THE SUNDERLAND SITE - PAGE 054
SHIPBUILDERS - PAGE 12

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Copyright? (100) Test.

On this page ... William Doxford Page 3, page bottom (messenger pigeon medal).

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Corrections in any of the material which follows, however tiny, would be most welcome. And additions, of course!

WILLIAM DOXFORD (1840/1875?)
WILLIAM DOXFORD AND SONS (1875?/1890)
WILLIAM DOXFORD AND SONS LIMITED (1891/1957)
WILLIAM DOXFORD & SONS (SHIPBUILDERS) LIMITED (1957/ )

(OF COX GREEN, THEN PALLION, SUNDERLAND)

This is the 3rd 'Doxford' page, made necessary by the increasing number of listings re 'Doxford' built vessels. The first page, with the first 100 vessels, is available here. And the 2nd & 4th pages, are here & here.

Build lists? A list of 'Doxford' built vessels is now on site, at page 143. Miramar lists, (highest hull number on page). It used to be that you could click on the links that follow & get to the relevant Miramar page. But no longer! The new procedure must be to go to Miramar (here) & log in (you must be registered to view any page). And once you are logged in, return to this page & all the following links should work for you:- 30, 60, 108, 119, 149, 179, 209, 239, 270, 299, 329, 362, 389, 419, 450, 495, 515, 546, 594, 627, 656, 686, 716, 746, 792, 818, 889, 870. (889) And a list of all of the Doxford built vessels is here (including those built at the Doxford yard in its later years after it was taken over) thanks to Fred Gooch & John Bage.

Names of just a few more of the vessels constructed by William Doxford & Sons of Sunderland - as I happen to spot references to them. In a table in build date sequence. And alphabetic within a year. But just a start!

201 Stonegate
5044 tons
Hull 585

149970
1928

A cargo ship. Per 1 (5/10 1939, sinking), 2 (Turnbull Scott history, 50% down), 3 (voyage of City of Flint), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Stonegate, but I cannot check the link), 5 (image, Stonegate), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 125.0 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 410 ft., speed of 10 knots. Built for Turnbull Scott Shipping Company Limited, a tramp ship company, of London. I have read that her maiden voyage was to Rio de Janeiro with coal, returning with River Plate grain to the Continent. Just a single WW2 convoy reference - KJ.2 ex Jamaica on Sep. 26, 1939. In late Sep. 1939, Stonegate was in an E. bound convoy out of Jamaica, en route from Antofagasta & Valparaiso, both Chile, to Alexandria, Egypt, with a cargo of nitrates. On Oct. 3, 1939, the vessel detached from the convoy. On Oct. 5, 1939, it was torpedoed & sunk by gunfire from Deutschland, a German cruiser/pocket battleship. At 31.10N/ 54.00W, which seems to 700 miles (many other distances are referenced) ESE of Bermuda. Miramar refer to the ship being 'scuttled', however, Can anybody explain? Does that really apply in this case? The crew or crew survivors were taken aboard Deutschland before the vessel was despatched. A few days later, on Oct. 9, 1939, Deutschland captured City of Flint, a U.S. (& neutral) merchant vessel. On Oct. 15, 1939, 38 men, part of the crew of Stonegate, were transferred to City of Flint, along with an armed 21 man German guard. City of Flint went on to Tromsø, a neutral N. Norwegian port, where the Stonegate crew were released on Nov. 8, 1939. It would seem that lives may have been lost in the Stonegate sinking in view of references to the 38 being 'a part' of the crew. But .. the webmaster has also seen a reference to Stonegate having aboard survivors from an unnamed British vessel that sank with the loss of 15 lives. Can you clarify the facts? And tell us more?

202 June
4323 tons
Hull 594

162762 (later)

Essex Oak
Ridley
Redgate
Basilisk
Missouri Maru
Loong Kang
1929

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data & image (left), Loong Kang), 2 & 3 (Basilisk, damaged in 1950, additional images available), 4 (Turnbull Scott, Redgate 1937, 70% down), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Redgate, but I cannot check the link), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 112.9 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 437.7 ft., speed of 10 knots. Built for Hans Hannevig, possibly of Asgaardsstrand, Norway.  In 1932, the vessel was sold to Essex Oak Ltd., of London, (Meldrum & Swinson the managers) & renamed Essex Oak. It was sold soon again, in 1933, to 'The Red "R" Steamship Co. Ltd.' (Stephens Sutton, of Newcastle, the managers) & renamed Ridley. And was sold again, in 1936, to Redgate Steamship Company Ltd. (Turnbull Scott Shipping Co. the managers) & renamed Redgate. I read that Redgate was discharging cargo at Shanghai, China, in Aug. 1937 when the Sino-Japanese War broke out. The Chinese authorities threw a boom across the Whangpoo river to prevent penetration of the harbour by Japanese submarines & Redgate remained incarcerated at Dollar Wharf, Pootung, for 20 weeks until she finally gained her freedom via a gap pierced by the Japanese Navy during their attack on Nantao. After drydocking at Shanghai, she finally sailed on Jan. 10, 1938 for Colombo, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). 99 WW2 convoy references including maybe 16 North Atlantic crossings, service to Mediterranean (Port Said, Malta, Naples, Augusta), to W. Africa, (Freetown & Takoradi), Caribbean & Canada, & many UK local voyages. In 1947, the vessel was sold to British Anthracite Sales Ltd. (Sir James German & Sons, of Swansea, the managers) & renamed Basilisk. On Jul. 21, 1950, the vessel, with a cargo of grain & in thick fog, ran onto rocks on the Island of Swona, Pentland Firth. She backed herself off, but was badly damaged & taking in water. She was located by the Thurso lifeboat & piloted to Scrabster where temporary repairs were effected. The vessel was sold, in 1951, to 'Dai-ichi Kisen KK', of Japan, & renamed Missouri Maru. It was sold for the last time, prior to Jun. 1964, to Fong Shing Shipping Co., of Panama, & renamed Loong Kang. On Dec. 11, 1967, while en route from the Philippines to Japan, the vessel hit a submerged object & had to be beached at Divilacan Bay, Luzon, Philippines. It must have been a substantial object! The vessel was re-floated on Jun. 8, 1968, declared a constructive total loss, & was broken up at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, in Jul. of 1968. Can you tell us more?

203 Triglav
6363 tons
Hull 595
1929

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('uboat.net', sinking, Triglav), 2 (landed at Gibraltar etc.), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 425 ft. (about 135 metres) long. Built for 'Jugoslavenski Lloyd Akcionarsko Drustvo', Baburizza & Co., the managers, of Zagreb, Yugoslavia. Homeport was Dubrovnik. On Jul. 9, 1942, the vessel was en route from Lourenço Marques, Mozambique, to New York via Lobito, Angola, with a cargo of manganese ore & zinc concentrates. Unaccompanied, the vessel was hit by 2 torpedoes fired by U-66, & sank after a boiler explosion. At 26.47N/48.10W, about 800 miles ESE of the Bermudas. 24 lives were lost, (23 crew & a gunner). 19 are said to have survived, were questioned by U-66 & later (date seems to be unknown) landed at Gibraltar. Were they taken aboard U-66 which did not return to Lorient, France, until Sep. 29, 1942? Anything to add?

204 Vinnie
2552 tons
Hull 602

5222237

Lago
Ringdal
Concordia
Maria
Aghios Dimitrios
1929

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image Lago), 1 (Lago & WW2 convoys), 2 ('convoyweb.org' WW2 convoy duty, insert Lago & pick out correct vessel, am unable to check the link), 3, 4 & 5 (images Concordia), 6 (Lloyd's Register data, 1930/31 thru 1933/34 ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 93.4 metres long, speed of 9 1/2 knots, signal letters LHNP. Built for 'Chr. Knudsen Rederi A/S', with 'Chr. Knudsen & Son' the managers. The vessel was sold, in 1934, to 'D/S A/S Laly', of Oslo, Norway, (C. T. Gogstad & Co., the managers) & renamed Lago. Extensive WW2 convoy service during WW2. In at least 11 convoys to N. America, also to Mediterranean (Port Said), Caribbean & many U.K. coastal voyages. In 1956 the vessel was sold to Fenno Shipping Co., of Nagu, Finland, & renamed Ringdal. And sold in 1958 to 'Korpo Rederi AB', of Helsinki, Finland, (Frans Nylund, the manager?), & renamed Concordia. And sold again, in 1962, to 'Mitrofanes SA', of Panama, (J. Zissopoulos the manager?), & renamed Maria. And sold for the last time, in 1965, to Z. & V. Roussos, of Greece, & renamed Aghios Dimitrios. In Jul. 1969, the vessel arrived at Perama (Athens), to be broken up. The above text may very well need correction. Can you do that? Or add anything additional?

205 Beth
6852 tons
Hull 609

5607225
1930

A tanker. Per 1 ('u-boat.net', 1942 sinking), 2 (extensive data, image, Beth, sinking detail near page bottom), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Beth, but I cannot check the link. But beware! The page that you come to records 734 WW2 convoys, of which just 13, I count, relate to this vessel), 4 (U-162, Beth on p.8), 5 (image), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 126.9 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 432 ft. 2 in., speed of 11 knots, signal letters LDPH & BMCR. Built for 'A/S Bill', L. Gill-Johannessen the managers, of Oslo, Norway. 13 WW2 convoy references, including 7 N. Atlantic crossings, almost all of which were carrying 'FFO', which term I learn means 'Furnace Fuel Oil'. There were many independent WW2 voyages also, recorded at 2, including in late 1940 thru early 1941, service in the Indian Ocean (Abadan, Karachi, Durban, Cape Town). I read that since 1941, the vessel was in Admiralty service as a Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA). At 10:20 p.m. on May 17, 1942, while proceeding independently with a cargo of 10,109 tons of fuel oil, from Port of Spain, Trinidad, to Freetown, West Africa, the vessel was hit by the first of 2 torpedoes fired by U-162, Kapitän zur See Jürgen Wattenberg in command. At 11.48N/57.32W, 135 miles SE of Barbados. The ship had a complement of 31 all told. The crew took to the lifeboats after the first torpedo hit near No. 1 tank on the starboard side, resulting in a tremendous explosion. 20 minutes after the first hit, with the boats clear of the ship, the vessel was struck by a 2nd torpedo. Another giant explosion resulted & the ship sank 5 minutes later. Said to be at 02:10 a.m. German time or 00:30 a.m. Caribbean time, on Mar. 18, 1942 (the times seem to be inconsistent?). Two boats, with a total of 21 aboard, including Hans Gulliksen the Master, reached Conset Bay, Barbados, after 36 hours. A third boat, with 9 aboard, reached Tobago on the evening of May 20, 1942.  One life was lost, boatswain Sigurd B. (Bernhard) Svendsen, possibly crushed at the time of the launch of the boats. A hearing into the sinking was held, at New York, on Jul. 8, 1942. Can you tell us more?

206 Essex Manor
4994 (or 5001 or 5079) tons
Hull 601

161371

Yamabuki Maru
1930

A cargo ship. Per 1 (extensive data), 2 (Essex Steam Ship Co. Ltd.), 3 (image, also -01), 4 (Task Force 38, 44/09/21, about 25% down), 5 (Lloyd's Register data, Essex Manor, 1931/32 thru 1937/38 ex 'plimsollship data.org'), 6 (Lloyd's Register data, Yamabuki Maru, 1938/39 thru 1945/46, same source), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 405.5 ft. long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 1/2 knots, signal letters LFPN & GPRT. Built for Essex Steam Ship Co. Ltd., ('Essex Line Limited' is related), of London, with Meldrum & Swinson, the managers. Tony Franklin advises, (thanks!), that J. R. Leek (or maybe Peek?) was the ship's master in 1936 & that the vessel made two round voyages to the Persian Gulf in that year. In Aug. 1937, the vessel was stranded in port at Erinosata (where is that?) & re-floated - the Lloyd's Register of 1937/38 & following states that the vessel was in port damaged. The vessel was sold, in 1938, to 'Yamashita Kisen Kabushiki Kaisha', of Kobe, Japan, & renamed Yamabuki Maru. The vessel became a little shorter perhaps. 404.5 ft. long perpendicular to perpendicular & 421.6 ft. overall. Signal letters became JCOM. On Sep. 21, 1944, when the vessel was in use as a Japanese military cargo transport, the vessel was sunk by U.S. carrier-based aircraft, at 14.45N/120.12E, about 100 miles S. of Olongapo, Province of Zambales, Philippines. Can you tell us more?

207 Iron Chief
4560 tons
Hull 607

161992

Stagpool
Granny Suzanne
Carmen
1930

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Stagpool (2)], 2 (data ex 'chesterahoy.com', a site now gone, it would seem), 3 (image, Stagpool), 4 (an image of Granny Suzanne. But the correct one? There were four of the name), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 112.9 metres (370 ft. 3 in.) long, speed of 10 knots. Built for 'Interstate Steamships Ltd.', of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, for the iron & steel industry. The vessel would seem to have been sold by 'Essex Oak' (there was a company called Essex Oak Ltd.) to Ropner Shipping Company in 1935 & became Stagpool. The vessel was sold again, in 1950, to Heron Steamship Co., of London, (owned by the Tsavliris family) & became Granny Suzanne. The vessel was sold in 1954 to 'Swiss-based owners' (S. Tuillier maybe), & became Carmen, registered under the Costa Rican flag. The vessel was sold again, in 1956, with no change of name, & likely registered under the Panamanian flag. The vessel was very briefly laid up in 1960. On Jun. 13, 1963, the vessel was sunk, off the coast of Kent, at South Foreland nr. Dover, at 51.08N/1.36E, when in collision with Sadikzade, a Turkish vessel - the lives of 2 Carmen crewmen were lost. Does anybody have another image?

208 Pegasus
9583 tons
Hull 603

7639 (Swedish #?)
3007639
1930

A tanker. Per 1 (Lloyd's Register data, 1930/31 thru 1943/44, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 2 ('uboat.net', sinking), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Pegasus, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 146.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 497 ft. 4 in., speed of 11 1/2 (or 11) knots. Built for 'Rederi-A/B Transoil', a subsidiary of 'Rederi A/B Transatlantic', of Gothenburg, Sweden, 'Rolf Sörman' the manager. Just 3 WW2 convoy references it would seem - in Apl. 1941, from Aden to Suez, & 2 Australian references in Mar/Apl 1943, from Melbourne, Victoria, to Newcastle, New South Wales & back. I presume that there were independent voyages, which I am not permitted to access. But beware link 3! There are 73 WW2 convoy references there, but 70 of them seem to relate to vessels other than this Pegasus. On Oct. 26, 1940, Pegasus hit a mine 1 mile S. of Bar Light Vessel, River Mersey. The vessel was damaged but I presume was soon repaired. In Jul. 1943, Pegasus, unescorted, was en route from Abadan, Iran, Persian Gulf, to Durban, South Africa, via Khasab Bay, Oman, & Lourenço Marques, Mozambique, with a cargo of 12,855 tons of gasoline. On Jul. 24, 1943, the vessel was torpedoed & sunk by U-197, under the command of Korvettenkapitän Robert Bartels ('Bartels'). At 28.05S/37.40E, SW of the island of Madagascar. The entire crew of 38 was saved. I have not read the circumstances i.e. the Captain's name, how they were rescued etc. etc. It would seem, however, i) that the vessel did not immediately burst into flames & ii) the crew were 'luckily' saved. U-197 was itself sunk, on Aug. 20, 1943, by depth charges from 2 British Catalina aircraft - its entire crew of 67 died including Bartels. I have read a couple of references to Pegasus being Swedish & therefore neutral. But Pegasus would seem to have been outside the Baltic (at the beginning of WW2 perhaps), served the Allies during WW2 (used in the Eastern cross-trades) & presumably would not therefore have been neutral? Can anybody correct the above and/or add additional data. Another image?

209 Lise
6826 tons
Hull 611
1931

A tanker. Per 1 (extensive data, names of 12 lost, list of voyages via links, image), 2 ('uboat.net' data, sinking), 3 (Norwegian page, image), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Lise, but I cannot check the link), 5 (1st hand account of sinking, English 55% down), 6 (Lloyd's Register data re a few years in the 1931/32 thru 1942/43 period, beware other vessels named Lise, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access).  416.2 ft. long (126.9 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 knots, signal letters LJQT & LDSG. Built for 'A/S Lise', or 'Skibsaktieselakapet - A/S Lise', of Oslo, Norway, with either (a) I. A. Christensen or b) S. Holter Sørensen, the manager. Carried oil products. 21 WW2 convoy references including 5 N. Atlantic crossings. Total WW2 service included W. & S. Africa, Mediterranean, Indian Ocean, Caribbean, often independent. On May 12, 1942, while en route, in ballast, from Southampton to Curaçao via Belfast Lough, the vessel was sunk by U-69, which both torpedoed & shelled the ship. Fire was returned. It would seem that 2 or maybe 3 U-boats were involved in the attack. At 13.53N/68.20W, 95 miles N. of Bonaire (Lesser Antilles, Caribbean). 12 lives were lost of the crew of 33. 8 survivors reached Carrizal, Columbia, on May 15, 1942, & were later (May 26) taken aboard Washington Express (Norwegian), & landed at New York. The remaining survivors ended up 8 in a gig & 5 on a raft. Rescued respectively by Femern, a Dutch whaler, & Socrates, a Dutch merchant ship. After 20 days at sea for the 5 on the raft. All were landed at Curaçao. 10 of the 13 were then taken aboard Crijnssen for New York, but that vessel was sunk in the Straits of Yucatan. All 10 survived the second sinking. Now 9 of the 10 (the last man made it to the Yucatan coast) were taken aboard Lebore (U.S.A.) which also was sunk. And the 9 survived that 3rd sinking also. Can you add anything, or provide an image?

210 Caithness
4970 tons
Hull 616

161589
516001

Swanvalley
Incharran
Star of Victoria
1935

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Caithness), 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Caithness, but I cannot check the link), 2 (data & image, Swanvalley, now only available in archive, 90% down page), 3 (data & image, Incharran), 4 (image, Caithness), 5 (1952 fires in holds, Swanvalley), 6 (Lloyd's Register data, 1935/36 thru 1945/46, Caithness, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 412 ft. 2 in. long (125.63 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 427 ft. 9 in. long (130.38 metres) overall, speed of 10 1/2 knots, signal letters GYPJ later ZCST. Built for 'B. J. Sutherland & Co. Ltd.', of Newcastle. 79 WW2 convoy references, including 7 completed N. Atlantic crossings, carrying such cargoes as paper, lumber, grain & pulp. The vessel served extensively in the Indian Ocean & in Australian waters, also, in Dec. 1939, on the W. coast of North America. Three voyages to Antwerp, Belgium, in early 1945. And U.K. coastal & more - the list of destinations is long. The vessel was sold, in 1951, to 'Westralian Farmers Transport Ltd.', owned by  'Westralian Farmers Ltd.' which company became, in 1985, 'Wesfarmers Limited' a giant public company based at Perth, Western Australia, & renamed Swanvalley. The vessel carried coal from India & South Africa to Australia for a number of years. On Apl. 4, 1952, while en route from India to Melbourne with a cargo of 9,000 tons of coal, Captain A. W. Fielding in command, two fires broke out - in cargo holds 1 & 5. The vessel proceeded to Fremantle where 200 tons of coal were unloaded & the fires were extinguished with water hoses. That water then had to be pumped out before the vessel resumed its journey, to Adelaide it would seem, with two new crewmembers - two canaries, to detect carbon-monoxide should fire break out again. It would seem that the ship's cat was prevented from finding out if the canaries tasted really good! The vessel was chartered for a couple of years to Australia Transport Board & re-chartered to BHP Shipping in the 1953 to 1956 period, & used to transport iron ore. I read that the vessel ran aground on mud banks at Newcastle Harbour, New South Wales, on Sep. 27, 1954. Two tugs could not pull the vessel off - it was freed 12 hours later on the next tide. The vessel was sold, in 1956, for £230,000, to 'Williamson & Co. Ltd.', of Hong Kong, & renamed Incharran. And sold again, in 1966, to 'Leecho Steamship Company S.A.' of Panama, a company owned by 'Yong & Lee Timber Shipping Co. Ltd.', & renamed Star of Victoria. In Jan. 1967, the vessel, with a crew of 32, was en route from Abadan, Iran, to Muroran, Hokkaidō, Japan, via Hong Kong perhaps, with a cargo of scrap metal. On Jan. 17, 1967, the vessel sprang leaks in No. 3 & No. 4 hatches during heavy weather when about 100 miles NE of Keelung, (or Chilung or Jilong), Taiwan. At 26.59N/123.09E, in the East China Sea. The crew were rescued by Pyrrhus, & landed at Kobe, Japan. The vessel, last seen in a sinking condition by a Japanese tug, presumably foundered. Anything to add?

211 Kinross
4956 tons
Hull 613

161578
1935

A Doxford 'Economy' cargo ship. Per 1 (Lloyd's Register data, Kinross, 1934/35 thru 1944/45, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 2 ('uboat.net', sinking, image), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Kinross, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 412.2 ft. long (125.64 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 427.9 ft. long (130.42 metres) overall, speed of 11 knots, signal letters GYGS. Built for 'B. J. Sutherland & Co. Ltd.' of Newcastle, the 4th fleet vessel of the name. Sister to Sutherland. 15 WW2 convoy references including 3 completed N. Atlantic crossings & U.K. coastal voyages. However, the vessel would seem to have sailed largely independently. In late 1939, the vessel was on the W. coast of N. America ex Bilbao, Spain. On Nov. 10, 1939 the vessel joined Convoy HX.8 & left Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, for Liverpool with a cargo of wheat & lumber. In Jan. 1940, the vessel left St. Helen's Roads, Isle of Wight (near Portsmouth & Southampton), for Fremantle & Adelaide, Australia, via the Suez Canal. It returned via Suez to Bilbao then sailed independently to the W. coast of N. America (Seattle, Tacoma. Los Angeles, & Vancouver) - returning independently to Bilbao. In 1941 the vessel was sold to 'Gydnia America Shipping Lines (London) Ltd.', also of Newcastle. On Jun. 15, 1941, the vessel left Liverpool for Canada on its 4th westbound N. Atlantic convoy crossing - in ballast & in Convoy OB-336, a convoy of 16 merchant ships, with James R. (Robson) Reed in command & a crew all told of 36. Now link 3 references the vessel being sunk 'after escort left' but also advises that the convoy dispersed on Jun. 25, 1941. At midday the day before, i.e. on Jun. 24, 1941, when about 700 miles SE of Cape Farewell, Greenland, two convoy ships were torpedo attacked by German submarine U-203, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Rolf Mützelburg. Kinross was sunk at 55.23N/38.49W. The entire Kinross crew was picked up by HMCS Orillia (K 119) & landed at Reykjavik, Iceland. Strangely, the vessel was still listed thru Lloyd's Register of 1944/45. Can anybody correct the above and/or add additional data. Another image? No.1910

212 Kirriemoor
4970 (later 5103) tons
Hull 614

164461

Transic
Kalliopi D. Lemos
E. Myrtidiotissa
1935

A cargo ship. Per 1 & 2 (images, Kirriemoor), 3 (data, including WW2 convoy service), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Kirriemoor, but I cannot check the link), 5 (Lloyd's Register data, 'plimsollshipdata.org', 1934/35 thru 1944/45), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 428.1 ft. long (130.48 metres) overall, 412.2 ft. long (125.64 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 (or 10) knots, signal letters GYJW later SGON. Built for 'Lord Runciman Shipping Co. Ltd.' of Newcastle, becoming 'Runciman Shipping Co. Ltd.' in 1938/39 & 'Moor Line Ltd.', in 1950. Just 11 WW2 convoy references, mainly thru Nov. 1940 & mainly U.K. coastal but including service to Port Said & to W. Africa (Freetown). A slow vessel it would seem. On Nov. 17, 1940, the vessel was requisitioned by the Royal Navy & commissioned as HMS Kirriemoor, Z199. The vessel was probably refitted, & served as a 'boom carrier' for the Royal Navy. Armed with 2 - 12 pounder guns. She served much of her time in the Indian Ocean. In 1941, she laid boom defences at Colombo & Trincomalee, both Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), then did the same at the Maldive Islands. In Apl. 1942, she carried survivors of HMS Cornwall to Mombasa, Kenya, where she also laid boom defences. To Diego Suarez, Madagascar, in Dec. 1942. 3 of the 11 WW2 convoy references are in 1944, including to Seine Bay in Jul. 1944, re the Normandy landings. The vessel was returned to her owners in 1946. Phil Lambell advises (thanks Phil!) that George Lambell (1930/2013), Phil's father, served as Kirriemoor's 4th Engineer for two voyages, the first being in Apl/Aug 1952, starting & finishing in Birkenhead. The second left Tilbury in Jan. 1954, eventually arriving back in the Tyne on Jun. 25, 1954. He always described the return voyage as the slowest ever crossing from Auckland, New Zealand, to the Tyne & said the boiler basically packed in as they passed the Tyne piers. She must have come back considerably faster to have been back in Auckland only two months later! - Kirriemoor visited Auckland, on Aug. 24, 1954. The vessel was sold, in 1955, to 'Rederi A/B Nordic', with F. H. Andersson, of Stockholm, Sweden, the manager & renamed Transic. The vessel was Lloyd's Register listed in 1957/58 at 5103 gross tons & 428 ft. 1 in. long. The vessel was sold again, on May 14, 1961, to 'Valviosa Cia Naviera S.A.' of Beirut, Lebanon, maybe with Lemos & Pateras Ltd.', of London & Piraeus, Greece, or Lebanon, the managers & renamed Kalliopi D. Lemos. Registered at Panama. The vessel was renamed (no change of ownership) E. Myrtidiotissa, in 1965. Then Lebanese flag. On Oct. 1, 1965, the vessel, en route in ballast from Cardiff to Archangel, Russia, ran aground, at 64.41.12N/ 39.47E., off Kumbysh Island in the southern part of the White Sea, near Archangel. It would appear that the vessel was then towed. But ended up wrecked. Presumably no lives were lost? Can you add to (or correct) the above?

