THE SUNDERLAND SITE - PAGE 045
SHIPBUILDERS - PAGE 5

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On this page ... Bartram, page bottom (Welsh postcard).

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BARTRAM

LISTER & BARTRAM
GEORGE BARTRAM & JOHN LISTER (1838/1854)
GEORGE BARTRAM & SONS (1854/1871)
BARTRAM, HASWELL & COMPANY (1872/1894)
BARTRAM & SONS (1894/1912)
BARTRAM & SONS LIMITED (1912/1971)

First a few images. Hover your mouse over each thumbnail to read the subject matter.

You are invited to drop by this site page which features books/booklets, photographs etc. that were published by or related to 'Bartrams' in the past. More would be welcomed for inclusion there!

The paragraphs that follow below have been revised & re-revised over the years as new data has been located. They surely will now need further revision to incorporate data published in 'A & P News', the employee magazine of Austin & Pickersgill Limited, specifically in issue No. 13, of Mar. 1977. Alan Vickers has kindly provided scans of two pages from that issue, a two-page spread about the history of the collective 'Bartram', derived from the manuscripts of James W. (Watson) Corder (1867/1953), whose lifetime work is now held in the Sunderland Central Library. These two pages summarise what Corder wrote about the history of the 'Bartram' businesses over the years, as you can see here. The 'Corder' data is not yet included below.

The second of the two 'A & P News' pages contains an interesting but faded image of blacksmiths at Bartram's shipyard in 1899. The webmaster is no expert in working with images. However, next is the webmaster's modest effort at 'improving' that faded image.

The 'Bartram' shipbuilding business was started, I read, in 1837 at Hylton by George Bartram (image, Sep. 12, 1800/?, who married Margaret Appleby) & John Lister. George Bartram was the son of Thomas Bartram & Mary Lister. At the age of 11, when an orphan, he was apprenticed at W. & J. Gales, a small wooden shipbuilder located at Hylton. He went to sea as a ship's carpenter but returned to Sunderland & became foreman or manager (1822/1831) for a Mr. Dryden, who built ships at Biddick Ford, near Hylton. And later (1828) George went into partnership with J. M. Gates & still later was associated (what does 'associated' mean?) with Robert Reay, known at Hylton as 'Squire' Reay. Both small ship builders, I believe.

The first two of the next three images are 'clickable'.

George started as Master Builder with John Lister. But they soon went into partnership. The George Bartram/John Lister partnership ('Lister & Bartram'? Or 'George Bartram & John Lister'?) lasted for 18 years & was dissolved in 1854. Over those years, the yard produced about 40 sailing vessels of all types, the largest being the John and Mary, of about 400 tons & 100 ft. in length, which vessel carried a 'three-quarter male figurehead'.

I believe that the Bartram/Lister firm in fact was named 'Lister & Bartram'. Why? At times, the shipbuilding yards would built vessels on speculation i.e. without a specific buyer in mind. Probably to keep the yard busy at otherwise slack times. The vessel to be later sold when a purchaser was located. Such vessels would be registered in the name of the yard initially, & later reregistered in the name of the purchaser when it later was sold. A list of Bartram built vessels which includes these early years is available here and included are three vessels initially listed as being owned by 'Lister & Bartram'. In years 1845, 1847 & 1849. Hence my conclusion.

Sheila Lister, of New Zealand, asks for data about what later happened to John Lister.

Above are two images of the yard at Hylton. The one at left, perhaps from the 1850s, is ex 'Where Ships Are Born' (1, 2).

Following the partnership dissolution, George Bartram was on his own at Hylton, trading as 'George Bartram & Sons'.

That presumably was after 1854, when he entered into a partnership with his son Robert Appleby Bartram, then already well experienced in shipbuilding, later (1921) Sir Robert Appleby Bartram (May 1835/Aug. 1925, who married Ann Naizby, the daughter of William Naizby, yet another Sunderland shipbuilder, & when she died young he married Margaret Agnes Rhind).

In 1871, George Bartram retired & the business was moved to a new shipbuilding yard located at South Dock. On land between Hudson Dock & the North Sea. And here is a undated image of that 'Bartram' yard at South Dock taken from the east. Hudson Dock is at the top of the image & the North Sea is at the bottom, or to be more exact at the bottom are waters separated & protected from the North Sea by piers or breakwaters. I believe that the 'Sea Lock' which connected Hudson Dock to the North Sea via 'South Dock Channel' & 'South Outlet', is visible at the lower left edge of the image.

There, Robert Appleby Bartram joined George Haswell (who had been connected with William Pile, but I wonder what 'connected' means!) to form Bartram, Haswell & Company.

The company began iron ship construction. The only Sunderland shipbuilder to launch ships directly into the North Sea, I read.

I have read that the yard reopened after the 1886 New Year's celebrations. The yard had secured an order having been closed for over a year.{ }

George Haswell retired in 1890, & the business became 'Bartram & Sons' when George Bartram (1860/1910) (herein 'George2') & William Naizby Bartram (1862/1923) (sons of Robert Appleby Bartram) joined the business. I think (interpreting the available data) that that must have been at the end of 1894.

The 'company' became a limited liability company in 1912 & was reconstituted in 1922.

I read that Sir Robert outlived both of his sons, the business then being run by Robert Appleby Bartram (1894/1981) (herein 'Robert2') (image at right & here, in 1955) & George Hylton Bartram, i.e. Sir Robert Appleby Bartram's grandsons & George2's sons.

 

Colonel Robert Appleby Bartram, i.e. Robert2, remained in charge of the yard, as Chairman & Managing Director of the company, until 1968 when the business passed out of family hands.


The Colonel retired in 1971 & died in 1981.

Alan Vickers has kindly advised that following his retirement in 1971, Colonel Bartram, i.e. Robert2, lived near Satley, Lanchester, in County Durham. Indeed, Alan has provided a fine image (at left) of the headstone at the gravesite of the Colonel & his wife Winifred Hannah in Satley Churchyard. Thank you, Alan!

I now learn that Robert Appleby Bartram, i.e. Robert2, was not known, in fact, as 'Robert'. Rather he was known as 'Robin', or just 'R.A.B.' After his passing, an obituary was published in the Volume 30, Jul. 1981, edition of 'A and P News', the employee magazine of Austin & Pickersgill Limited. As you can see next, thanks to Alan Vickers. You can click each of the images below to see the complete texts in a legible size. Someday, hopefully, an obituary as was published in the newspapers at the time, in the London Times or the Sunderland Echo perhaps, will be available thru this page.

Data as to the yard's facilities is particularly difficult, though the subject is covered, I am advised, by Norman L. Middlemiss in his 3 volume set entitled 'British Shipbuilding Yards' - Volume 1 of which, published in 1993 (cannot locate an ISBN number) covers the North-East in its 320 pages. And yard expansions & improvements over the years were surely geared to the prevailing business conditions. A hectic pace during WW1 & WW2, & also after those wars as vessels sunk in the wars were replaced. A major slump during the Depression of course, with Bartram's, indeed the whole of the industry, essentially shut down for six years.

Included amongst the images at the top of the listing is a yellow advertisement for 'Bartrams' during the Depression. In 1929 through 1933 for sure & maybe through 1939. When the ship yard was shut down & 'rabbits were frolicking unmolested in the yard'. The firm tried its hand, it would seem at a new business - making caravans. How very interesting! Can it be true? If so, can anybody tell us more about what happened?

In or about 1943, a new berth was added along with new platers & welding sheds & a 15 ton electric travelling jib crane was added also. That probably brought them to the three berths shown in the image above. The facilities were again expanded in 1952, with one berth extended by 30 ft. to accommodate ships of larger size. I read that the yard was, at that time, in the forefront technologically, introducing  'x-ray examination of welding, optical lofting procedures, shot blasting of all steel, and the use of paint primer'. Thanks to the kindness of Robert Hunter, of Westoe Village, South Shields, an explanation of the term 'optical lofting' is now available - see here. It would seem that the Bartram fitting out berth was located on South Dock & vessels, once launched, were moved through the lock into Hudson Dock to have the engines added & electrical, plumbing & other interior work completed. Until that lock was filled in, at a date that I have not yet read but would likely be in the 1940s or early 1950s. So for decades that was no problem, but as vessels grew in size that became impossible due to the narrowness of the lock (and presumably also of the locks at the northern end of Hudson Dock) & obviously after the lock was filled in, & 'most ships in the 1950s had to be sent to the Tyne to be fitted-out'. A situation that was rectified in 1964 when the Short Brothers yard at Pallion was closed. Bartram acquired the 'Short' fitting-out quay & new 'Bartram' ships could then be launched into the North Sea & towed up the River Wear for fitting out. All most interesting & I thank Norman Middlemiss for his words on the whole subject.

Next below - part of the Bartram's shipyard in 1952.

Bartram had a number of associated companies - i) 'A. & H. Parkin' that did rigging work on Bartram ships, ii) 'Coachwork Repair and Painting Company' that did sheet metal work on those ships & spray painting for others, iii) 'Sunderland Structural Steel Limited', which did, what else, structural steelwork, & iv) 'Ward & Davidson Limited', which specialised in brass foundry work & coppersmiths work.

There are many references to the company being acquired in 1968 by London & Overseas Freighters Ltd. What actually happened, it would appear, is that in 1957, London & Overseas Freighters Ltd. & 2 other companies took over Austin & Pickersgill Limited. Then, in Oct. or Nov. 1968, Austin & Pickersgill Limited took over Bartrams. And in 1970, London & Overseas Freighters Ltd. bought out the minority shareholders & became 100% owners of  Austin & Pickersgill Limited. So the 1968 ownership interest of London & Overseas Freighters Ltd. in Bartram's was indirect. The yard itself continued at the same location through 1978, when it was closed. The facilities were demolished & the area used for the storage of containers by the Port of Sunderland.

It is interesting to note that after Sir Robert Appleby Bartram was born, eight other following children sadly died. And both George Bartram & Sir Robert Appleby Bartram, when they each died, at ages ? & 91 respectively, were the oldest shipbuilders in the whole country! Strong genes!

For the later benefit of the webmaster, there is data here about John Haswell, father of the above referenced George Haswell, yet another Sunderland shipbuilder.

The above data is assembled from a number of sources. Including these fine sites (1 & 2). And also pages 11/13 of a 1976 booklet entitled 'Austin & Pickersgill Limited 150 Years' available here (11, 12 & 13). Corrections would be welcomed & are invited.

A large portion of a 141 page book, published by Bartram & Sons Limited in 1955, & a booklet published by them in 1962, are on this page. Along with many photographs. Do you have more literature, published by Bartram's, or related photographs, that could be included there? If so, it (or they) would be most welcome.

