in English via a 'Google' translation), 8 (Lloyd's Register data, Aldington Court, 1930/31 thru 1944/45, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org', see left), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). As this page is updated, in late Apl. 2014, an image of the vessel is e-Bay available. Forgive me if I invite you to find it for yourself. The listing image bears what to me is an excessive logo & I do not wish to reward the vendor by a link. 405.6 ft. long (123.63 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 422 ft. 4 in. long overall?, speed of 10 (have also read 12 1/2 & 13 1/2) knots, signal letters LDGJ later GTBQ. Built for United British Steamship Co. Ltd., of London, which company was restyled Court Line Ltd. ('Court') in 1936, (Haldin & Philipps Ltd., the managers). It was the first motor ship in the Court Line fleet. The vessel's maiden voyage was  on May 26, 1930, bound for Vladivostok (Russia, Pacific coast) under charter to Glen Line. The vessel, apparently, was not laid up during the Depression. 1 advises (thanks!), ex 'Middlemiss', 'She was used to take coal to Melbourne (including during a coal strike in Australia) and grain from Hobson's Bay to Melbourne, and also transportation of lumber from Vancouver to Sydney or Melbourne, and sugar from Cairns to Japan or India.' Note however that Hobson's Bay is at Melbourne. It would seem, ex Trove, Australia, that the vessel carried a great many cargoes of Australian wheat in the years from 1930 thru 1936. On Apl. 29, 1936 the vessel arrived at Brisbane, Queensland from New York - with amongst its cargo a 1936 model Stinson Reliant monoplane acquired in the U.S. by an Australian named Captain P. H. ('Skipper') Moody. 30 WW2 convoy references, including 2 completed Atlantic crossings, returning with lumber & grain and with iron. The vessel was sunk on its 3rd eastbound crossing proceeding independently. The vessel saw service in the Indian Ocean (Durban, Cape Town, Karachi, Mombasa, Lourenço Marques, Port Sudan), into Australian waters in May/Jun 1940, on the W. coast of N. America (Los Angeles, Vancouver, Victoria, etc.) & U.K. coastal.  Also service in the Caribbean & on the W. coast of Africa. On Oct. 8, 1942 the vessel proceeded eastbound, independently, from Trinidad, West Indies, with a cargo of government stores, coal & general cargo ex Philadelphia. Alfred Stuart was in command, with a crew of 44 all told, including gunners. The vessel was bound for Alexandria, Egypt, via Saldanha Bay, South Africa. The vessel was proceeding in the S. Atlantic when, at 10:21 p.m. on Oct. 31, 1942, the vessel was hit by 2 torpedoes fired by U-172, Korvettenkapitän Carl Emmermann in command. At 30.20S/2.10W, about 1400/1500 miles WNW of Cape Town (have read different distances but 1400/1500 miles looks to be correct). It would seem that most of the crew took to two lifeboats, one bigger than the other. The Master, two officers & a gunner stayed on board, but jumped into the sea as the ship rolled over & sank, 20 minutes after the vessel was hit. They were picked up, presumably by the bigger of the two lifeboats. Only a single lifeboat, the smaller it would seem, was later rescued, with 10 aboard, 7 crew & 3 gunners. It was found by City of Christiania, (when I wonder) & the 10 were landed at Montevideo, Uruguay, on Nov. 25, 1942. The other boat was never heard from again. 33 or maybe 34 lives were lost, including Captain Stuart. I read that the first officer (his name?) was taken prisoner aboard U-172, but have not read the detail as to how that occurred. It would, however, seem to have been effected after Aldington Court had sunk. Is there anything you can add?

42 Sheaf Holme
4811 (later 4814 & 4884) tons
Hull 225

161533
5064635

Düsternbrook
Bonanza
Carnation
1929

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Hamburg South American Line, Bonanza), 2 (1930 adrift), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Sheaf Holme, but I cannot check the link), 4 (1934 image, loading wheat at Port Adelaide, Australia), 5 (Lloyd's Register data, Sheaf Holme, 1930/31 thru 1945/46, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org', see left), 6 (Aegeon, sinking), 7 (image, Bonanza), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 406.5 ft. long (123.9 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 422.0 ft. long (128.63 metres) overall, speed of 10 knots, signal letters LDQS later GTFL & DJSR. The first vessel to have special automatic steel hatch covers patented by MacGregor & King Ltd. Built for Sheaf Steam Shipping Co. Ltd. ('Sheaf'), of Newcastle, [W. A. Souter & Co. Ltd. ('Souter') the managers]. It would seem that Souter owned Sheaf & also owned Bamburgh Shipping Co. Ltd. On Aug. 23, 1930, the vessel left Nauru (now Republic of Nauru, Micronesian South Pacific) for Fremantle, W. Australia, with a cargo of phosphates. A day later, one of her 63 in. pistons was 'carried away'. Temporary repairs failed after three days. The vessel was adrift for a total of 14 days while emergency repairs were effected. It made Port Jackson (Sydney) safely & without help on Sep. 17, 1930. May have been laid up during the Depression (1930 thru late 1930s). Was it? The vessel, however, visited Auckland, New Zealand, 6 times between Sep. 1935 & Feb. 1948. Extensive (65 refs.) to convoy duty in WW2 - at least 8 voyages across the N. Atlantic, also to S. Africa (Cape Town, Durban), W. Africa (Freetown), S. America (Rio), the Mediterranean & lots of coastal U.K. voyages. There were a bushel more WW2 independent voyages incl. Indian Ocean (Bombay, Mombasa). Not many places it did not go to, except for the Far East! T. C. (Charlie) Enos was, I read, the Captain of the vessel from 1937 to 1945. On Apl. 11, 1941, Aegeon was hit by a torpedo fired by U-124 when about 170 miles W. of Freetown, Sierra Leone. Sheaf Holme picked up the survivors (27 of 31) & landed them at Freetown. It would seem that there was a lawsuit respecting a collision between Sheaf Holme & Spondilus, a tanker - I have read limited detail - the collision was in the North Sea in, I believe, 1943, probably related to convoy ONS 012. Sheaf Holme was determined to be 1/3rd responsible. The vessel was sold, in 1951, for £197,972 to Reeder-Union A.G., of Kiel, Germany, Hamburg-Südamerikanische Dampfschiffahrts-Gesellschaft Eggert & Amsinck the managers, & renamed Düsternbrook. In 1954, Hamburg South American Line took over the Reeder-Union A. G. fleet, incl. this vessel which was renamed Bonanza. In 1960, the vessel was sold, for about £53,000, to 'Astrobelo Cia. Naviera S.A.', of Beirut, Lebanon, (Lemos & Pateras Ltd. the managers) & renamed Carnation. Registered at Panama, it would seem. The vessel arrived at Valencia, Spain, on May 12, 1965 to be broken up at the ship breaking facilities of Desguaces Incolesa. Relatively few WWW references to the vessel. And few images. An image accompanied an article in 'The Motor Ship' in 1929, an article in which, I learn, the 'plan' was published. Can you add anything? An image?
P.S. 'Cynthia', a site visitor, asks if anybody knows anything about Captain C. Rotlander, master of Carnation, & of her crew re a 1964 voyage to Canada. The webmaster will pass along any response to Cynthia.

43 Uffington Court
4976 later 5264 tons
Hull 227

161308
512225

Svarten
Ocean Pride
Fu An
1929

A cargo ship. Per 1 (extensive data), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Uffington Court, but I cannot check the link), 3 (data & image), 4 (Lloyd's Register data, Uffington Court, 1930/31 thru 1945/46, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org', see left), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 405.6 ft. long (123.63 metres) perpendicular, later it became 404 ft. 2 in. long perpendicular to perpendicular & 421 ft. 11 in. long overall, speed of 10 knots, signal letters LDWG later GPKX, SIFN & HPXD. Built for United British Steamship Co. Ltd. ('United'), of London, which company was restyled Court Line Ltd. in 1936, (Haldin & Philipps Ltd., the managers). In 1930, Philip E. Haldin was stated to be the vessel's manager, while in 1940 Frank W. Saunders was stated to be the manager. The vessel, apparently, was not laid up during the Depression. Extensive convoy duties in WW2; 68 convoy references, lots of coastal U.K. voyages but also at least 7 voyages across the N. Atlantic, (mainly carrying grain but also steel), & also to South Africa, Sri Lanka & Caribbean. In 1945/46 the vessel reverted to United as the registered owner. The vessel was sold, in 1952, to Rederi A/B Skåne, of Helsingborg, Sweden, (Hans Lundgren the manager) & renamed Svarten. In 1957, the vessel was transferred/sold to Rederi A/B Sigyn, a company associated with Lundgren, with no change of name. And in 1960 was sold to Panamanian Oriental Steamship Corporation, of Panama, (Wheelock, Marden & Co. Ltd., of Hong Kong, the managers) & renamed Ocean Pride.  In 1962, the vessel was sold again, to 'Cia. Nav. Peace Ltda. S.A.', of Panama, (Hai An Shipping Co. Ltd., of Hong Kong, the managers) & renamed Fu An.  On Nov. 27, 1967, the vessel arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, to be broken up. There are relatively few WWW references to the vessel. Can you add anything?

44 Stakesby
3900 (later 4026) tons
Hull 230

161017

Empire Derwent
Swan Point
1930

A cargo vessel, which had quite a life indeed. Per 1 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data 1930/31 thru 1940/41, Stakesby), 2 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, 1942/43 thru 1945/46, Empire Derwent & Swan River), 3 (a comprehensive 'wikipedia' page, Stakesby), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Stakesby, but I cannot check the link), 5 ('uboat.net', Stakesby damaged Aug. 25, 1940, image), 6 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, Empire Derwent, am unable to check the link), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 365.6 ft. long (111.435 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots, signal letters LGDK, later GPWM. The vessel was built for Rowland & Marwood's Steamship Co. Ltd. of Whitby, with Headlam & Son, also of Whitby, the manager. On May 15, 1933, the vessel, en route from Cardiff to Villa Constitución, Argentina, ran aground at Buenos Aires, Argentina. She was re-floated on May 19, 1933. On Jun. 23, 1939, the vessel ran aground again, near Puerto Obligado, Argentina, whilst outward bound for Sharpness, Gloucestershire. She was re-floated 3 days later, i.e. on Jun. 25, 1939. In 1940, William Headlam was stated to be the vessel's manager. 13 WW2 convoy references as Stakesby, including 2 completed N. Atlantic crossings (the vessel was torpedoed on the 3rd such crossing). To Buenos Aires & also U.K. coastal. On Aug. 12, 1940,  Stakesby, (who was in command, I wonder?) with a crew all told of 36, was in convoy HX-65 en route from Sydney (or maybe Halifax), Nova Scotia, Canada, to the River Tyne with a cargo of pit-props ex Newcastle, New Brunswick, Canada. Just before midnight on Aug. 25, 1940, she was hit by a torpedo fired by U-124, Korvettenkapitän Georg-Wilhelm Schulz in command. Harpalyce (built in 1940 by Bartram's) & Fircrest were sunk in U-124's attack. The attack was at 58.52N/06.34W, 23 miles N. of Butt of Lewis, Hebrides. Stakesby, hit in #1 hold, was badly damaged. A fire forward forced the crew to abandon the ship, in 3 lifeboats, an hour after the attack. The crew were picked up by Cetus, a Norwegian merchant ship, & landed at Stornaway, Isle of Lewis, on the next day. On Aug. 26, 1940. HMS Thames, a tug, was sent to the burning Stakesby, & towed her to Glumaig Bay, Stornaway. There the tow rope broke & the vessel sank in shallow water. In Jan. 1942, the vessel was raised, & temporary repairs were effected. On Jun. 9, 1942, the ship was towed to Rothesay Bay, Isle of Bute, Firth of Clyde, for more repairs (arrived Jun. 12, 1942) & then onwards to Sunderland (arrived Aug. 29, 1942). There she was permanently repaired on behalf of the Ministry of War Transport & resumed service, in 1943, as Empire Derwent. Neill & Pandelis, of London, became the vessel's managers. 43 WW2 convoy references as Empire Derwent, including 2 N. Atlantic crossings, carrying steel, lumber & grain. Also extensive service in the Mediterranean (Augusta, Bari, Brindisi, Tunis, Algiers, Taranto) & U.K. coastal. In 1946, the vessel was sold, to Cereal Shipping & Trading Co. Ltd., of London, J. D. McLaren & Co. Ltd. ('McLaren'), also of London, the managers & renamed Swan Point. Lloyd's Register of 1945/46 advises, however, that McLaren were then the vessel's owners. In late Jul. 1949, the vessel arrived at Chittagong, (was India, became East Pakistan & then Bangladesh), from Karachi with a cargo of oilcake & rapeseed. On Jul. 31, 1949, the vessel became 'dislodged' from Oil Jetty #4 & ran aground in the main channel of the Karnaphuli River. While I have not read all the detail, it caused a major blockage, it would seem. The vessel broke in two & was declared a constructive total loss. Can you add anything! Another image?

45 Betswood
1051 later 1067) tons
Hull 233

164885

Ashley
Havelet
1936

A collier. From 1 (image, Ashley), 2 & 3 (images, Havelet, also -03), 4 (O. Dorey & Sons, but Havelet not referenced), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Betswood, but I cannot check the link), 6 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, 1937/38 thru 1945/46, Betswood), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 218.0 ft. long (66.45 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 227 ft. 6 in. long overall, speed of 10 knots, signal letters MLPL. Built for Wm. France Fenwick & Co. Ltd., of London. The vessel was however registered at Shoreham. In 1940, Kenneth R. Pelly was stated to be the vessel's manager. 123 WW2 convoy references, the vast majority of which were U.K. coastal, many of them being to Southend, re London, & to St. Helen's Roads, River Solent. However there were also 7 voyages to Seine Bay, France, in the Jun/Sep 1944 period, re the Normandy landings, I presume. I read that on Jun. 28, 1944, the vessel was damaged by German shore batteries in the Straits of Dover while en route from Blyth to Shoreham. Can anybody explain that reference? It would seem likely that it may well relate to one of the above voyages to France, however the date seems not to jive with the dates of the Seine Bay voyages. Or could the German guns, at that time, almost reach the coast of England? In 1947, the vessel was sold to Stephenson Clarke Limited, of London & Newcastle, & renamed Ashley. Certainly by 1951/52 the vessel was recorded as being of 1067 gross tons. The vessel was sold again, in 1957, to Onesimus Dorey's 'Onesimus Dorey & Sons Ltd.', of Guernsey, Channel Islands, & renamed Havelet. In late 1961, the vessel was sold to Belgian ship breakers, & on Oct. 27, 1961 (have also read Oct. 2, 1961) the vessel arrived at Terneuzen, western Scheldt estuary, SW Netherlands, to be broken up. Can you add anything! Another image?