213 Stirling
4995 (later 4969) tons
Hull 615

161588

Stirlingville
Georgios M II
1935

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Stirlingville WW2 data), 2 & 3 (2 versions of same Sterlingville image), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 125.6 metres long, speed of 10 knots. Built for 'B. J. Sutherland & Co. Ltd.', of Newcastle. The vessel was sold, in 1936, to 'A. F. Klaveness & Co. A/S', of Oslo, Norway, & renamed Stirlingville. From 1940 the vessel was on charter to the Ministry of War Transport for the duration of WW2. Lots of WW2 convoy detail at 1. The vessel was sold, in 1959, to 'Loucas G. Matsas Salvage & Towage Maritime Company', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Georgios M II. On Nov. 20, 1968, the vessel caught fire at 21.51N/17.16W (seems to be off Senegal/ Mauretania on W. coast of Africa). Explosions ensued. 1 life lost. But can find no WWW data additional to 4 about that disaster. Anything to add?

214 Sutherland
4956 (or 4979) tons
Hull 612

161576

British Prince
1935

A Doxford 'Economy' cargo ship, in fact the very first or prototype ship of such design. Per A (e-Bay image, British Prince), 1 (Sutherland data), 2 [British Prince (4)], 3 (British Prince data), 4 (Prince Line & Rio Cape Line, British Prince (4), 90% down), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert British Prince, but I cannot check the link), 6 (Convoy ON.2), 7 (Convoy FS.604), 8 (image British Prince, also -03), 9 ('Sunderland Echo', fine Dec. 31, 2008 article), 10 (Sea Fisher), 11 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 442 ft. 9 in. (about 131 metres) long, speed of 10 or 11 knots. Built, at the cost of £89,000, for 'B. J. Sutherland & Co. Ltd.', of Newcastle. Sister to Kinross. Her maiden voyage was from the Tyne to Oran, Algeria, with a cargo of coal, then onwards to Pondicherry & Cuddalore (both Bay of Bengal, India) with return to South Shields via Dunkirk. On Mar. 8, 1936, the vessel collided with & sank Sea Fisher, a 552 or 525 ton collier built in 1920, in thick fog near the Shipwash Light Vessel, off Harwich on the Essex/Suffolk coast. Sutherland took the Sea Fisher crew aboard (no loss of life), landed them at Hull, & was dry-docked there for her own repairs. The vessel was sold for £102,000, also in 1936, (a 'handsome' profit but why sold so soon, I wonder?), to 'Rio Cape Line Ltd.', which company, owned by Prince Line Limited, itself owned by Furness, Withy & Co. Ltd., of London, operated a cargo service between Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, & Cape Town, South Africa. An appropriate company name, accordingly! The vessel was renamed British Prince, the 4th 'Prince Line' vessel of the name. 26 convoy references, I believe, in WW2 including at least 8 voyages across the N. Atlantic & many coastal U.K. voyages. On Jul. 27, 1941, the vessel left Liverpool for Loch Ewe (NW coast of Scotland) in Convoy ON-2, but had to return to Liverpool with weather damage. While data seems to be conflicting, it would seem that British Prince completed a voyage from Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada, to Liverpool on Sep. 21, 1941 (Convoy SC.43). And on Sep. 25, 1941 left Methil (Firth of Forth) for Southend, Essex, in Convoy FS.604. On Sep. 26, 1941, en route, it was bombed by German aircraft & sunk at 53.52N/00.25E, a distance off Hornsea, N. of Spurn Head & the mouth of the Humber River. While there would appear to have been no loss of life, the lifeboats 'were recovered later & landed at Grimsby' (nearby). Which is a statement that seems to need amplification. Did the crew not use the lifeboats? If not, how were they rescued? Anything to add

215 Moorby
4992 (or 5027) tons
Hull 619

162108

Moorcot
Huntsfield
Elbow River
1936

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Moorby), 1 [Moorby (2), 55% down], 2 (a 1947 image at Bagotville, Quebec), 3 (Power history, 40% down 'Dave Edge'), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 423.7 ft. (about 135 metres) long, speed of 10 1/2 knots. Built for Ropner Shipping Co. Ltd., of Cardiff. Picked up 6 (of total of 51) survivors of Fort Buckingham, hit by 2 torpedoes from U-188 NW of the Maldive Islands on Jan. 20, 1944. The survivors were landed at Fremantle, Western Australia, on Jan. 29, 1944. The vessel was sold, in 1948 (or 1949), to Power Steamship Co., ('Power') of London (owned by Donald McCowan & Captain Oscar Gross) (McCowan & Gross managers) & became Moorcot. McCowan withdrew from the partnership & Power, in 1951, became 'O. Gross & Sons'. The vessel was renamed in 1951 as Huntsfield, registered at London. And was sold in 1955 to Mollers', & renamed Elbow River, registered at Bermuda perhaps. There is or was a Shanghai, China, shipping company named Moller (Moller Line) - the same company? The vessel arrived on Jun. 30, 1966 at Hong Kong ship breakers to be broken up. Can you add more?

216 Queen Maud
4976 tons
Hull 629

164101
1936

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Thomas Dunlop, Queen Maud (3)], 2 ('uboat.net', 1941 sinking), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Queen Maud, but I cannot check the link), 4 (HMS Kipling, image of Queen Maud), 5 (image, Queen Maud), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 128.9 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 439 ft. 2 in., speed of 10 or 11 knots. The vessel was built for Queen Line Ltd., i.e. 'Queen Line', 'Thomas Dunlop & Sons' the owners & managers, of Glasgow. 16 WW2 convoy references including at least 3 N. Atlantic crossings carrying wheat & also both lumber & lead, service to Port Said, Egypt, & also U.K. coastal. In early Oct. 1940, (have not read the exact date), the vessel, requisitioned by the Ministry of War Transport for use as a Troop Transport vessel, was in collision with HMS Kipling, in the English Channel. HMS Kipling required repair at Devonport dockyard, but I have not read about any damage to Queen Maud. On Apl. 12, 1941, Queen Maud left Liverpool in convoy OB-309 bound for Alexandria, Egypt, via Freetown, Sierra Leone, with a cargo ex Cardiff that was mainly coal but included government stores, & aircraft parts. I presume that that means that the vessel was going via Cape of Good Hope, i.e. around Africa, rather than through the Mediterranean. Robert J. (John) McDonald was in command, with 44 aboard all told. The convoy dispersed on Apl. 19, 1941 & Queen Maud continued on independently. At 11:05 a.m. on May 5, 1941, the vessel was hit by two torpedoes fired by U-38, Fregattenkapitän Heinrich Liebe in command, when at 07.54N/16.41W, about 200 miles off the coast of Africa opposite Freetown. A third torpedo at 11:17 a.m., dispatched the vessel which sank within 3 minutes of the hit. One life was lost. 43 survivors, including the Master & 4 gunners, were picked by Mirandella, a Portuguese cargo vessel, transferred to HMS Dragon (D46) & landed at Freetown on May 8, 1941. Can you add more?

217 Riley
4993 (or 5017) tons
Hull 620

161597

Anoula A.
Kien Ping
1936

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Riley, but I cannot check the link), 2 (image, Anoula A.), 3 (image Riley, also -02), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 129.1 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 422 ft. 9 in. (or 438 ft. 8 in.), speed of 10 knots. Built for 'The Whalton Shipping Company Ltd.', which company was owned & managed by 'Stephens, Sutton Limited', both of Newcastle. 70 WW2 convoy references, including at least 11 N. Atlantic crossings, service in Indian Ocean (Bombay), Mediterranean (Port Said, Bari, Augusta), Caribbean (Guantanamo, Trinidad), W. Africa (Freetown), many U.K. coastal, & a voyage to Narvik, Norway. The vessel was sold in 1956, to Greek interests, to 'San Nicolaos Corporation', which it seems was a subsidiary of 'Angelos, Ltd.', of London, & became Anoula A. Registered at Monrovia, Liberia. In 1960, the vessel was registered at Greece. On Nov. 14, 1964, the ship went aground S. of Bergen, Norway, while en route from the White Sea (NW Russia, likely Archangel) to Newcastle. Have not read the details. In 1967, the vessel was sold to 'Kien Ping Steamship Co. SA' of Hong Kong, (have also seen references to Japan), & renamed Kien Ping. Miramar refer to 'Kien An SS Co', the managers, perhaps? Registered at Panama. 'Kien An SS Co S.A.' were apparently of Panama. The vessel arrived, in 1968, at Japanese ship breakers, to be broken up. Miramar specifically mention the break up was completed in May 1968. Can you add more, and/or correct the above?

218 Ross
4978 tons
Hull 626

161596
1936

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('uboat.net', sinking, image), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Ross, but I cannot check the link. Beware! Just a tiny portion of the vessels there listed are this vessel), 3 (B. J. Sutherland, Ross), 4 (sinking detail, Lloyd's Medal to Hayes), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 129.1 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots. Built for 'B. J. Sutherland & Co. Ltd.', of Newcastle. 25 WW2 convoy references I think, mainly U.K. coastal, but including at least 2 N. Atlantic crossings, & service to W. Africa (Freetown). On Oct. 27, 1942, defensively armed, under the command of John Dodds, with a crew of 40 all told, the vessel left Port Elizabeth, South Africa for Trinidad, with a cargo of 2,000 tons of manganese. Soon after midday on Oct. 29, 1942, Ross was hit by a torpedo fired by U-159, Korvettenkapitän Helmut Witte in command. At 38.51S/21.40E, about 370 miles SSE of Cape Agulhas, the southernmost tip of Africa. While the ship was most severely damaged, a second torpedo blew it into two pieces, the forward part of which immediately sank. A 3rd torpedo completed the job by sinking the stern section. The crew took to the lifeboats. One lifeboat was launched but fouled the propeller. 3 of its crew jumped into the sea but the 4th occupant, Roger A. (Armitage) Walker, the chief officer, could not be found. He proved to be the only crew member who lost his life. The 39 survivors ended up on a single lifeboat but Able Seaman Clayton Hayes & two others bailed out a second swamped lifeboat which was then able to carry 9, so the 2 lifeboats set sail together for Cape Town, South Africa, with Able Seaman Clayton Hayes in charge of the 2nd boat. The boats got separated 2 days later but on Nov. 3, 1942, both boats were found, a distance apart, by Rockrose, a Royal Navy frigate, which landed the crews at Simonstown. Clayton Hayes was later awarded the Lloyd's War Medal for Bravery At Sea for his conduct. Can you add more, and/or correct the above?

219 Rothley
4996 tons
Hull 621

161598
1936

A cargo ship, which had a short life. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Rothley, but I cannot check the link), 2 ('uboat.net', 1942 sinking), 3 (17 days on raft, 45% down), 4 (image, Rothley), 5 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Rothley, 1937/38 thru 1944/45), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 423.3 ft. long perpendicular to perpendicular (129.0 metres), 439.3 ft. long overall, speed of 10 or 11 knots, of 'Mark 2' design, with a raked stem & possibly a raised forecastle, signal letters GZDY. Rothley? A community in Northumberland, the most likely origin of the name. Built for 'The Whalton Shipping Company Ltd.', 'Stephens, Sutton Limited' the managers, both of Newcastle. A modest 1936 incident at Barry Dock resulted in a modest lawsuit - on Dec. 8, 1936 John W. Clark, working on the ship, tripped over a steel cable, broke a rib & was unable to work for 1 1/2 months. 19 WW2 convoy references, including at least 3 N. Atlantic crossings, carrying such cargoes as grains, lumber & lead, & U.K. coastal voyages. Probably also independent voyages, to which I am denied access. In Oct. 1942, the vessel was en route, in ballast & unescorted, from Durban, South Africa, to New York, via Trinidad, with Cyril J. (John) Foster in command & 42 aboard, all told. At 8.23 a.m. on Oct. 19, 1942, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-332, Kapitänleutnant Johannes Liebe in command, & sunk. At 13.34N/54.34W, about 300 miles E. of Barbados. Two lives were lost, a crew member & a gunner. The 39 survivors took to a boat or life raft & later landed at Aruba after 17 days at sea. Can you add to and/or correct the above? Another image?

220 Rugeley
4985 (later 5161) tons
Hull 618

161590

Stylehurst
Aspen
Metropolitan
1936

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Metropolitan), 1 (data, Rugeley), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Rugeley, but I cannot check the link), 3 (All 4 sides of data cards, which appear to be taken from the original blueprints. Maybe called 'builders load cards'?), 4 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, 1935/36 thru 1945/46, Rugeley), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 423.5 ft. long (129.08 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 439.2 ft. long (133.87 metres) overall, speed of 10 or 11 knots, signal letters MKVV. Rugeley? A town in Staffordshire, U.K. Built for 'Red 'R' Steamship Company Ltd.', owned & managed by 'Stephens, Sutton Limited', of Newcastle. 58 WW2 convoy references, including at least 3 N. Atlantic crossings carrying such cargoes as grain, steel & newsprint, service in Indian Ocean (Calcutta, Colombo, Bombay), Mediterranean (Port Said, Bari, Augusta), Caribbean (Guantanamo, Trinidad), Africa (Freetown, Cape Town, Durban), & many U.K. coastal voyages. Visited Auckland, New Zealand, once, on Jan. 27, 1947. The vessel was sold in 1948 to 'Stylehurst Shipping Company Ltd.', of London, & renamed Stylehurst, 'Hadjilias & Co.', of London, the vessel's managers. Fitted with replacement oil engines in 1950. In 1951, the vessel was sold, for about £415,000, to 'Rederiaktiebolaget Alfa', of Helsingborg (Helsinki), Finland, A. Borjesson, of Sweden, the manager, & renamed Aspen, registered Sweden. In 1960, the vessel was sold to 'Lombard Nav. Co. Inc.', of Panama, 'F. Tsao' the manager?, & renamed Metropolitan. On Jun. 4, 1970, the vessel arrived at the Hong Kong ship breaking facilities of 'Lee Sing & Co. Ltd.' to be broken up. Can you add to or correct the above? An image?

221 Wearpool
4982 (later 4997 tons) have also read 4992 & 5071) tons
Hull 627

162112

Adelsö
Lefkipos
Dimitros
1936

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Wearpool (2), at page bottom], 2 (Adelsö data & image), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Wearpool, but I cannot check the link), 4 ('plimsollshipdata', Lloyd's Register data, Wearpool, 1937/38 thru 1945/46), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 423.5 ft. long (129.1 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 439.3 ft. (133.9 metres) long overall, speed of 9 1/2 or 10 knots, signal letters GYYL, later SDLA & SZLI. The vessel was built for Pool Shipping Co. Ltd., of Cardiff, Sir R. Ropner & Co. Ltd., the managers. 44 WW2 convoy references including 5 Atlantic crossings, returning, where indicated, with lumber, potash or a general cargo. In Australian waters in May/Jun & Nov. 1940 (Fremantle, Adelaide, Melbourne), in Indian Ocean in Jun/Sep 1941, frequently in S. American ports & in western Mediterranean & W. African ports (Bône, Casablanca, Freetown, Takoradi). On W. coast of N. America also. The vessel was sold, in 1954, to 'Rederi A/B Regin', owned by 'Knut Gunnar Källström' (Ragnar Källström the manager) & became Adelsö, registered at Stockholm, Sweden. Engaged in the shipment of iron ore from the Swedish ports of Lulea & Oxelösund. The vessel was sold again, in 1964, to 'Skarasteel Shipping Co.', of Piraeus, Greece (M. Scufalos the manager?) & became Lefkipos. And was again sold, in 1971, to Dimitros Shipping Co., of Panama (G. Eleftheriou the manager?) & became Dimitros. The vessel was sold for the last time, in 1973, to 'Leahne Nav. Co.', of Cyprus, with no change of vessel name. On Oct. 20, 1979, the vessel arrived at La Spezia, Italy, to be broken up. Anything to add?

222 Eskbank
5137 tons
Hull 631

164117

Hsin Ann
1937

A cargo ship. Per 1 (brief ref., 50% down), 2 & 3 (data & images), 4 (Andrew Weir & Co., Bank Line, Eskbank), 5 (brief ref. 50% down), 6 (WW2 convoy duty, KMS 022 & KMS 022G), 7 (image, Esbank, also -02), 8 (image, Eskbank), 9 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Eskbank, but I cannot check the link), 10 (Lloyd's Register data, 1937/38 thru 1945/46 ex 'plimsollshipdata.org' - image at left), 11 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 438.6 ft. long overall, 423.2 ft. (about 134 metres) long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 13 knots, signal letters GZRJ. Built for Inver Transport & Trading Co. Ltd., which was, Andy Lavies advises, a subsidiary of Andrew Weir & Co. (Bank Line). Andrew Weir & Co. the managers. 42 WW2 convoy references, including at least 2 N. Atlantic crossings, to Seine Bay, France, in Sep. & Nov. 1944 re the Normandy landings, service in Indian Ocean, (Aden, Bombay, Bandar Abbas in Iran), Mediterranean (Port Said, Malta) & U.K. coastal.  Per 5, traded from Cape Town to Far East via "all ports". In 1961, the vessel was sold to 'Chip Hwa Shipping & Trading Co. Ltd.', ('Chip') of Singapore, & renamed Hsin Ann. In 1965, she was sold to 'Hwa Aun Co. (Hong Kong) Ltd.' (Chip the managers). And finally sold to Singapore ship breakers & arrived at Singapore on Jun. 13, 1967 to be broken up. Can you expand on the above?

223 Ettrickbank
5138 tons
Hull 637

165920
1937

A cargo ship. Per 1 (brief ref. 40% down), 2 (Andrew Weir & Co., Bank Line, Ettrickbank), 3 (1944 convoy 60% down), 4 (1943 convoy 90% down), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Ettrickbank, but I cannot check the link), 6 & 7 (images), 8 (Lloyd's Register data, 1937/38 thru 1945/46 ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'. Image at left hopefully soon!), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 438.6 ft. long overall, 423.2 ft. (about 134 metres) long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 13 knots, signal letters GDDS. Built for Inver Transport & Trading Co. Ltd., which was, Andy Lavies advises, a subsidiary of Andrew Weir & Co. (Bank Line). 43 WW2 convoy references, including at least 4 N. Atlantic crossings, extensive service in Indian Ocean (Bombay, Durban, Fremantle), West Africa (Freetown, Takoradi), Mediterranean & U.S.A. E. seaboard & Caribbean. A great many independent voyages with many in Indian & Pacific Oceans incl. service to Australia. Andy Lavies served aboard the vessel in the 1950s & describes Ettrickbank - & surely other ships of the period - in the following words (thanks Andy!) - Ettrickbank was fairly primitive. Four cylinder Doxford main engine. Everything else was steam driven - winches, steering engine, all pumps, electrical generator. Electricity supply was 110 volts DC and earth return. Only one wire to each appliance and the other terminal connected to the hull. No mechanical ventilation and no running water. Allowance of water was two buckets full per person per day and one had to be carried down to the boiler in the engine room and heated with live steam before being used to wash ourselves. We had our 20 year survey in 1957 at Yokohama when running water was installed and permanent repairs made to major typhoon damage suffered soon after I joined her. The vessel arrived at Hong Kong, on Jan. 18, 1963. to be broken up. WWW data is quite limited. Anything to add? More images perhaps?

224 Forest
4998 (later 5034 & 5345) tons
Hull 639

162214

Haulerwijk
Thomas Müntzer
Maritsa 2
Othon
Akropolis
1937

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Thomas Müntzer), 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Forest, but I cannot check the link. Pick out the correct vessel! There may be independent voyages also but the webmaster is not permitted to access the data though you surely can), 2 (image, Haulerwijk), 3 (WW2 bombings, 'November 1942', 21st), 4 (Lloyd's Register data, Forest, 1937/38 thru 1945/46, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 424.0 ft. long (129.235 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 439.2 ft. long (133.87 metres) overall, speed of 10 1/2 knots, signal letters GCGS later PEOL, DHZU & 5GBP. Built for 'Nolisement Steamship Company Ltd.', of London, ('Morel Ltd.' of Cardiff, the managers). The vessel was bombed on Nov. 21, 1942 & again, at Gibraltar, on Dec. 11, 1942. 53 WW2 convoy references, including 6 N. Atlantic crossings. Service to Mediterranean & West Africa (Freetown) but mainly U.K. coastal & continental. The vessel was sold, in 1951, to N.V. Stoomv. Maats "Wuklun" of the Netherlands, 'Erhardt & Dekkers', of Rotterdam the managers, & renamed Haulerwijk. BUT, the vessel was, it would seem marked Hawlerwijk & also Haulerwyk. The vessel was sold again, in 1958, to 'Deutsche Seereederei', of Rostock, east Germany, (the East German Government shipping company?), for 3 million Dutch guilders, & renamed Thomas Müntzer. The vessel served Canada, perhaps? The vessel was rebuilt at Warnemunde, Germany, between Dec. 1960 & Jul. 1961.  A high stern structure then added? The vessel was sold again, in 1968, to 'Kourion Cia. Nav. S.A.' of Famagusta, Cyprus ('V. Haji Ioannou' the manager?), & renamed Maritsa 2. And sold again, in 1975, to 'Matagi Maritime Co. Ltd.', of Cyprus, (A. Matarangas the manager?) & renamed Othon. And sold yet again, in 1977, to 'Sifnos Shipping Co.', also of Cyprus, & renamed Akropolis (A. Matarangas still the manager?). The vessel arrived in Pakistan, in 1978, to be broken up. WWW data is limited. Anything to add? An image perhaps?

225 Rodsley
5029 (or 4991) tons
Hull 638

5229550

Troma
Max Manus
Flora N.
1937

A cargo ship. Per 1 (extensive data, 70% down, Troma), 2 (Wikipedia, Max Manus), 3 (launch, Rodsley), 4 (page in Norwegian, data, 60% down, Max Manus), 5 (image, Troma), 6 (painting, Troma, by Jan Goedhart, of Holland), 7 (image, Max Manus), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 129.7 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 439 ft. 2 in., & 425.4 ft., speed of 10 knots. Ordered by & launched for 'Thomasson Shipping Co. Ltd.', Stephens, Sutton & Co. Ltd., the managers, both of Newcastle, as Rodsley, but bought by 'A/S J. Ludwig Mowinckels Rederi', of Bergen, Norway, a month before delivery as Troma. On Aug. 18, 1937, at its sea trials, the vessel attained 11.9 knots over the measured mile. The vessel was at Moss, Norway, unloading grain from S. America, when the Germans invaded Norway on Apl. 9, 1940. The vessel was taken over by the Germans. 1 advises that the vessel had a tough WW2 indeed, for the Germans, i.e. i) 'Ran aground, at Storebelt, (between Zealand, Sprogø & Forben in Denmark) on Oct. 28, 1940, ii) damaged due to ice in Jan. 1942 on a voyage from Hamburg to Norway, iii) struck a mine on May 4, 1942 off the coast of Holland & had to be towed to Rotterdam, iv) struck a mine on Jul. 10, 1942 off the coast of Holland, & again towed to Rotterdam, v) damaged by mine explosions on Dec. 12, 1942 on a voyage from Rotterdam to Horten, Norway, via Hamburg with a cargo of coal & coke, vi) damaged in air attack in Hamburg on Jul. 25, 1943, vii) sank following an explosion due to sabotage [by Max Manus (1914/1956), a famed Norwegian resistance hero] at 'Akers mek. Verksted', in Oslo, Norway, on Nov. 24, 1944. The vessel was, I read, raised in 1946, taken over by 'Statens Krigskaskoforsikring', the Government war insurance organisation, towed to Kongshavn, Oslo, & soon sold to 'A/S Olymp' (Einar Lange), of Oslo, who had it towed to Antwerp & repaired there by Beliard Crighton & Co. Was renamed, how appropriate, Max Manus. In 1963, the vessel was sold, for £40,500, to 'Therean Ltda', of Panama, Loucas Nomikos, of Greece, the manager, & renamed Flora N. Greek flag. On Jan. 25, 1964, the vessel, under the command of Captain Kapnasis, was discharging a cargo of cement ex Constantza, Romania, at Ibiza, in the Balearic Islands. At 2.30 a.m., there was an explosion in the boiler room with 1 crewman killed instantly. Two other crew members died a few hours later from severe burns. Efforts were made by the surviving crew, over a period of three hours, to get control of the fire - but with no success. A tug towed the burning ship out of port into shallow water, but the ship, partially blocking the port entrance, continued to burn. The fire was so serious that all other ships were ordered to leave the harbour & residential areas near the docks were evacuated. On Jan. 26, 1964, the vessel was towed again & beached at Playa d'en Bossa, 3 miles SW of Ibiza, to allow the fire to burn out. The vessel was completely gutted amidships, the bridge & boat decks were collapsed & much of the ship's decks & bulkheads were badly twisted. The vessel was declared to be a constructive total loss, & was broken up, though I have not read when & where. Anything to add? Or correct?