Names of just a few of the vessels constructed by 'Bartram' of Sunderland - as I happen to spot references to them. In a table in build date sequence. And alphabetic within a year. But just a start on what will probably be, in the future, a very long list! The first of 2 pages with 100 vessels - the second page being here.

Miramar list of 12 pages, (highest hull number on page). It used to be that you could click on the links that follow & get to the relevant Miramar page. But no longer! The new procedure must be to go to Miramar (here) & log in (you must be registered to view any page). And once you are logged in, return to this page & all the following links should work for you:- 100, 127, 157, 187, 213, 247, 277, 308, 339, 383, 413, 427. (427) Now I should add here, that thanks to i) the late Mr. Kit Bartram, great-grandson of Sir Robert Appleby Bartram & son of Colonel Robert Appleby Bartram & a company director, & ii) Robert Hunter, the webmaster has what is believed to be a complete list of 'Bartram' built ships - commencing in 1838. The list includes vessels built before any numbering system at all was started. That list can be found here.

Note that while Austin & Pickersgill Limited acquired Bartram's in 1968, in a practical sense they only took over in 1971 after a 3 year period of co-operation. The vessels built in such period are included in the list of 37 vessels in total which were built by Austin & Pickersgill Limited at South Dock, which list can be seen here.

1 Isabella
273 (later 279) tons
Hull 12

28598
1861

A brig. Per 1 (lowest ref. to the name). 103.0 ft. long, later 103.7 ft., signal letters QBFM. The webmaster has a few, but by no means a full sequence, of editions of Lloyd's Register available to him ex 'Google' books, thru 1887/78 - see left. The vessel was owned by Dawson & Co., of Blyth, Northumberland, (where registered), thru 1865 & then G. Dawson thru maybe 1874/75, in which year the vessel was re-rigged as a snow. Engaged in trade to the Mediterranean thru 1869. And thereafter to Baltic ports. In the 1878/79 edition of Lloyd's Register, G. R. Dawson of North Shields became the registered owner. Likely the same Dawson, but it surely could have been a different Dawson. In the 1883/84 to 1887/88 editions of Lloyd's Register, J. W. Woods, also of North Shields, is  the registered owner. 'crewlist.org.uk' advises that the vessel was lost on Oct. 05, 1888. Now a site visitor has kindly provided (thanks so much!) a photograph of a painting of a brig named Isabella, with a script at top right which reads - 'Isabella Supt John Garrison taken thr Elbe' - with 'thr' likely meaning 'thru'. The image is at left. Is it of the correct Isabella? Probably not in fact. In the 1861/62 edition of Lloyd's Register, there were, amazingly, 42 vessels of the name listed & 12 of them were brigs. My correspondent has now mentioned a vessel of the name built in 1846 of 37 tons only. Can you add anything additional?

2 Clan MacLeod
671 tons
Hull 75

68086

James Craig
1874

A 3 masted iron barque. What a long history - 136 years! 1 of only 4 19th century square riggers still sailing. Per 1 (Clan MacLeod data), 2 (Wikipedia data & links), 3 (data & 3 large images), 4, 5, 6 & 7 (extensive Bartram/Haswell, Dunlop & Clan MacLeod history), 8 ('Robert Carter' print), 9 (many images), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). There are a great many more links available! 179 ft. 5 in. (or 179.49 or 179.8) ft. long. Crew of 17. Built for 'Thomas Dunlop & Sons' ('Dunlop'), of Glasgow [Thomas Dunlop (1831/1893) the founder, initially a grain merchant], at the cost of £11,375. The very first 'Clan Line' vessel (really?). Made 11 voyages for Dunlop between 1874 & 1887. Her initial voyage, carrying coal, was from Sunderland to Callao, Peru, with return from Portland, Oregon, with grain & flour. A number of speedy voyages including one of 113 days from Portland, to Queenstown, Ireland, & another of 28 days from Kobe, Japan to Portland (Astoria). Vessel sold in 1887 to 'Russell & Co.', shipbuilders, of Glasgow, (in part payment for Clan Buchanan, a new vessel), who soon sold her to 'Sir Roderick W. Cameron' (or maybe 'R. W. Cameron & Co.') of New York, ('Pioneer Line'), who mainly traded wool & oil from the U.S. E. coast to Australia & New Zealand ('NZ'). A passage of 71 days from Wellington, NZ, to Boston in 1891. Crew became 12 only. The vessel was damaged in 1893 (ice floes & icebergs) while on voyage to Brisbane. But many other difficult voyages. The vessel was sold, on Aug. 15, 1899, to 'J. J. Craig', of Auckland, NZ, who used her on 'trans-Tasman' trade routes (which means Australia/NZ routes). Renamed James Craig in 1905 after the son of her owner. In 1907, the vessel raced Louisa Craig & won (Newcastle, Australia, to Auckland, NZ, in 4 days). In 1911, the vessel was laid up, stripped & used as a copra hulk at Port Moresby, New Guinea. In 1918 re-rigged. After WW1, the vessel was towed from New Guinea to Sydney, Australia, for re-fitting. From 1922 to 1926, the vessel was laid up at Hobart, Tasmania, & in 1925, reduced to a coal hulk at Recherche Bay, (which seems to be the early name  for Hobart), Tasmania, owned by 'Catamaran Coal Mining Co.' The vessel was abandoned in 1932 & later became beached after breaking her moorings in a storm. Also in 1932, the vessel was sunk by fishermen who blasted a 3-metre hole in her stern. She remained beached until 1972 when volunteers from the 'Lady Hopetoun and Port Jackson Marine Steam Museum', now 'Sydney Heritage Fleet', re-floated her. In 1973, she was towed to Hobart for temporary repairs before being towed to Sydney in 1981 for restoration. The James Craig’s restored hull was re-launched in Feb. 1997. Now fully operational again, James Craig sails ex Sydney Harbour most weekends, carrying 80 passengers at sea & 200 in harbour. In her lifetime, she rounded Cape Horn an amazing 23 times! Read the whole story at the links! I do not have the space to cover it all here. I wonder how much the restoration cost! It must have been a total rebuild. Much of the above data comes thanks to the files of Mori Flapan, of Sydney, Australia. A site visitor is searching for data about 'the counter threaded steering gear used on the James Craig and also on the John Oxley' - re restoration activities. I see that a book about the restoration was published in 2003, entitled 'THE JAMES CRAIG - Her history, recovery and restoration', by Geoff Toghill of the Sydney Maritime Museum. Of 90 pages. An earlier small book of similar name, 32/33 pages only, was originally published in 1978. Can you add anything significant that I have omitted?

3 Cumbria
675 tons
Hull 74

62876
1874

An iron barque. Per 1 (1881 voyage from Mauritius to Launceston, Tasmania, ex 2), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 53.9 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular (177.0 ft.), signal letters MPGS. I have read that the vessel was a sister to Clan MacLeod. The vessel was built for 'P. Hick & Co.', which means 'Pantland Hick & Co.', of Scarborough, U.K. The vessel's captain for its first 6 or so years was the presumably related W. B. Hick. The vessel was feared lost in 1881. on a voyage from Port Louis, Mauritius, to Launceston, Tasmania, with a cargo of sugar. Indeed HMCS Victoria was sent out to search for her but found nothing. The vessel left Port Louis on Mar. 15, 1881 under the command of Captain Baine (or Baines). After a voyage notable for its continuous storms, the vessel eventually arrived safely at Launceston on Jun. 1, 1881 after a voyage of 77 days, with its cargo, surprisingly, in good order. After, I presume, repairs were effected, the vessel left for Timaru, New Zealand, which it departed on Aug. 22, 1881.  The vessel arrived back in London on Dec. 24, 1881. The vessel was at the time of that voyage said to have been owned by 'Fantling Hicks Esq.' which is, I believe, an incorrect rendition of 'Pantland Hick' who would seem to have been the senior Hick family member for the lifetime of this vessel - he died in 1900. The vessel was at Christchurch, New Zealand, in 1883, & at Fremantle, Western Australia, in May 1887. In the 1889/90 edition of Lloyd's Register, the owner is stated to be 'P. Hick, jun.' Miramar advises us that on May 21, 1889, the vessel foundered - at 32.25S/40.09W, which is in the South Atlantic off the coasts of southern Brazil & Uruguay. The WWW is silent on the loss - I have not been able to read who was in command, how many lives were lost, its route, its cargo, the circumstances etc. Can you possibly provide that detail? Or otherwise add to this limited record. #1870

4 Kirch
1221 tons
Hull 76

70377
1874

An iron cargo ship, 2 masts, schooner rigged. Per 1 (ref. to Board of Trade inquiry, about 80% down page), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 73.5 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular (241.0 ft.), signal letters NRFH. The vessel was built for 'W. Wilkie & Co.' but the vessel soon became owned by 'Wilkie & Turnbull', presumably related, both of North Shields, U.K. The vessel was likely acquired for the Black Sea grain trade since Kirch or Kerch, Ukraine, is an ancient Crimean seaport located on Kerch Strait where the Black Sea & the Sea of Azov come together. The vessel's initial captain was J. W. Wilkie. Miramar advises us that on Nov. 24, 1876, the vessel was wrecked in the entrance to the Sulina River - which is in E. Romania where the Danube River flows into the Black Sea. The vessel had been en route from Messina, presumably Sicily, to Galatz (Galați), Romania, under the command of Richard S. (Shortridge) Thompson ('Thompson'). There was a Board of Trade Inquiry into the loss, in Jan. 1877, but such report seems not to be WWW available. However, link 1 advises (text) that the Inquiry concluded that Thompson was in default having tried to enter Sulina after dark. His certificate was suspended for 3 months. Can you possibly provide additional detail, maybe a copy of the report? An image? Or otherwise add to this limited record. This vessel was first listed as a result of e-mail correspondence from Cpt Tamer Demirci, (thanks!) who has kindly provided images of the recovered Kirch's ship's bell, shown at left. #1905

5 Castle Holme
1042 (or 1055) tons
Hull 83

72923

Ester
Ternen
Ternan
Tarnan
1875

an iron fully rigged ship. with 3 most similar later names. Per 1, 2 & 3 (images, Castle Holme), 4 (data), 5 [Herbert B. J. Everett painting, Castle Holme, (left vessel)], 6 (Sturt Bay, 65% down), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 213.9 ft. long (65.2 metres perpendicular to perpendicular). Vessel built for Holme Line (Hine Brothers) of Maryport, U.K. (Cumbria coast & Solway Firth). Traded between the U.K. & Australia, returning with wool, & later served Tasmania. In 1880, the vessel was reduced to a barque. On May 1, 1895, the vessel was stranded at Sturt Bay, South Australia. It was sold in 1910 (or 1908) to Anton H. Mysen of Frederickstadt, Norway, & renamed Ester. And sold again, in 1912, to Herman Jacobsen, of Norway? And sold again, in 1916, to Danish owners (V. Muller, the manager?) & renamed Ternen. The vessel's name became Ternan when sold in 1922 (or 1921) to A/B Romny, of Stockholm, Sweden (H. Bokland the manager?). The vessel was sold, in 1923, to E. Forsberg, of Karlskrona (SE Sweden), renamed Tarnan & registered at Karlskrona. On Dec. 18, 1924, while en route from London to Karlskrona, the vessel was stranded at Hofs Hallar, Bjäre Peninsula, 7 km off Torekov, Sweden. Broken up en situ. Presumably no lives lost. I am quite sure that the above contains unintended errors. Some inconsistencies in the source data. Can the three last names truly be so? Do correct me if you are able to do so. Or add additional data.