46 Henry Moon
1091
Hull 235

164886
1936

A collier. From 1 ('wrecksite.eu', sinking data, image), 2 ('Thursday, 25 July', 60% down), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Henry Moon, but I cannot check the link), 4 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, 1937/38 thru 1940/41, Henry Moon), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 210.5 ft. long (64.16 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 218.7 ft. long (66.66 metres) overall, signal letters GZJJ, speed? Launched by Mrs. J. Routley, Mayoress of Brighton Council. Built, I have read, for 'Brighton Borough' or 'Brighton Corporation Electricity Undertaking', & managed by 'Stephenson Clarke & Associated Companies, Ltd.', of London. However Lloyd's Register indicates that the vessel was more exactly owned by 'The Mayor, Aldermen & Burgesses of the County Borough of Brighton'. In 1940 Lord Hyndley of Meads was stated to be the vessel's manager. Acquired to carry coal from the NE to the electricity generating station at Brighton, Sussex (at Southwick?). Henry Moon? An electrical pioneer who had played an important role in the early history of the Brighton electricity undertaking. 15 WW2 convoy references, all of which were U.K. coastal. On Jul. 25, 1940, the vessel left Southend, with 1450 tons of coal ex Burntisland, Firth of Forth, bound for Shoreham, Sussex. With a crew of 16, in convoy CW.8, of 25 (or 21) vessels. Later that day, proceeding along the S. coast, the convoy was attacked by waves of 20 to 40 German aircraft launched from airfields based in France (& by motor torpedo boats also). 5 vessels were sunk including Henry Moon which was bombed by a Ju 87 aircraft (a 'Stuka' dive-bomber)  when 2 miles off Folkestone. At 51.00.07N/01.11.07E. One crew member was killed. The wreck is a dive site (60% down page) today. I read that the Germans lost 14 aircraft while the RAF lost 4 Spitfires, in a battle that was watched by scores of people from Abbott's Cliff, Dover. Corhaven & Portslade, both of which were Sunderland built, were also sunk that day, while 5 other vessels were damaged in the attacks. Can you add anything! Another image?

47 Northwick
4313 tons
Hull 226

161994

Alderpool
1936

A cargo vessel. From 1 (Ropner), 2 ('uboat.net', Alderpool), 3 (Polish troops, 75% down, 'Thursday, June 20', search page for Alderpool), 4 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, 1937/38 & 1941/42 only, Alderpool), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Alderpool, but I cannot check the link), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 382.1 ft. long (116.464 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters GBLN. The vessel was launched in 1930 but laid up, unfinished, for many years due to the Depression. In 1936, the vessel was purchased by Pool Shipping Co. Ltd., with Sir R. Ropner & Co. Ltd. the managers & effective owners & renamed Alderpool. Registered at West Hartlepool. 13 WW2 convoy references including 3 eastbound crossings of the N. Atlantic & U.K. coastal. The vessel was independent on its westbound N. Atlantic voyages. On Sep. 11, 1939, the vessel sank Brendonia (313/1937) in a collision in the Downs. Alderpool was en route, in ballast, from the Tyne to Southampton to load military vehicles & petrol for delivery to Brest, France. Brendonia was struck when at anchor near Gull Buoy, off Margate, while Alderpool, travelling without lights, was itself preparing to anchor. On Jun. 20, 1940, the vessel embarked 4,000 Polish troops from Brittany & transported them to Falmouth. Alderpool was in convoy SC-26 in Apl. 1941, en route from New York to Hull via Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada, carrying 7,200 tons of wheat. A laggard in the convoy, it would seem. On Apl. 3, 1941, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-46, Kapitänleutnant Engelbert Endrass in command, in the N. Atlantic, SW of Reykjavik, Iceland. The ship had to be abandoned. A few hours later, the vessel was sunk by a torpedo fired by U-73, Korvettenkapitän Helmut Rosenbaum in command. At 58.21N/27.59W. All 39 aboard Alderpool (including Tom V. (Valentine) Frank, OBE, her master) were picked up by Thirlby (built by Gray at Sunderland in 1928). They were landed at Loch Ewe, Scotland, after Thirlby was itself damaged en route by a torpedo fired by U-69. Can you add anything! An image? 

48 Portslade
1091 tons
Hull 234

164721

1936

A coal burning collier. Per 1 (Stephenson Clarke data, but this Portslade not referenced), 2 (Thursday, 25 July), 3 (sinking, last item on page), 4 (Convoy CW.8), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Portslade, but I cannot check the link), 6 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, 1937/38 to 1940/41, Portslade), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 210.5 ft. long (64.16 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 218.5 ft. long (66.6 metres) overall, speed of 9 knots, signal letters MLZZ. Built for Stephenson Clarke & Associated Companies Ltd. of London & used to transport coal to power stations in the S. of England. 20 WW2 convoy references, all U.K. coastal. Almost all of them were from the Tyne or Methil to Southend, with a couple rather to Falmouth. On Jul. 25, 1940, the vessel was in Convoy CW.8 carrying coal ex the Tyne onwards from Southend to Shoreham, West Sussex. Proceeding along the S. coast, the convoy was attacked by waves of 20 to 40 German aircraft launched from airfields based in France (& by motor torpedo boats also). 5 vessels were sunk - Portslade, & also Corhaven & Henry Moon, both Sunderland built. I read that the Germans lost 14 aircraft while the RAF lost 4 Spitfires, in a battle that was watched by scores of people from Abbott's Cliff, Dover. On Jul. 25, 1940 then, the vessel was bombed & sunk by German Ju-87 & Ju-88 bomber aircraft ('Stuka' dive-bombers), 4 miles NE of Dungeness, Kent. I have also read off Sandgate (search for Portslade) which seems however to be rather further to the east & nearer to Folkestone. All of the crew were rescued, likely by MTB.69 & MTB.70. Miramar indicates, incorrectly I believe, that the vessel was sunk on Jul. 25, 1941. It would seem that the wreck is still on the sea bed. Portslade? The location of the power station at Shoreham. Can you add anything! An image?

49 Arthur Wright
1091 later 1131 tons
Hull 236

164887

Ariston
1937

A collier/general cargo ship. Per 1 (Norwegian data, Ariston, there used to be an image also, 2nd at left), 2 (link 1 Google translated), 3 (image & data, Arthur Wright), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Arthur Wright, but I am quite unable to check the link), 5 (Danish 'pdf', item #299, 70% down), 6 (Andaman wreck), 7 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, 1937/38 to 1945/46, Arthur Wright), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 210.5 ft. long (64.16 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 215.0 ft. long (65.53 metres) overall, signal letters GZKV, speed of 10 knots. Built for the Brighton Corporation, to carry coal to the Brighton power station. However Lloyd's Register indicates that the vessel was more exactly owned by 'The Mayor, Aldermen & Burgesses of the County Borough of Brighton'. With 'Stephenson Clarke & Associated Companies, Ltd., later Stephenson Clarke Limited, of London, as managers. In 1940 Lord Hyndley of Meads was stated to be the vessel's manager. Sister to Henry Moon. Named after Arthur Wright, a famous electrical engineer, who in 1893 was appointed 'engineer in charge' of the first power station at Brighton. I am advised (thanks Don!), that there are 28 WW2 convoy references, all U.K. coastal or continental. In 1948 the vessel became owned by the British Electricity Authority & in 1954 by the Central Electricity Authority. On May 24, 1953, the vessel rescued 38 crew of Andaman (which sank) & transferred them to the Dover lifeboat. Andaman & Fortune had collided in thick fog off the South Goodwin Lightship. The vessel was sold, in 1958, to Ivar Olsen of Oslo, Norway, & renamed Ariston. In Jan. 1963, she was en route from Ventspils, Latvia, to Ghent, Belgium, with a cargo of potassium chloride. On Jan. 20, 1963, she became stuck in the ice at Stubbekøbing, Island of Falster, S. Denmark. It would seem that much of the waters around Denmark were frozen at the time. She was still stuck in the ice on Mar. 9, 1963 when fire broke out aboard & the galley, engine room & the rest of the stern was completely destroyed. The cause of the fire is unknown. 6 crew were aboard & none of them were injured. I presume that the vessel was beyond repair since it was later sold, presumably to ship breakers, & on Jul. 3, 1963 arrived at nearby Masnedsund, Denmark, presumably under tow, to be broken up. It would appear that an Inquiry into the fire took place at Stubbekøbing on Mar. 19, 1963. Can you add anything!

50 Hylton
5197 tons
Hull 232

161601

1937

A motor ship. Per 1 ('uboat.net', detailed account of sinking), 2 (1938 arrival, with a list, at Melbourne), 3 (Saturday, 29th March 1941, 75% down), 4 (convoy HX-115), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Hylton, but I cannot check the link), 6 (U-48), 7 (Lloyd's Register data, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org', 1937/38 to 1940/41, Hylton), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 427.0 ft. long (130.1 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 445.2 ft. long (135.70 metres) overall, speed of 11 knots, signal letters GZJF. Built for 'Hebburn Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Newcastle, with W. A. Souter & Co. Ltd., also of Newcastle, the managers (& maybe the ultimate owners also?). On Jun. 15, 1938, the vessel arrived at Melbourne, Australia, with a heavy list to starboard, her decks piled high with Oregon timber ex Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. 12 WW2 convoy references including 3 N. Atlantic crossings, & U.K. coastal. In late Mar. 1941, Hylton was en route from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, to the Tyne, in Convoy HX-115, with a cargo of 6,900 tons of lumber, & 1,500 tons of wheat, ex Vancouver via the Panama Canal. The vessel was in fact the ship of convoy Vice Commodore Vice Admiral Sir C. G. Ramsey, KCB RN, ('Ramsey'). U-48, Korvettenkapitän Herbert Schultze in command, attacked the convoy & at 6:19 a.m. on Mar. 29, 1941 fired at Hylton but missed. However, a little later, at 8:06 a.m., Hylton was hit by a torpedo fired by U-48. At 60.20N/18.10W (have also read 60.02N/18.10W), about 600 miles W. of Cape Wrath, due S. of Iceland. There was no loss of life. The entire complement of 44, including Ramsey & 6 staff, Watson E. (Edward) O'Connell, the Hylton Captain, & 2 gunners, were picked by British corvette Dianella & landed at Londonderry. Hylton, which had stayed afloat, was scuttled by HMS Venomous at about 2 p.m. U-48 also sank two other vessels ex convoy HX-115 - Limbourg & Germanic. I understand that 'Atlantic Roulette: A Merchantman at War, June 1940, Running the Gauntlet of U-boat Alley, E-boat Alley and the Luftwaffe', (1 & 2) written by Morris Beckman, covers extensively the vessel's final voyage. U-48 (1 & 2) was, you should know, the most successful of all of the German U-boats. It was responsible, under 5 different commanders, for the sinking of 51 allied ships & for damaging 3 more. Can you add anything! Another image?

51 Northleigh
5450 tons
Hull 237

165573

China Fir
1937

A cargo ship. Per A & B (Delcampe, images, Northleigh), 1 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Northleigh, 1937/38 thru 1945/46), 2 (data, Northleigh, 75% down), 3 (data, Tatem, Atlantic Shipping & Trading, & Northleigh), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Northleigh, but I cannot check the link), 5 (image, Northleigh), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 430.1 ft. long (131.09 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 447.2 ft. long (136.31 metres) overall, later 447 ft. 2 in., speed of 11 knots, signal letters GBBN later LCUJ. Built for W. J. Tatem Ltd. ('Tatem'), of Cardiff. In 1940, the vessel was transferred to 'Atlantic Shipping & Trading Co. Ltd.' ('Atlantic'),  a subsidiary of Tatem, with Tatem the managers. If that relationship is incorrect can somebody advise? Note that the 'Pickersgill' build list here states that the vessel was built for Atlantic. 72 WW2 convoy references including 4 N. Atlantic crossings returning with grain or lumber (& also 3 independent such crossings). In Australian waters in the period of Jun/Aug 1940 & in the Indian Ocean from Apl. to Dec. 1941. Service to W. Africa (Freetown, Lagos, Takoradi), voyages to Antwerp, Belgium, late in the war. And U.K. coastal. In 1956, the vessel was sold to Fir Steamship Co. Ltd. of Hong Kong, Fir Line Ltd. the managers, & renamed China Fir. Note, however, that Miramar refers to 'China Engineers'. Can anybody explain that reference? Registered at Hong Kong. In 1957, the vessel would appear to have been transferred to 'Hong Kong Fir Shipping Co. Ltd.', with no change of manager or vessel name. On Apl. 17/18, 1961, the vessel left Hong Kong, with a cargo of iron ore ex Marmugao, Goa, western India, bound for Kobe, Japan. I presume that the vessel had stopped at Hong Kong en route. On Apl. 18, 1961, (have not read the time), at night & in fog, the vessel ran aground on rocks, close to the entrance of Hong Kong harbour, at Tathong Point, six miles from Kowloon. On the W. side of Ngai Ying Pai or Tung Lung Island, in the Tathong channel, also described as 4 miles SE of Lyemun Pass. I have not read the co-ordinates. Efforts were made to save the vessel (can anybody give us detail?). The date of Apl. 26, 1961 seems to have some significance. Eventually declared a constructive total loss. In fact, it broke in two. It was salvaged over a period of months it would appear. A piece of the ship, about 2/3 of it, was floated off in Oct. 1961. Something happened to the wreck later on, on Nov. 17, 1961, but I cannot tell you what. From the text above, you can see that WWW data about the stranding, indeed about the whole ship, is most limited. I would have expected extensive data about what is, after all, a relatively recent ship wreck. Can you add anything! Another image?