226 Teesbank
5136 tons
Hull 632

165901
1937

A cargo ship. Per 1 (ref. re 1937), 2 (Bank Line/Andrew Weir, Teesbank), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Teesbank, but I cannot check the link), 4 ('uboat.net', sinking data & image), 5 (image), 6 (Lloyd's Register data 1937/38 thru 1943/44, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 129.0 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 423.2 ft., speed of 12 knots, signal letters GZSL. Built for Inver Transport & Trading Co. Ltd., of Glasgow, (as per 5) - Andrew Weir & Co. the managers. Operated as a tramp ship. 17 WW2 convoy references including 2 N. Atlantic crossings. In one of the E. bound crossings, the vessel was a straggler in convoy HX.162 & transferred to convoy SC.57 en route. On the later crossing, the vessel carried sugar. Also U.K. coastal voyages & to Freetown, West Africa. On Nov. 17, 1942, commanded by Captain William Lorains (per 2, William G. (George) Loraine), the vessel left Port Elizabeth, South Africa, in ballast, en route from Port Said to Demerera, British Guiana. There are 16 pages in a Bernard Edwards volume about the voyage. Unescorted, crew of 62, reasonably armed. On Dec. 5, 1942, 240 miles N. of St. Paul's Rocks (Penedo de São Pedro), approx 1,000 km. off the coast of Brazil, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-128, at 3.33N/29.35W. The ship's propeller shaft was destroyed, & the ship was sinking rapidly. A 2nd torpedo followed. The vessel sank within an hour of first hit. One life lost, it would appear - he died 2 days later. The crew took to 3 operative lifeboats. 2 of the lifeboats were intercepted after 3 days by U-461, which provided food but took the captain prisoner (landed at St. Nazaire & taken to POW camp). After 9 days, the 41 remaining survivors were rescued by West Maximus (2 says Bessemer) & landed, on Dec. 22, 1942, at Rio de Janeiro. Re the 3rd lifeboat, 19 were taken aboard East Wales, which vessel was itself sunk on Dec. 16, 1942 by U-159. All 19 survived the 2nd sinking & later were landed by Glimmaren (via 7 Gullmaren) at Natal, Brazil, also on Dec. 22, 1942. The WWW details differ from the 'Edwards' book. Anything to add? Or correct? An image?

227 Cliftonhall
5063 tons
Hull 642

160779
1938

A cargo ship. Per 1 (builder's model of ship, Bonhams, New York, Apl. 2010 auction), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Cliftonhall, but I cannot check the link), 3 [West Hartlepool, Cliftonhall (2)], 4 (I-20, sinking, 12 June 1942), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 129.9 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 419 ft. overall. Often, incorrectly it would seem, referred to as 'Clifton Hall'. Built for 'West Hartlepool Steam Navigation Company Ltd.', of West Hartlepool. Which company was principally engaged in the transportation of coal to the Baltic, to Germany & Sweden & also to St. Petersburg, Russia. 29 WW2 convoy references including 4 N. Atlantic crossings, service to West Africa (Freetown) & U.K. coastal. On Jun. 12, 1942, the vessel was sunk by a torpedo fired by Japanese Type C submarine I-20. At 16.25S/40.10E. In the Mozambique Channel, between Mozambique & Madagascar, though referenced as 'off Madagascar'. 2 lives were lost, I read. Can anybody advise us of the circumstances, its route, its cargo etc. Can you correct and/or expand on the above?

228 Ittersum
5199 tons
Hull 647

5368859

Triton Maris
1938

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Ittersum, but I cannot check the link), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 130.4 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 knots. Built for 'N.V. Stoomvaart Maats Oostzee' (Vinke & Co. managers), of Amsterdam, Netherlands. 59 WW2 convoy references including 9 N. Atlantic crossings, service to West Africa (Freetown), Indian Ocean (Colombo & Calcutta), Mediterranean, & many U.K. coastal voyages. Paul Baker advises, (thanks!), that the ship carried tanks & the Tank squadron to Gibraltar in 1942. In 1958, the vessel was sold to 'Marittima Ravennate S.A.', of Ravenna, Italy, & renamed Triton Maris. And in Jul. 1971, the vessel was broken up at Savona, Italy. Can you correct and/or expand the above?

229 Kaipara
5882 (or 6038) tons
Hull 636

165876
508214

Roscommon
Chris
1938

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Kaipara), 1 [New Zealand Shipping, Kaipara (2)], 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Kaipara, but I cannot check the link), 3 ('uboat.net', Kaipara), 4 (image, Roscommon, also -02), 5 (image, Roscommon), 6 (image, Kaipara), 7 (Lloyd's Register data, 1937/38 thru 1945/46 ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 133.8 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 454 ft. 7 in., speed of 13 knots. Miramar indicate that the vessel was initially of 7613 gross tons & became 5882 tons later. Is that correct? Built for 'New Zealand Shipping Co. Ltd.', of London, which company served New Zealand ('NZ') & Australia. 38 WW2 convoy references including at least 4 N. Atlantic crossings, (difficult to tell how many), service to West Africa (Freetown), Caribbean & U.K. coastal. I suspect that the vessel's independent voyages, which I am not permitted to access, record service from NZ to the point at which they joined a convoy. While I have not been able to read the detail, in Jun. 1943, Kaipara rescued seamen from the lifeboats of ships torpedoed in the Atlantic, I think off the coast of Brazil. On Jul. 13, 1943, the vessel left Freetown, Sierra Leone, W. Africa,  for Liverpool, with a cargo of frozen meat ex Buenos Aires, in Convoy SL.133, a convoy of 43 ships. On Jul. 16, 1943, Kaipara was hit by a torpedo fired by U-306, Kapitänleutnant Claus von Trotha in command. At 13.30N/17.43W, off the African coast, W. of Gambia. No loss of life. The vessel was damaged but limped into nearby Dakar, Senegal. Where it was repaired over 7 months in some most difficult conditions. And then rejoined the war effort. Can you add to that story? In 1955, the vessel was transferred to 'Montreal - Australian New Zealand Line' ('MANZ Line') & would have served ports in eastern Canada, Caribbean, Australia & NZ. Also in 1955, the vessel was transferred to 'Avenue Shipping Company Limited', a NZ owned company formed in 1954, 'Trinder Anderson & Co. Ltd.' the managers, & renamed Roscommon. It was sold again, in 1962, to A. Halcoussis & Co., or 'A. Halcoussis Shipping Ltd.', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Chris. On Oct. 7, 1967, the vessel arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, to be broken up. Can you correct and/or expand the above?

230 Palomares
1896 tons
Hull 635

166358

Mary Sven
Sarabande
1938

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Palomares), 1 [MacAndrews, Palomares (1)], 2 (builder's style model, Palomares, sold at a Christie's 2000 auction), 3 (Wikipedia, HMS Palomares), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Palomares, but I cannot check the link), 5 ('uboat.net', HMS Palomares), 6 (Convoy PQ-17), 7 & 8 (images, Palamores), 9 (image, Palamores, but you must be registered to see it), 10 (image, Palomares, also -02), 11 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 90.1 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 297.2 ft., speed of 16 (or 15 1/2) knots (maybe 19 knots at her trials), with capacity for 12 passengers. Built for 'MacAndrews & Co.' ('MacAndrews'), of Liverpool or perhaps of London, then a subsidiary of Andrew Weir & Co. Ltd.'s 'United Baltic Corporation'. The vessel served in the company's fruit service, carrying bananas from the West Indies & likely also fruit from Spain. The vessel was purchased by the British Admiralty in 1940 & in 1941 was converted, at the Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Company's yard at Govan, Glasgow, River Clyde, into an anti-aircraft artillery ship with 6 4 in. & 8 2 pounder anti-aircraft guns. She was eventually, in 1943, fitted with radar to direct fighter aircraft, & became a Fighter Direction Ship. 48 WW2 convoy references which mainly seem to be acting as an escort vessel. Many such voyages in the Irish Sea. No convoys referenced after Dec. 1943 & I am advised that the independent voyages at 'convoyweb.org' do not clarify her later duties. In Mar. 1942, the vessel sailed for Seyðisfjörður, Iceland, & in Jun. 1942 served as an escort in Convoy PQ-17, which suffered enormous losses en route to Archangel, Russia, (only 11 of the 35 merchant ships safely reached their destination). Palomares returned to Loch Ewe in Sep. 1942, an escort ship in convoy QP.14. The vessel served in the Mediterranean, in Operation Torch, the Nov. 1942 invasion of French North Africa. On Jan. 22, 1944, the vessel was damaged by a mine off Anzio, Italy, during an amphibious assault. Palomares was towed to Naples, & later was towed to Belfast for repairs. At the end of WW2, the vessel was sold back to MacAndrews & served with them for many years. In 1959, the vessel was sold to 'Rederiet Oluf Svendsen', of Copenhagen, Denmark, P. B. P. Svendsen the managers, & renamed Mary Sven. In 1961, the vessel was sold again, to 'Sten A. Olsson AB', of Sweden, & renamed Sarabande. While I have not been able to read any detail, the vessel suffered a fire on Oct. 4, 1961. At 23.06N/59.20E, in the Gulf of Oman. The vessel drifted aground 20 miles NW of Sur, Oman (SE coast of the Arabian Peninsula) & presumably was a total loss. Can you correct and/or expand upon the above?

231 Pozarica
1893 tons
Hull 634

166331
1938

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image), 1 [MacAndrews, Pozarika (1)], 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Pozarica, but I cannot check the link. Beware ... the page that you come to includes a 2nd (Italian) vessel of the name), 3 ('MacAndrews' history), 4 (extensive data, Pozarica), 5 (data), 6 (Convoy PQ-17), 7 (image, Pozarica, also -01 & -02), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 90.1 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 16 knots. Built for MacAndrews & Co. Ltd., (of Liverpool or perhaps of London), then a subsidiary of Andrew Weir & Co. Ltd.'s 'United Baltic Corporation'. Designed as a fruit carrier for the Spanish service, but may also have carried wine & passengers ex Madiera. On Jun. 20, 1940, the vessel was requisitioned (or maybe purchased) by the Admiralty & converted, at the 'Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Company' yard at Govan, Glasgow, River Clyde, for use as an anti-aircraft auxiliary ship - HMS Pozarica. 35 WW2 convoy references (I think) as an escort, including multiple crossings of the Irish Sea to Belfast, service to Archangel, Russia, in Jun/Sep 1942, & later service in the western Mediterranean (Bône, Oran, Philippeville, now Skikda (Sakīkdah), all Algeria). In Mar. 1941, whilst undergoing 'working up' on the Clyde, Pozarica collided with Canadian destroyer HMCS Restigouche. She joined the Western Approaches Command after repairs were effected & escorted convoys between Milford Haven & ports in Ulster. In May 1942, she collided with a merchant ship (which one & where?) & was repaired at Belfast. On Jun. 27, 1942, the vessel left Reykjavik, Iceland, in PQ-17, a convoy of 41 (or 36) merchant ships, bound for Archangel, Russia. A disastrous & harrowing voyage, in the perpetual daylight of the Arctic Ocean - 24 of the merchant ships were lost. I refer you to the many WWW sites re PQ-17, including here, but the story & particularly the numbers of ships is quite confusing). Pozarica returned to the U.K. in Sep. 1942 & then served in the Mediterranean as part of the allied invasion of North Africa (Operation Torch). At 7:45 p.m. on Jan. 29, 1943, the vessel, serving as an escort in convoy TE-14 from Gibraltar to Bône (now Annaba), Algeria, was attacked by 21 German & Italian aircraft & was hit & disabled by an Italian torpedo bomber which hit her astern. At 37.04N/4.36E, off the Algerian coast. She was towed by Cadmus, a minesweeper, to Bougie, Algeria (now Bejaïa), where efforts were made to repair her. On Feb. 13, 1943, while those repairs were still being effected, the vessel capsized & sank. It would seem that that was not the end of the story. Pozarica was later re-floated, & towed to Savona, Italy, where it arrived on Jun. 14, 1951, to be broken up. Anything to add?

232 Starstone
5702 tons
Hull 645

166528
1938

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Starstone), 1 (modest data), 2 ('Thursday, 31 October', at page bottom), 3 (George Taylor, medal, 35% down), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Starstone, but I cannot check the link), 5 ('convoyweb.org', Convoy SL.45), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 131.6 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 431.9 ft., speed of 11 knots. Built for Alva Steamship Company, Navigation & Coal Trade Co. Ltd. the managers?, of London. 58 WW2 convoy references including, I think, 10 N. Atlantic crossings, many of which were independent, carrying such cargoes as grain & steel. Extensive service in Indian Ocean & into Australian & South American waters, also service in western Mediterranean & U.K. coastal.  On Oct. 26, 1940, commanded by Captain W. R. Thomas, the vessel joined convoy OB 235, with a cargo of coal from Barry, Wales, destined for the River Plate. 10 1/2 pages in a Bernard Edwards volume about the voyage. Stated speed of 11 knots above is suspect. Rather 10 knots but much slower when loaded & in adverse sea conditions - 'lamentably underpowered'. Could not maintain convoy speed & withdrew from convoy. Reasonably well armed. Attacked by Focke-Wulf Condor aircraft on Oct. 31, 1940, 200 miles W. of Ireland (at 54.12N/15.32W). 2 bombs landed & strafed by gunfire. The ship suffered major damage but was able to proceed to Greenock, River Clyde, under own steam. George Taylor, quartermaster, but helmsman at time of attack, was hit in eye by a bullet but stayed at his post. Deaths & major injuries amongst crew. Taylor granted 'George Medal'. Clearly the vessel was repaired & continued in service. She was broken up at Nagoya, Japan, in early 1963. Anything to add?

233 S. Thomé
5237 (or 5213) tons
Hull 643

5304073
1938

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per 1 (data), 2 (image), 3 (collision with Enright & 2 images), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 134.46 metres long, 129.7 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 12 knots, crew of 40. Built for 'Companhia Nacional de Navegação', of Lisbon, Portugal, & registered there. On Apl. 16, 1944, the vessel (Portugal was a neutral country) was westbound, in fog in the N. Atlantic, in close proximity to an eastbound convoy. USS Enright, was instructed to intercept the unidentified vessel & divert her from the convoy route. Enright collided with S. Thomé, which suffered slight damage. But Enright was crippled - a 9 degree list to port, a 65 ft. hole in her port quarter, all living compartments flooded & 1 life lost. The Enright damage took a month to repair. I presume there was an inquiry? On Dec. 19, 1971, the vessel arrived at Bilbao, Spain, to be broken up. WWW data is modest. Can you tell us more?

234 British Genius
8553 tons
Hull 644

167160
1939

A tanker. Per A (e-Bay image), 1 ('3 September 1942'), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert British Genius, but I cannot check the link), 3 & 4 (drunken girl, 1949 waitress), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 142.3 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 481 ft. 8 in., speed of 11 or 12 knots. Built for British Tanker Co. Ltd. ('Tanker'), of London. Tanker, the ship owning & operating subsidiary of British Petroleum Company, Ltd., was later (1956) restyled as 'BP Tanker Company Ltd.' 52 WW2 convoy references. Would seem to have been in the Persian Gulf / Indian Ocean area for much of the war (Bandar Abbas, Aden, Bombay, Madras, Colombo), service in Mediterranean, to Freetown, W. Africa & U.K. local. I thought that she might have been damaged, since no convoy refs. after May 1944. But she was independent after that time, mainly in the Mediterranean but also to Australian ports including Brisbane & Fremantle. The vessel was unsuccessfully attacked, twice in fact, by Japanese submarine I-29 on Sep. 3, 1942, when in the Gulf of Aden. An item of trivia! In May 1949, 3 sailors apparently got a Southampton waitress drunk, took her aboard the vessel & hid her for 12 days. Not clear where she was landed, possibly at Miami. She proved to be, in fact, under age. The vessel was overhauled & dry docked at Harland & Wolff, at Southampton in 1949. It would seem that the vessel, was laid up in the River Fal at Falmouth, Cornwall, along with other BP tankers, also in 1959. How long for? No word about her peacetime service history. On May 12, 1961, the vessel arrived at the Briton Ferry, Wales, ship breaking facilities of T. W. Ward Ltd., to be broken up. WWW data is really most limited. Anything you can add?

235 Merchant Prince
5229 tons
Hull 651

167333
1939

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Merchant Prince), 1 (data), 2 ('uboat.net', torpedoed 1943, image), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Merchant Prince, but I cannot check the link), 4 (image), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 130.1 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 442 ft. 11 in., speed of 11 or 11 1/2 knots. Built for Drake Shipping Co. Ltd., of London, which company was managed by 'Lykiardopulo & Co. Ltd.' ('Lykiardopulo'), of Kefalonia, Greece, & indeed, per Roger Jordan, was a subsidiary of Lykiardopulo. 48 WW2 convoy references, including 7 N. Atlantic crossings, thru late Dec. 1942, generally carrying grain or lumber but on occasion iron, cotton & nuts. Also U.K. coastal, service on the W. coast of N. America, service (independent) to Cape Town & the Indian Ocean etc., & into the Mediterranean. At 11.20 a.m. on Mar. 16, 1943, while in convoy ET-14, en route, in ballast, from Bône, Algeria, (now Annaba) to Gibraltar, with 44 aboard all told, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-77, Kapitänleutnant Otto Hartmann in command. At 36.10N/00.30W, approx. 40 miles NW of Oran, Algeria. One life was lost in the attack. While I have not read the circumstances, it would appear that the vessel was abandoned, but was re-boarded the next day, towed to Oran & beached there. The vessel left Oran on Jul. 18, 1944, joined a convoy at Gibraltar three days later, joined convoy SL-164, & arrived at Liverpool on Aug. 1/2, 1944. The vessel must have been permanently repaired at Oran in the 15 months she was there, because the vessel was clearly operational when she arrived at Liverpool. The vessel was laid up at Hong Kong from Jul. 25, 1962. On Sep. 1, 1962, the vessel was in collision with Grosvenor Navigator during typhoon Wanda (note: that link refers only to Ocean Glory being in collision with Grosvenor Navigator). Merchant Prince severely damaged, was declared a constructive total loss & in Jun. 1963 was sold to Hong Kong based ship breakers. In Jun. 1963, the vessel arrived at the Hong Kong ship breaking facilities of 'Hong Kong Salvage & Towage Co. Ltd.', to be broken up. Can you tell us more?

236 Rodsley
5000 tons
Hull 654

165777
5421297

Reserv
Sirenes
Marcos G. F.
Sampaguita
Philippine Sampaguita
1939

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Rodsley, but I cannot check the link), 2 & 3 (Swedish pages, Reserv, images), 4 & 5 (links 2 & 3 translated), 6 [Johnson Line, Reserv, (2)], 7 (Bintang, 1942 sinking), 8 (1971 arrest of Philippine Sampaguita), 9 (image, Philippine Sampaguita), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 133.9 metres long overall, 127.0 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 (or 9 only) knots, signal letters SIKN. Built for 'Thomasson Shipping Co. Ltd.', Stephens, Sutton & Co. Ltd., the managers, both of Newcastle. 61 WW2 convoy references including 4 N. Atlantic crossings with cargoes of wheat, lumber, newsprint & spelter (i.e. zinc), service in the Caribbean, to Seine Bay, France, re the Normandy landings, extensively in Indian Ocean (Bombay, Colombo, Calcutta, Cape Town, Durban), in the Mediterranean (Tripoli, Alexandria, Malta etc.), West Africa & U.K. coastal. The vessel was frequently independent - on the W. coast of N. America & to S. America too, a long list of ports indeed. On Nov. 21, 1942, Bintang was sunk by 2 torpedoes fired by U-160 about 650 miles E. of Trinidad. 22 lives were lost in the attack & the 51 survivors took to rafts, the boats having all been destroyed. On or about Dec. 8, 1942, Rodsley rescued 12 survivors from one of those rafts & landed them at Port of Spain, Trinidad. On Dec. 22, 1951, the vessel was sold, for £625,000, to 'Rederiaktiebolaget Nordstjernan', i.e. Rederi A/B Nordstjernan known as Johnson Line, of Stockholm, Sweden, & renamed Reserv. It would appear that the vessel traded between the U.S.A. & Sweden, carrying coal. On Apl. 13, 1952, in thick fog in the straits of Dover, the vessel was in collision, bow to bow, with Edison Skipper, an American tanker, & suffered significant bow damage. It would seem that both vessels were travelling too fast & were held equally at blame. Reserv was repaired in France. After repair, the vessel was at Newport News, Virginia. 2 days after departure from Newport News, she suffered a serious engine failure & was towed back for repairs. Which repairs may have taken six months to effect. In 1952, or 1953, the vessel was sold to 'A. I. Langfeldt & Co.' ('Langfeldt'), of Kristiansand, Norway, for £290,000, & renamed Sirenes. The name 'A/S Oddero' is also referenced re that sale - the ship's managers perhaps? In 1963, the vessel was sold to 'J. Livanos & Sons', of Piraeus, Greece, 'Loutra Maritime Corp.' presumably the managers, & renamed Marcos G. F.  In 1965, the vessel was acquired by 'The Bradman Co. Inc.', of Manila, the Philippines, & renamed Sampaguita. Sampaguita? A plant of the jasmine family, the national flower of the Philippines. From Apl. 16, 1965, the vessel was undergoing repairs at Rotterdam re an engine failure. In 1966, the vessel was sold again, to 'Benigno Lim', of Manila, & renamed Philippine Sampaguita. 'Laguna Nav Co. Inc.', the managers, I presume. While I have not read the circumstances, in Feb. 1971, the vessel was arrested at Singapore & in Aug. 1971 it was sold at public auction for $390,000. In 1971/2 the vessel was broken up at Singapore. A portion of the above data came from Swedish pages, most difficult to translate. The above may well need correction. A wonderfully detailed model of Rodsley/Rawnsley/Rookley/Reaveley is in the Thomson Ship Models Collection at the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto, Canada. Images of the model are in the beautiful volume - 'Ship Models: The Thomson Collection at the Art Gallery of Ontario'. Can you tell us more?

237 Willowbank
5041 (or 5042) tons
Hull 648

165955
1939

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Andrew Weir, Willowbank (2)],  2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Willowbank, but I cannot check the link), 3 ('uboat.net', sinking, Willowbank), 4 ('wrecksite.eu', sinking, Willowbank), 5 (ref., 1939, Willowbank), 6 (image, I think), 7 ('Wednesday, 12th June 1940"), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 129.2 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 423.8 ft., speed of 11 (or 12) knots. Built for Bank Line Ltd. (Andrew Weir & Co.), of Glasgow. Just 4 WW2 convoy references, including service to Casablanca, Morocco, & Freetown, West Africa & clearly to Durban, South Africa, also. On May 31, 1940, the vessel left Freetown in Convoy SL-34, carrying 8750 tons of maize from Durban, South Africa, to Hull. At 7:38 p.m., on Jun. 12, 1940, a torpedo was  fired by U-46, Kapitänleutnant Engelbert Endrass in command, off Cape Finisterre in the Western Approaches. It missed Willowbank but instead hit Barbara Marie (built at Sunderland in 1928, by Priestman). 8 minutes later U-46 fired a second torpedo. This torpedo did not miss - it hit Willowbank forward. Willowbank sank by the bow, at 44.16N/13.54W, about 220 miles WNW of Cape Finisterre. All of the 51 crew all told, including Donald Gillies her captain, were picked up by Swedru. I have not read where the crew were landed, but Swedru was bound for Liverpool, so that is likely where the crew were landed. So no loss of life. Can you tell us more?

238   Catrine
5218 tons
Hull 656

167433

Tove
Tona
1940

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Catrine, but I cannot check the link), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.0 metres long overall, speed of 11 knots. Built for 'Pontypridd Steamship Company Ltd.' (Morel Ltd.), of London. 55 WW2 convoy references including 11 (or maybe 12) N. Atlantic crossings, carrying such cargoes as lumber, wheat, apples & frequently MT (can anybody tell us what that means). Also, extensive service in the Indian Ocean (Nov1941/Jan1942 & May/Aug 1942), in Australian waters (May/Jun 1944) & on the W. coast of N. America (Jun/Jul 1940). And also U.K. coastal voyages. On Dec. 29, 1940, the vessel was mined & damaged in Liverpool Bay, & on the 30th (I presume in Dec. 1940) hit another mine in Queens Channel, Liverpool. On Mar. 12, 1941, the vessel was damaged by aircraft at Liverpool. All of which would seem to have put her out of commission for many months, until Sep. 1941. In 1948, Morel Ltd. became the vessel's owners & the ship was registered at Barry Island, S. Wales. Bob Crosbie joined the vessel in 1947 at Montreal, Quebec, Canada. He advises (thanks Bob!) that the ship, Captain Owen in command, travelled via Cornerbrook, Newfoundland, to the Indian Ocean & then back to N. America. A mixed cargo eastbound which included fabricated steel, newsprint, & a deck cargo of three large locomotives & on the return journey coconut oil, carpets, spices & brassware for Halifax, Boston & New York. And then grain to Hamburg, Germany. Bob's complete words can be read here. In 1956, the vessel was sold to 'Transportes Maritimos Atlas, S.A.', Wheelock Marden & Co., the manager?, of Hong Kong, renamed Tove & registered at Panama. In 1963, the vessel was sold to 'Panamanian Oriental Steamship Corporation', of Panama & renamed Tona. On Sep. 15, 1966, the ship was towed from Moji to Kobe (both Japan) after an engine breakdown. The vessel broke adrift, grounded & was declared a constructive total loss (bottom damage). On Mar. 9, 1967, the vessel arrived at Hirao, Japan, to be scrapped. Can anybody possibly provide an image & add anything?