6 Eden Holme
818 (or 794) tons
Hull 79

62035
1875

An iron 3-masted barque. Per 1 (10 images), 2 (4 voyage dates & 6 images), 3 (comprehensive account & images), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Lots of photographs are available. The image at the 3rd thumbnail at left is of the vessel dismasted, possibly at Grenada, West Indies, incorrectly dated as 1874, but the correct date & nature of the circumstances is unknown. The same image is at link 2 dated as c. 1900. 201.8 ft. long. The vessel was owned by Holme Line (Hine Brothers) of Maryport, U.K. (Cumbria coast & Solway Firth). The vessel traded between the U.K. & Australia, & particularly Tasmania. En route from Hobart to Launceston, (both Tasmania) & whilst anchored & waiting for tug Wybia, the vessel grounded on Hebe reef off Tamar Heads on Jan. 6, 1907. Some iron plates were damaged & the vessel began to take in water. A tourist attraction at the time, it would appear, to see up close a wreck high & dry, right on Launceston’s doorstep. On Jan. 18, 1907, in a gale, she slipped off the rocks, broke in two, & sank. Virtually everything that could be salvaged from the ship was salvaged in those 12 days. The ship is still there today in 5 m. of water. The vessel was in the charge of Peter Mullay, the local pilot, when she struck; his pilot's certificate was suspended. The vessel's captain (28 year old G. H. Dulling) was held to be blameless. A 16 page booklet entitled 'Disaster to the Eden Holme' was published  in 2006 by The Pilot Station Museum, per a John W. Doull Bookseller, of Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, catalogue. Such booklet refers to the Inquiry, which was held at Launceston on Jan. 23, 1907. Anything to add?

7 Myrtle Holme
945 (or 902 or 955) tons
Hull 82

72921

Glimt
1875

An iron, 3 masted, fully rigged ship when built. Later reduced (in or about 1898) to a barque. Per A (e-Bay image, Glimt), 1 (large 'Word' file, in Norwegian, #102, data is here), 2 (data & links), 3 (image index at 'Picture Australia'), 4 (Myrtle Holme is the vessel with painted ports), 5 (images as Glimt), 6 (U-33), 7 ('u-boat.net', 1915 sinking), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 211 ft. long. Vessel was built for Holme Line (Hine Brothers) of Maryport, U.K. (Cumbria coast & Solway Firth). Traded between the U.K. & Australia. In 1895, the vessel went from Beachy Head to Adelaide, S. Australia, in 77 days, & in 1901, went from Dover to Adelaide in 81 days. In 1900, she was reported to be the largest sailing vessel to ever go up to Gloucester (River Severn). In 1907, the vessel was sold to 'Skips-A/S Glimt' (Johan Klöcker), of Arendal, Norway & renamed Glimt. And in 1913, the vessel was sold again, to 'Th. Bentzen', also of Arendal or Fredrikstad. On Sep. 4, 1915, while en route, in ballast, from Ellesmere Port, River Mersey, to Gaspé, Quebec, Canada, the vessel was torpedoed & sunk by U-33, Kapitänleutnant Konrad Gansser in command, (have also read U-35), 90 km. SW of Fastnet (at 50.40N/12.10W but 7 states at 51.37N/12.05W). I thank the folks at 1, but ... my ability in Norwegian is non-existent & WWW translation of the text is most difficult. I think that that link advises ('Senkningen funnet urettmessig av tysk priserett, erstatning betalt.') that the sinking of Glimt was in some way 'illegal' & that the German Government paid compensation. Need help!

8 Marlborough
2309 (or 2308) tons
Hull 101

79461
1878

An iron cargo ship which had a very short life. Per 1 ('pdf' file, 6 page Inquiry report re loss of vessel - of interest, a hard copy of such report was sold for GBP 1.20 via e-Bay in Oct. 2011), 2 (a part of the text ex 'Irish Law Times ...' 1880, a Google book, re the Garbutt lawsuit), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 91.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 301 ft. The vessel was built, for £34,000, for D. (David) P. (Parkinson) Garbutt ('Garbutt'), of Hull. Garbutt, whose experience was as a land & house agent rather than as a shipowner, had mortgaged all of the vessel's shares to one Richard Berridge. Her 1st voyage was to New York, returning with a general cargo. Her 2nd & 3rd voyages would both seem to have been into the Mediterranean with coal, to Ancona on one voyage, returning from the Black Sea with grain. On Nov. 29, 1879, the vessel left Cardiff for Genoa, Italy, on her 4th & last voyage, with a cargo of coal, under the command of Captain G. T. Fullam & with a crew all told of 25. The pilot left the ship after passing Nash Point, Glamorgan (at entrance to the Bristol Channel), & the vessel was never heard from again. The webmaster has read, by now, many Inquiry reports in the course of building this website, but this vessel's report is quite devastating. The Court determined that the vessel was, with the knowledge, sanction indeed direction of Garbutt, significantly overloaded & undermanned. Much of the text relates to the location of the ship's load line. The Court concluded that the load line was in the wrong position & that the vessel, loaded to that line, had insufficient freeboard for a winter or indeed any voyage. An astonishing number of crew members  left the ship during its brief history believing it to be unsafe when excessively loaded - the ship would take heavy seas aboard continually & would develop a list. Captain Fullam himself wanted & intended to leave the ship also. The Court 'condemned' Garbutt to pay £250 in costs. On Aug. 9, 1880, at Swansea, Wales, Garbutt was prosecuted for having sent the vessel to sea in an unseaworthy state. 10 pages re the case, a summary of the 'summing up' of the judge, appear in the 'House of Commons Papers', Vol. 66 re 1880, which was a Google downloadable book (is it still?). The jury found Garbutt to be not guilty, it would appear. I direct you to such volume for further detail. However 2, a part only of the available 'Irish Law Times' text, will assist in understanding the decision. It would appear that much of the evidence presented at the wreck Inquiry was inadmissible in a proper Court of Law. Can you add anything? #1792

9   Salient
1432 (or 1477) tons
Hull 105

81456
1879

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 250 ft. long. The vessel was built for James Westoll, of Sunderland. On Mar. 9, 1891, while en route in ballast from Rotterdam to Sunderland, her engines broke down in a heavy snow storm. The vessel was wrecked 3 miles N. from Filey (Yorkshire now N. Yorkshire). WWW data about the vessel seems to be non-existent. Need help! An image also.

10 Myrtle Branch
1735 (or 1653, later 1498) tons
Hull 127

87348

Behera
Torkel
Asplund
Regin
1883

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Nautilus, Myrtle Branch (1)], 2 (Norwegian page, Asplund), 3 (Lloyds Register data, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org', 1930/31 thru 1938/39, Regin), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 258.0 ft. long perpendicular toperpendicular, speed of 8 1/2 knots, designed to carry bulk cargoes of grain, signal letters LERB, MJPV. The vessel was built for Nautilus Steam Shipping Co. Ltd., owned by F. & W. Ritson, of Sunderland (known as 'Branch Line'). In 1896, the vessel was sold to 'S.S. Behera Co. Ltd.' (Maclay & McIntyre Ltd., of Glasgow, the managers & maybe the owners also) & renamed Behara. In 1913, the vessel was sold again, to 'D/S A/S Tormod', (Chr. Christensen, of Kristiania, Norway), & renamed Torkel. In Dec. 1917, the vessel was sold to 'A/S Venus' (S. Ugelstad, which later became S. Ugelstad & Co.), of Brevik, (& later Kristiania), Norway, with no change of name. In Mar. 1921, the vessel was renamed Asplund. In Sep. 1925, the vessel was sold to 'A/S Furulund' (S. Ugelstad & Co.), of Oslo, with no change of name. It was sold for the last time, in Jun. 1929, to 'Hannestads Rederi A/S', of Halden, Norway, Marcus Hannestad the manager, & renamed Regin. On Aug. 13, 1938, the vessel ran aground (at Emanuelsgrunnen?), 6 miles from Bredskar Pilot Station, which I believe is in the Baltic off the E. coast of Sweden. (Ex 2 - 8/1938: Grunnstøtte den 13/8 på Emanuelsgrunnen på reise Domsjø til Sandvik ved Umeå med splittved). Have not read the circumstances. Per Lloyd's Register it was re-floated. However, the vessel was condemned & towed to Danzig, Germany, to be broken up. Am glad for data at 2, since there is little else WWW available. Need help!

11 Olive Branch
2732 (or 2728) tons
Hull 133

90546

Gallia
1887

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Gallia), 2 (UB-40), 3 (Gallia), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 300 ft. long. Vessel built for Nautilus Steam Shipping Co. Ltd., owned by F. & W. Ritson, of Sunderland (known as 'Branch Line'). Sold in 1914 to 'Federazione Italiana del Consorzi Agrari' (Italo Spagnuolo manager?) of Genoa, Italy, & renamed Gallia. Have seen a ref. to 'Soc. Servizio Italo Spagnuolo SA di Nav.', of Genoa. Does the name relate? On Oct. 24, 1917, while en route from the Tyne to Savona, Italy, with a cargo of coal, the vessel was attacked & sunk by UB-40, Kapitänleutnant Hans Howaldt in command, in Lyme Bay, 14 miles E. of Teignmouth (or 24 miles WNW of Portland Bill). No loss of life. But ... the wreck location seems to be in error. Dave Wendes advises that a builder's nameplate on a wreck 50 miles away leads him to conclude that the wreck truly lies S. of Bournemouth, at 50.26.50N/01.48.00W. A translation issue, i.e. Portland Bill was 24 miles WNW of the sinking site, rather than the sinking site was 24 miles WNW of Portland Bill. WWW data most limited. Need help! And an image also.