52 Chulmleigh
5445 tons
Hull 238

166440
1938

A cargo or tramp ship. Per 1 ('uboat.net' re sinking), 2 (Aug 22, Fri.), 3 (reference), 4 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Chulmleigh, 1937/38 thru 1944/45), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Chulmleigh, but I cannot check the link), 6 (lots of references to Chulmleigh & its final voyage in 'Arctic Interlude: Independent to North Russia' by Harry C. Hutson), 7 (names of those buried at Tromsø, Norway, 75% down), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 430.1 ft. long (131.09 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 447.2 ft. long (136.31 metres) overall, speed of 10 1/2 knots, signal letters GJGM, with a cruiser stern. Built for Dulverton Steamship Co. Ltd., W. J. Tatem Ltd., the managers, of London. A comfortable ship, it would seem, with spacious & well furnished cabins, an 'elegant dining-saloon panelled in polished mahogany' and 'the captain's quarters would not have disgraced a first class hotel'. By 1940/41 the vessel was owned by 'Atlantic Shipping & Trading Co. Ltd.', a subsidiary of W. J. Tatem Ltd. & hence, perhaps, the reference (1) to W. J. Tatem Ltd. There was also 'The Tatem Steam Navigation Co. Ltd.', of Cardiff, as per 80% down here. Chulmleigh? A village in Devon, where the ship's owner is said to have lived as a child. The owner was not named - William J. Tatem perhaps? During the first 3 years of WW2, Chulmleigh was engaged in convoy work, mainly transporting supplies across the North Atlantic to European & Russian ports. 3 N. Atlantic crossings, one of which, westbound & independent, was to Buenos Aires, Argentina. To W. Africa - Lagos, Accra, Takoradi (with aircraft in crates) & Freetown. Also U.K. coastal. In May 1940, the vessel left Milford Haven for Australia via Capetown. In Australia, she visited Wallaroo, Newcastle, Cairns, & Brisbane, returning via Durban & Capetown in early 1941. On Aug 22, 1941, she accidentally rammed & damaged U.S. destroyer Hughes (DD-410) at Reykjavik, Iceland. In Oct. 1942, she was at Philadelphia, U.S.A., loaded with army stores, under the command of Captain Daniel M. (Morley) Williams. She sailed to Halifax, Nova Scotia, & joined a convoy headed east with Archangel, Russia, as her destination. 7 days out of Halifax, she broke off from the convoy & continued unescorted - part an experimental strategy to send vessels unescorted to Russia on different routes & 12 hours apart - to avoid the appalling losses of earlier convoys. Well armed, though that did not later help her. She rounded the north of Iceland, & intended then to pass 30 miles S. of Spitzbergen en route to the White Sea & Archangel. At that time of year she sailed in 24 hour darkness, snowstorms, extreme cold,  poor visibility & a lack of radio contact with any shore station to confirm her position. On Nov. 5, 1942, Chulmleigh was spotted by a German reconnaissance seaplane. Later that day, she ran aground on a reef off South Cape, Spitzbergen, Norway, 20 miles to the N. of her intended course & likely to break her back at any moment on the reef. Attempts were made to back the vessel off, without success. On Nov. 6, 1942, the stranded vessel was bombed by German Ju-88 aircraft & badly further damaged. 10 days later she was torpedoed by U-625 & again bombed by Ju-88 aircraft. The vessel ended up in three pieces. It seems that the vessel had a complement of 58. 2 lifeboats with 57 survivors set off to reach the Soviet? mining settlement of Barentsburg, 150 miles to the north - since landing on the coast was impossible - sheer ice cliffs, devoid of vegetation & uninhabited except for polar bears & Arctic foxes. I cannot possibly in this short account do justice to the story of what happened to those lifeboats & to the survivors aboard. So I will not try. I encourage you to read the quite terrifying story of their ordeals (see end of listing). One of the 2 lifeboats was never seen again. On Jan. 1, 1943, 58 days after the grounding, 2 Norwegian soldiers on patrol came upon the cabins where the survivors had sheltered, just 12 miles in fact from Barentsburg. The then nine remaining survivors were taken to Barentsburg, nursed back to 'health', & ultimately, but not until Jun. 15, 1943, they were landed at Thurso, Scotland, by Bermuda & Cumberland. So 49 of the 58 crew members ultimately died - frostbite, & gangrene the result of frostbite, being the major factor. Captain Williams, who did survive, was awarded the Order of the British Empire for his efforts & leadership. 3 others (Burnett, Peyer, Whiteside) received the British Empire Medal. As did, I learn, Dr. Per Hønningstad, the Norwegian doctor who had set up a makeshift hospital at Barentsburg & there cared for the 9 survivors (we thank Gerd Hønningstad, his daughter, for that data). 2nd Officer David F. Clark was one of the other survivors. The vessel? It is still there today off South Cape - just bones, of course. The WWW sites are in conflict in the details. I am sure that there is much more that could be added! What an amazing story!
Much of the above text, i.e. what happened in Nov. 1942 & onwards, came thanks to 'The Merchant Navy Goes to War' by Captain Bernard Edwards (1926 - ) & to 'boyd?' who posted its text on a website. That website is no longer available. The book was originally published, I read, as 'The Fighting Tramps'. But, I am now confused about the exact titles since 'The Fighting Tramps - The Merchant Navy Goes to War' (cover) is in our library system. Some text used to be here. But now that is a link to 'The Road to Russia: Arctic Convoys 1942', per its cover, also by Edwards, which also references Chulmleigh. There also is a volume named 'The Road to Russia: Arctic Convoys 1942-1945', by Edwards - have they gone mad! See also link 6 above - 'Arctic Interlude: Independent to North Russia'. The amazing story may also be covered in 'Goldfinder', written by Keith Jessop. But that book seems to rather relate to diving & to the recovery of gold. So it may well not relate to Chulmleigh. Identifying the available images for the two listed Sunderland built vessels named Chulmleigh is most difficult. The second, built in 1946, is here. I may well have included incorrect images in both listings. Need help!

53 Egton
4363 (or 7390) tons
Hull 239

161025
5094202

Dubrava
Joker
1938

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data), 2 & 3 (images, correct vessel?), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Egton, but I cannot check the link), 5 ('Rowland and Marwoods' & Headlam), 4 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Egton, 1937/38 thru 1945/46), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 398.0 ft. long (121.3 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 412.2 ft. long (125.64 metres) overall, speed of 10 knots, signal letters MMRX later YTED & 6OEG. The later dimensions are different - 385 ft. 6 in. long (117.51 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular and 412 ft. 2 in. long (125.63 metres) overall. Built for 'Rowland and Marwood Steamship Company Ltd.' ('Rowland'), of Whitby, 'Headlam and Sons', the managers - but likely much more than the managers since William Headlam was the sole managing director of Rowland & surely was its owner. Rowland was, I read, a tramp ship company that traded worldwide. They mainly carried coal outbound from U.K. & returned with grain or timber & many other types of cargo. But by the time this vessel came into service, general tramping had become the norm. 100 WW2 convoy references which include at least 10 N. Atlantic crossings, service to W. Africa (Freetown), Mediterranean (Port Said), North Sea (Narvik & Bergen) & a great many U.K. coastal voyages. Now Stephen Allen has kindly provided the recollections of his father, Fred Allen, who served aboard Egton from Aug. 1939 thru 1941. Egton was in what is believed to have been the very first E. bound convoy across the N. Atlantic, HX1, from Halifax to Liverpool with a cargo of wheat in Sep. 1939. He notes the vessel's 'raking bow' & mentions that in 1940 on a dark & stormy night south bound in the Irish sea, running without navigation lights, Egton rode right over the top of a coaster, similarly invisible, necessitating rebuilding to fix the severe damage to Egton's bow. I wonder which ship she ran down? Being wartime, there was no publicity & no inquiry. In Oct. 1939, modest guns were installed at Sunderland, i.e. an anti submarine gun & a 12 pounder anti-aircraft gun. Apparently Pickersgill's had had the foresight to have installed during construction a reinforced steel deck to take the gun mountings. Also noted was that Egton was equipped with two second hand 'oar & sail' lifeboats, ex Cunard's Berengaria. And notes also the improved crew accommodations the vessel had - but no refrigeration. Thank you, Stephen, for that most interesting data. The vessel was sold in 1957 to 'Atlantska Plovidba' of Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia, & renamed Dubrava. The vessel was sold again, in 1969, to Cia. Naviera General S.A. of Mogadiscio (Mogadishu), Somali Republic, (N. Patella the manager?) & renamed Joker. The vessel was scrapped, in Q2 of 1976, at Split, Yugoslavia. Anything to add?

54 Winkleigh
5468 tons
Hull 242

167425

St. Anthony
1940

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Tatem), 2 (image, Winkleigh), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Winkleigh, but I cannot check the link), 3 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Winkleigh, 1940/41 thru 1945/46), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 430.2 ft. long (131.125 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 447.3 ft. long (136.34 metres) overall, overall length later recorded as 447 ft. 4 in., speed of 9 or 10 knots, signal letters GCSG. Built for W. J. Tatem Ltd. ('Tatem') of London. The second fleet vessel of the name. 'Tatem' was noted for its ships' names ending in 'leigh', as in this case - 'Winkleigh' is a village in Devon, noted as the birthplace of Inch's cider. William J. Tatem, the firm's founder, had originated in Devon. 53 WW2 convoy references, including at least 6 N. Atlantic crossings (frequently with grain & lumber), service in the Caribbean & to S. America (Guantanamo, Trinidad, Bermuda, Rio), Africa (Freetown, Takoradi, Capetown, Durban) & into the Indian Ocean (Aden, Kilindini) & many U.K. coastal. In 1960, the vessel was sold to 'Greek buyers' for about £80,000 'as is', to 'Saint Anthony Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Monrovia, Liberia, & renamed St. Anthony. Registered at Lebanon, probably at Beirut. On Feb. 20, 1966, the vessel arrived at the Valencia, Spain, facilities of 'Aguilar y Peris', to be broken up. Can anybody help with more data?

55 Empire Hunter
5977 later 5967 tons
Hull 255

169031

Boryslaw
Bytom
MP-PZZ-2
1942

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data), 2 (image, Boryslaw, 20% down), 4 (image, Boryslaw), 5 (image, Bytom), 6 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire Hunter, but I cannot check the link), 7 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Boryslaw, but I cannot check the link), 8 (Lloyd's Register data, Empire Hunter, 1942/43 thru 1943/44, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 9 (Lloyd's Register data, Boryslaw, 1943/44 thru 1945/46, same source), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 401.0 ft. long (122.225 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 415.0 ft. long (126.49 metres) overall, signal letters BFDB later SPFK. Built for the Ministry of War Transport, with J & J. Denholm Ltd., the managers. 10 WW2 convoy references as Empire Hunter thru Jul. 1943, incl. service to Algeria (Bône), U.K. coastal, & one N. Atlantic crossing. In Jul. 1943, the vessel was sold/transferred to the Polish Government & renamed Boryslaw, managed by 'Gdynia-America Shipping Lines Ltd.', of Gdynia, Poland. 19 WW2 convoy references as Boryslaw, from Jul. 1943, incl. at least 3 N. Atlantic crossings, service in the Mediterranean (Port Said) & in the Indian Ocean (Bombay, Colombo, Aden, Durban). In 1950, the managers of the vessel became 'Polskie Linie Oceanienze' ('Polish Ocean Lines'), & it was renamed Bytom. In 1963 or 1964, (on Sep. 27, 1963 per Miramar), the vessel was sold to 'Rejnowe Zaklady Zbozowe PZZ', & became a 'floating grain warehouse' at Szczecin (Stettin), Poland, no longer presumably a registered ship, with the name or number of MP-PZZ-2. In c.1970, it was sold to 'Zaklady Obrutu Zbozami Importawanymi i Eksportowymi PZZ.9' Its later status is unknown to the webmaster, but it surely was scrapped. Can anybody help with more data?

56 Stancleeve
5970 (later 5971) tons
Hull 253

168294

Akera
1942

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Stanhope/ Billmeir, Stancleeve), 2 (Norwegian page, Akera, image), 3 (wrecked in 1947?), 4 (image, Akera, also -02), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Stancleeve, but I cannot check the link), 6 (Lloyd's Register data, Stancleeve, 1941/42 thru 1945/46, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 401.0 ft. long (122.225 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 415.0 ft. long (126.49 metres) overall, speed of 11 (or 9 1/2) knots, signal letters BPYP later LAKG. Built for Stanhope Steamship Co. Ltd., of London, J. A. Billmeir & Co. Ltd. the owners & managers. 84 WW2 convoy references incl. at least 8 N. Atlantic crossings, extensive service in the Mediterranean (Port Said, Augusta, Bari, Naples, Bône), a single voyage to Seine Bay, France, to West Africa (Freetown, Takoradi) & U.K. coastal. In 1951, the vessel was sold to 'Skibs A/S Preba', 'Prebensen & Blakstad', of Risør, Norway, the managers, & renamed Akera. On Oct. 9, 1961, the vessel arrived at the ship breaking facilities of 'Matsukura Shoji', at Hirao, Yamaguchi, Japan, to be broken up. I have seen a reference to the vessel being wrecked on May 11, 1947, while en route from Lagos, Nigeria, to Glasgow. But that would seem to have rather been Stanhill which Miramar advises was 'wrecked 4.29N/7.13W 11.5.47 [Lagos-Clyde, general]'. Can anybody help with more data?

57 Chiswick
6006 tons
Hull 259

168469

Olga
1943

A cargo ship. Per 1 (report re 1950 grounding, Chiswick, 1st 2 pages of 'pdf'), 2 (image, Chiswick), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Chiswick, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Lloyd's Register data, Chiswick, 1942/43 thru 1945/46, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 401.0 ft. long (122.225 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 415.0 ft. long (126.49 metres) overall, speed of 9 1/2 knots, signal letters GDLN. Built for 'Britain Steamship Company, Limited', of London, Watts, Watts & Co., of London, the managers. 41 WW2 convoy references incl. 3 completed N. Atlantic crossings, extensive service in the Mediterranean (Port Said & Alexandria, Augusta, Bari, Naples, Marseilles, Brindisi etc.), to West Africa (Freetown, Takoradi, Lagos) & U.K. coastal. One of the eastbound N. Atlantic crossings was to N. Africa re 'Operation Torch'. Fast forward a few years. At 7:58 a.m. on Jun. 22, 1950, the vessel left Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada, for Montreal, Quebec, also Canada, with a cargo of coal, Thomas Lipton ('Lipton') in command, with a crew of 42 all told. The vessel sailed up the S. shore of the St. Lawrence. Lipton chose to sail close to shore contrary to the advice of the St. Lawrence pilot (was he aboard?). Clearly the current, that day, was steadily forcing the vessel towards the coast. At 2:45 p.m. on Jun. 23, 1950, in fine & clear conditions, the 23 year old 2nd officer, considering that the vessel was 'getting too close inshore', altered course to the north. That instruction was countermanded by the Captain. The Captain reset the vessel's course an hour later, to a course described by the Court as 'close-shaving', then left the bridge leaving no instructions. At 4:00 p.m. the 2nd officer altered course to the northward again, but it was too late. The vessel stranded at 4:05 p.m., southward & eastward of Fox Point Pier, St. Lawrence River, about 1/2 mile off shore. The vessel was floated off with the rising tide at 7:00 p.m. having sustained extensive bottom damage. The vessel continued on to Montreal. No casualties amongst the crew. The Court determined that Lipton was solely at fault, considering him guilty of bad navigation & seamanship. His certificate was suspended for a 2 year period. In 1952, the vessel was sold to 'Reederei Willy H. Schlieker & Co.', maybe 'Willy H. Schlieker KG', of Hamburg, Germany, & renamed Olga. It would seem that the 'Schlieker' Group, a truly giant shipbuilding, steel making & trading enterprise in Germany, went into bankruptcy in 1962. On May 26, 1950, the vessel arrived at the ship breaking facilities of 'J. de Smedt', at Boom, Belgium, to be broken up. Can anybody help with more data? Or additional images.