239 Duke of Athens
5217 (or 5134) tons
Hull 665

168011

Breeze
San John P.
Theokletos
1940

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Duke of Athens), 1 (article, Duke of Athens in WW2), 2 (data, Duke of Athens), 3 (image, Duke of Athens), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Duke of Athens, but I cannot check the link), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.0 metres long overall, 128.4 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 427 ft., speed of 10 knots. Built for Trent Maritime Company Ltd., (S. Livanos & Co., the managers), both of London. 52 WWW convoy references, including at least 4 N. Atlantic crossings, service to Africa (Freetown, Cape Town, Durban), Egypt (Port Said), many U.K. coastal. In the interesting account at 1, 'G. Griffiths' refers to a 'largely unescorted' voyage in the period of Dec. 22, 1941 to Apl. 21, 1942  from U.K. (Milford Haven, joined convoy OM/KMS.15 at Liverpool) to Port Said via Cape Town & Bathurst (S. Africa), & Suez, with a cargo of tanks, Bren gun carriers, ammunition, 4 steam locomotives, with their tenders, etc. And then from Port Tewfik (Suez) to Fremantle (Perth) & Port Adelaide, both Australia, as a troopship, carrying 259 personnel of the 6th Division of the Australian Cavalry Regiment with their vehicles & equipment. Later, from 1954, the vessel was, I read, chartered to Palm Line. The vessel was sold, in 1961, to Atlantic Freighters Ltd., of Panama, Liberian flag, & renamed Breeze. It was sold again, in 1965, to 'Compania Naviera Prodromos SA', of Panama, Liberian flag, & renamed San John P. In 1967, it was sold for the last time, to 'Mardinamico Compania Naviera SA', of Mogadishu, Somalia, & renamed Theokletos. On Oct. 23, 1969, the vessel arrived at the facilities of Sind Steel Corporation Ltd., at Gadani Beach, Pakistan, to be broken up.  Can anybody add anything? Your contribution would be most welcome.

240   Rawnsley
4998 tons
Hull 661

165786
1940

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data, Rawnsley), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Rawnsley, but I cannot check the link), 3 (Lloyd's Register data, 1940/41 thru 1941/42, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 133.9 metres (439.8 ft.) long overall, 127.0 metres (423.2 ft.) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 knots, signal letters GDMD. Built for Red 'R' Steamship Company Ltd., of Newcastle, (Stephens Sutton Limited, the owners & managers). Just 8 WW2 convoy references including a single N. Atlantic crossing carrying lumber & wheat (HX.40 in Oct. 1940). On May 8, 1941, the vessel was bombed & aerial torpedo damaged en route in convoy AN.30 from Port Said, Egypt, to Suda Bay, (NW coast of Crete), maybe ex Haifa, Israel. At 34.56N/26.31E. The vessel was taken in tow for Makryalo Bay (E. end of Crete on S. side) to be beached but put into Hierapetra Bay & anchored due to bad weather. The vessel sank there, at 34.56N/26.31E, on May 12, 1941. Hierapetra is, I believe, Ierápetra on the SE coast of Crete. A wonderfully detailed model of Rodsley/Rawnsley/Rookley/Reaveley is in the Thomson Ship Models Collection at the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto, Canada. Images of the model are in the beautiful volume - 'Ship Models: The Thomson Collection at the Art Gallery of Ontario'. Can anybody provide an image & tell us more?

241 Reaveley
4998 tons
Hull 666

165802

Grenehurst
La Barranca
Westwind
Universal Mariner
1940

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Reaveley, but I cannot check the link), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 133.9 metres long, speed of 11 knots. Built for Stephens, Sutton Limited, of Newcastle. 39 WW2 convoy references including 9 N. Atlantic crossings, many of them independent, carrying such cargoes as steel, timber, grain, bauxite, etc. Extensive service, mostly independent, in Australian waters, to South Africa & South America, in Indian Ocean, on W. coast of N. America, the list of voyages is long indeed. In 1948, the vessel was sold to Grenehurst Shipping Co. Ltd. (Hadjilias & Co., the manager?), of London, & renamed Grenehurst. It was sold again, in 1956, to Buries, Markes Ltd., of London, & renamed La Barranca. In 1959, the vessel was sold to Eastwind Nav. Co., Wu Deh-Ling, the manager?, of Hong Kong, & renamed Westwind. And in 1966 the vessel was sold for the last time, to Dalcape Shipping Co. of Hong Kong, International SS Co. the manager?, & renamed Universal Mariner. In Nov. 1969, the vessel arrived at Whampoa (i.e. Huangpu, an outer port of Guangzhou, China) to be broken up. A wonderfully detailed model of Rodsley/Rawnsley/ Rookley/ Reaveley is in the Thomson Ship Models Collection at the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto, Canada. Images of the model are in the beautiful volume - 'Ship Models: The Thomson Collection at the Art Gallery of Ontario'. Can anybody provide another image & tell us more?

242 Rookley
4998 tons
Hull 663

165789

Despoina
Jumbo
Ibis II
1940

A Doxford 'Economy' cargo ship'. Per 1 (data, Rookley), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Rookley, but I cannot check the link), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 133.9 metres long overall, 127.0 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots, crew of 34. The vessel was built, at a cost of £130,647, for 'Thomasson Shipping Co., Ltd.' ('Thomasson'), of London, with 'Stephens Sutton Limited' ('Stephens'), of Newcastle, the managers. But requisitioned by the Ministry of War Transport for the duration of WW2 (returned to Thomasson on Mar. 6, 1946). The Thomasson vessels, together with other vessels managed by Stephens, formed a fleet known as the  'Red "R" Fleet'. 47 convoy references in WW2, including at least 4 voyages across the N. Atlantic, voyages to W. Africa (Freetown, Sierra Leone & Takoradi, Ghana), into Indian Ocean (Bombay, Calcutta, Colombo & Cape Town), & many U.K. coastal voyages. Carried grain, fertilizer, timber etc. In 1956, the vessel was sold to Margaronis & Fardis, of Athens, Greece, & renamed Despoina. And in 1960, the vessel was sold to D. P. Margaronis, of Athens, with no change of vessel name. In 1966, the vessel was sold again, to Cristalinimar S.A., of Panama, (Genario Della Gatta, of Naples, the manager?) & renamed Jumbo. In 1970, the vessel was renamed Ibis II. On Jun. 24, 1971, the vessel arrived at the Split, Yugoslavia, ship breaking facilities of Brodospas, to be broken up. A wonderfully detailed model of Rodsley/Rawnsley/Rookley/Reaveley is in the Thomson Ship Models Collection at the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto, Canada. Images of the model are in the beautiful volume - 'Ship Models: The Thomson Collection at the Art Gallery of Ontario'. Can anybody tell us more?

243 Sutherland
5172 tons
Hull 658

165783

Grainton
La Bahia
San John
Ledra
1940

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data, Sutherland), 2 ('Plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Sutherland, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135 metres long overall, 442 ft. 11 in., speed of 10 1/2 knots. Built for B. J. Sutherland & Co. Ltd. of Newcastle. 61 WW2 convoy references, including 8 or 9 N. Atlantic crossings, carrying such cargoes as sugar, grain, lead & lumber. Many times in Indian Ocean waters (Durban, Colombo, Bombay, Karachi) & in Mediterranean (Augusta, Bari, Naples etc). And U.K. coastal of course. In 1953, the vessel was sold to The Carlton Steamship Company Ltd.  & The Cambray Steamship Company Ltd. (Chapman & Willan Ltd. managers) & renamed Grainton. And in 1957, was sold to Buries, Markes Ltd., of London, & renamed La Bahia. In 1961, the vessel was sold again, to Valerosa Cia. Nav. S.A., of Panama, (M. J. Lemos Co., the manager?) & renamed San John (registered at Lebanon). In 1965, the vessel was sold to Atlas Shipping & Trading Co. Ltd., of Cyprus (same manager), & renamed Ledra. On Nov. 11, 1967, while  en route from Madras, India, to Poland, or perhaps from Calcutta, India, to Rijeka (was Yugoslavia but now Croatia) instead, with 9376 tons of iron ore, the vessel tried to avoid a collision with a local fishing boat. It ran aground on Alpee (or Alphus) Shoal, off the E. coast of Sri Lanka. At 7.25.30N/81.51.18E (or 7.24.30N), & became waterlogged. The vessel broke in two & was abandoned. It was subsequently boarded by looters, who 'set the accommodation on fire'. No loss of life - the entire crew took to one lifeboat & landed on the nearby shore. Can anybody tell us more? Did the vessel, in fact, hit that fishing boat?

244   Tower Grange
5226 tons
Hull 660

167617
1940

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('uboat.net', sinking data), 2 ('Plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data), 3 (an extensive account of the final voyage by Captain Williamson), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Tower Grange, but I cannot check the link), 5 (sinking data), 6 (U-154), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 130.3 metres long, speed of 12 knots, signal letters GMJW. Built for Tower Steamship Co. Ltd., Counties Ship Management Co. Ltd., of London ('Counties') the managers. Just 11 WW2 convoy references including 2 North Atlantic crossings, with, respectively, lumber & lead & a general cargo. The vessel was likely in Far East or Australian waters from Apl. to Aug. 1941, & from May 1942. On Nov. 18, 1942, while en route, unescorted, from Calcutta, India, to U.K., via Trinidad, with general cargo including 1800 tons of manganese ore, & modestly armed, the vessel was hit by 2 torpedoes fired by U-154, Fregattenkapitän Heinrich Schuch in command, (an initial salvo of 3 torpedoes missed) & sank 20 minutes later about 250 miles NE of Cayenne, French Guiana. At 6.20N/49.10W, off northern Brazil. 6 died, 41 survived. The survivors, at sea for many days, were rescued (30) by Castalia & (11) by Baron Belhaven. All  were landed in Trinidad. 3 details the experience of Tower Grange's master, Captain William H. (Henry) Williamson, last to leave the vessel, who had to beat a large shark 'on the head with a hammer' to stop it repeatedly ramming & battering the damaged lifeboat. Can anyone add to or correct the above? An image?

245 Antar
5222 (later 5323) tons
Hull 668

168066

Garbeta
1941

An 'Improved Doxford Economy' (cargo) ship. Per 1 [British India, Garbeta (2)], 2 (Antar, 'Plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Antar, but beware! Only 52 of the 137 convoys listed are re this vessel. I cannot check the link), 4 & 5 (images, Garbeta), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 130.1 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 427.0 ft., signal letters GMSZ. Built for 'New Egypt & Levant Shipping Co. Ltd.', of London, (T. Bowen Rees & Co., the managers). 52 WW2 convoy references including 8 N. Atlantic crossings frequently carrying grain or flour but also steel & general cargo. Served in the Indian Ocean (Colombo, Bombay, Bandar Abbas, Aden), to Antwerp, Belgium, in Apl. 1945 & many U.K. coastal. In 1948, the vessel was sold to British India Steam Navigation Company & renamed Garbeta. The vessel visited Auckland, New Zealand on May 22, 1956 & on Aug. 3, 1961. In 1957, the vessel carried livestock from Australia to Burma. On Apl. 27, 1963, the vessel arrived at the Hong Kong ship breaking facilities of 'Hong Kong Salvage & Towage Co. Ltd.' to be scrapped. Garbeta? A small town in West Bengal, India. WWW data re this vessel is quite limited. Need help!

246 Atlantic City
5133 (or 5212 or 5281) tons
Hull 662

165859

Achillet
1941

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Achillet), 1 [William Reardon Smith, Atlantic City (3)], 2 (ship's specifications), 3 (Atlantic City, Lloyd's Register data, 'plimsollshipdata.org', 1940/41 thru 1945/46), 4 ('uboat.net', image, Atlantic City hit & abandoned 1941), 5 & 6 (images, Atlantic City), 7 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Atlantic City, but I cannot check the link), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 415.0 ft. long (126.49 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 131.8 metres long overall, speed of 12 1/2 knots, signal letters GBQB. Built for Leeds Shipping Co. Ltd., of  Cardiff (or perhaps Bideford), owned by Sir William Reardon Smith & Sons Ltd. ('Reardon Smith'). 45 WW2 convoy references including at least 7 N. Atlantic crossings, service in Mediterranean (Algiers, Bône, Port Said, Alexandria), in Caribbean (Guantanamo, Key West), to West Africa (Freetown, Takoradi) & U.K. coastal. In Jul. 1941, Atlantic City was in convoy OS-1, en route from Liverpool to Freetown, Sierra Leone. At 3:28 a.m. on Jul. 26, 1941, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-141, Kapitänleutnant Philipp Schüler in command, at 55.42N/09.58W, NW of Ireland, 365 miles off Bloody Foreland. Atlantic City was abandoned, but re-boarded. I have not read the circumstances, which seem to be most interesting. Any loss of life? It made it to the Clyde (under tow, I presume) where repairs were effected & in Nov. 1941 the vessel resumed WW2 service. In 1957, when off the South African E. coast, the vessel was hit by a freak sea which smashed the bridge windows & injured both the Captain (John Lloyd) & the chief officer. In 1962, the vessel was sold to Achillet Cia Naviera SA ('Naviera'), of Bierut, Lebanon, & renamed Achillet. The name of 'Achille Halcoussis & Co.', of Piræus, Greece is mentioned with reference to Achillet. Perhaps that company owned Naviera? The vessel was managed by Reardon Smith, I read. On Feb. 25, 1971, while en route from Sfax, Tunisia, to Madras, India, via Dakar, Senegal, with a cargo of phosphates, the vessel's hull fractured in heavy weather & the ship took on water, when off the W. coast of Africa. The crew were, it would seem, rescued by Kaira, (a vessel not listed by Miramar, described as a factory ship). Achillet was last seen submerged to deck level & soon foundered. At 19.00S/10.19E, 260 miles NW of Walvis Bay, Skeleton Coast, Namibia. Was there an inquiry, I wonder? Need help!

247 Daghestan
7248 tons
Hull 674

165812
5019032

Annefield
1941

A cargo ship. Per 1 [data about 60% down, Daghestan (4)], 2 (model), 3 (Daghestan, 'Plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data), 4 (Auckland), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Daghestan, but I cannot check the link), 6 (CAM), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.0 metres long overall, 128.6 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 427.0 ft., speed of 10 1/2 knots, signal letters BCPP. A 'Catapult Armed Merchantman' ('CAM'), i.e. a British merchantman fitted with a catapult that could launch, but not recover, a single fighter aircraft, most often a used 'Sea Hurricane'. There were 35 of them in WW2, it would seem. A rocket propelled trolley carried the aircraft on a catapult fitted in the bow of the ship. The pilot? After his engagement, he would hope to make it to land or ditch in the sea close to his vessel, or another Allied vessel, & be picked up. In 1943, the vessel was equipped with two helicopter landing pads. Built for Hindustan Steam Shipping Co. Ltd., the main ship owning arm of Common Brothers Ltd., of Newcastle. 56 WW2 convoy references, including 18 voyages across the N. Atlantic. Visited Auckland, New Zealand, on Feb. 12, 1951. The vessel was sold, in 1957, to Asimarfield Shipping Corp., of Liberia, & renamed Annefield. On Feb. 21, 1969, the vessel arrived at the Santander, Spain,  ship breaking facilities of Isaac Manuel Varela Davalillo, to be broken up. WWW data about vessel is most limited. Am grateful for the data at 1. Can you add anything? Another image, perhaps?

248 Eastern City
5185 tons
Hull 667

165860

Helmos
Nicopaul
1941

A cargo ship. Per 1 [William Reardon Smith, Eastern City (3)], 2 (image, Eastern City, also -03, -05), 3 (Eastern City, 'Plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data), 4 (image, Eastern City), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Eastern City, but I cannot check the link), 6 (Eastern City, CAM), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 131.8 metres long overall, 126.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 415.0 ft., speed of 12 1/2 knots, signal letters GBRB. Built for Leeds Shipping Co. Ltd., of  Cardiff (or perhaps Bideford), owned by Sir William Reardon Smith & Sons Ltd. ('Reardon Smith'). 54 WW2 convoy references including at least 10 N. Atlantic crossings (mostly carrying grain), service in the Mediterranean (Bône, Port Said, Philippeville, Tripoli), in the Indian Ocean (Aden, Bombay, Calcutta, Colombo, Kilindini, Durban), & U.K. coastal. A number of the convoys refer to Eastern City being a 'CAM' ship, & indeed the vessel was a 'Catapult Aircraft Merchantman', fitted with a rocket-launched Hurricane fighter. I read that Eastern City would be stationed at the outer corner of a convoy to provide free flying space for the Hurricane when it was launched to fight off enemy air reconnaissance aircraft. See Empire Day for a fuller explanation of such a ship. In 1953, or maybe in 1954, the ship was damaged during a gale, when loading grain at Geraldton, Western Australia. And the wharf itself, which was missing fender walls & a hauling-off buoy, was damaged also. The resulting legal case, which found in favour of the ship, would seem to have become a major maritime legal precedent. In 1962, the vessel was sold to Helmos Cia Naviera SA, of Bierut, Lebanon, & renamed Helmos. And was renamed Nicopaul in 1969. On Apl. 8, 1970, the vessel arrived at Whampoa, (i.e. Huangpu, an outer port of Guangzhou, China), to be broken up. Need help!

249 Empire Day
7242 tons
Hull 673

168914
1941

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('uboat.net', data & image), 2 ('wrecksite.eu', data), 3 (image), 5 (Empire Day, 'Plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data), 6 (U-198), 7 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire Day, but I cannot check the link), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.0 metres long overall, 130.8 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 429 ft., single screw, speed of 10 knots, signal letters BCMG. Built for the Ministry of War Transport, with Stephens, Sutton Ltd., of Glasgow, the initial managers, soon to become Lyle Shipping Co. Ltd. The vessel was converted, in 1942, to a CAM (Catapult Aircraft Merchantman) ship, with a Hawker Sea Hurricane fighter mounted on a catapult & armed with 1-4 in., 1-12 pdr., & 2-20 mm. guns. The fighter would be launched to attack Focke-Wulf reconnaissance aircraft approaching a convoy, after which the pilot would ditch or parachute down & hope to be rescued, while the aircraft was lost. 39 WW2 convoy references, including at least 8 N. Atlantic crossings, service in Indian Ocean (Colombo, Calcutta, Bombay, Madras, Kilindini in Kenya, Lourenço Marques), to South Africa (Durban), Mediterranean (Port Said, Bône). Stephens, Sutton Ltd. would seem to have become the manager again. On Aug. 7, 1944, under the command of Charles G. (Gordon) Mallett, while (that day) unescorted & en route from Lourenço Marques, Mozambique, to Aden & Port Said with a cargo of coal, the vessel was torpedoed & sunk by U-198, Oberleutnant zur See Burkhard Heusinger von Waldegg in command, about 200 miles E. of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. At 7.06S/42.00E. The 42 aboard were landed (have not read how) on the island of Zanzibar including the Master, but the 43rd crew member, chief officer Robert C. (Courtney) Selfe, was taken prisoner aboard U-198 & was lost when U-198 was sunk by a depth charge near Seychelles on Aug. 12, 1944. Can you help? Another image perhaps?

250 Empire Latimer
7244 tons
Hull 680

169004

Kronprinsessen
Polytrader
Flora M.
1941

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data in Norwegian & image), 2 (image, Polytrader, & -06), 4 ('warsailors.com', extensive WW2 data incl. independent voyages that I am not permitted to access at 'convoyweb.org', detailed narrative at page bottom), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire Latimer, but I cannot check the link), 6 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Kronprinsessen, but I cannot check the link), 7 (Lloyd's Register data, 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.0 metres long overall, 128.5 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 429 ft., single screw, speed of 10 knots, signal letters BCQJ & later LNAR. Built for the Ministry of War Transport, managed by 'Dodd, Thomson & Co. Ltd.', of London. The vessel's maiden voyage was to South Africa. Just 5 WW2 convoy references as Empire Latimer, including 1 N. Atlantic crossing. On Jul. 28, 1942, when at New York, the vessel was allocated to the Norwegian Government (Nortraship), Oslo, & was renamed Kronprinsessen. 34 WW2 convoy references as Kronprinsessen, including at least 9 N. Atlantic crossings, service in Indian Ocean (Aden, Bandar-Abbas, Bombay, Cape Town), also Port Said, E. seaboard of N. America incl. Caribbean & Canada). Also extensively to S. America (independent). The vessel was sold, on Feb. 15, 1946, for 4.2 million kroner, to 'Kristiansands Tankredi AS', of Kristiansand, Norway, & renamed Polytrader, 'Einar Rasmussen', the manager. In Jul. 1962, the vessel was sold to 'Marenviado Compagnia Navigazione SA', of Panama, managed by Loucas G. Matsas & Charalambos L. Matsas, of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Flora M. Registered at Monrovia, Liberia. Am confused as to what, if anything, happened to the ownership status of the vessel in 1965 (Miramar). Can anybody advise? On Jan. 22, 1966, the vessel was in collision with Oka, which vessel was owned by 'Sovtorgflot' & was en route from Klaipeda, Lithuania, to Rotterdam. At 53.31N/5.16E, nr. West Frisian Islands, northern Netherlands. Oka was beached at Terschelling Island, & later abandoned. Have not read the circumstances. On Dec. 12, 1968, the vessel arrived at the ship breaking facilities of 'Seibu Kogyo K.K.', at Mihara, Japan, to be broken up. A very long tow. Can you help? Another image perhaps?

251 Empire Mist
7241 (or 7251) tons
Hull 669

168664
5154179

King David
Hongkong Venture
1941

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire Mist, but I cannot check the link), 2 (ship's bell, Empire Mist, found at Modesto, California, now in Australia), 3 (Diloma, 1942 collision), 4 [King Line, King David (4)], 5, 6 & 7 (images, King David - but you must be registered to see them!), 8 (image, King David, also -02), 9 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Empire Mist, 1940/41 thru 1945/46), 10 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, King David, 1945/46), 11 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.0 metres (442.9 ft.) long overall, 128.4 metres (427.0 ft.) perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters GPJC, speed? Built as Empire Mist for the Ministry of War Transport, managed by 'Haldin & Phillips Ltd.' & from 1943 by 'Dodd, Thomson & Co. Ltd.'. 35 WW2 convoy references including 4 or maybe 5 North Atlantic crossings, (carrying general cargo, one with lumber piled 12 ft. high on the decks & 2 locomotives), service in Mediterranean (Augusta, Bari, Naples, Leghorn, Port Said), in Caribbean (Trinidad, Guantanamo, Key West), in Indian Ocean (Aden, Bombay), to Freetown, West Africa, & U.K. coastal. In Feb. 1942, the vessel was in collision with Diloma, a Shell tanker, in the River Mersey. The vessel was in the Indian Ocean in Nov. 1942, & on the 19th, spotted a submarine 100 miles N. of Trincomalee, Ceylon, now Sri Lanka. In Jan. 1944, 12 days out of Karachi, Pakistan, & bound for Chile to load nitrates, the vessel diverted to Perth, Western Australia, because of a smallpox outbreak. In 1945, the vessel was sold to King Line Ltd., of London, Dodd, Thomson & Co. Ltd. the managers, & renamed King David. The ship visited Auckland, New Zealand, twice, on May 25, 1953 & Feb. 7, 1961. In 1962 (or maybe in 1963), the ship was sold to 'Pan Norse Steamship S.A.', of Panama, (have seen references to Wallem & Co. Ltd., of Hong Kong) & renamed Hongkong Venture. Managed by T. Y. Chao, of Hong Kong. Registered at Monrovia, Liberia. In 1966, the vessel was sold to 'Unity Carriers Inc.', of Monrovia, Liberia, Wah Kwong & Co. Ltd., of Hong Kong, the managers, with no change of vessel name. On Apl. 19, 1969, the vessel arrived at the Hong Kong ship breaking facilities of 'Ming Hing & Co.', to be broken up. Actual break up was under way by the end of the month. Can you add anything additional? Another image perhaps?