12 Hazel Branch
2623 tons
Hull 138

95292
1889

A cargo ship. Per 1 (NY Times archives, re wreck. It is there but most difficult to read for reasons the NY Times alone can explain), 2 (NY Times Archives, New Orleans accident, same comment - I guess the New York Times wishes to make it difficult to see free material), 3 (Spanish page re wreck), 4 (painting ref.), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 300 ft. long. Vessel built for Nautilus Steam Shipping Co. Ltd., owned by F. & W. Ritson, of Sunderland (known as 'Branch Line'). On Sep. 24, 1892, while loading grain at the West Wago grain elevator at New Orleans, Louisiana, a bulkhead gave way & 4 longshoremen were buried by grain. 2 of the 4 died. On Nov. 12, 1907, Captain Gambrill in command, while en route from the W. coast of S. America to Liverpool with a cargo of silver, copper & zinc ores or metals, the vessel was wrecked at Smyth Channel, Adelaide Patch, Magellan Strait, Chile. As a result of navigational error. The cargo was partially recovered. A few ribs still remain today. The vessel was painted, in 1891, by 'H. Versaille' - a painting which sold, I read, on May 31, 1989 at Sotherby's for GBP 700. WWW data re the vessel is most limited. Need help! An image of the 'Versaille' artwork?

13 Ludgate
2413 tons
Hull 146

98910

Nettleton
1891

A cargo ship. Per 1 (auction ref.), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 88.4 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of ? knots. The vessel was built for 'Ludgate Steam Shipping Co.', of London, H. W. Dillon, also of London, the managers. In 1898, the vessel was sold to 'London Gates Steamship Company' - no change of vessel name. In 1899, the vessel was sold to Nettleton Steamship Company, of London, J. Sunley & Co. the managers, & renamed Nettleton. The vessel was sold in 1903 to 'Crosby, Magee & Co.', of West Hartlepool & sold again in 1915 to 'W. A. Massey & Sons', of Hull. No change in the vessel's name re either sale. On Feb. 11, 1916, while en route from the Clyde (Glasgow) to Barry Roads (Cardiff), in ballast, the vessel was wrecked 6 or 7 miles N. of Bude, North Cornwall. Have not read the circumstances, but it would seem to have been off course? No loss of life mentioned so I presume all were rescued. In 1998, 'Tennants' Auction House auctioned a shipbuilder's half model, 214 cm. long, of Nettleton. Would be good to locate an image of it. WWW data most limited. Need help!

14 Laurel Branch
3308 tons
Hull 154

99621
1893

A cargo ship. Per 1 (wreck of Laurel Branch), 2 (Spanish page, data & fine image), 3 (link 2, 'Google' translated), 4 (1899 painting), 5 & 6 (Arequipa wreck), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 104.8 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots. The vessel was built for Nautilus Steam Shipping Co. Ltd., owned by F. & W. Ritson, of Sunderland (known as 'Branch Line'). Eileen Hart advises (thanks!) that her grandfather, Charles Judge, a fireman aboard the ship, died at Marseilles, France, on Nov. 16, 1893 at age 25. Apparently he fell between the quay & the ship while returning on board & fractured his skull! On Jun. 3, 1903, the vessel rescued 32 (but see below) of the crew of Arequipa (Pacific Steam Navigation Company), which sank in a major storm while moored & loading at Valparaiso, Chile. The captain of Arequipa & 10 crew lost their lives, while 13 were rescued by another vessel. But ... 6 says that Laurel Branch saved 7 crew members only. On Aug. 23, 1903, Laurel Branch, under the command of Captain Lee, left Coronel, Chile, for Sunderland, with a stop in Punta Arenas. With a general cargo (& maybe with metals). At 2 a.m. on Aug. 28, 1903, the ship ran aground, in heavy seas, 40 miles N. of Tres Mortes (off Stewart Bay, Tierra del Fuego, Patagonia, Chile). Everyone aboard made it safely to shore except for two young girls who were drowned when their boat overturned. Some weeks later, a boat, manned by some of the survivors, reached Port Otway, & Casma, a Chilean cargo ship, returned to the scene, successfully but with difficulty saved all the others, & landed them at Talcahuano, in S. central Chile. The 28 (or maybe many more?) survivors had spent 29 days on a deserted shore. Much of the above data does not conform with the detail at the Spanish page link above. Harry Shannon (thanks!) indicates that the crew was 58 in number (per the 'Newfoundland Memorial University MN archives'), & that his great grandfather was the ship's carpenter. WWW data is limited. Need help!

15 Kirkfield
3602 tons
Hull 164

106034
1896

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('pdf', wreck report, col. #2 & #3), 2 (wreck report), 3 (ref. 20% down, '08 Jul 02'), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 328 ft. long. Vessel built for 'Kirkfield Steamship Co. Ltd.', with 'J. R. Cuthbertson & Co.' the managers, both of Glasgow. In a ref. I do not understand, the vessel would seem to have left St. Helena (S. Atlantic Ocean) on Jul. 7, 1902 for Cape Town with 9 prisoners including 2 sons of General de Wet. Boer War related. On Apl. 7, 1910, while en route from Christmas Island (an Australian island S. of Jakarta, Indonesia) to either Yokohama or Kobe, Japan, with a cargo of phosphates, the vessel ran aground on Royal Captain Shoal, North Borneo. At Palawan Passage, W. of Palawan Island. Efforts were made to free her without success & she sank into deep water a week later. Captain Laurie & his crew made the 31 hour voyage in ship's boats to Kudal (or Balabec) & from there proceeded to Singapore. Have not read the circumstances. Presumably no lives were lost. WWW data is most limited. Need help!

16 Queen Eleanor
3574 (or 3549) tons
Hull 163

106019

Luigi
1896

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Thomas Dunlop, Queen Eleanor (1)], 2 ('uboat.net', 1918 sinking), 3 ('wrecksite.eu', 1918 sinking), 4 (ref. 70% down, Queen Eleanor), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 104.8 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 344 ft., speed of 10 knots. A Google 'snippet' advises that the vessel's launch was referenced in the 1897 edition of 'Marine Engineer and Naval Architect'. The vessel was built for 'Thomas Dunlop & Sons', of Glasgow, known as 'Queen Line'. 4 probably refers to this ship, re a May 3, 1899 arrival at Melbourne, Australia, from New York in 62 days, for onward travel to Sydney & New Zealand. In 1913, the vessel was sold to Figli di Luigi Dufour, of Genoa, Italy, 'L. Dufour Sons' the managers, & renamed Luigi. On Mar. 7, 1918, the vessel, en route from Marseille, France, to Dakar, Senegal, was stopped by U-152, Kapitänleutnant Constantin Kolbe in command. At 25.35N/14.38W, off Rio de Oro, Western Sahara, E. of the Canary Islands. The circumstances are not clear. It would seem that U-152 shelled Luigi, which ended up beached near Cape Juby, which since 1958 has been a part of Morocco near the border with Western Sahara. Was Luigi torpedoed, I wonder? No lives were apparently lost. I presume that the vessel was a total loss, once beached. WWW data is most limited. Need help!

17 Hemisphere
3486 tons
Hull 166

106857
1897

a cargo ship. per 1 ('Wikipedia, Kronprinz Wilhelm), 2 ('wrecksite.eu', events of Dec.1914/Jan.1915), 3 & 4 (the cruise of Kronprinz Wilhelm), 5 (data & image of Captain Richard Jones), 6 (New York Times, re Holger), 7 (image, Hemisphere), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 106.7 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 350 ft., signal letters PRVG. The vessel was built for 'W. Thomas & Co.', of Liverpool (& also of London perhaps?). The vessel may have been later sold, since in 1914 the vessel would seem to have been owned by 'Hemisphere Steamship Co. Ltd.', with 'W. Thomas, Sons & Co. Ltd.' the managers. But it may well be that the vessel was rather transferred, the companies being related. Still registered at Liverpool. In Dec. 1914, the vessel, commanded by Richard Jones of Criccieth, Wales, was en route from Hull to Buenos Aires & Rosario, both in Argentina, with a cargo of 5000 or 5500 tons of coal. On Dec. 28, 1914, she came into contact with Kronprinz Wilhelm, (a 14,908 gross ton German passenger liner built in 1901 for Norddeutscher Lloyd i.e. German Lloyd), when 400 miles off Pernambuco, (now Recife), Brazil - at 04.20S/29.25W. Kronprinz Wilhelm, under the command of Captain Grahn, was in the western Atlantic when WW1 was declared. She was commissioned into the Imperial German Navy & met with SMS Karlsruhe, which provided her with modest armament - two 88 mm rapid-firing guns, a machine gun & 36 rifles - & some personnel which included Paul Thierfelder, previously Karlsruhe's navigation officer, to serve as her commander. Grahn became her 1st Officer. Modestly so equipped, she started her new career as an auxiliary cruiser or raider. She headed to the Azores where she obtained coal but with further coal supplies not likely to be available in the area, headed towards the coast of Brazil, hoping to find sources of coal more friendly to Germany or at least a greater choice of neutral ports in which to intern his ship if she should find herself unable to replenish her supplies .... I have not read whether Hemisphere realized the new status of Kronprinz Wilhelm, whose tactics were to approach any intended prey openly & then capture them by surprise. Hemisphere had likely little choice other than to surrender. She was not the first or last ship that was so captured - there were ultimately 14 other vessels similarly captured & sunk. The two ships headed east, away from the shipping lanes, & early on Dec. 30, 1914 the transfer of Hemisphere's cargo of coal, & stores (a great quantity of white flour, butter, sweet cakes, potatoes & canned vegetables) to Kronprinz Wilhelm commenced. About a week later, on Jan. 7, or 8, 1915, Hemisphere became expendable & was scuttled. At 01.26S/24.17W. The 27 person crew were required to sign declarations not to take any further part in the war & were on Jan. 16, 1915, transferred to Holger, a German steamer, which in mid Feb. 1915 landed them at Buenos Aires along with 217 others taken from Potaro, Semantha, Wilfred M., & Highland Brae. The crews ultimately returned to Liverpool, in mid Mar. 1915, aboard Deseado. And Kronprinz Wilhelm? It sailed away towards her rendezvous with destiny, interned at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Virginia. She was later renamed Von Steuben, & perhaps Baron Von Steuben also, & was broken up at Baltimore in 1924. Hemisphere would seem to have had an association with Wales, maybe with Anglesey. Can anybody explain that? It should be specifically mentioned that not a single crew member of the captured ships lost his life. If you can add such data or additional data, do please be in touch. The career of Kronprinz Wilhelm as a raider is the subject of The Cruise of the Kronprinz Wilhelm, published in 1928 & written by Count Alfred von Niezychowski. #1846

18 Kirklee
3580 tons
Hull 167

108689

Cleveland Range
Cymric Vale
1897

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Neptune, Cleveland Range (2)], 2 (wreck data), 3 (Normandy), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 344 ft. long. Vessel built for 'Kirkfield Steamship Co. Ltd.', with 'J. R. Cuthbertson & Co.' the managers, both of Glasgow. And was christened by Mrs. Cuthbertson, wife of the managing owner. In 1915, the vessel was sold to Neptune Steam Navigation Company, which company was owned by Furness Withy & Company, & renamed Cleveland Range. In 1916, the vessel was sold to 'Anglo-Belgique Shipping Company Limited', of Cardiff, or perhaps of Liverpool, (Owen & Williams the managers?). And in 1918 was renamed Cymric Vale. I did read somewhere that during WW1, the vessel was attacked 4 times by a submarine but the submarine submerged when Cymric Vale tried to ram her. When exactly was that? In early Aug. 1918, Cymric Vale towed Normandy, a barque then in a leaking condition, 300 miles back to Monte Video. On Mar. 7, 1923, the vessel was wrecked at Naeroen (Nærøy), near Florø, an area on the coast of Norway, N. of Bergen, noted for treacherous & strong currents. Approx. at 61.37N/4.58E. A wreck site but very little is now left. Have not read the wreck circumstances. Any lives lost? WWW data is most limited. Need help!