58 TID 155
54.26 tons
Hull 282

180171

Danae
Hailey
1945

A steam tug. Per 1 (data, Danae at page bottom), 2 (data, TID 155), 3 (ref. Danae), 4 ('pdf', extensive history of Alfred Holt & Company/Ocean Steamship company), 5 (data, Hailey, ex registers at Singapore), The vessel is not Miramar referenced. Built for Ministry of War Transport. ('TID' = Tug Inshore Defence). 71.0 ft. (have also read 65 ft.) long, speed of 9 knots, signal letters GCKB. In 1946 or 1947, the vessel was sold to 'Ocean Steamship Co. Ltd.', the main operating subsidiary of 'Alfred Holt and Company' ('Holt'), known as Blue Funnel Line, of Liverpool, & renamed Danae. Holt were the vessel's managers. The vessel was moved to Hong Kong for harbour duties there. In 1960, the vessel was sold to 'Wang Kee & Co. Ltd.' ('WangKee'), of Hong Kong, & renamed Hailey. Peters & Co., of Hong Kong, were involved in the 1950s - could they have been the vessel's managers? But, for interest, they would seem to have in 1950 owned a similar tug, TID 125, then also named Hailey. In 1960 or 1961 the vessel was sold again to 'Sarawak Steamship', or 'Sarawak Co.', or more likely 'Sarawak Co. (1959) Ltd.' ('1959Co') of Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. The vessel was based at Sibu, (60 km from the ocean, at the junction of the Rajang & Igan rivers), Sarawak. I read that the vessel was deleted from the registers in 1985. Can anybody provide any additional information? The limited available data about this vessel seems to be confusing & perhaps contradictory in its detail - an example:- 1 indicates that the vessel was owned by Holt thru 1961 & then sold to 1959Co. But WangKee would surely seem to have acquired the vessel in 1960. WangKee (which company supplied stevedores, provisions, crew etc. to shipping lines at Kowloon, including Blue Funnel, also operated ships on behalf of other shipping companies), would seem to have been a quite independent company. The most 'official' available data, ex registry documents at Singapore (thanks to author Harold Cartwright), is at 5. #1902

59 TID 159
54.26 tons
Hull 286

181130

Brent
1945

A steam tug. A National Historical Ship. Per 1 (National Historic Ships), 2 [text & fine image, Brent (6 more Brent images at site)], 3 (Brent, 60% down, 2nd April 2007), 4 (Brent 60% down, 5-12-2010), 5 (2 images & data, Brent. 40% down), 6 (image, Brent). Built for Ministry of War Transport. ('TID' = Tug Inshore Defence). 73 ft. 10 in. long, speed of 7 knots, signal letters GCML. In 1946, the vessel was sold on to the Port of London Authority ('PLA'), 'at a subsidised price of £4,000', & renamed Brent. The tug worked with the PLA Dredging Dept. & later tended barges & lighters in the London docks. Was laid up in 1969. The tug was sold in 1969 or 1970 to Stour Salvage Co., a ship breaker of Mistley, near Colchester. But was bought by R. & J. Hall (Ron L. Hall), a private owner, of Maldon, Essex, in 1971. The ‘Best Kept Privately Owned Power Craft’ at the Greenwich Festival in 1973. Still operating in 2006, it would seem. How wonderful! In 2014 still?

60 Empire Flamborough
4191 tons
Hull 277

5054965

Vindeggen
Bulgaria
1946

A cargo ship. Per 1 (image, Bulgaria), 2 (ref. in Norwegian about 45% down, Empire Flamborough/Vindeggen), 3 (data & 2 images, Empire Flamborough/Bulgaria), 4 (extensive data in Norwegian & English, Vindeggen), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 401.0 ft. long (122.225 metres) long overall, later recorded as 122.00 metres overall, signal letters LZDC. Was built for the Ministry of War Transport, to be managed by Galbraith, Pembroke & Co., Ltd., of London. But the contract was acquired, for 4.9 million kroner, by 'Rederiet Vindeggen A/S', owned & managed by Chr. Østberg, of Oslo, Norway. The vessel was completed for them as Vindeggen, the 5th fleet vessel of the name. Was chartered for its first year of operation. In 1948, the vessel was sold, for 6,262,000 kroner to 'Navigation Maritime Bulgare', which would seem to have meant the Government of Bulgaria, of Varna, Bulgaria, & renamed Bulgaria. In Jul. 1976, the vessel arrived at Sveti Kajo, Split, Yugoslavia, to be broken up at the 'Brodospas' facilities there, having been sold for scrap at about $65 per 'light tonne'. Can anybody help with more data?

61 Hendrik
2270 (later 2219) tons
Hull 303

180978
5225930

Marlindo
Naftilos
Yacu-mama
1946

A cargo ship, a fruit carrier, presumably refrigerated. Per 1 (data), 2 (Euxine), 3 (image, Hendrik), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 316.2 ft. long (96.38 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 330.3 ft. long (100.675 metres) overall, later 310.0 ft. long (94.49 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular & 330.4 ft. long (100.71 metres) overall, speed of 12 (or 11 1/2) knots, signal letters GMXG, later HOIO & SVQQ. May have carried a few passengers? Sister to Henzee. Built for 'Euxine Shipping Company Ltd.', of London. 'W. H. van der Zee', the owner. Would likely have served Egyptian (Alexandria) & other Mediterranean ports. The company later operated a regular service from Bremen & Hamburg, Germany, to Aqaba, Jordan. In 1962, the vessel was sold to 'Marservicio Compagñia Naviera S.A.', of Panama, Euxine Shipping Co. the managers, & renamed Marlindo. In 1966, the vessel was sold to 'Marcrecida Compagñia Naviera S.A.', of Piraeus, Greece, M. J. Lemos the manager, & renamed Naftilos. And in 1970, the vessel was sold to 'Naviera Amazonica Peruana S.A.', of Iquitos, Peru, & renamed Yacu-mama - named after a sea monster of the name, believed to inhabit the mouth of the Amazon River & nearby lagoons, a monster which, according to legend, would suck up any living thing that passed within 100 paces of it. A giant snake it would seem. The name may not have helped any! On Jun. 19, 1974, while en route from Callao, Peru, to Iquitos, also Peru, the vessel ran aground in the River Amazon, off Ilha Jupatituba, about 70 miles from Belém, (Brazil, at the mouth of the Amazon). Now Callao & Iquitos (about 3,000 km up-river from Belém) are physically close but separated by the Andes mountains, so the ship had a long way around to get there. The vessel broke in two & 2 of her 35-man crew were lost. Can you add anything?

62 Loch Fionn
1580 tons
Hull 264

6122463

Largo Bay
1946

A Royal Navy patrol frigate. Per A (e-Bay image, Largo Bay, F423, a 'Skyphotos' image), 1 (data, Largo Bay), 2 (Bay Class frigates, data & armament), 3 (2 images, click to enlarge), 4 (image, Largo Bay, K423), 5 (image, Largo Bay, F423, also -01 & -03), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 93.6 metres long overall, 87.2 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, crew of 157, speed of 20 knots. Built for the Royal Navy. The vessel was laid down as Loch Fionn, (have also seen many references to Loch Foin), but completed as Largo Bay, a Bay Class, anti-aircraft frigate. Named for Largo Bay, Fife, Scotland. Armed with four 4" & six 40 mm anti-aircraft guns, a Hedgehog mortar, & depth charges. Was commissioned on Jan. 26, 1946 as HMS Largo Bay, K423. Saw brief service thru Sep. 1946, in the Mediterranean. Then reduced to Reserve Fleet & laid up at Portsmouth. It would seem that from Feb. 1952 until 1954, the vessel served with the 4th training squadron at Rosyth, Scotland. In 1958, the vessel was sold to BISCO (British Iron & Steel Company) & was towed to the 'T. W. Ward' ship breaking facilities at Inverkeithing, Scotland. It arrived there, to be broken up, on Jul. 11, 1958 (have also read Jul. 11, 1959, but I think that date is in error). Somewhere along the way the vessel seems to have become F423. Can anybody explain that? Or add anything?

63 Lord Glanely
5640 tons
Hull 304

181643
523084
5230844

Mehdi
1947

A cargo ship. Per 1 (ref. Lord Glanely, 80% down), 2 (Lakonia), 3 (image, Lord Glanely, also -02), 4, 5 & 6 (Lord Glanely), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 437.0 ft. long (133.2 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 450.7 ft. long (137.37 metres) overall, later 425 ft. 3 in. long (129.62 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 450 ft. 8 in. long (137.36 metres) overall, speed of 10 knots, signal letters GMXD later AQLR. Built for 'Atlantic Shipping & Trading Co. Ltd.', of Cardiff & later London, a company managed by W. J. Tatem Ltd., partly owned, & likely earlier managed by William J. (James) Tatem, 1868/1942, who was made a baronet (1st Baronet Tatem) in 1916 & became Baron Glanely of St. Fagans in 1918, honoured for his WW1 services. A horse that he owned, 'Grand Parade', won the Epsom Derby in 1919 at 33-1 odds, just one of his horse racing successes. G. G. Price was her Captain in or around 1953/54 - a character - which maybe goes with the territory. The ship was laid up for most of 1959. In 1960, the vessel was sold, for £200,000, to Gulf Steamships Ltd., of Karachi, Pakistan, & renamed Mehdi. Registered at Panama, it would seem. Was one of a group of ships that went to the assistance of Lakonia, a Greek cruise liner, which caught fire on Dec. 22/23, 1963, off Madiera (Portuguese archipelago, in the N. Atlantic SW of Portugal). 128 lives were lost in the disaster & Lakonia sank on Dec. 29, 1963. Mehdi assisted & may well have rescued some of the survivors. Transferred?, in 1971, to Gulf Shipping Corporation Ltd., also of Karachi, with no change of name, & registered at Pakistan. On Sep. 13, 1973, the vessel arrived at the 'Metalside Ltd.' ship breaking facilities at Gadani Beach, Pakistan, to be broken up. Can you add anything?

64 Memphis
3575 tons
Hull 305

182392
5231977

Elias
1947

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per 1 [Moss Hutchison Line, Memphis (2)], 2 (data, Memphis), 3 (image, Memphis, also -02 & -04), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 345 ft. 7 in. long (105.34 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 364 ft. 6 in. long (111.11 metres) overall, speed of 13 knots, signal letters GBGC later SYRS, especially designed for the fruit trade. Built for 'Moss Hutchison Line Limited.' ('Moss'), of Liverpool. The vessel was used on Moss's Mediterranean service, mainly serving ports in North Africa & in the Eastern Mediterranean. It would seem that the company had two 'runs' since a ship that called in at Israeli ports could not visit an Arab port. Memphis, would appear to have served Haifa, Israel, so I presume it was unwelcome accordingly at say Lebanon or Syria. I read that the vessel was transferred, in 1971, to the P&O General Cargo Division - P&O (Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company) were, I should reference, the owners of Moss. In 1972, the vessel was sold to 'Sifnonav Shipping Co. S.A.' ('Sifnonav'), of Piraeus, Greece, 'Grecomar Shipping Agency Ltd.' ('Grecomar') the managers, & renamed Elias. The ship was engaged on a regular service between Constanza, Romania, & Port Said, Egypt. Have also seen a reference to 'Grecomar' in a context which suggested that they owned Sifnonav. On Sep. 25, 1981, the vessel left Ras al Katheeb, Yemen, bound for Karachi, Pakistan, & on Dec. 7, 1981, the vessel arrived at the 'Fazal Corp. Ltd.' ship breaking facilities at Gadani Beach, NW of Karachi, Pakistan, to be broken up. Can you add anything?

65 Admiral Fraser
2276 (later 2330) tons
Hull 311

182879

Canberra
Cronulla
1948

A cargo ship. Per 1 (80% down Canberra/Cronulla with image), 2 (1962 typhoon 'Wanda'), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 317.6 ft. long (96.8 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 330.3 ft. long (100.675 metres) overall, signal letters MAXJ later VMRR. Built for 'W. A. Phillips, Anderson & Co. Ltd.', of London. Later chartered to The Clarke Steamship Co. Ltd. ('Clarke') of Montreal. Admiral Fraser made 11 voyages for Clarke, in 1953, from Montreal, Quebec, to St. John's, Newfoundland, with general cargo, returning via Port Alfred (Saguenay River, Quebec), where she discharged a cargo of fluorspar for the Arvida aluminium smelters ex the mines at St. Lawrence, Newfoundland. In the winter months, she carried coffee & other cargo for United Fruit Co. from Puerto Barrios, Guatemala, to Houston & New Orleans, U.S.A. The vessel was sold in 1954 to 'Australasian United Steam Navigation Company Ltd.' ('Australasian'), of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia (have also read Brisbane), & renamed Canberra. Australasian served northern Australia, New Zealand & the Pacific Islands. In 1958, the vessel was renamed Cronulla to free up the name of Canberra for use by Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Company, (P&O Line), which company owned Australasian. The vessel was sold again, in Feb. 1961, to 'Cronulla Shipping Co. Ltd.' of Hong Kong, 'John Manners & Co.' likely the manager. Cronulla came to an unfortunate end. She was a) blown ashore at Hong Kong by typhoon Wanda on Sep. 1, 1962 or b) capsized near 'West Point', presumably Hong Kong, as a result of that typhoon. 3 says broken up (means break-up commenced I think) on Nov. 15, 1962 at the 'The Hong Kong Chiap Hua Manufactory Company, (1947) Ltd.' ('Chiap') ship breaking facilities at Hong Kong. Chiap, now 'Chiaphua Limited', was incorporated in 1947 to undertake ship-breaking & deep sea salvage operations for the Hong Kong Government. However 1 indicates that the vessel was gradually broken up thru 1963 where she lay. Data is quite limited. We thank Kevin Griffin, of the U.K., for kindly providing the data about Admiral Fraser's service with Clarke, which data is included in Chapter 10 of an upcoming book, a draft of which is now available on line. Can anybody help with even more data?