252 Empire Raleigh
7240 tons
Hull 677

168925

Vermeer
Zonnewijk
Antonakis
1941

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Wikipedia, data), 2 (West Hartlepool, Empire Raleigh, page bottom), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire Raleigh, but I cannot check the link), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Vermeer, but I cannot check the link), 6 (United Netherlands, page bottom, Vermeer), 7 (image Zonnewijk) 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 130.7 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular (429 ft.), speed of 10 knots. Built for the Ministry of War Transport & managed by West Hartlepool Steam Navigation Company, of West Hartlepool. 6 WW2 convoy references as Empire Raleigh including one N. Atlantic crossing & a voyage to Freetown, West Africa. The vessel was allocated, in 1942, to the Netherlands Government & renamed Vermeer. Managed by 'N.V. Vereenigde Nederlandsche Scheepvaartmaatschappij', i.e. United Netherlands Navigation Company. 23 WW2 convoy references as Vermeer, including 4  N. Atlantic crossings, 2 of them independent, service in Indian Ocean (Durban, Bandar Abbas, Karachi, Aden), to Australia & New Zealand waters in May/Jul 1944, a voyage to Alexandria & one to Antwerp in Mar. 1945. Most of the vessel's voyages were independent, it would seem. The vessel was sold, in 1946, to 'Stoomscheep Maatschappij Wijklijn NV', managed by Erhardt & Dekkers, of Rotterdam, & renamed Zonnewijk. And sold again, in 1948, to 'N.V. Stoomvaart Maats Wijklijn', of Rotterdam, with no change of vessel name. The vessel was sold for the last time in 1961, to 'Compagnia Navigazione de Egeo', of Panama, managed by Lemos & Pateras Ltd., & renamed Antonakis operating under the Greek flag. On Dec. 6, 1961, while en route from Santiago de Cuba, Cuba, to Shanghai, China, with a cargo of sugar, the vessel ran aground in dense fog, broke in two & was a total loss - at Cape Spartel (often spelled Spartal), 12 km. W. of Tangier, Morocco. Any loss of life? At 35.43N/05.57.45W. Can you help? Another image perhaps?

253 Empire Spray
7242 (or 7308) tons
Hull 671

168907

Gerard Dou
Marken
Inchmull
1941

A cargo ship. Per 1 [data 50% down, '8th November 2007' Inchmull (3)], 2 [Inch Steamship, Inchmull (3)], 3 [Douglas Steamship Company, Ltd., Inchmull], 4 (West Hartlepool, managed, at page bottom, Empire Spray), 5 ('pdf', pages 4/5, data & Inchmull image), 7 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire Spray or Gerard Dou), 8 (CAM), 9 (Lloyd's Register data, 1940/41 thru 1942/43, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org', Empire Spray), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.0 (or 130.78) metres long ovearll, 128.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots. Built as Empire Spray for the Ministry of War Transport, managed by 'West Hartlepool Steam Navigation Company'. A 'Catapult Armed Merchantman' ('CAM'), i.e. a British merchantman fitted with a catapult that could launch, but not recover, a single fighter aircraft, most often a used 'Sea Hurricane'. There were 35 of them in WW2, it would seem. A rocket propelled trolley carried the aircraft on a catapult fitted in the bow of the ship. The pilot? After his engagement, he would hope to make it to land or ditch in the sea close to his vessel, or another Allied vessel, & be picked up. 23 WW2 convoy references as Empire Spray, including 8 E. bound N. Atlantic crossings carrying grain, also, from Oct/Dec 1942, in the Indian Ocean (Durban, Karachi, Abadan, Bandar Abbas), & a few U.K. coastal. On Mar. 2, 1943, the vessel was at New York. The vessel was then sold to the Netherlands Government & renamed Gerard Dou, managed by 'Rotterdamsche Lloyd' [Gerrit or Gerard Dou was a famous Dutch painter (1613/1675)]. Gross tonnage became 7242. The vessel left New York, on Mar. 30, 1943, as Gerard Dou. 34 WW2 convoy references as Gerard Dou, including 9 E. bound Atlantic crossings carrying such cargoes as grain, sugar or a general cargo, service in the Caribbean & to S. America (Rosario, Buenos Aires), to Port Said & into the Indian Ocean (Karachi, Bombay), to Antwerp in May 1945. In 1946, the vessel was sold to 'NV Stoomvaart Maatschappij Rotterdam', of Rotterdam (I think - proper names are WWW contracted far too often). And in 1947, the vessel was renamed Marken. In 1955, the vessel was sold to Williamson & Co. ('Williamson') of Hong Kong, or maybe to Inch Steamship Company Ltd., a subsidiary of Williamson, & renamed Inchmull. In 1966, the vessel was transferred to Douglas Steamship Company Ltd., a Hong Kong company in which Williamson would seem to have had an ownership interest. In Feb. 1969, the vessel arrived at the Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ship breaking facilities of 'Shin Lie Steel Co. Ltd.', to be broken up. Can you add anything? Another image perhaps?

254 Kafiristan
7248 tons
Hull 675

165816
5254278

Avisglen
Noelle
1941

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Avisglen), 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Kafiristan, but I cannot check the link), 2 [Kafiristan (2) data & Common Brothers history 40% down], 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 442 ft. 11 in. long (135.0 metres) overall, 421 ft. 6 in. long (128.5 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 1/2 knots, signal letters GOFK later ODGR. Built for 'Hindustan Steam Ship Co. Ltd.', of Newcastle, owned by 'Common Brothers Ltd.' ('Common'), also the ship's managers. The 2nd Common vessel of the name. 51 WW2 convoy references including 12 voyages across N. Atlantic, mainly carrying grains, voyages into the Mediterranean (Port Said), Indian Ocean (Aden, Bombay), West Africa (Freetown) & many U.K. coastal trips. Kafiristan was a Catapult Aircraft Merchantman ('CAM'), equipped with a Hurricane aircraft that could, if necessary, be catapult launched from a rocket propelled trolley located in the bow of the ship. The vessel was sold, in 1954, to 'The Aviation & Shipping Co. Ltd.', of London, (Purvis Shipping Co. Ltd., also of London, the managers, however Lloyd's Register of 1957/58 states N. W. Purvis) & renamed Avisglen. And was sold, in 1961, to 'Compania de Navegacion Skiathos S.A.', of Beirut, Lebanon, & renamed Noelle. In 1969, the vessel was sold or transferred to 'Carmelia Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Famagusta, Cyprus, with no change of name. On Jul. 20, 1972, the vessel arrived at Shanghai, China, to be broken up. Can you add anything? 

255 Coombe Hill
7268 tons
Hull 693

168322

London Artisan
Jag Laadki
Vyzas
1942

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, London Artisan), 1 (15% down, Coombe Hill, London & Overseas), 2 (Alan Shard WW2 experiences, Coombe Hill, 40% down), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Coombe Hill, but I cannot check the link), 4 (image London Artisan, also -01), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.0 metres (421 ft. 1 in.) long overall, speed of 10 1/2 knots. Built for 'Putney Hill Steamship Co. Ltd.', of London, 'Rethymnis and Kulukundis', with 'Counties Ship Management Company Limited' the manager. 57 WW2 convoy references including 6 voyages across the N. Atlantic, service into the Mediterranean (Egypt, N. Africa, Italy, etc.), & U.K. & Continental coastal trips. Carried 'Churchill tanks, trucks, ammunition, supplies and most dangerous of all, gasoline in what were known as flimsy non-returnable cans.' Carried grain also. In Feb. 1949, the vessel was transferred to 'London & Overseas Freighters Ltd.', of London, & in 1950 renamed London Artisan. 'Counties Ship Management Company Limited' still the manager. The vessel was sold, in 1953, to 'Great Eastern Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Bombay, India, & renamed Jag Laadki. The vessel was sold again, in 1965, to Centre Shipping Co. ('Centre'), of Liberia, with 'G. C. Calafatis & Co. Ltd.', of Greece, the manager, & renamed Vyzas. The vessel was sold by Centre for $138,000 to Japanese ship breakers ['Fukada Salvage Company' ('Fukada')] & arrived at Kure, Japan, on Sep. 21, 1968. On Nov. 1, 1968, the vessel arrived at the Fukada facilities at Etajima, Hiroshima, Japan, to be broken up. Can you add anything?

256 Empire Dryden
7164 tons
Hull 682

169010
1942

A cargo ship, which had a very short life indeed, about 2 months only. Per 1 ('u-boat.net', sinking), 2 & 3 (account of sinking, by 2nd mate survivor David Whittet (1916/2011) - the account at link 3 used to be WWW available but is no longer, but it lives on through this page), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire Dryden, but I cannot check the link), 5 (U-572), 6 (Heinz Hirsaker, with image), 7 (Lloyd's List, data - for reasons unknown the vessel was recorded thru 1944/45), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 442 ft 9 in. (135.0 metres) long overall, 428 ft. 8 in. (130.8 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots. Surely defensively armed. Built for the Ministry of War Transport, 'Sir R. Ropner & Co. Ltd.', of West Hartlepool, the manager. The vessel was completed in Feb. 1942. The vessel only lasted long enough for just 4 WW2 convoy references, including one W. bound voyage from Liverpool to Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, in Mar. 1942. On Apl. 17, 1942, Robert Powley in command, the vessel left New York, New York, bound for Alexandria, Egypt, via Table Bay, South Africa & the Suez Canal. A total complement of 51 (mainly English) was aboard, & the vessel carried 7,000 tons of government & general cargo (including sugar), which would seem to mean mainly ammunition & tanks. Empire Dryden was unescorted when, at 3:06 a.m. on Apl.  20, 1942, E. of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, at 34.21N/69.00W, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-572, Kapitänleutnant Heinz Hirsacker in command. David Whittet believed that the sinking was the result of German espionage at New York, & the precise place where the ship was instructed to be (and was) was passed on to U-572. The vessel sank quickly, perhaps in just 3 minutes. No lives were lost in the actual attack. Three lifeboats were launched with all aboard, but on the next day the smallest & slowest of the boats was abandoned to leave two lifeboats on the empty ocean, one with 25 aboard & the other with 26. The decision was made to sail westwards toward the U.S. coast, 644 km away, rather that try to make Bermuda, 322 km to the southeast. On the third night adrift, the two boats were separated in a storm & the boat with 26 aboard, including the Captain & 3 gunners, was never seen again. Do read David Whittet's account of his experience; the rationing of water, the limited food etc. After in fact 17 days at sea, on May 5, 1942, the 25 survivors were picked up by a passenger ship, at 30.37N/77.15W, & landed at Bermuda. I cannot tell you, from the WWW record, which ship rescued them! David Whittet said it was City of Birmingham & he should know since he was there! Other accounts state Monarch of Bermuda. And a book by G. H. Bennett, states City of Bermuda - but there would not seem to have even been such a ship! It was, however, City of Birmingham, which itself was torpedoed & sunk a few weeks later, on Jun. 30, 1942. There are inconsistencies in the story, including the number of days at sea in the lifeboat. What followed ... On Aug. 3, 1943, U-572 was sunk, NE of Trinidad, by depth charges, dropped from a U.S. Mariner aircraft, with the loss of the entire crew of 47. Ann Hansen of Australia, who lost her grandfather, George W. S. Sellars, an able seaman, in the Empire Dryden disaster, tells me that Heinz Hirsacker, commander of U-572, was sentenced to death by the Germans & in fact committed suicide. Thanks Ann! You can read about Hirsacker via the link above. He was indeed charged with & found guilty of cowardice at a court martial held in Paris, France. And killed himself with a borrowed pistol on Apl. 24, 1943. A list of the Empire Dryden crew is available here, marked, to the extent known to the webmaster, as to who was saved & lost. With input from David Whittet. Tom Hall has advised (thanks!) that his father, Leslie Hall, an 18 year old cook aboard Empire Dryden, survived, & that 'some of the crew went mad from salt water & one of his friends eventually lost his legs from the ordeal'. Tom adds that the reason the crew were able to get off the ship was that the torpedo hit a hold which contained sugar. Additional data is requested. The list has 2 too many names, it would appear, who left the ship at New York. And seems to omit 'Walter Farrer', a fireman/trimmer aged 23, whom David Whittet advised was also lost. Can you add anything? An image perhaps?
Now I had previously indicated in this listing that 2 days out of New York, Empire Dryden rescued part of the crew of Victoria, an Argentinean tanker, that had been torpedoed. And that the crew were transferred within hours to an American destroyer. Victoria did not in fact sink & ended its days as a barge in late 1961. David Whittet advised categorically that that rescue never happened - 'At no time did we come in contact with that vessel or its lifeboats or any crew members'.

257 Harpagus
7271 (or 7262 or 7265) tons
Hull 695

168347

Treworlas
1942

A cargo ship with a most interesting history. Per 1 (1944 fine data), 2 (3 images, 'Halfpagus', interesting but modest, unloading at Southampton, data), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Harpagus, but I cannot check the link. But only 'Harpagus II'), 4 (image Treworlas), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.0 metres long overall, 130.9 metres perpendicular to perpendicular?, speed of 13 1/2 knots. Built for 'National Steamship Co. Ltd.', of London, owned by J. & C. Harrison Limited, but requisitioned by the Ministry of War Transport. 23 WW2 convoy references, mainly U.K. local & Continental but including 2 N. Atlantic crossings & service into the Mediterranean. In May 1944, the ship was sold to 'Hain Steamship Co. Ltd.' of St. Ives, Cornwall. The vessel was used to supply the Normandy landing beaches, & made, it would seem, 2 such trips to Arromanches, France. On its 1st trip it safely carried ammunition for the invasion. On its 2nd trip, in Convoy ETM.62, carrying wire meshing & rolls of hessian, it neared the harbour at Arromanches, where, on Aug. 18, 1944, it hit a mine & broke in two pieces 'at the deep tank bulkhead'. One casualty only, the captain, Captain Brown (I think that means he was killed. Yes?). The forward part of the vessel sank 1 1/2 or 2 1/2 miles NW of Arromanches & the wreckage still seems to lie there today. The rear part of the vessel, containing the engine room, was beached, re-floated & towed to Southampton for discharge of its cargo. The crew apparently rechristened that rear part the 'Halfpagus'! From there 'Halfpagus' was towed to ultimately arrive at Newcastle on Dec. 1, 1944, for the attachment of a new 190 ft. bow section. That tow had its troubles, it would seem. It went via Leith, Scotland, due to bad weather ran aground on the sands at West Barrow & was beached again at Sheerness, all as you can read at 2. The new bow section would seem to have been built by the Walker-upon-Tyne branch of 'Shipbuilding Corporation'. But did they also attach the 2 pieces together, I wonder? Likely they did. The ship was re-launched in May 1946 & was renamed Treworlas. Keith Tindell advises (thanks Keith!) that his first trip on Treworlas was from London to Botwood, north-central Newfoundland, Canada, & back, a 28 day voyage. The vessel visited Auckland, New Zealand, once, on Dec. 22, 1954, as Treworlas, when apparently owned by Hain-Nourse Ltd. (Hain Line). On Jun. 1, 1960, the vessel ran aground in the Persian Gulf, off Kuwait, at 28.49.15N/48.45.48E. Hamusah, a Kuwait Oil Company tug, tried to refloat her but failed. The vessel was later returned to Falmouth (under tow I presume), where she was inspected in drydock & declared a total loss. It was towed to Briton Ferry, Wales, & arrived there on Sep. 21, 1960, to be broken up. Can you add anything to this interesting history?

258 Harpalyce
7269 (or 7262) tons
Hull 694

168334
502554

Trewellard
Artemon
1942

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Harpalyce, but I cannot check the link. But beware! Access Harpalyce (II) data only), 2 (image, Trewellard, also -04 & -05), 3 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, 1942/43 thru 1945/46), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 428.8 ft. long perpendicular to perpendicular, 442.9 ft. or 442 ft. 11 in.  long (135.0 metres) overall,  speed of 11 knots, signal letters BFDD, later MATK. Built for 'National Steamship Co. Ltd.', of London, owned by J. & C. Harrison Limited, who also managed it. 26 WW2 convoy references only, including 3 N. Atlantic crossings (cargoes not indicated), service into Mediterranean (incl. Algiers. Malta, Augusta, Port Said) & U.K. coastal. On Jan. 1, 1943, the vessel was damaged by aerial bombing at Bône Harbour, Algeria. I understand that the vessel was carrying explosives at the time. For much of the war, the vessel was independent - from Jan. to Oct. 1944 in Australian waters, to South America & in Indian Ocean. The vessel visited Auckland, New Zealand ('NZ') once as Harpalyce, on May 5, 1944. From Mar. 1945, the vessel was independent again, in the Indian Ocean. The vessel was sold, in 1944, to 'The Hain Steamship Co. Ltd.' ('Hain') of St. Ives, Cornwall, & in 1946 was renamed Trewellard. The vessel visited Auckland, NZ, 4 times as Trewellard between late 1947 & early 1962. In 1956, the vessel was sold to Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Co. Ltd., of London, managed by Hain. It reverted to Hain in 1958. It was sold again, in 1962, to 'Compania Maritima Santa Marina SA', of Greece, 'N. & E. Vermicos' the managers, & renamed Artemon. On Oct. 7, 1965, the vessel arrived at Piraeus, Greece, having suffered engine damage  while en route from Cebu, Philippines, to Rotterdam, with a cargo of copra. On Nov. 1, 1965, a fire broke out in her cargo & she was beached at nearby Ambelaki Bay to permit the fire to be fought. The fire was only put out 7 days later on Nov. 8, 1965. The vessel suffered serious damage, indeed was a total loss. On Oct. 8, 1966, the vessel arrived at the Valencia, Spain, ship breaking facilities of 'Desguaces Incolesa', presumably under tow, to be broken up. Can you add anything?

259 Houston City
7262 (or 7278) tons
Hull 691

165864

Castle Peak
Sandys River
Juliana
Prominent Star
Goodwin
1942

A cargo or tramp ship. Per 1 [a few references, Houston City (2)], 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Houston City, but I cannot check the link), 3 (Moller & Co., Castle Peak), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Single screw, speed 12 knots. Built for Reardon Smith Line Ltd. ('Reardon'), of Cardiff, Wales, but registered at Bideford, Devon. 48 WW2 convoy voyages, including at least a couple of voyages across the N. Atlantic, also to W. Africa (Freetown, Sierra Leone), Mediterranean & many U.K. coastal voyages. The vessel seems to be convoy listed as Houston City & also as Houston City II. Reardon owned, over time, 3 vessels of the identical name, it would appear. I believe owned by Reardon until 1960, when sold to 'Anglo-Chinese Shipping Company, Ltd.', of Hong Kong, with Mollers, of Hong Kong, the managers (& possibly also the owners), & renamed Castle Peak. The vessel was sold, in 1961, to  'River Line Ltd.', of Bermuda, & renamed Sandys River, And sold, in 1967, to China Pacific Navigation Co., of Hong Kong, & renamed Juliana. Miramar reference 'Holly Nav. Co. SA', of Panama City, Panama re the vessel when named Juliana & also when named Prominent Star. The manager most likely? Was renamed Prominent Star in 1968. And sold again, in 1968, to Q. Chuang & renamed Goodwin. Miramar reference 'Clara Shipping Corp. SA', of Panama City re that last ownership. On Oct. 15, 1968, the vessel arrived at Hong Kong to be broken up. Do you know any more? The above data may very well need correction. Which is invited.

260 Tower Hill
7268 tons
Hull 696

168358
5335747

London Banker
Avisbank
Southern Venture
1942

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Avisbank), 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Tower Hill, but I cannot check the link), 2 & 3 (images, Tower Hill), 4 (image, Avisbank, also -02), 5 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Tower Hill, 1942/43 thru 1945/46), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access).  428.8 ft. long (130.70 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 442.9 ft. long (135.0 metres) overall, speed of 10 1/2 knots, signal letters BFNN. Built for 'Tower Steamship Company Ltd.' ('Tower'), of London, which company was a subsidiary of 'Counties Ship Management Company Limited'. There are many references to 'Putney Hill Steamships' owning the vessel instead of Tower. Can anyone explain those references? 22 WW2 convoy voyages, including 5 N. Atlantic crossings, service in the Mediterranean (Alexandria, Port Said, Casablanca, Augusta), in the Indian Ocean (Calcutta, Colombo), & U.K. coastal. Surely independent voyages also. The vessel visited Auckland, New Zealand twice, on May 20 & Dec. 15, 1947. In 1949, the vessel was acquired by London & Overseas Freighters Ltd., of London, who, in 1950, renamed the vessel London Banker. The vessel was sold, in 1953, to 'The Aviation & Shipping Co. Ltd.', of London, Purvis Shipping Co. Ltd., of London, the managers, & renamed Avisbank. While I have read no detail, it would seem that the vessel was, in 1959, disabled in the Suez canal, while en route from Casablanca to Kaohsiung, Taiwan, with a cargo of phosphates. In 1959, the vessel was sold to 'Pan Norse Steamships Co. Ltd.', of Panama City, Panama, & renamed Southern Venture. And sold for the last time, in 1966, to Bianca Carriers Inc., also of Panama City, with no change of vessel name. On Jul. 8, 1970, the vessel arrived at the Kaohsiung ship breaking facilities of 'Keun Hwa Iron & Steel Works', to be broken up. Can you add any additional data? Or correct the above?

261 Vancouver City
7261 tons
Hull 689

165862

Everbloom
1942

A cargo or tramp ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Vancouver City), 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Vancouver City, but I cannot check the link), 2 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Vancouver City, 1941/42 thru 1945/46), 3 (image, Vancouver City, also -02), 4 & 5 (images, Vancouver City), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 428.8 ft. long (130.70 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 134.9 metres long overall, single screw, speed of 11 or 12 knots, signal letters BDYL. Built for Reardon Smith Line Ltd. ('Reardon'), of Cardiff, Wales, but registered at Bideford, Devon. Sir William Reardon Smith & Sons Ltd., were the vessel's managers. Reardon owned, over time, it would appear, 3 vessels of the identical name. Sister to Bradford City, Cornish City & Houston City). 44 WW2 convoy voyages, including at least a couple of voyages across the N. Atlantic, also to S. Africa, India, Mediterranean & many U.K. coastal voyages. Vancouver City was, I read, laid up at Cardiff from Nov. 1962 (maybe from earlier) awaiting a buyer. In 1963, the vessel was sold to Prosperity Navigation Corporation Ltd., of Panama, but registered at Monrovia, Liberia, & renamed Everbloom. 'Wah Kwong & Co. Ltd.', likely of Taiwan, were the vessel's managers. On Sep. 10, 1965, the vessel, partly ballasted, was anchored off Wakanoura, Japan. She was driven ashore in typhoon 'Shirley' & was wrecked there. All of the crew were rescued. In Nov. 1965 the vessel was broken up at the Wakayama, Japan, ship breaking facilities of Matsukura & Co. We thank Paul Milligan for part of the above listing content. Can you add anything?

262 Bradford City
7266 tons
Hull 698

165865

Vercharmian
Shun Wah
1943

A cargo or tramp ship. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Bradford City, but I cannot check the link), 2 (extensive data), 3 (data), 4 (image, Bradford City, & others), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Sister to Vancouver City, Cornish City & Houston City). Likely therefore single screw, speed of 12 knots. Built for Leeds Shipping Company, Ltd., a subsidiary of Reardon Smith Line, (Sir William Reardon Smith & Sons Ltd. - managers), of Cardiff, Wales, at a cost of £230,000. There were 4 vessels of the name in the Reardon fleet, the ships being so named due, I read, to a business link between Reardon & Fred & Priestley Mitchell Bradford, drapers, of Cardiff. Have seen a reference to the vessel being managed by Vergocean Steamship Company Ltd.' ('Vergocean'), of London, & a Vergottis Group subsidiary company, on behalf of the Ministry of War Transport. Can anybody explain? Now I expected that there would be WW2 convoy voyage data available via link 1 above. But am advised that there is none for this vessel which is a bit of a puzzle. Owned by Reardon until 1962, when sold, for £120,000, to Vergocean. On Apl. 12, 1962, the vessel left Cardiff for the Sorel Shipyard, St. Lawrence River, Quebec, Canada, for refitting?, & was renamed Vercharmian. In 1968, the vessel was sold to Jebshun Shipping Company Ltd. ('Jebshun'), of Hong Kong, & renamed Shun Wah. But before the sale to Jebshun was finalised, the vessel ran aground & suffered an engine failure en route from Hong Kong to Port Campha, Vietnam. Most of her cargo was, on Apl. 9, 1968, transferred to Shun Tia. The sale was consummated only once the resulting legal case was settled. I have not so far been able to read when & where the vessel ran aground, the circumstances, & the nature & result of the lawsuit. Can you help with any of that? The vessel arrived at Hong Kong on Apl. 19, 1968 for repair & entered service again in Oct. 1968 'working between China & Japan'. Rajan Ramkumar, of Bangalore, India, has advised (thanks) that he was Captain of Shun Wah for a single voyage in 1971. He took over from Capt Stanley (known as 'Mild') Steel, on Jan. 2, 1971. His voyage was with a cargo of anthracite coal ex Nampo, N. Korea, to Constanta, Romania with a diversion en route to Port Louis, Mauritius, for repairs. Then, after drydocking in Istanbul, to Novorossiysk (Russia, Black Sea) to load bagged cement for Port Harcourt & Lagos (both Nigeria) & onwards again with cotton seeds to Japan. The ship did not make Japan, the voyage rather ending at Singapore when the owners declared insolvency & 1st mortgagee 'Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation' had the ship & cargo arrested, on Dec. 26, 1971. On May 3, 1972, the vessel arrived at Tadotsu, Japan, to be broken up. Can you add anything?