19 Queen Mary
3564 (later 3541) tons
Hull 165

106064

Angiolina
Bagnoli
Dori
Larch
1897

a cargo ship. per 1 [Thomas Dunlop, Queen Mary (1)], 2 ('uboat.net', U-34, Angiolina, 1917), 3 (image, Queen Mary, & -39), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 104.8 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed ? knots. The vessel was built for 'Thomas Dunlop & Sons', ('Queen Line'), of Glasgow. In 1913, the vessel was sold to 'L. Dufour Sons', of Italy it would seem, (who may only be the managers) & renamed Angiolina. The name means 'little angel' in Italian. On Mar. 19, 1917 Angiolina, 3541 tons, was damaged by a torpedo, fired by U-34, Kapitänleutnant Johannes Klasing in command, E. of Elba, while en route, in ballast, from Taranto, Italy, to Sagunto, Spain. At 42.41N/10.36E. The vessel was beached but was later refloated. 'Figli di Luigi Dufour', of Genoa, was then the 'operator'. U-34 had quite a career in WW1 - it sank an amazing 119 ships & damaged 5 more, including Angiolina. In 1920 or 1921, the vessel was sold to 'Lloyd Mediterraneo Societa Italiana di Navigazione', of Genoa, Italy, & renamed Bagnoli. In 1923, or maybe in 1925, the vessel was sold again, to F. Bernatti, likely of Italy, (who also could just be the manager) & renamed Dori. Apparently Dori landed illegally 100 Italian immigrants near Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, in 1927. The vessel was seized, by the Canadian Authorities I presume, & sold under seizure, in 1927, to W. K. McKean ('McKean') of Halifax, & renamed Larch. The Google 'snippet' where I read that data suggests that the vessel twice carried the name of Larch. Can anybody explain? Miramar refers to 'Farquhar & Co.' in 1927 - perhaps the managers for McKean? In 1929, the vessel was transferred to Panamanian registry. And on Feb. 2, 1934, the vessel arrived at Charlestown, to be broken up. There are a number of places called Charlestown but it surely means the Charlestown at Fife, Scotland, noted for its ship breaking facilities. WWW data is very modest re this vessel. Need help! To correct and/or add to the above.

20 Ohio
4006 (or 4189) tons
Hull 174

109699

Zaandijk
1899

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Neptune, Ohio), 2 (Holland America, Zaandijk), 3 & 4 (the 1917 sinking), 5 (3 images), 6 (history in Dutch, vessel name spelled differently i.e. Zaandyk), 7 (fine image), 8 (Dutch page, Zaandyk, twice, 75% down & at page bottom, both with images, link out of commission, hopefully temporary), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 119.8 (or 128.78) metres long, speed 12 (or 10 1/2) knots, crew of 43. Built for Neptune Steam Navigation Company, (W. & T. W. Pinkney, managers) of Sunderland, which company principally operated a Rotterdam & U.S.A. (Baltimore) service. A manager change in 1904? Became F. W. Bolam & Swinhoe? Sold (6) in 1905 to Furness Withy & Co. Ltd. But that last data may very well be in error. Vessel does not appear in the 'not all inclusive' 'Furness Withy' list here or in other Furness related lists available via that link. Sold in Jul. 1909 to Holland America Line (Nederlandsch-Amerikaansche Stoomvaart Maatschappij), with the entire 'Neptune' line, & renamed Zaandijk. Can anyone explain the matter of the vessel's new name? Most references are to Zaandijk, but 2 links above refer to Zaandyk. Were not vessels formally registered? And the exact name as registered, whatever it was, should govern? At some point her 'stem was cut straight'. On Mar. 11, 1916, while en route from Philadelphia, U.S.A., to Rotterdam, the vessel hit a mine in the North Sea - was repaired at Gravesend. On Feb. 22, 1917, Zaandijk was one of seven neutral Dutch vessels at Falmouth. The small convoy left Falmouth, at full speed, heading to a safety zone with the convoy safety guaranteed by the German Government. Zaandijk was en route to Philadelphia in ballast. Later that day, 6 of the 7 vessels were lost, near Bishop Rock Lighthouse, Scilly Islands, as a result of torpedoes and/or bombs placed aboard (as in Zaandijk's case) by German submarine U-21. At 49.52N/7.00W. It would seem that the crew made it safely to the Scilly Islands after a hard row. Do read the full story at 4. Can you add anything? Your contribution would be most welcome, however small - even a typo!

21 Zillah
3779 (or 3788) tons
Hull 177

112677
1900

A cargo ship. Per 1 (image, Zillah), 2 (Zillah, 1917 sinking), 3 (U-46), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 103.7 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of ? knots, crew of 18 in 1917. Built for Turner, Brightman & Co. ('Turner'), a partnership apparently, of London, which owned & managed "Z" Steam Ship Co. Ltd. ('Z'), also of London. Z seems later to have been Newcastle based. Turner also operated 'Zinal Steamship Co. Ltd.' Both companies perhaps known as 'Z Line'? The vessel was christened by Mrs. Turner. On Oct. 22, 1917, while en route from Archangel, Russia, to Lerwick, Shetland Islands, with a cargo of timber, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-46, Oberleutnant zur See Leo Hillebrand in command, 25 miles NE of Kildin Island, off Murmansk. 18 lives were lost, the entire crew. Have not spotted the exact location. Kildin is at 69.21.9N/34.10.4E. There is very little WWW data about the vessel. Would welcome anything you can add.

22 Benarty
3910 (or 3747) tons
Hull 187

115657

Antinoe
1902

A cargo ship, schooner rigged. Per A (e-Bay image, crew of Antinoe aboard President Roosevelt), 1 (Board of Trade wreck report), 2 (President Roosevelt), 3 [Ben Line Benarty (2)], 4 (image Benarty, but more likely? the 1876 vessel of the name), 5 (a long account of the rescue, at pages 81 thru 108, in 'Yankee skippers to the rescue: a record of gallant rescues on the North Atlantic by American Seamen', by Felix Riesenberg Jr. (1879/Nov191939), first published in 1940 & republished many times, in Chapter VI. Check 'Contents' & then 'A Yankee Ship Stands By'), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 116.6 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 382.5 ft., speed of 12 (or 10 1/2) knots. Built for William Thomson & Company of Leith, Edinburgh, Scotland, which company later (1919) became Ben Line Steamers Ltd., known as Ben Line. The vessel was sold, for £19,000, in 1924 to 'New Egypt and Levant Shipping Company' (T. Bowen Rees & Co., owned by Thomas Bowen Rees, the managers?) & renamed Antinoe. A number of voyages carrying grain. The vessel arrived at Cardiff on Mar. 31, 1925 for repairs which were completed on Apl. 24, 1925, but the vessel was laid up at Cardiff until Jul. 1925. On Jul. 21, 1925 it was chartered to Frank C. Strick and Company, Limited for a single voyage. The vessel left New York on Jan. 14, 1926 for Queenstown, Ireland, under command of Capt. Harry Tose, with a cargo of grain, largely in bulk. The ship was damaged in a gale on Jan. 23, 1926 which resulted in the cargo shifting & a list of 6 degrees. The gale got worse (have read it described as a 100 mph hurricane & as being 'one of the greatest storms the Atlantic has ever known'), water entered the ship, the steam failed & the list became 30 degrees. An SOS was sent. President Roosevelt, (14,187 tons, Captain George Fried, ?/1949), which had arrived at the scene on Jan. 24, 1926, launched a lifeboat (Jan. 25) which capsized with the loss of 2 lives (Wirteman & Ernest Heitman). It would seem however that it was Fritz Steger who died rather than Heitman - Steger, a taxi driver from Germany, apparently was using Heitman's identification papers. The vessels were separated for 18 1/2 hours in the lack of visibility (violent snow squalls). The entire crew (25) of Antinoe were eventually (after many attempts), rescued days later, on Jan. 27 & 28, 1926, in improving weather, by two more President Roosevelt lifeboats. Robert B. Miller, Chief Officer, commanded multiple lifeboat rescue attempts. Antinoe was abandoned with a list of 50 degrees &, it is presumed, soon sank. At 47.50N/36.00W. About 1250 miles E. of St. John's, Newfoundland. The crew was landed at Plymouth. No blame was attached to any party. Read the detail at the links above. The congratulations of King George V & the Admiralty were sent to the crew of President Roosevelt & to President Coolidge. A ticker-tape parade, no less, was held in New York for Captain Fried & his crew. Medals were issued including those to Frank Roberts, fireman & also Frank M. (Monroe) Upton (1896/1962), 4th Officer of President Roosevelt, both of whom were in the lifeboats' crews. Dale Fisher, Frank Upton's granddaughter, has advised (thanks Dale!) that many New York Times articles related to the Antinoe rescue were saved by Frank Upton's wife, & presented to the 'Congressional Medal of Honor Society Museum', who put them on disk. Why that particular museum? Frank Upton had earlier been awarded a Congressional Medal of Honour for his bravery in 1918 re Florence H. - as you can read here:- A & B. A brilliant long poem about the rescue was written in 1930 by Edwin J. D. (John Dove) Pratt (1882/1964, a Canadian poet). The poem is indeed long, of 990 lines, & takes about 30 pages of 'E. J. Pratt, Complete Poems, Part I, Edited by Sandra Djwa & R. G. Moyles. Published by University of Toronto Press in 1989. This listing was re both Parts 1 & 2. I have read that of his long poems, this particular poem was Pratt's favourite. It would be good to link to a site with the complete text, so you might read the poem for yourself - but I have not yet found such a link. There are a great many WWW links re the sinking. Can you add anything to this listing? Images just must exist of such a famous ship & rescue.