66 Agnete
2347 (later 2358 & 2377) tons
Hull 306

5005641

Agnete Torm
Ghikas
George
Spyros
Spyros V
1948

A cargo ship. Per 1 (image Agnete Torm), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 326.8 ft. long (99.61 later 99.07 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 347.0 ft. long (105.77 metres) overall, signal letters OYFT later SYRR & P3LP. Built for Dampskibsselskabet Torm A/S, i.e. 'Torm Lines' (founded in 1889 by Captain Ditlev Torm) of Copenhagen, Denmark, with Axel Kampen & Carl M. Andersen the managers. The vessel was renamed Agnete Torm in 1951. In 1964, the vessel was sold to 'Pindos Shipping Corp.', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Ghikas. Two later ownership changes without a change of vessel name. 'John B. Douros & N. J. Voganatsis', also of Piraeus, became the owners in 1969 & 'Dokos Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Limassol, Cyprus, in 1969. In 1977, the vessel was sold to Timka Shipping Co. Ltd., of Limassol, Cyprus, & renamed George. They only owned the vessel for a short time. In 1978, the vessel was sold to Ionian Fortune Marine Inc., of Panama City, Panama, & renamed Spyros. And in 1979 the vessel became became Spyros V, owned by 'Oceangod Lines Ltd.', of Limassol with 'Vamvamare Inc.', also of Limassol, the managers. There is a reference that I do not fully understand yet - '[cpl at Helsingor Vft, Elsinore #287]. 'cpl' seems to mean 'completed by', while 'Helsingor Vft' appears to be the name ('Helsingor Vaerft'), of a Danish ship builder at Helsingør (in English 'Elsinore'), Denmark. It likely means that the vessel was towed to Elsinore for the installation of its engines. And a 1992 reference 'deleted 1992 (probably BU Greece 6.80)' which I think means that the vessel was likely broken up in Greece in Jun. 1980, but struck from the registers only in 1992. The vessel is in Lloyd's Register of 1990/91. Can anybody help with more data? And confirm the meaning of some of the data above. 

67 Dunstan
2993 tons
Hull 315

182457
5094991

Sallust
Dunstan
Basil
Christina
1948

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image Sallust), 1 (data & Dunstan image), 2 [Booth, Dunstan (4) & Basil (4)], 3 [Lamport, Sallust (2)], 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 343.8 ft. long (104.79 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, later 355 ft. 7 in. perpendicular to perpendicular, 357.8 ft. long (109.06 metres) overall, later 357 ft. 10 in. long overall, signal letters GDZD. Built for 'Booth Steamship Company Limited', i.e. 'Booth Line', of Liverpool. A sister ship to Denis. In 1946, 'Booth Line' was sold to the Vestey Group of companies. (I think that the above Booth data is correct.) The vessel was sold, in 1951, to Lamport & Holt Line Ltd. & renamed Sallust. In 1958 the vessel was 'returned' to 'Booth Line' & renamed Dunstan. The vessel, in 1966, was renamed Basil. And in 1967 it was sold to 'Cia Marítima Vlahoulis S.A.', of Panama, (E. P. Vlahoulis) & renamed Christina. The vessel was fire damaged on Jan. 3, 1969 when at Galveston, Texas. The vessel was condemned, & on Dec. 2, 1969 break up of the vessel commenced at Barranquilla, Columbia. WWW data is most limited. Can anybody help with more data?

68 Henzee
2372 later 3286 tons
Hull 310

182000
514829
5148297

Olga
Nestor
1948

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Henzee image), 2 (Euxine), 3 (Henzee image, also -01), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 317.6 ft. long (96.80 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, later 310 ft. 0 in. perpendicular to perpendicular, 330.3 ft. long (100.675 metres) overall, later 330 ft. 4 in. long overall, speed of 11 1/2 (have also read 12 & 16) knots, signal letters GBVD later SYVH. Sister to Hendrik. Built for 'Euxine Shipping Company Ltd.', of London with 'Brown, Jenkinson and Company Ltd.' and/or 'Weidner, Hopkins and Partners Ltd.', the managers? 'W. H. van der Zee', the owner. Would likely have served Egyptian (Alexandria) & other Mediterranean ports. In 1964, the vessel was sold to 'Olga Shipping Co. S.A.', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Olga, with 'D. Xanthopoulos & Co.' the manager. In 1969, the vessel was sold to 'Nestor Cia Naviera SA.', of Piraeus, 'D. Stratopoulos', the manager & renamed Nestor. It would appear that the vessel was sold in 1977 to Pakistani ship breakers 'for about $94.75 per L/T', (that quote likely incomplete). However, the vessel arrived, on Jul. 20, 1977, at the Eleusis, Greece, ship breaking facilities of Tzonis Ltd., to be broken up. I wonder what happened to change the arrangements? WWW data is most limited. Can anybody help with more data?

69 Sebaa
2226 (later 2228, 2205 & 2137) tons
Hull 308

502152
5021528

Docteur Laveran
Aragonese
Marianthi
1948

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('Delcampe', image, Docteur Laveran), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 283.0 ft. (86.26 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, later 283 ft. 1 in. and 278 ft. 10 in., 292 ft. 10 in. long (89.256 metres) overall, speed of 12 knots, signal letters FPUN later ICAG & 5BDM. Sister to Chateau Palmer. Built, it would seem, for 'Armement Giannoni-Rastit', of Marseilles - Lloyd's Register of 1949/50 states 'Giannoni Rastit' of Marseilles, to be the registered owner. Would likely have linked Marseilles with Algiers, Algeria, & other Mediterranean ports. In 1950, the vessel was sold to 'Societe Les Affrêteurs Maritimes Indochinois' ('Affrêteurs'), also of Marseilles, & renamed Docteur Laveran. In 1956, the vessel was sold to 'Soc. Anon. Gestioni Marittima S.p.A.', of Palermo, Sicily, & renamed Aragonese. The vessel was sold again, in 1967, to 'Twelve Islands Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Famagusta, Cyprus, & renamed Marianthi. On Sep. 28, 1969, the vessel arrived at the 'Lee Sing Co.' ship breaking facilities at Hong Kong, to be broken up. WWW data is virtually non-existent. Can anybody help with more data?

70 Alfa
2808 later 2641 tons
Hull 317

540178
5401780

Normundo
Willmar
Bodin
Good Hope
Pangri
Agni
1949

A cargo ship, strengthened for travel in ice. Per A (e-Bay negative, Willmar), 1 & 2 (Norwegian pages, data & image, Normundo & Bodin), 3 (Norwegian page, data & image, Bodin), 4 (data, Willmar, 80% down, & image above), 5 (image, Alfa, also -03), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 332.1 ft. (101.224 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, later 325' 0" & 99.07 metres, 346.3 ft. long (105.55 metres) overall, later 346 ft. 4 in. & 105.57 metres, speed of 11 1/2 or 12 knots, signal letters ELAM later LCGL & SVLO. Built for 'Alfred Falter Shipowner, Inc.', of Monrovia, Liberia, which company was owned by Alfred Falter (or maybe 'A. Falter & Company', of New York. The vessel was the first American-owned vessel to be built on the River Wear since WW2. Was intended to be chartered to Caltex for 10 years. In Jan. 1952, the vessel was presumably modified, became of 2641 tons only, was sold through 'Messrs. Thb. L. Engo, A/S', of Oslo, Norway, for U.S. $1,300,000 to 'Skibs A/S Skibsfart', of Farsund, Norway, 'Jacob Salvesen' the manager, & renamed Normundo. Taken over in May 1952. The vessel was chartered for 3 years & used in the West Indian (means West Indies?) trade. Was renamed Willmar in 1956. 'A/S Salvesen' became the owner in 1962. In May 1963, the vessel was sold to 'Jacob Sannes & Co.', of Bodö, Norway, & renamed Bodin. In 1965, the vessel was sold or maybe transferred to 'Skips A/S Bodin', also of Bodö, 'Jacob Sannes & Co.' the manager, with no change of vessel name. On May 28, 1966, while en route from Antwerp to Rotterdam, the vessel suffered an explosion & fire in its engine room. The fire took 2 hours to be extinguished. The vessel drifted ashore at Vlissingen (Flushing, Netherlands, at mouth of Scheldt River), & being seriously damaged, was condemned & sold 'as is' - in Jul. 1966, to 'Frangmouge Compañía Naviera SA', 'George Moundreas & Bros. S.A.' ('Moundreas') the managers, both of Piraeus, Greece. Above links however indicate that Moundreas were the owners. The vessel was presumably repaired, renamed Good Hope & registered at Panama. In 1973, the vessel was sold to 'Unimax Shipping Panama S.A.', Leandros Shipping Co. the managers, both of Piraeus, & renamed Pangri. The vessel was sold for the last time, in 1976, to 'AS Trader Maritime Co. Ltd.', of  Limassol, Cyprus, & renamed Agni. In Aug. 1977, the ship was sold to Pakistan ship breakers, & on Aug. 4, 1977, the vessel arrived at Gadani Beach, Pakistan, to be broken up. Can anybody help with more data?

71 Denis
2990 tons
Hull 316

182479
508864
5088643

Akrogiali
1949

A cargo ship. Per 1 (2 Denis images), 2 [Booth Line, Denis (2)], 3 (Denis image), 4 (image, Denis, also -01 & -02), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 343.8 ft. (104.79 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, later 335 ft. 7 in. (107.286 metres), 357.8 ft. long (109.06 metres) overall, later 357 ft. 9 in. (109.04 metres), speed of 10 (or 11 1/2) knots, carried 7 passengers, signal letters GFKK later ELDZ. Built for 'Booth Steamship Company Limited', of Liverpool. A sister ship to Dunstan. Built to carry goods & passengers to Manaos, Brazil, (River Amazon) from ports on the U.S. East Coast. In 1967, the vessel was sold to 'Vasmanto Shipping Co. S.A.', of Monrovia, Liberia, & renamed Akrogiali. The vessel was laid up, at Piraeus, from Apl. 10, 1971. On Feb. 15, 1972 the vessel arrived at the 'Margaritis & Sartamouns' ship breaking facilities at Perama, Piraeus, Greece, to be broken up. WWW data is most limited. Can anybody help with more data?

72 Loch Heilen
1600 tons
Hull 266

6102011

Morecambe Bay
Dom Francesco de Almeida
1949

A Loch Class frigate, K 624, designed for anti-submarine & escort duties, which became a Bay Class frigate, F 624. Per 1 (image 10% down), 2 (image - also available, i, ii, iii, iv), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Am most confused by what I read re this vessel. The vessel was laid down as Loch Heilen. 307 ft. 4 in. long (93.6 metres) overall, 87.2 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, complement of 114 (became 157 as Bay Class?), speed of 19 1/2 or 20 knots. Launched on Nov. 1, 1944. Its duties? The vessel was rebuilt & commissioned, on Feb. 22, 1949, as a Bay Class frigate, Morecambe Bay, F 624. Rebuilt by? Possibly John I. Thornycroft of Southampton but I am not sure of that. Then armed with four 4 inch anti-aircraft guns, six 40 mm Bofor's, two 20 mm Oerlikons, depth charges & a 'Hedgehog' mortar. The vessel served in the Korean War. Other duties over the years? The frigate was sold, on May 9, 1961, after a refit (at Thornycroft?), to the Portuguese Navy & renamed Dom Francesco de Almeida. It was deleted, likely means scrapped, on Sep. 7, 1970. Can you correct my data and/or add anything!

73 Loch Kilbirnie
1600 (or 1580) tons
Hull 267

6102010

Mounts Bay
Vasco da Gama
1949

A Loch Class frigate, K 627, designed for anti-submarine & escort duties, which became a Bay Class frigate, F 627. Per A (e-Bay image, Mounts Bay), 1 (data & service detail), 2 (image, Mounts Bay, many images available at the site), 3 (extensive data, Mounts Bay), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Laid down as Loch Kilbirnie. K 627, 307 ft. 4 in. (93.6 metres) long, speed of 20 knots, complement of 157 as Bay Class. Maybe was intended to be Luce Bay? Was launched on Jun. 8, 1945. First commissioned? Have read Apl. 11, 1944 & the same date in 1946. I read, however, that work was suspended in 1946 & a new contract to complete her build was placed with John I. Thornycroft, of Woolston, Southampton. She was transferred there on Mar. 20, 1946. A major delay! Her build was completed on Apl. 11, 1949, (or Aug. 11, 1949 per Miramar), as a Bay Class frigate, Mounts Bay, F 627. Then armed with four 4 inch anti-aircraft guns, six 40 mm Bofor's, two 20 mm Oerlikons, depth charges & a 'Hedgehog' mortar. Served in Korean War. Transferred to the West Indies Station & served in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic & Far East. See 1 for other duties over the years. Decommissioned & re-commissioned a number of times. Placed on reserve in May 1960 & not re-commissioned. The vessel was sold on May 9, 1961, after modernisation by John I. Thornycroft, to the Portuguese Navy & renamed Vasco da Gama. Portuguese service? Miramar refer to the vessel being deleted (from the lists) on Dec. 2, 1971. Was sold for demolition on Dec. 12, 1971. Can you correct my data and/or add anything!

74 Poole Island
1366 later 1357 tons
Hull 314

183109
5157547

Hydracrete
Bankstone
1949

A collier, which became a sand carrier or dredger. Per 1 (image, Hydracrete), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 224 ft. 4" (68.38 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 235 ft. 1" long (71.66 metres) overall, speed of 9 1/2 knots, signal letters MDJQ. With engines by 'The North Eastern Marine Engineering Company (1938) Limited' of Sunderland. The vessel was ordered by 'Coastwise Colliers Ltd.' ('Coastwise'), a company formed by 'Wm. France Fenwick and Co. Ltd.' & 'Stephenson Clarke Ltd.' re the chartering of vessels to 'County of London Electric Supply Co. Ltd.' - for the purpose of transporting coal to London power stations. But with the nationalization of the U.K. electricity industry in 1948, Coastwise went into liquidation, & British Electricity Authority ('Authority') took over the contract & took delivery of the vessel for use delivering coal to the Poole power station, in Poole, Dorset. Authority became 'Central Electricity Authority' in 1954 & 'Central Electricity Generating Board' in 1958. Wm. Cory & Son Ltd. were the vessel's managers. When the generating stations switched from coal to oil, colliers such as Poole Island became redundant. So in 1959, the vessel was sold, for about £35,000, to 'Associated Portland Cement Manufacturers Ltd.', of London, & renamed Hydracrete, with 'Blue Circle Shipping Co. Ltd.' ('BlueCircle'), also of London, the managers. In 1960, it was sold to BlueCircle, with no change of vessel name. In 1963, the vessel was sold to James Contracting & Shipping Co. Ltd., of London, & renamed Bankstone. And converted in 1963 (where I wonder) into a sand carrier or dredger, of 1357 gross tons. Re-engined to burn oil, with engines by Schps. L. Smit & Zoon, of Kinderdijk, Holland. In 1967, the vessel was sold to Westminster Gravels Ltd., also of London, with no change of vessel name. On Dec. 13, 1976, the vessel arrived at the ship breaking facilities of 'T. W. Ward Ltd.', at Gray's, Essex, to be broken up. Break up commenced in Mar. 1977. There are very few WWW references to the vessel. Can you add to or correct the above?