263 Empire Beauty
7297 tons
Hull 703

169119

Polycrown
Ioannis Aspiotis
Laurel
1943

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Wikipedia, Polycrown), 2 (Beauty), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire Beauty, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Norwegian page, Polycrown), 5 (image, Polycrown, also -03), 6 ('plimsollshipdata', Lloyd's List, data), 7 (data), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.0 metres long overall, 442 ft. 9 in., 128.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 428 ft. 8 in.. speed of 11 1/2 or maybe 10 knots. Defensively armed, with one 4 in. gun, 6 machine guns, & a net defence. Built for the Ministry of War Transport, 'Stephens, Sutton Limited', of Newcastle, the manager. 13 WW2 convoy references, including at least one N. Atlantic crossing, service to Port Said, Egypt, also to Aden, Bombay, Durban, Cape Town & Malaysian ports. Now 7 indicates that on Jul. 27, 1944, the vessel was damaged by an E-boat torpedo in the English Channel, at 50.55.N/01.02E, & that she may have been under repair for most of 1945. Can that data be correct? It would seem it was rather Empire Beatrice? 3 indicates that Empire Beauty was in a convoy in Oct. 1944 (which would seem to have been ultimately to Bandar Mashur, Iran, via Port Said & Basra, Iraq), & one in Aug. 1945. The 'gap' between those dates may well have been independent voyages - which I am not permitted to access. Can anybody go to link 3, click on independent voyages at the bottom, & advise me of its data? In 1946, the vessel was sold to 'Kristiansands Tankrederi II A/S', with 'Skips A/S Avant & A/S Skjoldheim' (owned by Einar N. (Normann) Rasmussen), the managers, all of Kristiansand, Norway, & renamed Polycrown. In 1962, the vessel was sold to 'Lamda Shipping Enterprises Corporation', of Panama, or maybe of Beirut, Lebanon, & renamed Ioannis Aspiotis. Lebanese flag. In 1966, 'John Livanos & Sons Ltd.', of London, became the managers. In 1968, the vessel was sold to Laurel Shipping Co. Ltd., of Famagusta, Cyprus, & renamed Laurel, with no change of manager. On Dec. 23, 1968, the vessel arrived at the Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ship breaking facilities of 'Chien Tai Iron Works Co', to be broken up. Can you add anything? Another image perhaps?

264 English Prince
7275 tons
Hull 700

168414
5328811

Simos
1943

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Prince Line, English Prince (1)], 2 (data English Prince (1) 40% down), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert English Prince, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Shaw Savill, but English Prince not referenced), 5 (image, English Prince, & -04), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.0 metres long overall, 128.0 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 442 ft. 11 in., speed of 11 knots. Built for Prince Line Limited, of London. 35 WW2 convoy references, incl. service thru Mediterranean (Port Said, Alexandria), & U.K. coastal. The vessel was independent in the Indian Ocean for extended periods in 1943 & 1944 (Mombasa, Zanzibar, Beira, Karachi, Bombay, Durban, Cape Town) & was in Australian waters in late 1945 (Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane). From 1953 thru 1957, the vessel was chartered to Shaw, Savill & Albion Line, with no change of vessel name or 'livery'. In 1961, the vessel was sold to 'Amanda Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Monrovia, Liberia, & renamed Simos. Presumably registered at Liberia. The vessel was, in 1963, registered at Piraeus, Greece, with 'S. Sikiardis' the manager. On Jul. 22, 1972, while en route from Ashod, Israel, to France, the vessel ran aground, in fog, 1/2 mile NE of Cape St. Vincent, Portugal. I have not read the circumstances. I read that the vessel was re-floated on Aug. 22, 1972, & proceeded to Setúbal, Portugal, to unload her cargo (what was that cargo?). There the vessel was determined to be uneconomic to repair. The vessel stayed at Setúbal until she was towed to Spanish ship breakers a year later. On Aug. 31, 1973, the vessel arrived at the Bilbao, Spain, ship breaking facilities of 'Hierros Ardes', to be broken up. She was broken up in Sep. 1973. Can you add anything? Another image perhaps?

265 Greenwich
7292 tons
Hull 707

169615

Portador
1943

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data, Greenwich, 90% down), 2 (model, Greenwich), 3 (image, Greenwich), 4 (image Greenwich, 3 other images available), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Greenwich, but I cannot check the link), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.0 metres long overall, 128.0 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 428.8 ft., speed of 10 1/2 knots, signal letters GCSM, armed with a single 4 inch gun, a 'pillar box' rocket launcher, four 20mm machine guns, & two 0.303 machine guns, also equipped to cut the wires of moored mines. Ordered by the Ministry of War Transport. But owned, it would seem, by 'Britain Steamship Co. Ltd.', of London, which company was owned & managed by 'Watts Watts & Co.', also of London. The vessel was launched by Her Royal Highness, the Princess Royal, on Jul. 1, 1943, at which time a fine model of the ship was presented to her. Just 21 WW2 convoy references, including 2 voyages to Seine Bay, France, in Jul. & Aug. 1944, re the Normandy landings. Service in the Mediterranean (Bône, Bizerta, Naples, Augusta, Port Said) & U.K. coastal. The vessel made 5 crossings of the N. Atlantic, (no cargoes are specified), incl. 3 which were independent, the last being from Hampton Roads to Cochin, India, in Nov. 1944. From Nov. 1944, the vessel was largely independent in the Indian Ocean & across to S. America.  A tramp ship. The vessel visited Auckland, New Zealand, 3 times between Dec. 17, 1950 & Dec. 29, 1957. In 1959, the vessel was sold to Capricorn Corp., of Panama, 'Argus Steamship Company Inc.', of Monrovia, Liberia, likely the managers, & renamed Portador. Registered at Liberia. On Apl. 13, 1962, while en route, in ballast, from Manchester to Baie Comeau, Quebec, Canada, a fire broke out in the vessel's engine room. At 51.15N/15.34W, 350 or so miles W. of southern Ireland. I read that the vessel was abandoned & that a later search revealed no trace of the ship. Any loss of life? I have not been able to WWW read any detail. Can you tell us the circumstances, or otherwise add anything? Another image perhaps?

266 Jersey Hart
7275 (or 7257) tons
Hull 701

168425
5160037

Stanpark
Queen Eleanor
Inchdouglas
1943

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Inchdouglas), 1 (data 50% down, '8th November 2007', Inchdouglas), 2 (Inch Steamship, Inchdouglas), 3 (Douglas Steamship Company, Ltd., Inchdouglas), 4 (image, Inchdouglas, but you must be registered to see it.), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built as Jersey Hart for, I think, 'Nolisement Steamship Co. Ltd.', of London, ('Morel Ltd.' of Cardiff, the manager?). In 1945, the vessel was sold to Stanhope Steamship Co., J. A. Billmeir & Co. the manager, & renamed Stanpark. In 1951, the vessel was sold to T. Dunlop & Sons, of Glasgow, & renamed Queen Eleanor. In 1956, the vessel was sold again, to Williamson & Co. ('Williamson') of Hong Kong, or maybe to Inch Steamship Company Ltd., a subsidiary of Williamson, & renamed Inchdouglas, (D. Lapraik & Co., the manager?). In 1956, the vessel was transferred to Douglas Steamship Company Ltd., a Hong Kong company in which Williamson would seem to have had an ownership interest. Visited Auckland, New Zealand, on Oct. 27, 1957. On Nov. 4, 1970, the vessel arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, to be broken up. Can you add anything? Another image perhaps?

267 Trevelyan
7292 tons
Hull 704

168475
1943

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image), 1 (image Trevelyan, also -01, -02, -03 & -04), 2 (Bunbury refs., Trevelyan), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Trevelyan, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 445 ft. long. Built for Hain Steamship Co. Ltd. ('Hain') of St. Ives, Cornwall.  At that time, since 1917, Hain were part of the P & O group of companies. 40 WW2 convoy references, including at least 3 N. Atlantic crossings, also service to Mediterranean & U.K. local & continental. In 1944/45, the vessel was independent in the Indian Ocean. A few ref. to carrying grain incl. Bunbury, S. of Perth, Western Australia refs. in 1949 & 1956. On Nov. 5, 1962, the vessel arrived at Hong Kong to be broken up. There is almost no WWW data available about this vessel. So the above needs expansion & may need correction. Anything to add?

268 Trevince
7292 tons
Hull 705

169571

Densu River
Vicky
1943

A cargo ship. Per 1 (image Trevince, also -01), 2 (Bunbury refs. Trevince, but they seem no longer to be there), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Trevince, but I cannot check the link), 4 (image, Densu River, but you must be registered to access it.), 5 (messages re Black Star), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.0 metres long overall, 128.0 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, about 445 ft., speed of 11 knots. Built for Hain Steamship Co. Ltd. ('Hain') of St. Ives, Cornwall.  At that time, since 1917, Hain were part of the P & O group of companies. 22 WW2 convoy references, including at least 3 N. Atlantic crossings. But in late 1943 into mid 1944 the vessel was on service in the Indian Ocean, mainly independent. It would seem that the vessel ran aground at Anticosti Island in Gulf of St. Lawrence, probably in late Apl. 1945. A few refs. to Bunbury, S. of Perth, Western Australia, & the carriage of grain in 1949 & 1956. A few snippets of data that indicate that the vessel was engaged in the world grain trade. In Sep. 1956, the vessel was towed 200 miles by Ponty to Freetown, Sierra Leone, when it had engine trouble & required assistance. In 1959, the vessel was sold to 'Black Star Line Ltd.', of Accra, the State Shipping Corporation of Ghana, & renamed Densu River. Fleet vessels were registered at Israel it would appear & operated by 'Zim'. In 1967, the vessel was sold to 'SOARMA' i.e. 'Soarma-Societa Armamento Marittimo' of Genoa, Italy, & renamed Vicky. It may later have been sold again because it would seem that in 1973, the vessel was sold by 'Cia. de Nav. Victoria SA.', of Panama, to 'Bolivian Shipping Co.', also of Panama. On Jul. 27, 1974, the vessel arrived at Whampoa, (i.e. Huangpu, an outer port of Guangzhou, China), to be broken up. There is limited WWW data available about this vessel. So more data is needed & the above may well need correction. Anything to add?

269 Brockleymoor
7368 tons
Hull 719

169997
5293420

Restormel
Newglade
1944

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Lloyd's Registers, Brockleymoor, 1943/1945), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Brockleymoor, but I cannot check the link), 3 (image, Restormel), 4 (British Steam, Restormel, at page bottom), 5 (Moor Line), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.6 metres long, 444.8 ft., overall, 128.0 metres, 431 ft., perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 1/2 knots, signal letters GDWP. Built for Moor Line Ltd., of London, Runciman Shipping Co. Ltd. the managers. Her maiden voyage was on Apl. 4, 1944. Only 3 WW2 convoy references - in the period of Nov/Dec 1944, including a return crossing of the N. Atlantic (to Gibraltar). Presumably the vessel had many independent voyages, which is data at 2 that I am not permitted to access. A Google data 'snippet' states that at (date unknown), an Indian seaman was alleged to have beaten to death two fellow seamen in mid-Atlantic. In 1959, the vessel was sold to 'Orders & Handford Steamship Co. Ltd.' ('Orders'), of Cardiff, & renamed Restormel. In 1960, the vessel was sold to Cardigan Shipping Co. Ltd. ('Cardigan'), also of Cardiff, with no change of vessel name. But ... 4 refers to both British Steam Shipping Co. Ltd. & John Cory & Son Ltd. re the period of 1959/1964 but I am unclear as to why i.e. the relationships. Can anybody explain how Orders & Cardigan relate to Cory & British Steam? In 1964 the vessel was sold again, to Waterloo Shipping Co. Ltd., of Cardiff, & renamed Newglade. On Nov. 7, 1968, a fire broke out in the vessel's engine room, while anchored at Kynosoúra, Salamis Island, near Piraeus, Greece & the vessel was beached at Ambelaki Bay. The fire continued to burn until Nov. 10, 1968, the ship being heavily damaged. It is possible that some lives were lost? I read that the vessel arrived under tow at Spezia, Italy, on Jun. 13, 1969 & left on Jul. 3, 1969, presumably again under tow, bound for Vado Ligure, Italy. In Jan. 1970, the vessel was broken up there at the ship breaking facilities of 'Vado Alti Forni e Acciaierie'. There is only very limited WWW data available about this vessel. So more data is needed & the above may need correction. Anything to add?

270 Empire Earl
7359 tons
Hull 713

180132
5095921

Cressington Court
East Wales
Universal Skipper
1944

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Cressington Court), B (e-Bay, a negative, Universal Skipper), 1 & 2 (quite similar extensive data & images, Cressington Court), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire Earl, but I cannot check the link), 4 (image, Cressington Court, also -03), 5 (images, Cressington Court), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.6 metres long overall, 128.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 431 ft., speed of 10 1/2 knots. Built for the Ministry of War Transport, with Dodd, Thomson & Co. Ltd. the managers. 43 WW2 convoy references, including 8 crossings of the English Channel to Seine Bay, France, in Jun/Aug 1944, presumably re the Normandy landings (have seen a ref. to her carrying troops & mechanical transport), & from Dec. 1944, 13 voyages to Antwerp, Belgium, ex Southend. Also U.K. coastal. 2 lists later independent voyages mainly to & from Antwerp. In 1945, the vessel was sold to United British Steam Ship Company Ltd., of London, Haldin & Phillips or Haldin & Co. Ltd., the managers, & renamed Cressington Court. In 1953, the owner's name was restyled as Court Line Ltd., also of London, with Haldin & Co. Ltd. the managers. Cressington Court visited Auckland, New Zealand, 7 times between Feb. 21, 1947 & Aug. 29, 1955. In 1958 or 1959, the vessel was sold to West Wales Steamship Co. Ltd., of Newport, Wales, with Gibbs & Co. Ltd., the managers, & renamed East Wales. In 1966, the vessel was sold again, to Dalkeith Shipping Co. Ltd., also of Newport, with International Steamship Co. Ltd., of Hong Kong, the managers, & renamed Universal Skipper. On Aug. 25, 1970, the vessel arrived at Whampoa (i.e. Huangpu, an outer port of Guangzhou, China) to be broken up. The WWW available data for this vessel is quite inconsistent, particularly in the 1945/1953 time period, & the above may well contain unintended errors. Do consider being in touch if you can correct the above text and/or tell us more.

271 Empire General
7359 tons
Hull 712

180131
5354078

Hendonhall
Taxiarhis
Tony C.
1944

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data & images Hendonhall, access via left column), 2 [West Hartlepool, Hendonhall (3)], 3 (fire at Bahrein, 70% down), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire General, but I cannot check the link), 5 (image, Hendonhall), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.6 metres long overall, 128.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 431 ft. (or 444 ft. 10") long, speed of 10 or 11 knots. Built for the Ministry of War Transport, with Hain Steamship Co., of St. Ives, the managers. 42 WW2 convoy references, mainly U.K. local & continental but including 1 N. Atlantic crossing. A 1945 voyage to Mediterranean (Alexandria, Port Said) & to Bombay, India. In 1947, the vessel was sold to 'West Hartlepool Steam Navigation Co.', of West Hartlepool, & renamed Hendonhall. Chartered to Palm Line. Suffered a fire at Sapele, Nigeria, where it was to pick up palm kernels & logs, probably mahogany. The ship's wheelhouse was gutted. The vessel ran aground exiting the port & was pulled off by a tug 3 days later. Voyages all over the world, Australia, India, Japan, N. America etc. including 3 voyages from Newport News, Virginia, amazingly to Cardiff with coal. On Jun. 3, 1958, the vessel suffered a fire at Bahrein. Extensive damage to the engine room, #4 hold, plates etc. Beached & re-floated on Jun. 8, 1958. Temporary repairs were effected, maybe more extensive repairs later, at Basra & in U.K. In 1959, the vessel was sold to 'Lebanesa Ltda S.A.', of Panama, (Lebanese flag), (L. Nomicos, of Greece, the manager) & renamed Taxiarhis. On Jun. 30, 1959, the vessel was in collision with Carl Julius in Lake St. Lawrence (St. Lawrence Seaway, W. of Cornwall/Massena). Taxiarhis suffered major bow damage. In 1961, renamed Tony C., no owner change. On Apl. 24, 1972, the vessel arrived at Skaramanga, (nr. Athens & Piraeus) Greece, to be broken up. Can you add anything? Another image perhaps?

272 Empire Lord
7359 tons
Hull 711

180130
5015634

Aldington Court
Anacreon
White Daisy
Robertina
1944

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data, history & images Aldington Court), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire Lord, but I cannot check the link), 3 (image, Aldington Court), 4 (image, Aldington Court, also -01), 5 (ref. to 1949 Thames collision), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 136.8 metres long overall, 128.2 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 431 ft., speed of 10 1/2 or 11 knots. Built for the Ministry of War Transport, with W. Runciman & Co. the vessel's managers. I read that her maiden voyage was in Mar. 1944. 22 WW2 convoy references, including likely 4 N. Atlantic crossings, service into the Mediterranean (Augusta, Naples, Bari, Oran, Port Said), a voyage to Antwerp, Belgium, in May 1945, & U.K. coastal.  2 refers, re Convoy HX343 to 'Horta, following collision'. I presume that the vessel was involved in a collision during the course of that convoy, which left New York for Liverpool on Mar. 9, 1945. Empire Lord, I presume, diverted to Horta, the Azores, for repair. Can anybody confirm or correct my assumption. I read, attributed to Norman Middlemiss, that the vessel left Swansea, Wales, on Jul. 12, 1945, on a 21 month voyage during the course of which she was sold & renamed Aldington Court. That voyage was apparently as follows (slightly revised): 'Swansea, Cornerbrook, Montreal (Manz Line charter), Panama, Auckland, Wellington, Auckland (grain), Colombo, Bombay, Port Louis (sugar), Durban to Plate with coal returning with grain on repeated basis, Plate (grain), Durban (bunkers), Madras, Colombo (dry-dock), Adelaide, Port Pirie (grain), Port Lincoln (grain), Port Lincoln (grain), Calicut & Vizagapatnam (Manganese ore), Calcutta (general), Colombo, Port Said, Azores (engine repairs), St John, Baltimore, Newport News, Norfolk Virginia, New York (Cunard White Star Line charter), London, Tyne - arrived 3 April 1947 for dry dock.' In 1946, the vessel was sold to United British Steamships Ltd. ('United'), of London, Haldin & Phillips Ltd., the owners & managers, & renamed Aldington Court. In 1947, United was restyled as 'Court Line Ltd.' ('Court'), of London, & the managers were restyled as Haldin & Co. The vessel visited Auckland, New Zealand, 9 times between Sep. 26, 1947 & May 4, 1955. In 1949, the vessel was in collision with a Thames barge near Gravesend. The vessel, which had arrived from Australia with a cargo of wool & zinc, later docked at Royal Albert Dock, London, with damage above her water line & with her forepeak flooded. In 1958, while en route, in ballast, from Bremen, Germany, to Jacksonville, Florida, the vessel suffered 'machinery trouble', & ran aground on a sand & coral reef about 500 yards from the beach at Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The vessel suffered extensive damage, I read. In 1959, the vessel was sold to 'Cosmar Shipping Corp.', of Monrovia, Liberia, 'M. C. Fred Hunter', of London, the managers, & renamed Anacreon. Registered, however, at Piraeus, Greece. In 1966, the vessel was sold to Zirda Compania Naviera S.A., of Genoa, Italy, (have also read of Panama), & renamed White Daisy. In 1967, Garden City Shipping Co. Inc., of Panama, acquired the vessel, F. Italo Groce, of Italy, the managers, with no change of vessel name. In 1968, the vessel was sold to Compagnia Naviera Rivabella S.A., of Panama City, Panama, World Shipping SA the managers, & renamed Robertina. On Jun. 15, 1970, while en route from Takoradi, Ghana, to Leith, Scotland, with a cargo of bauxite, the vessel 'sprang a leak' off Cape Palmas, Liberia, West Africa, & was beached 2 miles W. of Cape Garraway, Liberia. The flooded vessel was abandoned & ended up as a total loss. Can you add anything?

273 Empire Sceptre
7359 tons
Hull 710

180126

Jacques Bingen
Sottern
Red Rose
1944

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay negative, Sottern), 1 (French 'pdf', ref. to name of Jacques Bingen), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire Sceptre, but I cannot check the link), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.6 metres long overall, 444 ft. 10", 128.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 431 ft., speed of 11 knots. Built for the Ministry of War Transport, with 'Haldin & Philipps Ltd.', of London, the managers. 'Convoyweb.org' records 19 WW2 convoy references, including 4 N. Atlantic crossings, service in Mediterranean (Port Said), Indian Ocean (Aden, Colombo, Calcutta), W. Africa, (Freetown) & U.K. local. In 1945, the vessel was either i) sold to the French Government or ii) allocated to France after WW2 (have read both) & renamed. If I understand 1 correctly, the vessel was to be re-named Louis E. Durand but it was in fact named Jacques Bingen. To honour Jacques Bingen (1906/44), an Italian Jew, who became a French patriot & a hero of the French resistance during WW2. A French Wikipedia page 4, (translated), tells us about him, but I have not spotted a similar page in English. He was arrested, on May 12, 1944, by the Gestapo in the railway station at Clermont-Ferrand, & took cyanide to protect his knowledge, knowing he was to be tortured. His life was honoured by a 1958 French postage stamp. The vessel was, in 1949 & 1953, sold to, respectively, 'Compagnie des Bateaux à Vapeur du Nord' (owned by 'Société Anonyme de Gérance et d'Armement'), & 'Société Navale de l'Ouest' (served Algeria & West Africa), both of Paris, with no changes of vessel name. In 1954, the vessel was sold to 'Rederi A/B Sigyn', of Helsingborg, Sweden, H. Lundgren or 'Lundgren & Börjesson' the owners/managers, & renamed Sottern. In 1963, the vessel was sold to 'Zirda Compagnia Navigazione S.A.', of Panama, F. Italo Croce, of Genoa, Italy, the manager, & renamed Red Rose. 4 years later, in 1967, it was sold again, to 'Garden City Shipping Co. Inc.', of Panama, with no change of name. The vessel was sold to Italian ship breakers & on Feb. 16, 1970, arrived at La Spezia, Italy, to be broken up. Can you add anything? Some images perhaps?

274 Registan
7368 (or 7373) tons
Hull 720

180022

Tresillian
1944

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data, image Tresillian), 2 (data, including 5 articles ex London Times re the 1954 sinking, links 85% down, but alas the London Times links no longer work), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Registan, but I cannot check the link), 4 (image, Tresillian), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.6 metres long overall, 448.4 ft., 128.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 1/2 or 11 knots. Built for Strick Line (1923) Ltd., of London, with Frank C. Strick & Co. Ltd., the managers. 17 WW2 convoy references, mainly U.K. local but including 1 N. Atlantic crossing & service to W. Africa (Freetown) & Mediterranean. In 1945 the vessel was sold to Hain Steamship Company Ltd. ('Hain') of London, & in 1946 was renamed Tresillian. In 1950, vessel ownership was transferred to 'Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company', Hain still the managers. All of the above companies seem to be part of the P & O group of companies. Used on P&O cargo liner services & tramping. In Jun. 1953, the vessel was damaged at Kobe, Japan, when 'she ranged alongside a wharf'. The vessel left Urangan, Queensland, Australia, on Aug. 28, 1954 & proceeded via Fiji to Canada. On Nov. 17, 1954, the vessel left Sorel, Quebec, Canada, for Avonmouth with a cargo of 9350 tons of bulk barley & wheat. On Nov. 30, 1954, the vessel encountered heavy weather 44 miles off Ballycotton, County Cork, Ireland. At about 51.14N/07.30W. The Captain had indicated that the cargo had shifted, which seems, per the Court of Inquiry, to have been likely so only late in the disaster when the vessel was already doomed as a result of water entry. Any cargo shifting would not have effected the outcome. The ship developed a list to port in winds of up to force 12. The list increased, water invaded the engine room, the vessel listed 30 degrees to port, & capsized. 17 crew members were rescued, 4 by Ardglen (landed at Milford Haven) & 13 by Liparus, a 6473 ton 'Shell' tanker, owned by Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Co. Ltd., & landed via Maer at Cork. However one of the 13 (Charles Harrison, aged 18, a cadet) soon died from swallowing oil, the result of Liparus spreading oil to calm the seas. Tresillian had a crew of 40, so 24 lives were lost, including W. J. Winter, the Captain. It would seem, that Captain Winter was rescued also, but he died soon thereafter. Other ships searched for survivors also - Parima, Floristan & Brocklebank. The court of inquiry stated that there was no evidence of a breach of the main hatchways, & that the likely cause of water entry was the 'breakage of a soil pipe'. The soil pipe that they refer to would be immersed at a list of 5 degrees & if damaged, as they believe it was, would have admitted water continuously at a greater degree of list. All nine members of the motor life boat crew of Liparus, which could not itself get near the foundering ship, were later awarded the Silver Medal for Gallantry for Saving Life at Sea for their rescue efforts. There were other awards also, including the Bronze such medal awarded to Clement Griffiths, Able Seaman of Tresillian, for his part in saving lives.  And Christopher Colley, pumpman of Liparus, received the 'Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct' for saving the totally exhausted Charles S. Owston, the commander of the lifeboat. Can you add anything? Another image perhaps?
Jerry Owston has kindly been in touch (thanks!) re the 1954 sinking. Jerry's father, Charles S. (Stanley, known as Stan) Owston, S.G.M., (1920/1988) was Chief Officer of Liparus & in command of the Liparus lifeboat with a crew of 8 volunteers. My words above clearly do no justice to the appalling sea & weather conditions at the time of the rescue. Do read the letter that advised Chief Officer Owston that he had been awarded the Silver Medal. And also i) these descriptions of the Liparus rescue (A & B), & ii) the letter (C) of investiture. The bottom image at left is well worth viewing - the modest attempt of the webmaster to stitch together Jerry Owston's 2 scanned images of a giant drawing ex Illustrated London News. Jerry also advises that 'The Lifesaving Awards Research Society' has published a truly comprehensive 33 page report, Journal No. 70, on the loss of the Tresillian. You are invited to contact the Society here re its availability. A site visitor has left a guestbook message, here, about Charles Howden, another survivor of the disaster.