23 Fallodon
3012 (or 3011) tons
Hull 190

118348
1903

A cargo ship, probably used mainly as a collier. Per 1 (wreck data), 2 (1917 loss list), 3 (UC-71), 4 (1917 U-boat attacks), 5 (wreck location), 6 (Pyman), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 339 ft. (about 108 metres) long. Built for London & Northern Steamship Co. Ltd., (Pyman Brothers Limited, the managers), of London. The vessel was sold to 'Pyman, Watson & Co., Ltd.', coal shippers, of Newport, Monmouthshire (Cardiff), in early 1917. On Jun. 16, 1917, defensibly armed, while en route from Cork, Ireland, to Cherbourg, France, with a cargo of hay, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-61 when S. of Ireland - 9 miles ESE of Mine Head, County Waterford. Fallodon was damaged & beached, but re-floated. No loss of life. Later in 1917, the vessel was sold to 'St. Just Steamship Co. Ltd.', which company was, it would seem, managed by William Reardon Smith & Sons, of Cardiff. On Dec. 28, 1917, defensibly armed, & en route, in ballast, from Le Havre, France, to the Clyde, Fallodon was hit by a torpedo fired by UC-71 (Ernst Steindorff, the commander) & sunk 12 miles SSE of St. Catherine's Point, Isle of Wight. At 50.25.967/01.05.912. One life was lost. The wreck lies in 30/40 metres of water. Thanks go to Michael Lowery of 4 for much of the above data. Can anybody add anything. An image?

24 Benledi
3931 (or 3391) tons
Hull 197

118699

Chetvertyi Krabolov
1904

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Ben Line, Benledi (3)], 2 (about 50% down image & text, with account of WW1 attack), 3 (a c.1910 oval oil painting of vessel. The image used to be available at [4] The Taylor Gallery, of London, but no longer), 5 (75% down Chetvertyi Krabolov), 6 ('Lloyds Register', data, 1930/31, Benledi), 7 ('Lloyds Register', data, 1932/33, Cheyvertiy Krabolov), 8 ('Lloyds Register', data, 1932/33 thru 1935/36, Tchetvertiy Krabolov), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 115.5 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular (379.0 ft.) long, single screw, speed of 12 knots, signal letters UOFH. Built for William Thomson & Company of Leith, Edinburgh, Scotland, which company later (1919) became Ben Line Steamers Ltd., known as Ben Line. The vessel took part, it would seem, in Naval manœuvres in 1906. On Nov. 8, 1917, when west of Gibraltar, the vessel was shelled by U-63. S.O.S signals were broadcast. The ship's wireless room took a direct hit & the radio officer (Gardiner) was killed. In 1930, the vessel was sold to Russian owners (Krabotrest?), per 9 the USSR Government, renamed Chetvertyi Krabolov ('4th crabber') (the last name seems to be regularly spelled two different ways but Krabalov would seem to be incorrect) & converted to a crab cannery. Some confusion as to the first word also in that new name - maybe 'Tchetvertiy'. 5 seems to indicate that vessel became owned by 'Krabomorzverotrest' in 1937 & that in 1942 it was requisitioned for WW2 war transport operations. Became U.S. owned? '1944 CHETVERTYI KRABALOV (WSA) under reverse Lend Lease 12.6.44'. And abandoned by Navy Dept. on Oct. 30, 1944 as 'unfit'. Other links state de-listed from Lloyds Register, i.e. most probably scrapped, in 1959. Can anybody clarify matters?

25 Benvenue
3929 (or 3835) tons
Hull 193

118697

Taiyetsu Maru
Jinkai Maru
1904

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Ben Line, Benvenue (2)], 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 115.5 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, (379 ft.), speed of 12 knots. Built for William Thomson & Company of Leith, Edinburgh, Scotland, which company later (1919) became Ben Line of Steamers Ltd., known as Ben Line. The vessel was requisitioned, in May 1916, for WW1 service as a collier (#1160) thru 1919. The vessel was sold in 1926 to Taikoku (or Taihoku) Kisen K.K., of Tokyo, Japan, & renamed Taiyetsu Maru. It was sold again, in 1932, to 'Yamamoto Hidesaburo', of Kobe, Japan, & renamed Jinkai Maru. In 1935, the vessel was sold to 'Sugaya K.K.', of Japan, with no change of name. On Mar. 23, 1937, the vessel, en route from Miike (a coal mine located in western Japan) to Hong Kong, with a cargo of coal, went ashore at Waglan Island, Hong Kong. The vessel broke up & sank in deep water. Presumably no loss of life? Can anybody add anything? Another image?

26 Benavon
3996 tons
Hull 199

123011

Piatyi Krabolov
Anastas Mikoyan
1905

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Ben Line, Benavon (1)], 2 (25% down image & text, 45% down account of WW1 attack), 3 (75% down Piatty Krabalov & 95% down Piatyi Krabolov), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 115.2 metres long, speed of 11 knots. Per 2 'often quoted as being the most beautiful of the Leith Yachts.' Built for William Thomson & Company of Leith, Edinburgh, Scotland, which company later (in 1919) became Ben Line of Steamers Ltd., known as Ben Line. On Sep. 30, 1917, the vessel was attacked by a U-boat on the surface in the Atlantic. The vessels exchanged fire. Benavon survived the encounter - any damage, I wonder? In Feb. 1930, the vessel was sold to Russian owners (Krabotrest?), renamed Piatyi Krabolov, ('Fifth crabber') & converted to a crab cannery. In 1936 the vessel was renamed Anastas Mikoyan. But ... 3 seems to indicate that vessel was renamed in 1934 rather than 1936, & had 4 later owners thru 1970. (1937 Krabomorzverotrest, 1958 DGMP, 1959 Krabomorzverotrest again & 1970 Dalmoreprodukt). Other links say 'delisted from Lloyds Register', i.e. most probably scrapped, in 1959. Some confusion as to the spelling of 'Piatyi'. Can anybody clarify matters? 

27 Benlawers
3949 tons
Hull 198

118706

Shestoy Krabolov
1905

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Ben Line, Benlawers (2)], 2 (50/55% down details re WW1), 3 (75% down Shestoi Krabolov), 4 (1918, below 1st image, William Dunnett), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 115.2 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 knots. Built for William Thomson & Company of Leith, Edinburgh, Scotland, which company later (1919) became Ben Line of Steamers Ltd., known as Ben Line. The vessel was requisitioned for WW1 service between the final months of 1915 & the end of 1917. In Dec. 1917, the vessel was attacked by a U-boat in the North Sea, but survived the encounter. On May 12, 1918, the vessel struck a mine in the Irish Sea - 5 lives lost but the vessel was able to reach Holyhead. I read that during 1918, Benlawers transported a large number of motor launches, & their crews to the Mediterranean. In 1930, the vessel was sold to Russian owners (Krabotrest?), renamed Shestoy Krabolov, ('Sixth crabber') & converted to a crab cannery. 3 seems to indicate that vessel had 2 later owners thru 1970. (1937 Krabomorzverotrest, & 1970 Dalmoreprodukt). Which last ref. seems not to make sense if the vessel was deleted in 1959, as seems to be so, from Lloyds Register, i.e. most probably then scrapped. Can anybody add anything?

28 Quarrydene
2883 tons
Hull 195

120528

King City
Anastassia
1905

A cargo ship. Per 1 (SC 15 Anastassia), 2 (Veniero re 1940 attack), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Anastassia, but I cannot check the link), 4 [Reardon Smith, King City (1)], 5 (Farmann), 6 (image, King City), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 100.9 metres (331 ft.) long, speed of 9 knots. Built for London & Northern Steamship Co. Ltd., (Pyman Brothers Limited, managers), of London. On Sep. 11, 1918, the vessel collided with & sank Farmann, a 205 gross ton yacht, at Alstenfjorden, Norway. Quarrydene was sold to Sir William Reardon Smith & Sons Ltd. ('Reardon'), (later, in 1928, Reardon Smith Line Ltd.) of Cardiff, & renamed King City. The exact date of that sale is most difficult. Miramar state 1918, while 4 states that the vessel was in 1917 purchased from Pyman Bros, (the managers rather than the owners it would seem), & in 1918 renamed King City. But ... Jon Sowell has advised, (thanks Jon!) that his grandfather, Horace A. (Ashton) Jewell, of Charles, near Barnstable, North Devon, was Master of Quarrydene on Feb. 14, 1919, as per his 'Continuous Certificate of Discharge'. So it would seem that the vessel may only have been, in fact, renamed King City after Feb. 1919. The vessel was sold again, in 1927, to C. Choremis, of Greece, (John Livanos & Sons Ltd., managers), & renamed Anastassia. Just 4 WW2 convoy references, 2 voyages across the N. Atlantic. Differing versions of what happened in Dec. 1940, when the vessel was returning eastbound, en route from Newcastle, New Brunswick, Canada, to Belfast & Sharpness with a cargo of lumber. The vessel joined eastbound convoy SC 15, at Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada, with Cilicia as escort. On Dec. 18, 1940, the vessel was torpedoed by Italian submarine Veniero. At 54.24N/19.04W in the N. Atlantic. 18 of the crew of 28 died. 10 crew members were taken prisoner, presumably by Veniero, & 1 of the 10 died. But Flowergate reported sighting the drifting & derelict ship on Dec. 20, 1940. Data a little different at 2, which states that the vessel was torpedoed & sunk with Veniero's deck gun on Dec. 18, 1940 & that only 9 survivors were picked up. Anastassia apparently sank at sea on Dec. 20, 1940. Anything you can add?