75 Poole Quay
1366 tons
Hull 312

183045
5369700

Snowcrete
Tris Ierarche
Georgios-G.
1949

A collier. Per 1 (image, Snowcrete), also -01), 2 (image, Georgios-G. wreck), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 227.3 ft. long (69.28 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, later 224 ft. 4 in. & 68.38 metres, 235 ft. 1" long (71.65 metres) overall, speed of 9 1/2 knots, signal letters GBVJ later SYFV & SV3346. The vessel attained about 12 knots at her trials. The vessel was ordered by 'Coastwise Colliers Ltd.' ('Coastwise'), a company formed by 'Wm. France Fenwick and Co. Ltd.' & 'Stephenson Clarke Ltd.' re the chartering of vessels to 'County of London Electric Supply Co. Ltd.' - for the purpose of transporting coal to London power stations. But with the nationalization of the U.K. electricity industry in 1948, Coastwise went into liquidation, & British Electricity Authority ('Authority') took over the contract & took delivery of the vessel for use delivering coal to the Poole power station, in Poole, Dorset. Authority became 'Central Electricity Authority' in 1954 & 'Central Electricity Generating Board' in 1958. When the generating stations switched from coal to oil, colliers such as Poole Quay became redundant. So in 1959, the vessel was sold, for about £35,000, to 'Associated Portland Cement Manufacturers Ltd.', of London, & renamed Snowcrete, with 'Blue Circle Shipping Co. Ltd.' ('BlueCircle'), also of London, the managers. To carry bulk cement around the U.K. coast. And it would seem that the vessel was then converted to burn oil. In 1960, it was sold to BlueCircle, Wm. Cory & Sons Ltd., the managers, with no change of name. In 1963, the vessel was sold, for about £20,000, delivery at the River Thames, to A. Gatzanis & E. Moraitis, of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Tris Ierarche. In 1972, the vessel was sold to 'Gabriil Theocaris & Alvertos', also of Piraeus, & renamed Georgios-G. In early Apl. 1978, the vessel was en route from Piraeus to Aqaba, (Al 'Aqabah), Jordan, with a cargo of flour. On Apl. 4, 1978, the vessel ran aground 60 miles short of its destination, 2 miles N. of Bir al Mashiya, Saudi Arabia, in the Gulf of Aqaba. The vessel was, I read, abandoned as a total loss. I have not read the circumstances. Any loss of life? The wreck is still there today, it would seem, a dive site though much of the vessel is out of the water. There are very few WWW references to the vessel. Can you add to or correct the above?

76 Cliff Quay
3357 later 3345 tons
Hull 319

183253
507602
5076028
1950

A collier. Per 1 & 2 (images, also -02 & -04), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 326.8 ft. long (99.61 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, later 320 ft. 7 in. & 97.72 metres, 338.9 ft. long (103.3 metres) overall, later 338 ft. 11 in. & 103.31 metres, speed of 10 or 10 1/2 knots, signal letters GFRX. Built for the British Electricity Authority. Which became the Central Electricity Authority in 1954 & the Central Electricity Generating Board in 1957. Stephenson Clarke Ltd. were the vessel's managers, later Stephenson Clarke Shipping Ltd. The vessel would have shipped coal from the North East to power stations in the S. of England. A regular visitor to Ipswich, Suffolk, presumably to the Cliff Quay Power Station then located there (it closed in 1985 & was demolished in 1994). On Nov. 16, 1983, the vessel arrived at the Manchester facilities of 'Stretford Shipbreakers Ltd.', to be broken up. Can anybody add anything?

77 Kypros
3499 tons
Hull 318

183765
519992
5199923

Aurania
Kypros
Angeliki
Angel
1950

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per 1 (Pickersgill 1951 advert featuring Kypros), 2 (Moss Hutchison, Kypros), 3 & 4 (images, Kypros), 5 (image Angeliki), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 354.2 ft. long (107.96 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, later 345 ft. 8 in. & 105.36 metres, 367.7 ft. long (112.075 metres) overall, later 367 ft. 8 in. & 112.07 metres, speed of 13 or 13 1/2 knots, signal letters GFLN. Built for Moss Hutchison Line Ltd. ('Moss'), of Liverpool. Served Moss's routes to eastern Mediterranean ports & maybe to the Black Sea also. The vessel was briefly chartered to Cunard Line for service to the Great Lakes, & for the duration of the charter, the vessel was renamed Aurania - which name reverted to Kypros at charter end. It must have been a very short charter indeed since both name changes were in 1967. In 1971, the vessel was 'transferred' to 'Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Co. Ltd.' ('P. & O.'), which company owned Moss, with no change of vessel name - managed by the General Cargo Division of P. & O. In 1976 the vessel was sold to 'Keanav Shipping Co. S.A.', of Piraeus, Greece, (have also seen 'Grecomar Shipping Agency', of Greece mentioned - the managers perhaps?), & renamed Angeliki. In 1981, the vessel was sold to 'Angel Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Valletta, Malta, 'Intercontinental Transport Management' likely the managers, & renamed Angel. On Apl. 30, 1982, the vessel arrived at the Beypore, India, ship breaking facilities of 'Steel Industrials Kerala Limited' ('Steel'), to be broken up. Have also seen i) the name 'Metal Scrap Trading Co. Ltd.' of Calcutta, India, referenced & ii) that the ship was allocated to Steel to be broken up. Beypore, on the Kerala coast, is quite a long way from Calcutta, however. Can anybody add anything?

78 Loch Mochrum
1640 (1580 when launched) tons
Hull 269

Pegwell Bay
Cook


6122709
1950

A Loch Class frigate, which became a Royal Navy survey ship. Per 1 & 2 (images, Cook, more there), 3 (service record, 1950/1964), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 87.2 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 93.6 metres long overall, speed of 20 knots. The vessel was ordered by the British Navy in 1943 as a Loch Class frigate, to be named Loch Mochrum. The keel was laid down on Nov. 30, 1944, in which year the ship was changed to be a Bay Class Frigate. It was launched on Sep. 1, 1945 as Pegwell Bay. After launch the Pickersgill contract was terminated & the ship was towed (when?) to HM Dockyard at Devonport to be completed as a Survey Vessel. It took a while! Work commenced in Feb. 1948 & on Jul. 20, 1950, the vessel was completed as HMS Cook, K638 A307, named after Captain James Cook (1728/79). (4 other Loch Class frigate hulls were similarly converted). Wikipedia states that the ship was equipped to deal with uncharted wrecks & mines around the British Isles as a result of WW2 & was fitted accordingly for minesweeping. But it would seem that it spent most of its life away from U.K. waters, in the Pacific (Fiji, New Zealand, Philippines), South China Sea (Singapore), West Africa, indeed over much of the world. The detail is all at 3. You might enjoy knowing that in late 1957 the ship's cat jumped ship. It went AWOL when it failed to re-join the ship & was found in HMS St. Brides Bay! Maybe the food was better there? More mice perhaps? On Oct. 1, 1963, the vessel grounded on coral at Suva, Fiji, & was badly holed forward - repaired & re-floated. In Feb. 1964 it was withdrawn from service & paid off in May 1964. The vessel was placed on the disposal list & on Apl. 2, 1968 was sold to BISCO for demolition. Was towed to Zeebrugge, Belgium, to be broken up. Can anybody add anything?

79 Lord Citrine
3357 later 3274 tons
Hull 321

184276
521183
5211836
1950

A cargo ship, a collier. Per 1 & 2 (images, also -05), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 326.8 ft. long (99.61 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, later 320 ft. 7 in., 338.9 ft. long (103.297 metres) overall, later 338 ft. 11 in., speed of 10 1/2 knots, signal letters MFTF. Built for British Electricity Authority ('BEA') & managed by Stephenson Clarke Ltd. Named, I presume for the then Chairman of the BEA. In 1954 BEA became the Central Electricity Authority which in 1957 became the Central Electricity Generating Board. The manager later became Stephenson Clarke Shipping Ltd. Would have shipped coal to power stations around the U.K. coast. On Sep. 12, 1972, the vessel arrived at the Bo'ness, (properly Borrowstounness), Scotland, ship breaking facilities of P. & W. MacLellan Ltd., to be broken up. Can anybody add anything?

80 Capitaine Louis Malbert
4259 later 4261 tons
Hull 323

5607724 (a few sites rather reference 5062340)
1951

A collier. Per 1 & 2 (data in French, image. There are many pages re the vessel at that site but I cannot spot an index to them all. I searched for the vessel name via Google), 3 (Allan Jensen Danish page re sinking, 2 images), 4 (3 translated), 5, 6, & 7, (all images), 8 & 9 (Roger Capelet painting), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 368.2 ft. long (112.23 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 380 ft. 11 in. long (116.10 metres) overall, speed of 12 1/2 knots, crew of 27, signal letters FNVB. Named after Louis Malbert, from 1924 to 1932 the Captain of tug Iroise, which tug was later owned by 'Union Industrielle et Maritime Société d'Armement Française' ('UIM'), of Paris & Rouen, France, the owners of Capitaine Louis Malbert.  A model of Capitaine Louis Malbert was sold at Christie's, South Kensington, London, on Nov. 11, 1999 for £598 incl. buyer's premium. The vessel was built for UIM. It mainly carried coal, but occasionally carried other cargoes such as phosphates, gypsum, or wheat. On Jan. 19, 1962, the vessel was in collision with Anita Dan, a Danish  2641 gross ton cargo ship, at 53.34.45N/6.03.40E, in the Frisian islands. Anita Dan, en route from Oulu, or Kotka, Finland, to Calais, France, with a cargo of wood pulp, was severely damaged & its forepart was flooded. It may have been beached. Nobody was hurt in the collision but 10 of the 23 person crew of Anita Dan were taken aboard Capitaine Louis Malbert. On the morning of Dec. 30, 1963, while en route, in dense fog, from Hartlepool to Aarhus, Denmark, with a cargo of coal, with Joseph Huet in command, the vessel was in collision with Rosborg, a Danish tanker, which, it would seem, buried its bow into the port side of Capitaine Louis Malbert. Rosborg was damaged but 'was not in danger'. At 57.02.367N/12.00.016E, 10 miles SW of Varberg, Sweden. Huet attempted to beach the vessel & in so doing vanished into the fog. The vessel sank 6 hours after the collision. Rosborg launched two lifeboats. Nine of the Capitaine Louis Malbert crew were speedily picked up by Russian trawler Primorsk, which later also picked up 8 crewmen of Rosborg, whose lifeboat had suffered an engine failure while searching for survivors. All 17 were landed at Copenhagen, Denmark. 5 more crew members of Capitaine Louis Malbert were rescued by Gapern & landed at Helsingborg, Sweden, while another 5 were taken aboard Rosborg. In the final analysis, 8 Capitaine Louis Malbert crew members, including Captain Huet, lost their lives with 6 only of the bodies being recovered. Captain Huet, it would seem, stayed with his ship to the very end. Those who were lost succumbed to the freezing sea, though I read that 4 or 5 of the 8 in fact froze to death in a lifeboat. The wreck would seem to be still on the sea bed today, in about 54 ft. of water, substantially intact but ex the ship's bell & compass which were salvaged. Was there an Inquiry into the 1963 collision? Allan Jensen has kindly advised (thanks Allan!) that a human skull was discovered in 2005 at the wreck site, which skull may well be that of Captain Joseph Huet. Now, thanks to the kindness of Birgitta Sadler, an approximate translation into English is available - of the related Swedish newspaper articles provided by Allan (8, 9 & 10). Can anybody clarify the vessel's Official Number or otherwise add anything?

81 Captain J. M. Donaldson
3357 later 3341 tons
Hull 324

184395
506284
5062845

Highland
1951

A collier. Per 1 (image, Captain J. M. Donaldson), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 326.8 ft. long (99.61 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, later 320 ft. 6 in., 338 ft. 11 in. long (103.30 metres) overall, signal letters MFTP. Built for British Electricity Authority, which became Central Electricity Authority in 1954 & Central Electricity Generating Board in 1957. Stephenson Clarke Ltd. were the vessel's manager. The vessel carried coal from the North East to power stations in the lower Thames River. In 1972, the vessel was sold, to 'Shipping & Coal Company Ltd.' of London, & renamed Highland. The vessel arrived at Gothenburg, Sweden, on Oct. 17, 1975, to be hulked. Do you know what later happened to the hulk? WWW available data is most limited. Can anybody help with more data?

82 Siddons
4459 later 4332 tons
Hull 328

185442
530159
5301590
6342-L

Rubens
Bernard
Rossini
Bernard
Berwell Adventure
Al Turab
1951

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per 1 [Lamport & Holt, Siddons (3)], 2 [Booth Lines, Bernard (4)], 3 (the 1st of 7 pages, Lamport & Holt history), 4 (vessel history), 5 (c.1953 painting of Siddons by Wallace Trickett), 6 (image, Siddons, & 4 more), 7 (image, Rubens & -04), 8 (image Bernard), 9 (image, Rossini), 10 (interesting Lamport & Holt page, in Spanish), 11 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 405 ft. 0 in. long (123.44 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, later 123.45 metres, 436 ft. 5 in. long (133.02 metres) overall, later 133.03 metres, speed of 15 knots, signal letters GPKZ later H31A. Did it carry any passengers? Built for Lamport & Holt Line Ltd. ('Lamport'), of Liverpool for their New York to Brazil & Buenos Aires, Argentina, service. In 1955 the vessel was renamed Rubens & traded between the U.K. & Brazilian ports. In 1965, the vessel, still owned by Lamport, was bare-boat chartered for 2 years to Booth Line, i.e. Booth Steamship Company Ltd. ('Booth'), & was renamed Bernard. At the end of the charter, in 1967, the vessel was renamed Rossini. Was chartered again by Booth, indeed transferred to their ownership, in 1970, & named Bernard for the second time. In 1973, the vessel was chartered to 'Sopac Bulk Carriers Co. Inc.' of Panama, & renamed Berwell Adventure. In 1974, the vessel was sold to 'Overseas Marines Corp.', of Panama (Gokal Group, the managers?). In 1975, the vessel was sold to Kelsey Bay Shipping Co. Ltd., also of Panama, 'Gulfwest Ship Management Ltd.', the managers, & renamed Al Turab. On Dec. 16, 1977, the vessel arrived at the Gadani Beach, Pakistan, facilities of 'Haideini Shipbreaking' to be broken up. And was broken up in Mar. 1978. Can anybody help with more data?