275 Roybank
7368 tons
Hull 721

169430

Silver Lake
1944

A cargo ship. Per 1 (brief ref., 70% down), 2 [Bank Line, Roybank (1), 65% down], 3 (Convoy OS.110), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Roybank, but I cannot check the link), 5 (image Roybank), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.6 metres long overall, 128.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 431 ft. speed of 10 knots. Built for Bank Line Ltd., owned by Andrew Weir & Co., of Glasgow. The first of two fleet vessels of the name. Just 2 WW2 convoy references, both in Feb. 1945. In convoy OS.110, ex Southend, Essex. The vessel went on to Calcutta, India. The vessel visited Auckland, New Zealand, twice, on May 20, 1950 & Apl. 11, 1957. In 1962, the vessel was sold to 'Transportes Maritimos Mundiales', of Monrovia, Liberia, C. S. Koo the managers?, & renamed Silver Lake. In 1965, Silver Lines Inc., of Monrovia, acquired the vessel with no change of vessel name. And in 1967, 'Empresa Naviera La Libertad SA', also of Monrovia, acquired the vessel, again with no change of vessel name. On Apl. 16, 1968, the vessel arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, to be broken up. Anything you can add?

276 Trevose
7354 tons
Hull 716

169931

Ruthy Ann
1944

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Trevose), 1 (large 'pdf' file, Typhoon Ida, p.34), 2 (image Trevose, also -03), 3 (images Trevose), 4 (image, Ruthy Ann, but you must be registered to access it), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Trevose, but I cannot check the link), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.6 metres long overall, 445 ft., 128.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 knots. Built for Hain Steamship Co. Ltd. ('Hain') of St. Ives, Cornwall.  At that time, since 1917, Hain were part of the P & O group of companies. Only 4 WW2 convoy references, including one N. Atlantic crossing. Spent most of its time independently in the Indian Ocean - India, South Africa, Singapore, Suez, etc. Visited Auckland, New Zealand, once - on Apl. 18, 1954, when apparently owned by 'Hain-Nourse Ltd.'. The vessel was sold, in 1962, to Red Anchor Line Ltd., of Hong Kong, (C. Moller Ltd. of Hong Kong, the managers) & renamed Ruthy Ann. In 1964, the vessel ran aground at Kowloon Bay, Hong Kong, during Typhoon Ida. It would seem that on Sep. 9, 1968 the vessel collided with Cun Long of 1157 tons & ran aground at Haiphong, North Vietnam, during another typhoon. On Feb. 11, 1971, the vessel arrived at Whampoa, i.e. Huangpu, an outer port of Guangzhou, China, to be broken up. There is very little WWW data available about this vessel. So the above may well need correction. Anything to add?

277 Ambassador
7312 (or 7308) tons
Hull 730

169205
1945

A cargo ship. Per A, B, (e-Bay images, Ambassador), 1 (1964 sinking, a fine article by C. William Bailey, Commanding Officer of Coos Bay in 1964), 2 (image Ambassador), 3 & 4 (Coos Bay), 5 (data & wreck images), 6 (data), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.0 metres long overall, 442 ft., 128.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 1/2 knots. Built for Hall Brothers Steamship Co., Ltd. ('HallBros'), of Newcastle, owned & managed by (who else) 'Hall Brothers'. The first vessel in the HallBros fleet equipped with diesel engines. Built too late for WW2 convoy service, it would appear. I have WWW read nothing about the ship's service through 1964, except a comment that the vessel may have carried ammunition & vehicles to the Suez Canal conflict - presumably in 1956. In Feb. 1964, Ambassador left Philadelphia, U.S.A., for Hull, U.K., with a cargo of grain, under the command of Captain Frickland, his first voyage as a Captain. On Feb. 15, 1964, when about 660 miles SE of Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, the engines failed & the ship listed heavily in mountainous seas. I have read 'the most mountainous seas seen in the life-times of several career seamen'. SOS messages were sent out until the radio failed. Leonardo Da Vinci stood by initially but would seem to have left the scene. Many vessels responded to the SOS & a fleet assembled including Vulcania, Caraibe, City of Alma, Fruen, a Norwegian bulk carrier en route to Rotterdam (Captain Molver in command), & Coos Bay, a U.S. Coastguard cutter which arrived at the scene on the morning of Feb. 19, 1964. Canadian aircraft, & aircraft of both the U.S. Air Force & Coastguard, flew low over the sea searching for survivors. Elbe, a Dutch salvage tug, proceeded towards the scene, to tow Ambassador to port, were that to be possible. Ambassador had a crew of 35. 'Most of the crew of 35' left the ship, taking to life rafts thinking that the ship was about to founder. Those life rafts were immediately upset in the high seas & 14 of the crew were lost. 21, however, made it back to the stricken vessel. In a splendid action over many hours, Fruen, displaying admirable seamanship, recovered 9 crew members, with great difficulty, via a life line, until they ran out of line, which snapped (3 times) under the severe stress. Coos Bay then took over & 11 of the remaining Ambassador crew made it to Coos Bay, & eventually to Portland, Maine, through the extraordinary efforts of 6 volunteer Coos Bay swimmers on the end of lifelines. Captain Frickland of Ambassador tied himself onto the lifeline too tightly & was drowned while being hauled to safety. How many lives were lost? I have read, in WWW sources of authority, numbers that range from 13 to 16. Ambassador sank on Feb. 21, 1964 when under tow to the Azores, by Elbe. At 37.22N/48.51W. The tow rope broke & the ship was gone. Awards were issued re the rescue. 9 Coos Bay officers & men were awarded decorations & the entire ship’s company was given the Commandant's Unit Award. No awards to the crew of Fruen? The causes of the disaster? 6 advises us that locking bars were not installed on No. 3 hatch, that a heavy gangway was lightly lashed on top of the hatch, that fuel tank vent pipes were improperly secured, & a list to port, apparent as they commenced their journey, was not corrected en route as it should have been by using fuel from the appropriate tanks. A Board of Trade inquiry was held into the disaster but I am not aware of its findings. Do please correct me if I have any of the above incorrectly. For such an amazing rescue effort, the WWW record is limited. Why did the engines fail? Because of seawater in the fuel? Anything you can add? Or correct?

278 Empire Singapore
7381 tons
Hull 723

180151
5121122

Fresno City
Sea Captain
1945

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Reardon Smith, Fresno City (3)], 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire Singapore, but I cannot check the link), 4 (image, Fresno City), 5 (image, Fresno City, but you must be registered to see it), 6 (image, Sea Captain), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.6 metres long overall, 128.1 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 431 ft., speed of 11 knots. Built for the Ministry of War Transport, Common Bros. Ltd., the managers. Just 2 WW2 convoy references, including a single N. Atlantic crossing in Apl/May 1945, though her return arrival port is not known. In 1946, the vessel was sold to Reardon Smith Line Ltd., of Cardiff, Sir W. Reardon Smith & Co.,  the managers, & renamed Fresno City. Registered at Bideford. In 1965, the vessel was sold to 'Vergocean Steamship Co. Ltd.', of London, 'Vergottis Ltd.' the managers, also of London & renamed Sea Captain. In Nov. 1970, the vessel arrived at Shanghai, China, to be broken up. Anything to add?

279 Empire Tavoy
7381 tons
Hull 722

180150

Great City
Shipwind
Wing Kwong
1945

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Reardon Smith, Great City (2)], 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire Tavoy, but I cannot check the link), 3 (data, Great City), 4 (image, Shipwind), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.6 metres long overall, 128.1 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 431 ft., speed of 11 knots, signal letters GBYS. Built for the Ministry of War Transport, Dodd Thomson & Co., of London, & then Sir W. Reardon Smith & Co., of Cardiff, the managers. Just 3 WW2 convoy references, including a single N. Atlantic crossing in Mar/Apl. 1945. In 1946, the vessel was sold to Leeds Shipping Co., of Cardiff, Sir W. Reardon Smith & Co.,  the managers, & renamed Great City. Registered at Bideford. A vessel most economic on fuel, it would appear. In 1964, the vessel was sold to Taiship Co. Ltd., of Hong Kong, & renamed Shipwind. The vessel was sold again, in 1968, to Southern Shipping & Enterprises Co. Ltd., also of Hong Kong, & renamed Wing Kwong. In 1969, the vessel was acquired by Poon Shun-Po, also of Hong Kong, with no change of vessel name. But the vessel became Mogadishu, Somalia, registered. On Jan. 15, 1975, the vessel arrived at Shanghai, China, to be broken up. Anything to add?

280 Empire Tilbury
7312 tons
Hull 732

181116

Trevean
East Lion
Kawana
1945

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Trevean), 1 (90% down, Empire Tilbury), 2 (image Trevean, the correct one?), 3 (wreck at Chittagong, 50% down, Kawana), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.0 metres long overall, 128.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 429 ft., speed of 11 knots. Built for the Ministry of War Transport, Walter Runciman & Co. Ltd., of Glasgow, the managers. In Mar. 1946 the vessel was sold to Hain Steamship Co. Ltd. ('Hain') of St. Ives, Cornwall, & renamed Trevean.  At that time, since 1917, Hain were part of the P & O group of companies. In 1957 the vessel was owned directly by 'Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company', it would seem. In 1958 the vessel reverted to Hain ownership. In 1963, the vessel was sold to Willow Shipping Co., of Hong Kong, (Eastern Asia Navigation Co., the managers?), & renamed East Lion. In 1964, the vessel was renamed Kawana. It was sold, in 1966, to Coral Shipping Co., also of Hong Kong. On Jun. 4, 1966, the vessel was beached near Chittagong, Bangladesh, after a cargo fire. The vessel was a total loss, indeed, the wreck is still located there today - at 22.12.32N/91.48.10E. Anything to add?

281 Hartington
7325 tons
Hull 731

180756

Abaco
Funabashi
1945

A cargo ship. Per 1 (builders' model, item #1049), 2 & 3 (image & painting, Hartington, but you must be registered to see them), 4 (re 1966 collision of Funabashi with White Mountain), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.0 metres long overall, 128.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 442 ft. 11 in. & 420 ft. 1 in., speed of 11 knots. Built for National Steamship Co. Ltd., of London, owned & managed by J. & C. Harrison Ltd., also of London. In 1962, the vessel was sold to World Wide (Shipping), Ltd. ('WorldWide'), Sycamore Steamship Co. Ltd. ('Sycamore'), of Hong Kong, the managers, & renamed Abaco. But is that truly so? It looks as though Sycamore were, in fact, the owners & WorldWide were the managers, in view of a later lawsuit (per Google data 'snippets') involving Sycamore & the owners of White Mountain. British flag, Hong Kong registered, I read that Abaco was renamed Funabashi in 1963. At 8.30 p.m. on Feb. 16, 1966, the vessel, en route from Telok Ramunia, (must be quite close to Singapore), Malaysia, to Japan, with a cargo of bauxite, was in collision with White Mountain. At 1.22N/104.15E about 9 miles off Singapore. White Mountain sank, while Funabashi, suffering severe bow damage & a flooded No. 1 hold, was beached 1 mile off Telok Ramunia. There were no crew injuries on either vessel. Who was at fault? Funabashi was later re-floated (the cargo being transferred to Ever Protector), & dry-docked at Singapore where her damage was determined to be so severe as to constitute a constructive total loss. In Dec. 1966, the vessel arrived at the Singapore ship breaking facilities of 'Hong Huat Hardware', to be broken up. Anything to add? Or to correct?

282 Meadowbank
7307 tons
Hull 728

169446

Hsing Yung
1945

A cargo ship. Per 1 (brief ref. 75% down), 2 [Bank Line, Meadowbank (1)], 3 (Auckland), 4 (image, Meadowbank. but you must register to see it), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.0 metres long overall, 128.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 12 knots. Built for Bank Line Ltd., owned by Andrew Weir & Co., of Glasgow. The vessel visited Auckland, New Zealand, 4 times between 1947 & 1955. It was sold, in 1963, to 'United Maritime Trust' (may be the manager only), of Nationalist China, & renamed Hsing Yung. In Sep. 1968, the vessel arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, to be broken up. Can you add anything?

283 Moraybank
7307 tons
Hull 729

169448
5022821

Ardrowan
Tetrarch
1945

A cargo ship. Per 1 (brief ref., 75% down), 2 [Bank Line, Moraybank (1)], 3 (image, Moraybank), 4 (image, Moraybank, also -05, -06, -07, & -11), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.0 metres long overall, 128.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 12 knots. Built for Bank Line Ltd., owned by Andrew Weir & Co., of Glasgow. In 1962, the vessel was sold to Mullion & Co. Ltd., of Hong Kong, & renamed Ardrowan. In 1967, the vessel was acquired by Tetrarch Shipping Company Limited, of Gibraltar, with no change of vessel name. Was renamed Tetrarch in 1968. On Dec. 3, 1969, the vessel arrived at the Hong Kong ship breaking facilities of 'Leung Yau Shipbreaking Co. Ltd.' to be broken up. Is there data about the vessel that you can add?

284 Pundua
7295 tons
Hull 725

180569
5287108

Shun On
1945

A freighter. Per 1 (a diorama of Pundua, Bonhams, New York, Apl. 2010 auction), 2 [British India, Pundua (2)], 3 (image, Pundua), 4 (Steel Admiral, 10/26/63 date), 5 (most modest image), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.0 metres long overall, 128.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 1/2 knots. WWW data about this vessel is most limited. Much of the data listed here came from a long expired e-Bay listing. 'Although a 'P' name this ship was a one off.' And a 'later development of the Doxford economy design'. Ordered by the Ministry of War Transport but delivered to 'British India Steam Navigation Company'. Visited Auckland, New Zealand, 4 times in 1957. Visited Australia also. 'Navigated the waters of the Eastern trade routes carrying passenger, mail and freight'. On Oct. 26, 1963 the vessel collided with Steel Admiral at Singapore. The vessel was sold to 'Jebshun Shipping Co.', of Hong Kong, in 1967, & renamed Shun On. The vessel was laid up at Singapore on Dec. 9, 1971 & broken up there in 1973. Need help.

285 Weybank
7368 (or 7268) tons
Hull 724

169437

Silver Moon
1945

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Weybank), 1 (brief ref., 75% down), 2 [Bank Line, Weybank (1)], 3 (image, Weybank, below thumbnails), 4 (image, Weybank, also -08), 5 (Auckland, New Zealand), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.6 metres long overall, 128.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 431 ft., speed of 11 knots. Built for Bank Line Limited. Visited Auckland 7 times between 1947 & 1957. The vessel was sold, in 1962, to 'Pacific Overseas Nav. Corp.', of Liberia, (C. S. Koo the managers?), & renamed Silver Moon. On Apl. 8, 1968, the vessel arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, to be broken up. Can you correct the above and/or add anything?

286 British Major
8564 (or 8650) tons
Hull 734

180838
1946

A tanker. Per 1 (image, British Major, also -03), 2 (image, British Major but you must register to see it), 3 (image, British Major), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 149.3 metres long overall, speed of 12 knots. A Google Books 'snippet' refers to her being the first vessel to be equipped with a Doxford engine with twin-lever scavenge pumps. Built for British Tanker Co. Ltd. ('Tanker'), of London. Tanker, the ship owning & operating subsidiary of British Petroleum Company, Ltd., was later (1956) restyled as 'BP Tanker Company Ltd.' No word about her service history but likely would have traded with the Persian Gulf, Curaçao & Trinidad. A single visit to Auckland, New Zealand, on May 25, 1950. It would seem that the vessel was laid up at Falmouth, Cornwall, on May 5, 1959. The vessel was sold to 'BISCO' ('British Iron & Steel Corporation') for scrap, was towed to Cardiff (arrived there on Sep. 29, 1961) 'to be prepared for demolition', & left Cardiff in tow for the 'John Cashmore Ltd.' ship breaking facilities at Newport, Wales. She arrived there on Apl. 8, 1962 & demolition commenced immediately (Apl. 9).  WWW data about the vessel is most limited. Anything you can add?

287 British Marshal
8582 tons
Hull 737

180959
1946

A tanker. Per 1 (River Fal, 50% down), 2 (image, British Marshal, I think, despite the recorded name), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 149.3 metres long overall, 490 ft., speed of 12 (or 11 1/2) knots. Built for British Tanker Co. Ltd. ('Tanker'), of London. Tanker, the ship owning & operating subsidiary of British Petroleum Company, Ltd., was later (1956) restyled as 'BP Tanker Company Ltd.' It would seem that the vessel, with cargo, was laid up in the River Fal at Falmouth, Cornwall, along with many other BP tankers. How long for? Held loaded in case of need re the 1956 Suez Canal crisis. No word about her service history but certainly traded with the Persian Gulf, Curaçao & Trinidad. Arrived at Blyth, Northumberland (NE of Newcastle upon Tyne), on Nov. 6, 1961, to be broken up at the facilities of Hughes Bolckow Ltd. WWW data is most limited. Anything you can add?

288 Empire Northfleet
5349 tons
Hull 733

180814

Chulmleigh
Rugeley
Madura
1946

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Northfleet), 2 (image, Chulmleigh, also -01 & -02), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.0 metres long overall, 429 ft., or 442 ft. 11 in., speed of 10 1/2 knots. Sister to Empire Tilbury. Laid down as Empire Northfleet for the Ministry of War Transport, managed by 'Stephens, Sutton, Ltd.', of Newcastle. But the vessel was delivered, as Chulmleigh, to Atlantic Shipping & Trading Co. Ltd., of London, W. J. Tatem Ltd. the managers. In 1961, the vessel was sold to Whalton Shipping Co. Ltd., of Newcastle, & renamed Rugeley. It was sold again, three years later, in 1964, to Union Fair Shipping Co., of Monrovia, Liberia, & renamed Madura. The vessel had the misfortune to be at Hong Kong in late May 1964 undergoing repairs to her propeller & tail shaft. Immobile accordingly. A tropical depression from the south grew over a few days into 'Typhoon Viola', which made landfall, with high winds & seas, at Hong Kong on May 28, 1964. On that date, Madura broke her moorings during the storm & drifted onto rocks at Lantao, Hong Kong. The vessel was holed in three of her holds, causing her to take on water. Her engine-room was flooded & she developed a list of 30 degrees. Lengthy efforts were made to re-float her, accomplished on Jul. 10, 1964. Upon examination, the vessel was found to have severe bottom damage, was declared to be a constructive total loss, & on Aug. 10, 1964 the vessel arrived at Hong Kong ship breakers to be broken up. WWW data is quite limited. Wikipedia & many Wikipedia 'copycat' sites refer to the ship being of 7311 gross tons. I wonder why? It would seem that 5349 tons is correct, unless the vessel was lengthened. Anything you can add?

289 Cragmoor
5253 tons
Hull 741

181624

Ratna Shobhana
1947

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('wrecksite.eu', sinking data,  Ratna Shobhana), 2 (image, Cragmoor), 3 (image, Cragmoor, also -01 & -03), 4 (history, Runciman, Moor Line), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.5 metres long overall, 444 ft. 9 in., speed of 12 1/2 knots. Built for Moor Line Ltd., of Newcastle, Walter Runciman & Co. Ltd., the managers. The vessel visited Auckland, New Zealand, once, on May 17, 1953.  In 1962, the vessel was sold to Ratnakar Shipping Co. Ltd., of Calcutta, India, & renamed Ratna Shobhana. On Jun. 5, 1966, while en route from Rangoon, Burma (Myanmar), to Calcutta, with a cargo of Burma bagged rice, the vessel ran aground & was wrecked off Muna Khali, 8 miles from Calcutta off Garden Reach. I have read no detail as to the circumstances. Can anybody tell us about them? The vessel ended up a total loss.  WWW data is most limited. Anything you can add?

290 Eastbank
5947 (or 5928) tons
Hull 745

182079
5095969

Bordazuri
Pella
Sierra
Makedonia II
1947

A cargo ship. Per 1 (ref. Eastbank, low on page), 2 [Bank Line, Eastbank], 3, 4 & 5 (images, Eastbank), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). As this listing is updated, in late Mar. 2013, an image of Pella is e-Bay available. But can I invite you to find it for yourself. I prefer not to reward with a link e-Bay vendors whose logos are so intrusive, as in this case. Built for Bank Line Limited. 141.5 metres long overall, 132.7 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 435 ft., speed of 14 knots. Have read it was the first 'Compass-point' ship built by Doxford. Visited Auckland, New Zealand, on Aug. 7, 1958 & Mar. 4, 1961. The vessel was sold, in 1965, to 'Bordagain Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Monrovia, Liberia, managed by 'Ramon de la Sota Jr.' of France, of the Larringa Group, & renamed Bordazuri. Juan Uriagereka ('Juan') advises (thanks!) that in about 1965 thru 1968, Juan's father, 'Juan Uriagereka-Zorrotzua', was the vessel's captain. In the Apl/Oct 1966 period, Juan, then a young child, was aboard Bordazuri with his mother on a voyage from  Mauritius to Liverpool with a cargo of sugar. In mid Aug. 1966, entering the Suez Canal, Bordazuri collided with Norina, an American tanker that had been converted to a bulk carrier, resulting in significant damage to both vessels but no loss of life. The U.S. vessel cut across the bow of Bordazuri, which hit it in the stern. The first officer was in command, & the captain rushed to the deck in his underwear, screaming orders when he got there. To find the vessel on automatic pilot with the engines in 'full ahead'. 'A naked man obeyed by his men, as they followed the Mayday protocol.' Quite a scene! It would seem that there was some kind of Inquiry into the collision with the blame being apportioned 75% to Norina & 25% to Bordazuri. Bordazuri's bow was temporarily repaired at Alexandria, & the vessel resumed its voyage to Liverpool. Permanent repairs were effected at South Shields. Juan adds that 'the owner (of Bordazuri) in the early seventies was Ramon de la Sota, the son of Sir Ramon de la Sota, the only Basque magnate who opposed Franco's dictatorship and was instrumental in evacuating children from war zones early in the Spanish Civil War. Franco confiscated the company (at the time called Sota & Aznar), the biggest one in Spain. Sota the younger was able to rebuild a fraction of it in England, due to his reputation in Britain. Bordazuri was one of his acquisitions when the company was beginning to function decently, and Franco still wouldn't allow Sota's ships to touch any Spanish port.' The vessel, in 1968, was sold or transferred to 'Bordazuri Trading & Shipping Co. Ltd.' ('BordazuriTS') of Liberia (with no change of vessel name) & in 1972, BordazuriTS sold the vessel to Toto Shipping Co. S.A., of Piraeus, Greece, who renamed it Pella. It was sold again, in 1974, to 'Annaba Shipping Co. S.A.', also of Piraeus, & renamed Sierra. In 1977, the vessel was sold to 'Krateros Maritime Enterprises S.A.', of Piraeus, & renamed Makedonia II. On Nov. 11, 1977, the vessel suffered a major engine failure in the south Adriatic. The vessel was en route from Split, Yugoslavia, to Apapa, i.e. Lagos, Nigeria, with a cargo of bagged cement. The vessel was towed to Patras, & in 1978 was further towed to Itea, (Itéa, Gulf of Corinth, Greece?), where the vessel arrived on Apl. 3, 1978 & was laid up. Declared a constructive total loss. The vessel was later sold to 'C. N. Lotti' & on Jan. 18, 1980, the vessel arrived at La Spezia, NW Italy, to be broken up. Can you correct the above and/or add anything?

291 Herdsman
6822 tons
Hull 739

181069

Hock Aun
Kota Selamat
1947

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data & image 60% down, also 90% down), 2 (data, Herdsman), 3 (Thos. & Jas. Harrison, Herdsman), 4, 5 & 6 (all images Herdsman), 7 (image as Kota Selamat, I believe). The vessel used to be listed at Miramar, but is no longer, it would appear. 461 ft. long, speed of 14 knots, accommodation for 8 passengers & an additional deck under the bridge structure for those passengers. Interpreter & Factor were her sisters. Built for Thos. & Jas. Harrison (Charente Shipping Co.), of Liverpool, stated to be indeed their first motor ship. In 1960, the vessel towed disabled sister ship Interpreter into Dakar, Senegal, West Africa. The vessel was sold, in 1965, to 'Hwa Aun Co.' (or maybe 'Chip Hwa Shipping & Trading'), of Hong Kong, & renamed Hock Aun. And sold again, in 1969, to Pacific International Lines, of Singapore, & renamed Kota Selamat. The vessel arrived at Whampoa, (i.e. Huangpu, an outer port of Guangzhou, China), on Nov. 9, 1973, to be broken up. Can you add anything?