29 Rochdale
3718 (or 3816) tons
Hull 201

123155

Amersham
Delphin
1906

A cargo ship. Per 1 (ref. to sinking, Delphin, 'Wednesday, 9 October'), 2 ('uboat.net', sinking, image, Delphin), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, the single Delphin convoy, SC.6), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 106.6 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 346.5 ft., speed of 9 (or 8 only) knots. Built for 'Rochdale Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Cardiff. Which may have been a Charles Radcliffe & Co., of London & Cardiff, company, since the 'Bartram' build list on this site records them as being the initial purchasers. In 1924, the vessel was sold, to 'Britain Steamship Co. Ltd.', of London, Watts, Watts & Co. Ltd. the managers, & renamed Amersham. In 1929, the vessel was sold again, to 'Simon and Const. M. Los and E. C. Andreadis', of Chios, Greece, & renamed Delphin. Sometime along the way, the vessel's bridge would seem to have been modified. Just 1 WW2 convoy reference, SC.6, from Sydney, Cape Breton, Canada, to Liverpool on Sep. 27, 1940. There presumably were, however, independent voyages which I am not permitted to access. Soon after 10 p.m. on Oct. 9, 1940, Delphin, with a cargo of maize & wheat ex Montreal, was torpedoed by U-103, Kapitän zur See Viktor Schütze in command, 37 miles NNW of Rockall. Out in the N. Atlantic approaching northern Scotland. At 58.11N/13.57W. Delphin was a convoy straggler, it would appear. The vessel did not immediately sink, but it did sink on the next day, i.e. on Oct. 10, 1940, at 57.46N/13.504W. I read that no lives were lost, but cannot tell you which vessel rescued the crew. What was the name of Delphin's captain? Anything you can add?

30 Cronstadt
1674 tons
Hull 206

123025
1907

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Ben Line, Cronstadt), 2 (bronze medal, 'More'), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 75.4 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, (247 ft.), speed of 10 knots. Built for William Thomson & Company of Leith, Edinburgh, Scotland, which company later (1919) became Ben Line of Steamers Ltd., known as Ben Line. A modest ref. to the vessel in 1910 when at St. Petersburg, Russia, on the Baltic - George More, then 2nd Mate, was awarded the Bronze Medal of the Royal Humane Society for his life-saving effort on Jun. 24, 1910. At the outbreak of WW1, in 1914, a large group of ships (100) were detained at St. Petersburg. Can anyone tell us if Cronstadt was in the vessel list? I suspect that it was. The vessel was requisitioned by the British Government in May 1915 for service as a collier during WW1 (Collier #691) - until Feb. 1919. The vessel was attacked by a U-boat on Sep. 30, 1917 in the Atlantic. Likely when Benavon was similarly attacked that same day. On Sep. 4, 1923, while loading petroleum at Lisbon ('Lisboa'), Portugal, fire broke out on the vessel. The vessel was totally destroyed & was later broken up there - in May 1927. The WWW record for this ship is quite limited. An image of the vessel was available via e-Bay but is not longer accessible. Another image? Can anybody add anything?

31 Coniston Water
3738 tons
Hull 210

128483
1908

A cargo ship. Per 1 (1913 voyage ex New York), 2 ('uboat.net', sinking, Coniston Water), 3 ('wrecksite.eu', sinking), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 105.6 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters HNDB (I think). Built for 'Coniston Water Steamship Company Limited' ('Steamship'), of Cardiff, Wales, 'Macfarlane & Lander', also of Cardiff the managers. It would appear that Steamship was owned by 'Sir Wm. Reardon Smith & Sons Ltd.', of Cardiff. On Oct. 12, 1913, said to be owned by 'Messrs. Macfarlane and Lander', the vessel, under the command of J. S. Simpson & chartered to Vacuum Oil Co. Ltd., left New York for Australian & New Zealand ports with 150,000 cases of oil (benzine, naptha, kerosene etc.). Her final destination was Hobart, Tasmania, where she arrived on Feb. 1, 1914, landed 39,000 cases & then took on board a full cargo of railway sleepers for Colombo, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). On Jul. 21, 1917, while en route from Newport, Wales, to Arkhangelsk (Archangel), Northern Russia, with a cargo of coal, army stores & foodstuffs, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-87, Kapitänleutnant Rudolf Schneider in command, & sunk. At 59.29N/07.36W, 70 miles NxW of Butt of Lewis, the most northerly point of the Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides. While no lives were lost, 2 advises that one Coniston Water gunner was taken captive by U-87. On Feb. 12, 1918, the members of Steamship, in Extraordinary General Meeting, agreed that the company be voluntarily liquidated & it was liquidated late in that year. The WWW record for this ship is most limited. Another image? It would be good to know in whose name the vessel was Lloyd's registered in 1908 & after. Can anybody add anything? #1876

32 Cedar Branch
3554 (or 3553) tons
Hull 217

123970

Aenos
1910

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Nautilus, Cedar Branch (2)], 2 (Wikipedia, Aenos), 3 ('uboat.net', Aenos, image), 4 (U-38), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Aenos, but I cannot check the link), 6 (convoy SC-7), 7 (plimsollshipdata.org, Lloyd's Regiister data, Aenos, 1932/33 thru 1940/41), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 119.0 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular (390.5 ft.), speed of 10 1/2 or 11 knots, fiddle (or clipper) bow, signal letters JHWL later SVGI. Built for Nautilus Steam Shipping Co. Ltd., owned by F. & W. Ritson, of Sunderland (known as 'Branch Line'). Have also read references to Cedar Branch being in 'Gulf Line' serving the W. coast of S. America, i.e. Chile, Peru & Ecuador. Was the vessel requisitioned for WW1 service, I wonder? The later Lloyd's Registry data is a puzzle. I have read that in 1932 (have also read 1930 & 1931), the vessel was sold to 'Zephyros Steamship Co. Ltd.' ('Zephyros'), of Athens, Greece, or of Argostoli, Kefalonia, Greece, 'A. Lusi Ltd.', of London, the manager, & renamed Aenos. However Aenos, from 1932/33 thru 1936/37, was registered in the name of A. Lusi. The 1937/38 edition of Lloyd's indicates that Zephyros then became the owner. So other data I have read, that in 1937, the vessel was acquired by the Government of Greece, with no change of name seems to be incorrect. Subject to its service prior to Oct. 1940, whatever that service was, the vessel had a short WW2 career. Was in just one convoy, SC-7, leaving Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada, for Liverpool on Oct. 5, 1940. The vessel had sailed from Sorel, Quebec, to Sydney, with a cargo of 6,276 tons of wheat, for delivery at Manchester. She was, I read, the first vessel to be sunk ex that convoy, but certainly was not the last. 20 of 37 merchant ships were sunk & 6 were damaged. The convoy was intercepted by a pack of 7 u-boats. Aenos was a convoy straggler when spotted early (at 9.57 a.m.) on Oct. 17, 1940 by U-38, which fired a G7e torpedo (which missed), then surfaced & shelled the ship until she sank at 10.52 a.m. At 59.03N/12.24W, about 450 miles W. of the Isle of Lewis. 4 lives were lost. 25 survivors were picked up by Eaglescliffe Hall, also a straggler, & landed on Oct. 18, 1940 at Gourock, River Clyde, Scotland. Can anybody add anything? Another image?

33 Benlomond
4887 (or 4159) tons
Hull 219

129407
1911

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Ben Line, Benlomond (2)], 2 (image), 3 (1929 service, 1st table), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 123.4 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, (405 ft.), speed of 12 knots. Built for William Thomson & Company of Leith, Edinburgh, Scotland, which company later (1919) became Ben Line Steamers Ltd., known as Ben Line. At the outbreak of WW1, in 1914, Benlomond was in a large group of ships detained in the Baltic. Was requisitioned by the British Government for service during WW1, 'between the final months of 1915 to the end of 1917'. It would seem that in 1929 at least, Benlomond was part of 'Java-China-Japan Lijn', serving Sourabaya, Balikpapan, Manila & Amoy. On Mar. 3, 1932, the vessel arrived at Shanghai, China, to be broken up. The WWW record for this ship is quite limited. Can anybody add anything?

34 Maisie
4425 (or 4410) tons
Hull 220

132627

Scatwell
Antonis G. Lemos
1911

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Lot 120 at page bottom, data, 60 1/2 in. long builders model, sold by 'Charles Miller Ltd.' on Jul. 17, 2008 for £17,000. Image now at left), 2 (Antonis G. Lemos, page bottom), 3 (Cairn Line, Scatwell), 4 (collision with Keith), 5 (wreck discovered?, one above page bottom), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 117.3 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, (385 ft.), speed of 11 knots. Built for 'Laming D'Ambrumenil Steamship Co. Ltd.', 'A. Laming & Co.', of London, the managers. In 1918, the vessel was sold to 'Harris & Dixon Limited', of London, & renamed Scatwell. On the Gibraltar to New York service, perhaps. Later in 1918, the vessel was sold again, to 'Portloe Shipping Co. Ltd.', & in 1919 it was sold again to 'Tempus Shipping Co. Ltd.' ('Tempus') & then to T. Lewis & Co. of London, in all cases with no change of vessel name. Have seen references to the name of 'W. E. Hinde' ('Hinde'), of Cardiff, maybe they owned or were the managers for Lewis? In 1919 or 1920, the vessel was sold (by Hinde) to 'Cairn Line of Steamships Ltd.' with no change of name. While I have read only limited detail ex e-Bay, it would seem that in May 1923, the vessel was in collision with a vessel named 'Pensecola'. (Now Miramar do not list a vessel of that name so it may have been Pensacola) A wire was caught around the vessel's propeller, & in Jun. 1923 the vessel suffered a fire at sea, 'which damaged huge amounts of flour wheat butter'. Can anybody add additional detail? In Jun. 1928, the vessel was sold, for £34,325, to 'S. A. & P. A. Lemos', (Spyros & Polydoros, sons of Antonis G. Lemos), of Chios, Greece, & renamed Antonis G. Lemos. In a data 'snippet', I read that at an unknown date in 1936, the vessel, badly damaged, called for immediate assistance, when 75 miles W. of Bermuda. On Aug. 24, 1936, while en route, with a cargo of coal, from Danzig (Gdansk), Germany, to Buenos Aires, Argentina, (though 4 has it the other way around), the vessel was in collision, in dense fog, with Keith, a 1400 ton British destroyer. At 49.56N/2.17W or perhaps at 49.56N/2.15W, roughly in the middle of the English Channel, S. of Portland, & sank within a few hours. No loss of life, it would seem, & the crew was later landed at Portsmouth. Have not read the circumstances. The WWW record for the ship is limited, & the data 'differs', so the above may well need correction. Can anybody add to or correct the above?

35 Salopian
4302 (or 4310) tons
Hull 228

135237

Radnorshire
1913

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Radnorshire (3)], 2 [about 1/2 down, Radnorshire (1)], 3 (data), 4 (Möwe), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 385 ft. long, speed of 10 knots. Laid down as Salopian. Built for 'John Mathias & Sons of Aberystwyth's Cambrian Steam Navigation Co.' The vessel was sold, later in 1913, to Royal Mail Steam Packet Co., & renamed Radnorshire. On Jan. 7, 1917, en route from Pernambuco (now Recife), Brazil, to London & Le Havre with a cargo of coffee, cocoa & sugar, she was captured by the most successful German Hilfskreuzer Möwe (generally referred to as Mowe), in the South Atlantic about 110 miles north of Pernambuco. Map of sinking. No loss of life, it would seem. Crew taken aboard Möwe & then Hudson Maru & taken to Pernambuco, Brazil. The vessel was sunk on Jan. 8, 1917. Note that 3 refers to SMS Seagull capturing the vessel. The reason for that reference would seem to be that the German word 'möwe' translates into English as 'seagull'. Image may be here (Radnorshire), but I do not think any of the images are of the correct vessel. Can anybody provide an image?