83 W. J. H. Wood
3357 later 3345 tons
Hull 325

184426
538432
5384322
5258-L

Calypso IV
Spring
1951

A collier. Per 1, 2, 3 (images, W. J. H. Wood), 4 (image, W. J. H. Wood, also -01 & -03), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 320 ft. 7 in. long (97.71 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, later 97.72 metres, 338 ft. 11 in. long (103.30 metres) overall, later 103.31 metres, speed of 10 1/2 knots, signal letters GMDG later 3ERZ. Built for British Electricity Authority, which became Central Electricity Authority in 1954 & Central Electricity Generating Board in 1957. Managed, initially at least, by 'Stephenson Clarke Shipping Ltd.' & later by Stephenson Clarke Shipping Ltd. I have not WWW spotted a biography of W. J. H. Wood (?/1955), an electrical engineer, after whom the vessel was named, but it is clear that he had a distinguished career in the history of electricity supply in the U.K., including service with the London Electricity Board & the County of London Electric Supply Company. The vessel carried coal from the North East to power stations in the lower Thames River. In 1971, the vessel was sold, for £22,000, to Marine Enterprises (Malta) Ltd., of London, with no change of vessel name. In 1972, the vessel was sold again, to 'Ulster Shipping Co.', of Panama City, Panama, & renamed Calypso IV. And in 1974 was sold to 'Copernik Shipping Co.', also of Panama City, & renamed Spring. On Jan. 27, 1979, the vessel arrived at the Trieste, Italy, ship breaking facilities of Sidemar SpA, to be broken up. WWW data, other than images, is most limited. Can anybody help with more data?

84 Framlington Court
5754 tons
Hull 329

184638
520450
1067
5204508
3628

Laxmi Jayanti
Spyros
1952

A cargo ship. Per 1 [data, Framlington Court (3)], 2 (image, Framlington Court, also -04 & -06), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). There is, as this page is updated, an e-Bay listing for an image of Framlington Court. But I must ask you to find it for yourself - the image bears a most intrusive 'logo' & I prefer not to link to it. 430 ft. 9 in. long (131.29 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 457 ft. 2 in. long (139.34 metres) overall, speed of 12 knots, signal letters GPDD later VWSK & SZNC. Built for Court Line Limited ('Court'), of London. Previously I have stated that it was built for 'United British Steamship Co. Ltd.', a subsidiary of Court, with Haldin & Company Ltd. ('Haldin'), of London, the managers. As per this reference. Certainly in 1957/58 Court were the registered owners & Haldin were the managers. Built at a difficult time, apparently, when freight rates dropped severely. A tramp ship. The vessel visited Auckland, New Zealand once only, on Jan. 30, 1953. The vessel was sold, in 1962, to 'Jayanti Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Bombay, India, & renamed Laxmi Jayanti. In 1967, 'Shipping Corp. of India', became the managers. On Nov. 25, 1969, the vessel put out a distress call in the S. China Sea, due to high winds from typhoon 'Nina'. The vessel was sold again, in 1970, to 'Padre Cia. Naviera S.A.', of Piraeus, Greece, 'A. Halcoussis', of London, the managers, & renamed Spyros. In May 1973, Spyros was en route from Karachi, Pakistan, to Chittagong, Bangladesh, with a cargo of 10,000 tons of bagged rice. The vessel suffered 'engine room leaks' when 200 miles E. of Madras, India. They must have been major leaks, indeed, because the vessel was abandoned at sea on May 10, 1973. The vessel was taken in tow, by Hariet, but sank while under tow, at 10.23N/84.17E, 240 miles SE of Madras, or NE of Sri Lanka. Hariet rescued also the entire crew of 27. Can anybody help with more data?

85 Clement
4300 (or 4472) tons
Hull 332

196204
521822
5218224

Malay Star
Malay
Mahsuri
Benedict
Renoir
Diamond Star
1953

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per 1 (Austasia Line, Malay), 2 (Lamport & Holt, Renoir, images), 3 (image, Malay), 4 (image, Mahsuri), 5 (image, Benedict), 6 (image Mahsuri, also -01 & -03), 7 (image Renoir, also -01, -02, -03), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 385 ft. 7 in. long (117.53 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 410 ft. 7 in. long (125.15 metres) overall, speed of 12 1/2 knots, signal letters VSNW, later GSQE, 3EJT & maybe PEXT. On her 3rd name by the time she was delivered! Was laid down as Clement for Booth Steamship Co. Ltd. ('Booth'), of Liverpool. The contract was taken over by Blue Star Line Limited ('BlueStar') & the vessel was launched as Malay Star. It was renamed Malay while being fitted out, & transferred & delivered as Malay to 'Austasia Line Ltd.' ('Austasia'), of Singapore. Austasia was formed by Vestey Bros., in 1962, to operate services from Singapore to Malaysian & Australian ports with intermediate calls in Indonesia. Austasia, Booth, BlueStar & 'Lamport & Holt Line Limited' ('Lamport') were all related companies. In 1964, the vessel was renamed Mahsuri. Of interest, a later Mahsuri was owned by 'Austasia Line (Private) Ltd.' In 1966, the vessel was transferred to Booth, renamed Benedict, & used for their Brazil & Amazon service. In 1967, the vessel was bareboat chartered to Lamport & was renamed Renoir for the duration of the charter. In 1971, the vessel was sold to 'Starlight Steamship Co. S.A.', of Panama, & renamed Diamond Star. In 1973, it was sold to 'Minlex Navigation S.A.', of Panama, who soon sold it for scrap. The vessel was laid up at Kaohsiung, Taiwan for a while. On Oct. 12, 1973, the vessel arrived at the Suao, or Su-Ao, Taiwan, facilities of 'Tung Ho Steel Works', presumably owned by 'Tung Ho Steel Enterprise Corporation', to be broken up. WWW data for this vessel is really quite limited. Can anybody help with more data?

86 Jersey Dawn
5342 & 7487, later 7353, later 5007 & 7226 (per Miramar 5319) tons
Hull 330

185971
516809
5168091

Jalagovind
Stalo
Thomas K.
1953

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Morel Ltd., Jersey Dawn), 2 [Scindia Steam Navigation, Jalagovind (1)], 3 (image, Jalagovind), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 420 ft. 0 in. long (128.02 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 447 ft. 11 in. long (136.53 metres) overall, speed of 12 1/2 (or 13) knots, signal letters VWDW, later 5B2079 & SVEJ. Built for Morel Limited, of Cardiff, Wales, but registered at London. The 'Morel' family originated in Jersey, Channel Islands, hence 'Jersey' in the name. In 1956, the 'Morel' fleet of 3 vessels was sold & the company was wound up, (Jersey Spray & Jersey Mist were the other two vessels). The vessel visited Auckland, New Zealand, once, on Jun. 6, 1954. In 1956, Jersey Dawn was sold, for £850,000, to 'Scindia Steam Navigation Co. Ltd.', of Bombay, India, & renamed Jalagovind. In 1970, the vessel was sold again, to 'Vasha Cia. Naviera S.A. of Panama', & renamed Stalo. Became registered at Famagusta, Cyprus, in 1972. In 1974, the vessel was sold for the last time, to 'Landsdowne Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Thomas K. The vessel was sold for scrap at a price in the region of $77 per L.d.t., & on Mar. 29, 1980, the vessel arrived at the Kaohsiung, Taiwan, facilities of Lung Ching Steel Enterprise Co., to be broken up. WWW data is limited. Can anybody help with more data?

87 Reynolds
6247 tons
Hull 333

185920
5159739

Imtiazbaksh
1953

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Reynolds), 1 [Bolton Steam, Reynolds (4)], 2 [Bolton Steam, Reynolds (4)], 3 (data & images, Reynolds), 4 (image), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 430 ft. 6 in. long (131.22 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 457 ft. 6 in. long (139.45 metres) overall, speed of 11 1/2 knots, signal letters GQNG later AQLK. 3 advises that the vessel was the last riveted ship to be built at the 'Pickersgill' yard. Built for 'Bolton Steam Shipping Company Ltd.', of London, operators of tramp ships named after artists beginning with the letter 'R'. The vessel was sold, in 1961, to 'United Oriental Steamship Company Limited', of Karachi, Pakistan & renamed Imtiazbaksh. On May 15, 1976, the vessel arrived at the Gadani Beach, Pakistan, ship breaking facilities of 'Khetran SB & Industrial Dev. Corp.' (the full correct name?) to be broken up. WWW data is quite limited. Can anybody help with more data?

88 Baron Ardrossan
5254 (later 5254 & 7234) tons
Hull 335

180208
503705
5037058
2765

Aliakmon
1954

A cargo ship. Per 1 [H. Hogarth, Baron Ardrossan (5)], 2 (image, Baron Ardrossan, also -04), 3 (4 images, Baron Ardrossan), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 410 ft. 9 in. long (125.20 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 436 ft. 7 in. long (133.07 later 133.08 metres) overall, speed of 12 1/2 knots, signal letters MSKP later SVQH. Built for Hogarth Shipping Co. Ltd. (Henry Hogarth & Sons Ltd. the managers) i.e. 'Baron Line', of Glasgow, but the ship was registered at Ardrossan, Ayrshire, Scotland. The owners of the Baron Line had, at one time, I read, a reputation for being 'economical' when feeding their crews, and, as a result, the line was nicknamed the 'Hungry Hogarths'. In 1966, the vessel was transferred to H. Hogarth & Sons Ltd. of Ardrossan. The vessel was sold, also in 1966, to Empros Lines Shipping Co. Special S.A., of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Aliakmon. From Aug. 24, 1975, the vessel was laid up at Chalkis, island of Euboea, Greece. She was sold for scrap at about $48 per L/T, & in late 1977, arrived at the Piraeus ship breaking facilities of Frantzeskos Yard to be broken up. Break up commenced on Nov. 21, 1977. WWW data is limited. Can anybody help with more data?

89 Ramon de Larrinaga
5818 later 5611 & 8025, later 8086 tons
Hull 334

185480
528978
5289780
321500

Marianna
Marian
1954

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Larrinaga Line, Ramon de Larrinaga (4)], 2 & 3 (images, Ramon de Larrinaga, also 04, 06 & 07), 4 (image, Ramon de Larrinaga), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 430 ft. 0 in. long (131.06 later 131.07 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 457 ft. 2 in. long (139.34 later 139.36 metres) overall, speed of 12 knots, signal letters GRLT later 5BUK, registered at Liverpool. Built for 'Larrinaga Steamship Company Limited', of Liverpool, which had, over time, 5 vessels of the name. Launched by Mrs. Ramon de Larrinaga. It would seem that the vessel was chartered thru to 1966, when a monthly service to Mombasa, Kenya, was commenced. The vessel ran aground in St. Mary's River, S. of Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada & Michigan, U.S.A. In or about 1957. The vessel saved the crew of a burning tanker. But which tanker? And when? (data is often located in Google Books 'snippets' with complete detail hidden). On May 3, 1959, the vessel arrived at Duluth/Superior, the first ocean going ship to arrive there via the just opened St. Lawrence Seaway. The vessel was sold, in 1969, to 'Elxis II Maritime Corp. S.A.', of Piraeus, Greece, 'Nicolaos Leondaras et al' the managers, & renamed Marianna. The vessel was sold again, in 1971/2, to 'Explorer Maritime Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Cyprus, N. Leondaras & P. Kallikis, the managers, & renamed Marian. The vessel suffered engine trouble when leaving Lisbon, Portugal, on Mar. 26, 1976. And the Portuguese Authorities decided that she be towed out to sea. Where she foundered off Cascais, on Mar. 27, 1976. At 38.31N/09.38W. But Robert & Christine Wilson indicated, at a site which no longer contains the data, that there was much much more to the story. The vessel was, it would seem, abandoned at Lisbon in early 1976 following engine trouble. At the time she was loaded with 10,000 tons of cement, en route from Rostock, Germany, to the Persian Gulf. The cement solidified while the ship lay derelict at Lisbon. No wonder she had to be sunk at sea! It would seem that there is loads of material about Ramon de Larrinaga in the Maritime Archives & Library of National Museums, Liverpool. Can you add anything?

90 Welsh Trader
5671 tons
Hull 331

186124
5211185

Rookley
London Breeze
Golden Bridge
Song Thu Bon
Song
1954

A cargo ship. Per 1 (image, Welsh Trader), 2 (image, but you must be registered to see it), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 136.3 metres long overall, 128.2 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 12 knots, signal letters MTMC. Built for Trader Navigation Co. Ltd., (Trader Line), of London. In 1958, the vessel was chartered to R. S. Dalgliesh Limited, of Newcastle. In 1961, the vessel was sold to Avon Steamship Co. Ltd., of Newcastle, (Stephen Sutton), & renamed Rookley. In 1963, the vessel was sold to Carrington Navigation Co. Ltd., of Hong Kong, J. Manners & Co. ('Manners'), & renamed London Breeze. There was a further change of owner without a change of the vessel's name - in 1964 to Cambay Prince Steamship Co. Ltd., also Manners, of Hong Kong. Roger Biggs advises, (thanks Roger!) that he served as Chief Officer of the vessel in early 1965 & left her late in that year. At that time, the vessel's hull, especially in the rudder area, was in poor condition & the hatch covers were rusted through, the owners declining, however, to undertake repairs. The vessel carried a cargo of fertiliser from Venice to China, where she was detained for some months due to safety & political issues. The vessel was sold, in 1970, to Hong Kong South Sea Shipping Co. Ltd. ('HKSouthSea'), of Hong Kong, Guan Guan Shipping likely the managers, & renamed Golden Bridge. In 1972, the vessel was registered at Mogadishu, Somalia, in the name of 'Thio Keng Leng' & in 1976, the vessel reverted to HKSouthSea now registered at Panama City, Panama. In 1977 the vessel was owned by Golden Star Shipping Ltd., also of Panama. Later in 1977, the vessel was sold to Vietnam Coastal Shipping Co. of Haiphong, Vietnam, & renamed Song Thu Bon (or Song Huong). The vessel was sold for the last time, in 1980, & was renamed Song. Later in 1980, it was sold to German interests, but was resold to Taiwanese ship breakers, through the 'intervention' of Jacq. Pierot Jr. & Sons of New York in circumstances of which I am not aware. They would seem, however, to have sold many vessels to ship breakers & were presumably agents specialised in such a role. On Jun. 3, 1980, the vessel arrived at the Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ship breaking facilities of First Copper & Iron Industrial Co. Ltd., to be broken up. For a quite recent ship, WWW data is most limited. We thank Miramar for much of the above data. Can anybody help with more data?