292 La Cordillera
6330 tons
Hull 740

181593
5096133

Eastern Planet
Virgo II
1947

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, La Cordillera), 1 (data & images, La Cordillera, lower ship of the 2), 2 (Buries Markes history), 3 (data, La Cordillera), 4 (laid up, Blackwater), 5 (image La Cordillera, also -02, -03 & -04), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 141.6 metres long overall, 132.7 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 430 ft., speed of 14 knots (apparently did better), accommodation for 12 (why 12?) passengers. I am advised that at launch the vessel was described as the finest vessel Doxford had ever built. Complete superstructure type, & an 'orlop' deck in No. 1 hold. Built for Buries Markes Ltd., of London, the British subsidiary of 'Louis Dreyfus & Co.' ('Dreyfus') of France. Visited Auckland, New Zealand, on Jan. 1, 1950 & May 14, 1955. In 1958, the vessel was transferred to Dreyfus, (Buries Markes the managers), with no change of vessel name. I read that the vessel was unique in that she was the sole British ship which had an all female catering crew, all ex WRNS, accommodated in self contained living quarters at the forward end of the boat deck. It would seem that the unions were not happy about that. Was it a success? I read also that the passenger capacity was not a success, due to the un-predictable nature of her routes. The vessel was laid up, in 1962, in the River Blackwater (Mersea). The vessel was sold, in 1962 (or 1963), to Eastern Shipping Lines ('Eastern'), of Manila, Philippines, & renamed Eastern Planet. Philippine flag. The vessel was sold again, in 1971, to 'Cia. Pan Oriente S.A.' ('Oriente'), of Panama, managed by Eastern, & renamed Virgo II. Panama flag. Miramar refers to 'J. L. Chiongbian' re that sale. Can anybody explain the reference? A principal of Oriente, perhaps? On Oct. 21, 1972 the vessel arrived at the Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ship breaking facilities of Keun Hwa Iron & Steel Works Enterprises Ltd., to be broken up. Can you add anything?

293 Pelayo
2579 (or 2578 or 2589) tons
Hull 744

181741
5018818

Annalisa
Maria Susanna
Geremia
1947

A dry cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Pelayo), 1 (1959 sinking, ref. 14/1 1959, Pelayo, 25% down), 2 [MacAndrews, Pelayo (2)], 3 (image, Pelayo, also -02), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 107.3 metres long overall, 100.7 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 350 ft. or 330 ft. long, speed of 15 1/2 knots, with accommodation for 4 passengers. Built for the general cargo & Mediterranean fruit-carrying trade of MacAndrews & Co. Ltd., of London & Liverpool. Sister to Pinto. On Jan. 14, 1959, with a crew of 32 & 2 passengers aboard, while en route from Liverpool to Naples, Italy, the vessel ran aground on the outer breakwater at Leghorn, i.e. Livorno, Italy. The vessel sank in shallow water, was re-floated on Jul. 28, 1959 & beached 'for final tightening'. She was dry-docked on Sep. 14, 1959 & declared a constructive total loss. While I have not read about the detailed circumstances, a Court of Inquiry was held into the grounding, however, & a copy of the report would appear to be in the Liverpool Record Office. That was not the end of the story. The vessel was sold, in 1960, to "Atlantide" S.p.A. Compagnia Sarda di Navigazione, of Cagliari, Sardinia, Italy, & renamed Annalisa. Somewhere along the way it was presumably extensively repaired, though before or after that 1960 sale I cannot tell you. In 1963, the vessel was renamed Maria Susanna. In 1965, the vessel was sold again, to 'Tremari Nav S.p.A.', of Genoa, Italy, & renamed Geremia. It was sold again, in 1967, to "Garibaldi" Soc. Cooperativa di Nav. a Resp. Ltda, also of Genoa, with no change of vessel name. On Mar. 24, 1973, the vessel arrived at the La Spezia, Italy, ship breaking facilities of 'CN della Palmaria', to be broken up. Can you add anything? An image? The Court of Inquiry report?

294 Pinto
2579 (or 2576) tons
Hull 743

181705
5278781

Panaghia P
1947

A dry cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Pinto), 1 (image, Pinto, also -03 & -04), 2 [MacAndrews, Pinto (2)], 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 107.3 metres long overall, 100.6 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 15 knots, accommodation for 4 passengers. Built for MacAndrews & Co. Ltd., of London & Liverpool. Sister to Pelayo. The vessel was sold, in 1965, to General Maritime Enterprises Corp. of Greece, T. A. Papagelopoulos, also of Greece the managers, & renamed Panaghia P. On May 28, 1978, the vessel arrived  at the Vigo, Spain, ship breaking facilities of Jose Gomez Oliveira to be broken up. Anything you can add?

295 Anunciada
5370 tons
Hull 759

5419048

Beni Saf
1948

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data, Anunciada), 2 (page in German with history, image (Fabre Line) low on page, WWW translation most difficult), 3 & 4 (images, Anunciada), 5 (image, Beni Saf), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 134.96 metres (442 ft. 10 in.) long overall, 128.0 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 12 1/2 knots, crew of 36, accommodation for 12 passengers, signal letters HPDM. 1 states that the vessel was initially owned by 'Anunciada Shipping Co. Inc.' of Genève (Geneva), Switzerland, & registered at Panama. And that the vessel was sold, on Apl. 13, 1949, to 'Transports Maritimes Suisse-Outremer S.A.' ('Transports'), of Geneva or possibly of Basel, Switzerland, & became Swiss registered. It should be noted, however, that Miramar refer to Transports as the initial owner. I do not have access to the applicable Lloyd's Registers to determine the issue. Managers? It would seem there were 3 until sold in 1963 - 1948/53 'Alpina Transports & Affretements S.A.', 1953/63 'Suisse-Outremer S.A. de Gérance et d'Affretement Maritimes' & in 1963 'Société d'Armement Maritime Suisse-Atlantique S.A., of Lausanne. The vessel was sold, on Jul. 9, 1963, to the Bulgarian state trading company 'Imextracom Etablissement Texim' of Varna, Bulgaria (northern Black Sea coast) & renamed Beni Saf. And was sold or transferred, in 1967, to 'Navigation Maritime Bulgare', also of Varna. The vessel was broken up, in 1974, in Bulgaria. Can anyone advise what happened in Oct. 1959, (2nd para in 3). And advise also why 'Fabre Line' is on the vessel. Was the vessel chartered to Fabre Line, perhaps? The above may well contain errors. Corrections are invited.

296 Borba
4455 (or 4457) tons
Hull 762

5048253
1948

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Portuguese page, image available), 2 (link 1 translated), 3 (Sociedade Geral de Comércio, Borba), 4 (Companhia Nacional de Navegação, Borba), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 129.66 metres long overall, 122.1 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 12.7 or 13 knots, crew of 33, with accommodation for 12 passengers, signal letters CSIY. Built for 'Sociedade Geral de Comércio, Indústria e Transportes', of Lisbon, Portugal, & registered there. It would seem that the vessel was laid up, on Oct. 23, 1971, in the Mar da Palha, Estuário do Tejo, i.e. at the 'Sea of Straw' in the estuary of the Tagus river, at Lisbon. The vessel was transferred to 'Companhia Nacional de Navegação' in 1971 or 1972, when the companies merged. The vessel was still laid up in Jun. 1972. On Feb. 20, 1973, the vessel left under tow by Montsant, (a Spanish tug, perhaps) for ship breakers at Castellon, Spain. On Feb. 27, 1973, the vessel arrived at the Castellon ship breaking facilities of I. M. Varela Davalillo, to be broken up. The above may well contain unintended errors - the WWW translation of Portuguese into English appears to be most difficult. Anything you can add?

297 Braga
4455 (or 4403) tons
Hull 760

5050103
1948

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data & image), 2 (Sociedade Geral de Comércio, Braga), 3 (Companhia Nacional de Navegação, Braga), 4 (routes), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 129.56 metres long overall, 122.0 metres perpendicular to perpendicular (400 ft.), speed of 12.8 or 13 knots, crew of 33. Built for 'Sociedade Geral de Comércio, Indústria e Transportes', of Lisbon, Portugal, & registered there. The vessel was transferred to 'Companhia Nacional de Navegação' in 1971 or 1972, when the companies merged. The vessel served ports in W. Africa (Angola & Congo) & European ports north to Hamburg. On Jan. 15, 1977, or, per Miramar, on Jan. 14, 1977, while en route from Sao Tome, off Gabon, to Luanda, Angola, with a partial general cargo, the vessel suffered a fire & an explosion, when off the coast of Angola, between Ambrizete & Ambriz. Two crewmen died & 6 were injured. The 6 crewmen, together with the 32 remaining crew members, were landed at Luanda by a Spanish fishing vessel. The blazing vessel was taken in tow to Pointe Noire, Republic of Congo. The vessel, essentially gutted by the fire, was determined to be beyond economic repair. She was accordingly later towed out to sea & scuttled on May 6, 1977, off Pointe Noire. Anything you can add?

298 Bragança
4455 tons
Hull 758

5050115
1948

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data & image), 2 (Sociedade Geral de Comércio, Braganca), 3 (Companhia Nacional de Navegação), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 129.57 metres long overall, 122.0 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 12.8 or 13 knots, crew of 33. Built for 'Sociedade Geral de Comércio, Indústria e Transportes', of Lisbon, Portugal, & registered there. The vessel was transferred to 'Companhia Nacional de Navegação' in 1971 or 1972, when the companies merged. On Nov. 11, 1974, the vessel arrived at the San Esteban de Pravia, Spain, ship breaking facilities of 'Desguaces Aviles SA', to be broken up. And was scrapped in 1975. Anything you can add?

299 Interpreter
6815 tons
Hull 747

182429
5162011

Taxiarchis Michael
1948

A cargo ship. Per 1 (reference 60% down, also 90% down, Interpreter), 2 (data, Herdsman 1960 tow), 3 (Thos. & Jas. Harrison, Interpreter), 4 (66 1/2 in. long builder's model, Interpreter, many images), 5 & 6 (images Interpreter, also -01, -02, -03 & -04), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 140.4 metres long overall, 132.7 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 461 ft. long, speed of 14 knots, accommodation for 8 passengers & an additional deck under the bridge structure for those passengers. Herdsman & Factor were her sister ships. Built for Thos. & Jas. Harrison (Charente Shipping Co.), of Liverpool, T. & J. Harrison Ltd., the managers. In 1960, the vessel, disabled, was towed by Herdsman into Dakar, Senegal, West Africa. The vessel was sold, in 1967, to 'Polina Armadora SA', of Piraeus, Greece, or perhaps of Panama, & renamed Taxiarchis Michael. Taxiarchis Michael Panormitis? A Byzantine monastery located on Symi Island, near the island of Rhodes, Greece. On Sep. 16, 1969, the vessel left Rotterdam bound for Singapore & suffered engine damage en route. The damage must have been major because on Nov. 28, 1969, the vessel left Singapore Roads bound for Whampoa, (i.e. Huangpu, an outer port of Guangzhou, China), where it arrived on or prior to Dec. 12, 1969, to be broken up. Can you add anything?

300 Westbank
5957 tons
Hull 761

182096
5378972

Simba
Santa Helena
1948

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image Westbank), 1 (Bank Line, Westbank), 2 (1952 grounding ref., Pemba, 75% down), 3 (image, Westbank, also -01, -02 & -04), 4 (image, Santa Helena), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 141.5 metres long overall, 132.8 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 444 ft., speed of 14 knots. Built for Andrew Weir & Co. Limited's 'Bank Line Limited', of Glasgow. In 1952, at a date that I have not yet read, the vessel ran aground on Juan De Novo Island, off the W. coast of Madagascar. Arusha, a tug, I read, came to her assistance. Westbank clearly was re-floated since temporary repairs were later carried out at Durban, South Africa, while permanent repairs awaited her return to Smith's Dock, North Shields. Can anybody tell us about the detailed circumstances of the grounding? In 1965, the vessel was sold to 'Katani Shipping  Co. SA' ('Katani'), of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Simba. Katani renamed the vessel Santa Helena in 1969. In 1970, the vessel was sold to 'Oceanica Surena Nav. SA', also of Piraeus, with no change of vessel name. On Apl. 11, 1974, the vessel arrived at the Santander, Spain, ship breaking facilities of 'Recuperaciones Submarinas', to be broken up. Anything you can add? Another image?

This page is the 3rd of 4 Doxford pages, the first being here. And the 2nd & 4th pages are here & here.

TO END THE PAGE

For your pleasure and interest.

The webmaster maintains a number of web sites & on many site pages medals are depicted. Most frequently they are medals related to Sea Gallantry or Life-Saving but other medals are included also as relate to the content of the particular page. The subject matter of the image below is to the webmaster of interest - and I hope to you also. In these days of easy communication. A medal that relates to a messenger or carrier pigeon! I read that one such pigeon was awarded the French Croix de Guerre medal for his heroic service during WW1. How extraordinary!

The medal depicts a woman receiving a letter from a messenger pigeon. She is seated on a cannon, an allegory, I read, of the city of Paris. A hot air balloon in the sky. On the reverse, the pigeon is returning to his cage. Dated 1870-1871 at Paris. By French medallist 'DeGeorge'. 63 mm. in size & in bronze. With a legend 'Ministere de la Guerre / Communications Aeriennes', which legend translates into English as 'Secretary of War / Air Communications'.

It comes from an e-Bay item where the vendor advises us:-

Messenger pigeons, more commonly known as Carrier pigeons, were used as early as 1150 in Baghdad and also later by Genghis Khan. The Republic of Genoa equipped their system of watch towers in the Mediterranean Sea with pigeon posts.

In 1860, Paul Reuter, who later founded Reuters press agency, used a fleet of over 45 pigeons to deliver news and stock prices between Brussels and Aachen, the terminals of early telegraph lines. The outcome of the Battle of Waterloo was also first delivered by a pigeon to England. During the Franco-Prussian War pigeons were used to carry mail between besieged Paris and the French unoccupied territory. Possibly the first regular air mail service in the world was Mr. Howie's Pigeon-Post service from the Auckland New Zealand suburb of Newton to Great Barrier Island, starting in 1896. Certainly the world’s first 'airmail' stamps were issued for the Great Barrier Pigeon-Gram Service from 1898 to 1908.

They were used extensively during World War I, and one homing pigeon, Cher Ami, was awarded the French Croix de guerre for his heroic service in delivering 12 important messages, despite having been very badly injured. During World War II, the Irish Paddy and the American G.I. Joe both received the Dickin Medal, and were among 32 pigeons to receive this medallion, for their gallantry and bravery in saving human lives with their actions.

The item was listed by e-Bay vendor 'jesske00', a Belgian vendor. His e-Bay listing is now long gone. 'Jesske00' we thank you. The medal, incidentally, sold for U.S. $48.89 on Feb. 6, 2009, after 8 bids from 4 bidders.

May I suggest that you navigate the site via the index on page 001.PRIOR PAGE / NEXT PAGE

To Thomas M. M. Hemy Data Page 41. All of the other Thomas Hemy pages, including image pages, are accessible though the index on Thomas Hemy page 05. [ ] £

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Webmaster’s Note. The following very fine article deserves, I believe, to continue to be WWW available. It was previously offered on the website of the ‘Tyne Area Shipping Club’ (‘TASC’). Keith Atkinson, TASC Chairman, webmaster & chief bottle washer, has kindly provided it for inclusion here. (Those are Keith's words as to his titles. I understand the sentiment well). Keith, we thank you!

I have used BOLD text throughout the article for vessel names - to be consistent with the rest of this web site.

The Ambassador Story
UNITED STATES COAST GUARD
USCGC COOS BAY (WAVP – 376)

Portland Maine

On the morning of 18th February 1964, the United States Coast Guard cutter COOS BAY, a 2500 ton 311 ft diesel-powered ship, was steaming in snow squalls and fog off the outer tip of the Grand Banks on her return from a three week winter weather patrol on ocean station BRAVO, located in Davis Strait off Labrador. The crew of 134 Officers, men and weather bureau observers had been alert for drifting icebergs, and now their thoughts were of homecoming two days hence. An emergency broadcast TTT was intercepted by the radio operator, advising that the British motor-ship AMBASSADOR, 7308 gross tons, with a crew of thirty five aboard was broken down and listing heavily in mountainous seas, some 370 miles south of the COOS BAY. Shortly thereafter an SOS signal was received. Meanwhile, the Commander, Eastern Area, U.S. Coast Guard in New York, had directed the COOS BAY to proceed and assist. COOS BAY’s maximum speed of 18 knots was soon cut down to 15 by the heavy seas as she plunged south along in the trough, rolling heavily.

Meanwhile the Italian passenger liner, SS LEONARDO DA VINCI, was reported standing by the stricken AMBASSADOR. The 'Ambassador' was transmitting on emergency batteries, since the engine room was flooded, and her signals grew progressively weaker. Finally the radio operator said that he too was abandoning. As the distress case progressed, ships of all nationalities and in various locations, some even several hundreds of miles away called and offered their help.

COOS BAY arrived the morning of 19th February to find several merchant ships standing by the stricken freighter. The wind was very strong and the seas were running high. Even the large ships were yawing wildly back and forth. On the scene were the Italian passenger liner VULCANIA, and the French merchant ship CARAIBE, the American ship CITY OF ALMA, and the Norwegian ship FRUEN. United States Air Force and Coast Guard and Canadian aircraft had been searching since the previous day for liferafts and survivors. Just before COOS BAY arrived on the scene she recovered a deflated life-raft sighted by one of the look-outs.

FRUEN was laying about 200 yards to leeward of the AMBASSADOR and had thrown a line-throwing gun to the stricken freighter just as COOS BAY had arrived. Five men had already been taken off by FRUEN however there were still sixteen men on board the AMBASSADOR. The previous day, most of the crew of 35 had taken to the liferafts. The port lifeboat of the AMBASSADOR had been crushed by the seas and the heavy port list prevented the starboard boat from being launched. The operator had radioed the previous day that they didn’t think the ship would last another eight hours. The first crewman to reach FRUEN told of how two of the rafts had upset almost immediately near the ship and that fourteen men had been lost. They said that three men had been seen drifting away in a small raft. Twenty one of the men in the rafts made it back on board the AMBASSADOR and spent the night huddled in the lee of the bulwarks on the bow of the steeply listing ship.

Since the FRUEN had a line fast on the AMBASSADOR, COOS BAY stood by and directed the various merchant ships and aircraft to search the different areas of possible drift of the liferafts. The odds were heavily against finding anyone alive by this time because of the weather and the fact that two of the first liferafts had upset, nevertheless, the search went on. Over the space of the next two hours four more men made it across to FRUEN on the long line. The waves were breaking over their heads and often they would disappear from sight.

The first line that FRUEN put aboard the wreck snapped after a while, as did the second but a few men got off each time. When a total of nine men had been removed, the third line also parted and FRUEN radioed that she had no more lines to put out. The radio operator was a woman and the COOS BAY had considerable difficulty understanding her accent until fortunately, the Master of the Dutch salvage tug ELBE cut in and offered to translate and relay messages. The ELBE was still a hundred miles away and was coming in to attempt to tow the derelict into port should she remain afloat. Although FRUEN was out of rescue equipment and was several days late on her voyage, she remained on the scene while COOS BAY attempted to remove the crew. FRUEN then stood off to windward to watch.

The Master of the FRUEN, a ship of 10,000 tons (larger than the AMBASSADOR) displayed admiral seamanship in manoeuvring such a large vessel in the vicinity of a foundering wreck and successfully putting a line aboard three times. Fortunately the two ships drifted at about the same rate, making the operation possible.

COOS BAY manoeuvred her bow close to the bow of the AMBASSADOR and fired a line-throwing gun. The first shot was true and the crewman of the AMBASSADOR pulled the line aboard. COOS BAY, being a lighter draft ship with a lot of superstructure to resist the wind, drifted to leeward faster than the wreck. Thus it was readily apparent that the rescue operation was not going to be a snap. The men on the wreck hauled away as rapidly as they could and soon a fifteen-man rubber life-raft was on the way. The seas were not as steep as on the previous day, yet they were still about 25 feet high with the tops breaking and blowing spume in the 40 knot wind. COOS BAY rolled heavily 20 to 30 degrees with all hands hanging onto whatever they could.

Launching of the ships boats was out of the question. The rubber life raft seemed the men’s best chance for getting off. COOS BAY drifted away as the men hesitated to board the bouncing craft. Finally five men jumped towards the stern of the ship. Look-outs were immediately alerted to “keep those men in sight at all costs”. Again a wave surged over the raft and the remaining two men went overboard. COOS BAY immediately got underway at best speed to get the first man who had drifted farthest from the ship upwind. It was hoped that the crewman still aboard the AMBASSADOR would help the other men back aboard who were still floating near the ship.

Within minutes, the COOS BAY was alongside the man who now was 500 feet to windward. A standard ship pick-up (as practiced in Man-Overboard Drill) was made and swimmers with lifelines went into the water to help them up the embarkation net. The first man was exhausted but required no treatment. Then the look-outs spotted another man drifting under the stern of the AMBASSADOR. COOS BAY ran over close aboard and threw a line to him which he had just enough strength to grasp until he had been pulled a hundred feet clear of the ship. Then he too was brought aboard by the swimmers. These six men who volunteered for swimmer duty risked their lives many times before the day was out and were all recommended for commendation. The second man to come aboard required the service of the ship’s doctor who was ready on deck with a resuscitator. It was touch and go for a while but finally he was revived and by the following day was up and about.

Meanwhile COOS BAY steamed around to leeward of the wreck to see what had happened to the three other men in the water. They were not in sight, however the life-raft was seen drifting off to windward. In the chance that they had been able to climb back aboard, FRUEN was asked to recover the raft.

Since darkness was approaching, it was decided better to take COOS BAY right in close aboard the wreck, pass a line for the men to secure around themselves, and pull them aboard through the warm Gulf Stream water, one at a time. Since the ships drifted at different rates, COOS BAY could not lay close aboard long enough for more than one man to be hauled aboard. COOS BAY waited until the man had jumped into the water, then took a light strain on the line to pull him clear of the derelict’s bow while the man was being hauled alongside where the swimmers in their rubber wet-suits could help him aboard.

As soon as one man was aboard, COOS BAY steamed around to make another approach, fire a line aboard, and repeat the operation. Since the life preservers worn by the first two men were observed to keep the man’s head above the water it was decided to send over COOS BAY jackets on the line. The jackets had a collar to protect the man’s head.

After two men had been recovered in the above manner, and since time was running out, it was decided to take them off two at a time on the line. Two jackets were sent over the next time. This worked well until the next to the last trip when there were four men remaining on the ship.

Suddenly all four men were seen to jump overboard tied on the line and it was too late to try to stop them. The COOS BAY was drifting onto the wreck and nothing could be done but get them on board as quickly as possible. The first man on the line was seen to lose consciousness about mid-way and to go face down in the water. The other men were too far away to help him and there was nothing to do but haul them aboard as fast as possible, hoping that quickly applied resuscitation would save them. The line was leading through a block just above the embarkation net and there was no delay in hauling the first man quickly aboard. The doctor applied emergency measures even before he was cut loose from the line but it was too late. The other three men came aboard in good condition.

COOS BAY then left the wreck under the observation of FRUEN who would warn passing ships of the unlighted derelict, and proceed to search for a life raft that had just been located by an aircraft 26 miles away. The plane dropped float lights to mark the spot and circled the area until COOS BAY arrived. The fully inflated raft was located floating upright by searchlights but no survivors were found. COOS BAY then steamed west to look for a light that had been reported by another aircraft. Although by this time the VULCANIA had been dismissed to proceed on her voyage, she remained to search for this light until COOS BAY arrived. COOS BAY and various aircraft searched throughout the night and the following day without results. The weather was worsening and the search visibility was almost nil, therefore active search was discontinued late in the evening of the 20th pending further developments.

The eleven survivors responded rapidly to treatment as the entire crew of COOS BAY pitched in to make them comfortable, outfit them with clothing and personal needs. By the next day they were all up and about the ship. During the night of the 20th and for the next couple of days they had a rough ride as COOS BAY fought her way back to port against 30 foot seas and winds gusting to 80 knots.

In commending his crew, the Commanding Officer, COOS BAY said, among other things, “This was certainly an ALL HANDS effort” and he meant not only his own crew of whom he was justly proud, but also the crew of the aircraft who flew many hours low over the water in hazardous weather, and the Master and crew of the M.V. FRUEN and the other ships who actively participated in the search, all of whom lived up to the highest traditions of the sea and its brotherhood.

C. W. Bailey, Commander U.S. Coast Guard Commanding Officer

Ambassador. Built by William Doxford & Sons for Hall Bros. Launched March 1945.
Recorded to have foundered 37.22N/48.51W on the 21st February 1964.
(not 100% sure that this Ambassador picture is the correct one)

A copy of the report which is reproduced here was presented to each of the survivors of the AMBASSADOR by the Author of the Report. One of these survivors presented his copy to TASC Member George Wade when George was employed by the Shipping Federation. We thank George for making it available to share on the ‘Tyne Area Shipping Club’ website & now on the ‘Sunderland Site’.