91 Kellington
360 tons
Hull 349

5329671
1955

A 'Ton' Class auxiliary minesweeper. Intended to counter seabed mines laid in shallow coastal waters, rivers, ports & harbours. Per 1 (Jan. 9, 2008, to be scrapped), 2 & 3 (Kellington Association), 4, 5 & 6 (images), 7 (data & images), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 153 ft. long, speed of 12 knots, constructed of wood & other non-ferromagnetic materials. HMS Kellington (CMS 54) was named after the village of Kellington in N. Yorkshire. Minesweeping equipment was installed at Royal Naval Base, HMS Diligence, at Hythe. The vessel had a crew of 38, & was armed with a Bofors 40 mm gun. Based at Malta in Mar. 1956, she served for about 3 months on patrols around Cyprus. The vessel returned to Portland & in Jan. 1957 joined the Reserve Fleet at Hythe. Remained in the Reserve Fleet until Jul. 1962, when towed to Devonport Dockyard for extensive refitting. The decision had been made to convert her to a mine hunter. In May 1967, the vessel was towed to Chatham to be so converted. On Jun. 6, 1969 re-commissioned (M1154) & joined the Fishery Protection Squadron based at HNS Lochinvar at Port Edgar, Firth of Forth. To South Queensferry, also Firth of Forth, on Jul. 31, 1969. 'For the next 6 years she was constantly on patrol round the UK.' On Nov. 16, 1976, the vessel was transferred to Sussex Division of Royal Naval Reserve, refitted at Portsmouth &, as part of the Channel Group, was involved in NATO  mine counter measure exercises, including those based in Gibraltar. On Apl. 1, 1977, the vessel returned to the Navy. Was de-commissioned in 1993 & became headquarters for the Sea Cadet unit at Stockton-on-Tees, T.S. Kellington. (T.S. means Training Ship) In 1999, the vessel was sold to them for £2,000. Known as 'Special K'. Out of use in 2005 due to health & safety concerns. It was hoped that a way would be found to preserve the vessel. But Harold Appleyard advises, (thanks!) that all preservation possibilities were exhausted & the vessel was demolished, at her berth at Stockton, in 2009. Can anyone add anything?

92 Richard de Larrinaga
5841 tons
Hull 337

185517

Adamandios
Fong Min
1955

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Larrinaga Line, Richard de Larrinaga (3)], 2 (Larrinaga history, ref. to vessel 85% down), 3 (image, Richard de Larrinaga, more available), 4 (many images, Richard de Larrinaga, but you must now be registered to see them), 5 (Richard Williams, longshoreman, injured Jan. 1958), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 139.4 metres long overall, 131.1 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 12 1/2 knots, signal letters GSXB. Built for 'Larrinaga Steamship Company, Limited', a tramp ship company, of Liverpool. It would seem that the vessel traded all over the world. In 1966/67, the vessel was under charter to Elliniki (Hellenic) Lines, of Greece. A 'snippet' reference to the ship being the first to arrive, in 1969, at Churchill, Manitoba, after the freeze up. On Jan. 23, 1958, when the ship was at South Norfolk, Virginia, Richard Williams, a longshoreman, was seriously injured while attempting to raise a hatch cover section. His claim against the ship & its owners was not successful. In 1966, coming out of Beaumont, Texas, the vessel ran aground, but I have not read the circumstances. In Oct. 1967, the vessel, chartered to Anglo Canadian (Westships) Ltd., carried a cargo which included timber & zinc/lead ingots from North Vancouver & New Westminster, both British Columbia, Canada, to Belfast & Avonmouth. The vessel was sold, in 1970, to 'Diamandis Eidiki Anonymos Naftiliaki Etaireia', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Adamandios. The vessel was sold again, in 1974, for about $885,000, to 'Min Sei Nav Corp.', of Panama, & renamed Fong Min. On May 27, 1975, the vessel suffered fire damage, but I have not read where or the circumstances. Can anybody tell us? The damage was presumably major because, on Mar. 15, 1976, the vessel arrived at the Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ship breaking facilities of 'Zui Ho Steel Enterprise Co. Ltd. et al' to be broken up. There is very little data WWW available about this ship. Miramar indicates that the vessel was initially of 7967 gross tons & became 5841 tons only in 1970. I have assumed that data to be in error. Can you help with additional data?

93 Sir Johnstone Wright
3382 tons
Hull 340

186331
5329671

Fanis
1955

A cargo ship, a collier. Per A (e-Bay image, Sir Johnstone Wright), 1 (fine image, Sir Johnstone Wright, bottom of page), 2 (brief data ref., 85% down), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). While there are images of the vessel at a number of web sites, I do not provide links since you must register at each one to see the image. I try not to impose on site visitors in this way. 339 ft. 0 in. long (103.33 metres) overall, 320 ft. 0 in. long (97.54 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 knots, signal letters GSMY. Built for 'Central Electricity Authority', which in 1957 became 'Central Electricity Generating Board', of London, for use on spring tides to Shoreham (Power Station in Sussex), otherwise to stations on the Thames estuary. Shipped coal from the north of England to power stations in the U.K. south, it would seem. Stephenson Clarke Ltd, of London, was the vessel's manager in 1957/58. Later 'Stephenson Clarke Shipping Ltd.' was the manager. The vessel was sold, in 1976, to 'Christincoast Cia Naviera SA', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Fanis. On Nov. 22, 1984 the vessel arrived at the 'Chalivdemporiki EPE' ship breaking facilities at Aspropyrgos (20 miles NW of Athens, Greece) to the broken up. An e-Bay item indicated that the break up period ran from Dec. 12 1984 thru Feb. 15, 1985. The vessel was, it would appear, named for Sir Johnstone Wright (1883/1953), a distinguished engineer who served as President of the Institution of Electrical Engineers. WWW data is most limited. Can you add anything?

94 André Masset
4195 tons
Hull 341

5016468

Léon Mazzella
Nafsika L.
1956

A cargo ship. Per 1 (French page, André Masset), 2 (Link #1, translated), 3 (2nd French page, André Masset), 4 (Link #3 translated), 5 (French, André Masset vessel movements), 6 (drawing by Roger Chapelet), 7 & 8 (images, André Masset), 9 (image, André Masset, but you must be registered to see it), 10 (medal, André Masset), 11 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Sister to Capitaine Rio (1 & 2). There is a postcard image of André Masset at 'Delcampe'. But forgive me for inviting you to find the auction listing for yourself - the image bears an intrusive logo, which I prefer not to reward with a link. 115.0 metres (377 ft. 3 in.) long overall, 109.1 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 13 knots, crew of 27 all told, signal letters FORM. Launched by Mme. Jean Masset, representing her stepmother, Mrs. Eugene Masset, wife of the Chairman of 'Union Industrielle et Maritime Soc. Francaise d'Armement' ('Union'), of Paris, or maybe of Rouen or Dunkirk. Vessel registered at Rouen. The launch did not go smoothly - the vessel got stuck in the mud after its launch & it took 4 hours to free her! An ore & coal carrier, built for Union, a company noted for the carriage of phosphates, minerals generally, coal, etc. On Jul. 12, 1968, the vessel was sold to 'Armement Léon Mazella & Compagnie', of Bayonne, France, & renamed Léon Mazzella. And was sold again, in 1973, to 'Astrofeliz Compania Naviera SA' or 'Astrofeliz Compania Naviera de l'Armement Stef. Lambrou SA', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Nafsika L. On Feb. 23, 1982, the vessel arrived at the 'Eisen u.Metall AG' ship breaking facilities at Hamburg, Germany, to the broken up. WWW data is quite limited. A medal, 48 mm in size, was issued re the launching of the vessel, see left & link above. The vessel was named in memory of André Masset, an aviator who died in aerial combat & was awarded both the Military Medal & the Croix de Guerre. WW1 perhaps? Can anybody tell us about him? And was the Masset of Union, referred to above, related to him? Can you add to and/or correct the above?

95 Dartwood
6139 tons
Hull 339

187344
5086669

Spalmatori Captain
Princess Aquamarine
1956

A cargo ship. Per 1 & 2 (images, Dartwood), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 139.4 metres long overall, 131.1 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 457 ft., speed of 12 knots. I read that plans of the vessel were published in the Oct. 1955 edition of 'The Motor Ship'. Built for William France, Fenwick & Co. Ltd. ('Fenwick'), of London. That company primarily carried coal from the north east to London, but Dartwood would seem to have made a number of voyages to Canada, particularly to the St. Lawrence River, to Montreal, Quebec City & Three Rivers, & to Newfoundland also, it would seem. Likely still in the coal trade. On Jul. 9, 1962, Captain William Manson, MBE, senior master in the Fenwick fleet & the Master of Dartwood, died at age 61 aboard the ship & was buried at sea. In 1969, the vessel was sold for about £32,000, to Spalmatori Cia Naviera SA, of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Spalmatori Captain. And was sold again, in 1974, to 'Aquamarine Nav. SA', of Panama, & renamed Princess Aquamarine. On Jun. 28, 1979, the vessel arrived at the 'Lung Shing Steel Enterprise Co.' ship breaking facilities at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, to the broken up. WWW data is most limited. Can you add anything?

96 Rossetti
4538 (or 4693) tons
Hull 343

187143
5401792

Boniface
Rossetti
Boniface
Amaryllis
Zefyros
1956

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per 1 [Lamport & Holt, Rossetti (2)], 2 [Booth Line, Boniface (3)], 3 (Lamport & Holt history), 4 (Lamport & Holt history thru 1936), 5 (image Rossetti, also -01 & -03), 6 (image, Boniface), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 133.0 metres long overall, 123.5 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 15 knots, signal letters GVMX. Built for 'Lamport & Holt Line Ltd.' ('Lamport'), of Liverpool. Which company was noted for naming its ships after famous artists, poets, & authors. Hence Rossetti, named, I presume, after 'Dante Gabriel Rossetti' (1828/1882), an English artist, poet, illustrator & translator. The vessel was chartered to Booth Steamship Company Ltd. ('Booth'), i.e. Booth Line, in 1963, for service between Liverpool, the West Indies & the Amazon, & for the duration of the charter, the vessel was renamed Boniface. The vessel reverted to Lamport & the name reverted to Rossetti. Similarly, the vessel was chartered to Booth again in 1970, & again was renamed Boniface for the period of charter. Hence the sequence of vessel names at left. But do I record the facts correctly? In 1970 the vessel may well have become owned by rather than chartered by Booth. Can anybody clarify? Note that Lamport & Booth were both, it would seem, owned by the Vestey Group. In 1974, (Miramar states 1973), the vessel was sold (by Lamport or Booth?) to 'Hydra Navigation Co. Ltd.', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Amaryllis. And was sold again, in 1978, to 'Imerama SA', also of Piraeus, & renamed Zefyros. On Aug. 22 (or Aug. 27), 1979, the vessel arrived at the 'Nan Jong Iron & Steel Co.' ship breaking facilities at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, to be broken up. WWW data is really quite limited. Can you add anything?

97 Stanwear
8108 tons
Hull 342

187516
5338440

Lady Era
1956

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Stanhope Steamship, Stanwear), 2 (Billmeir/Stanhope, image Stanwear), 3 (image, Stanwear, also -01, -03 & -04), 4 (fine image, Lady Era, & data), 5 & 6 (wreck images, Lady Era), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 139.6 metres long overall, 131.1 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 457 ft. 3 in. overall, speed of 13 knots, signal letters GVRT. Built for 'Stanhope Steamship Co. Ltd.' ('Stanhope'), of London, which company was owned by J. A. Billmeir. In 1952, Stanhope went into voluntary liquidation, but continued to trade until 1960. In 1964, Stanhope was sold to George Nott Industries Ltd., of Coventry. (I wonder what happened to Stanwear, between 1960 & 1964). In 1966, the vessel was sold to 'Oceanic Freighters Corp.' of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Lady Era. In Nov. 1977, the vessel left Avonmouth for Port-Cartier, (39 miles SW of Sept-Îles (Seven Islands), Quebec, Canada, in ballast, likely to load a cargo of iron ore. On Dec. 1, 1977, the vessel dragged its anchor & was wrecked. At 50.00.40N/66.50.48W, off Port-Cartier. I have not found a WWW account of the circumstances but from data 'snippets' it would seem that the vessel was at anchor about a mile off Rayonier Dock, Port-Cartier. During a severe snowstorm, presumably with very high seas, certainly 12 ft. swells & gale force winds hindered rescue efforts. The vessel dragged its anchor & ran aground in 11 ft. of water, the engine room & holds Nos. 4 & 5 soon flooded & the ship developed a 12° list. A day later the crew abandoned the vessel, which became a constructive total loss. Presumably no loss of life. The wreck is still there today, indeed it is a tourist attraction. Can you add to or correct the above?

98 Naess Trader
6853 tons
Hull 354

187263
5245538

Zapata Trader
Cora
Zapata Trader
1957

An ore carrier which later became a drill ship. Per 1 & 2 (images, Naess Trader), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 430 ft. long, speed of 11 knots. Built for 'Inverness Shipping Co. Ltd.' ('Inverness'). The limited WWW record for this vessel is, to the webmaster at least, most confusing. I have seen references to 'Naess Denholm and Co. Ltd.', of Glasgow, Scotland, owning the ship & 2 would seem to indicate that 'J. & J. Denholm, Ltd.' also owned the vessel. All interrelated, possibly? It would seem that the vessel was laid up for a while at Falmouth. Inverness were surely involved thru 1972 since the vessel was sold, in 1972, by 'Inverness Shipping Co. (Bermuda) Ltd.', (Denham Ship Management Ltd., the managers), to 'Zapata North Sea Ltd.' of Panama. The vessel, in 1973, was renamed Zapata Trader. There would appear to have been only one vessel of that name - a drill ship. The vessel must then have been most extensively converted to have become a drill ship. See the thumbnail at left. That image originates from a PowerPoint presentation here should you wish to access it. Colin Meiklejohn has advised (thanks!) that the vessel was converted into a drill ship at Port Arthur, Texas, in 1973/74. The vessel was to be contracted to 'Exxon' but that contract had to be scrubbed due to the vessel's late delivery. Instead it first went into action as a drill ship off the coast of Louisiana. Colin indicates also that there was an issue with visibility from the bridge - a matter thought to be solved by the installation of a full submarine periscope - which never worked in practice since the lens & scope filled up with barite & cement dust. The vessel could drill in water up to 600 ft. deep & was involved in drilling activities in Alaska, Chile, Columbia & probably many other places. Steve Smolar has advised (thanks Steve!) that he served aboard the drill ship from Dec. 1979 to May 1980. It was then owned & operated by 'Zapata Offshore Drilling Co.' ('ZapataOffshore'), contracted out, at $35,000 a day, to 'Petróleos Mexicanos' (Pemex), & drilling just off Isla Isabela, close to Isla Marías off the coast of the state of Nayarit, Mexico. In May 1980, when the contract had ended, the ship was sold to Pemex, renamed Cora, & registered at Panama. In 1983, ZapataOffshore bought the ship back from Pemex & changed its name back to Zapata Trader. The vessel was broken up at Singapore, in 1987. WWW data is most limited. And I am not certain of much of the above, assembled from 'snippets' of data. Can you correct the above and/or add anything more?


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