36 Benrinnes
4791 (or 4798) tons
Hull 233

135099

Thorpeness
1914

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Benrinnes), 1 [Ben Line, Benrinnes (1)], 2 (70% down), 3 (data, see English text), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 123.4 metres long, speed of 12 1/2 knots. The vessel was built for William Thomson & Co., of Leith, Scotland, i.e. Ben Line, which mainly traded to the Far East. It was sold, in 1937, to Westcliff Shipping Co., of London, (G. O. Till managers?), & renamed Thorpeness. The vessel was used as a blockade runner during the Spanish Civil War. And, on Jan. 20, 1938, the vessel was damaged during an air raid on Tarragona, Spain. 7 were killed & 8 were wounded. On Jun. 22, 1938, while en route from Marseilles, France, to Valencia, Spain, with a cargo of wheat, the vessel was hit by an aerial torpedo in an air attack by a Rightist aircraft & sunk, a mile off Valencia. I presume there was no loss of life. Can you add anything?

37 Etonian
4306 (or 5712) tons
Hull 231

136654

Clan Keith
Hilarius
Clan Keith
Orminster
1914

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Clan Line, Clan Keith (1)], 2 (data, Clan Keith, 30% down), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Orminster, but I cannot check the link. And beware! The page you come to includes Corminster), 4 ('uboat.net', sinking, image, Orminster), 5 (image, Clan Keith, also -02, -04, -05), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 117.3 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 1/2 (or just 10) knots. Built for Cambrian Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. ('Cambrian'), of Cardiff, John Mathias & Sons, of London, the managers. Cambrian apparently named its vessels after English 'public' schools, hence Etonian, Harrovian, etc. In 1916, the vessel was requisitioned by the British Government, presumably for WW1 service. The vessel was sold, in 1918, to Clan Line Steamers Ltd. ("Clan"), of Glasgow, Cayzer, Irvine and Co. Ltd., the owners & managers, & renamed Clan Keith. In 1920 or 1921, the vessel was transferred to British and South African Steam Navigation Co. Ltd., ('Houston Line') R. P. Houston and Company, the managers, both of which were owned by Clan, & renamed Hilarius. In 1923 or 1924, the vessel reverted to Clan & was renamed Clan Keith. In 1937, the vessel was sold, for £23,000, to Minster Steamship Co. Ltd., of London, Thomas Eeles & Co., also of London, the managers, & renamed Orminster. In 1940, the vessel was sold to South American Saint Line Ltd., of Cardiff, with B and S Shipping Co. Ltd. the managers, with no change of vessel name. 66 WW2 convoy references (I think), mainly U.K. coastal but including at least 6 N. Atlantic crossings, service into the western Mediterranean, to Freetown, W. Africa, & into the Caribbean (Trinidad, Key West, Guantanamo). The vessel made a couple of voyages to Seine Bay, France, in Jun. & Aug. 1944, re the Normandy landings, but did not return from the second such voyage. On Aug. 25, 1944, while under the command of Harold Gittins, the vessel, returning from the Normandy Beaches, was a straggler in convoy FTM-74. At 2:43 p.m. that day, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-480, Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Joachim Förster in command. At 50.09N/00.44W, 35 miles NW of Cap d'Antifer, France. 4 lives were lost, 3 gunners & a single crew member, (I have also read that 6 were lost). 59 persons, including the Captain, 14 gunners & an Army storekeeper, were picked up HMS Pennywort (K 111) & by HMS Damsay (T 208), neither of which were FTM-74 escort vessels, & landed at Portsmouth. Can you add anything?

38 Ennistown
824 tons
Hull 240

140288

Sunnycroft
Carterside
Yewkyle
1917

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data, Carterside), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Yewkyle, but I cannot check the link), 3 (Sylvia Beale, 9th item down), 4 (wreck ref.), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 59.4 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, (195 ft.), have not read her speed. Built for Town Line (London) Ltd., of Cardiff perhaps, despite the company name, 'Harrison, Sons & Co. Ltd.', of Cardiff, the managers. The vessel was sold, in 1922, to Triumph Steamship Co., & renamed Sunnycroft. In 1923, the vessel was sold to The Side Shipping Co. Ltd. ('Side'), of Newcastle, 'Connell & Grace Ltd.' the managers, & renamed Carterside. Side would appear to have been wound up in 1939. Vessel was however sold in 1938 to J. Stewart & Co. Shipping Limited, of Glasgow, & renamed Yewkyle. 46 WW2 convoy references, mainly U.K. coastal, but including 8 voyages to Seine Bay, France, re the Normandy landings from Jun. thru Sep. 1944. To Norway in Mar. 1940. On Aug. 17, 1940, the vessel was hit by bombs & gunfire from German aircraft. At 52.27N/05.45W, in St. George's Channel between Ireland & Wales. Probably an independent voyage that 'convoyweb.org' does not permit me to access. On Jan. 19, 1945, the vessel, when en route from Blyth to Portsmouth, was in collision with Sylvia Beale (also a Sunderland built ship) & sank. At 52.09N/1.50E, off the Suffolk coast (Aldeburgh). It would seem that both vessels were in the port column of a S. bound convoy & Yewkyle was crossing the bow of Sylvia Beale at the time of the collision. The Yewkyle would seem to have been at fault. I have not been able to read the circumstances. However, there does not appear, per 2, to have been any Jan. 1945 convoy references for the vessel. Probably no loss of life. Can you confirm that or otherwise add anything?

39 Hindustan
4990 tons
Hull 239

137266

Korean Prince
Diamantis
1917

A cargo ship. Per 1 (image Korean Prince), 2 (40% down Common Bros. history), 3 (data), 4 (data Korean Prince), 5 (Prince Line), 6 (Diamantis & image), 7 (Diamantis data galore), 8 (painting of rescue of crew from high seas), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 400 ft. (about 127 metres) long, speed of 11 knots. Built for Hindustan Steam Shipping Co. Ltd. ('Owner'), of Newcastle (Common Bros. the managers). The 4th vessel of the name for Owner. In 1918, the vessel was sold to Prince Line Ltd., (Furness, Withy the managers), & renamed Korean Prince. Was sold again, in 1934, to Diamantis J. Pateras & Sons, of Chios, Greece, & renamed Diamantis. On Oct. 3, 1939, under the command of Master Panagos Pateras, the vessel was en route from Pepel (Sierra Leone, i.e. Freetown) to Barrow-in-Furness with a cargo of manganese. The vessel was stopped in bad weather by U-35, 40 miles W. of the Scilly Islands. At approx. 49.19N/05.35W but that location seems not to jive. The crew was ordered to abandon ship & 2 torpedoes were fired but exploded prematurely. A 3rd torpedo sank the vessel. Werner Lott, the U-boat captain, knew the Diamantis lifeboats were not suited for the bad weather & in 7 trips in a small boat took all 26 crew aboard & landed them next day at Dingle Bay in neutral Ireland. Walter Kalabuch, a crew member of U-35, was awarded the Iron Cross, second class, for his part in the rescue. Captain Lott, however, was later rebuked by the U-Boat command for putting his vessel & crew in danger. So, thanks to Captain Lott, no loss of life. Can you add anything?

40 Clan Macbean
5052 (or 5000) tons
Hull 243

141876

Anglos
Korthion
Audax
1918

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Clan Line, Clan Macbean (1)], 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Clan Macbean, but I cannot check the link), 3 (convoy HG-3, ref. to Clan Macbean, 25% down), 4 ('uboat.net', Goodwood sinking), 5 (image, Clan Macbean, also, I think, -02 & -07), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 121.9 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 411 ft. 10 in., speed of 11 1/2 knots. Built for Clan Line of Steamers Ltd. ("Clan"), of Glasgow, Cayzer, Irvine and Co. Ltd., the owners & managers. The 1st  of 2 fleet vessels of the name. 76 WW2 convoy references, including at least 1 North Atlantic crossing, (returning with sugar, fruit etc.), service in the Indian Ocean, (Bombay, Madras, Bandar Abbas, Suez), in the Mediterranean (Bone, Algiers, Port Said), to Africa (Freetown, Takoradi, Lagos, Cape Town), Caribbean & U.K. coastal. A large list of 'independent' voyages is available - access via the link at page bottom at 2. On Oct. 13, 1939, the vessel left Gibraltar for Liverpool in convoy HG.3. 5 days later, on Oct. 18, 1939, a submarine fired a torpedo at Clan Macbean but missed, then surfaced & shelled the ship. Captain Ernest Coultas retaliated by attempting to ram the submarine & came within 100 ft. of her before the submarine crash dived leaving its gun crew awash on her deck. Robert Almeida advises (thanks!) that in Jul. 1940, Clan Macbean was used in convoy HG 39 to transport 313 civilian population evacuees from Gibraltar to Cardiff, Wales. On Aug. 27, 1940, the ship rescued, after 5 days at sea, 34 crew members & a gunner from Brookwood, which vessel, was torpedoed, S. of Iceland, by U-37, then set on fire by gunfire & sunk. They landed the 35 at Freetown, Sierra Leone. In 1947, the vessel was sold to, I think, Okeanis Shipping Co. Ltd., likely of Malta, Goulandris Bros Ltd., of Andros, Greece, the managers, & renamed Anglos. The vessel was sold again, in 1949, to 'G. N. Louloudis et al', of Paris, France & Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Korthion. In 1950, the vessel was sold for the last time, to 'U. Gennari', of Italy, (possibly 'U. Gennari fu Torquato & Co.', of Ancona), & renamed Audax. On Jun. 8, 1959, the vessel arrived at Yawata, Kyoto, Japan, to be broken up. Can you add anything? Or correct the above?

41 War Cygnet
5271 tons
Hull 245

142628

Sierra Blanca
Queen Eleanor
Pelorum
Rio Chico
Pelorum
1918

A 'B' type dry cargo ship. Per 1 (War Cygnet), 2 (New Zealand, Queen Eleanor), 3 (image Queen Eleanor, the correct one?), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 125.6 metres (400 ft.) long, speed of 11 knots. Built for The Shipping Controller & managed by E. Bigland & Co., of London. The vessel was sold, in 1919, to 'Soc. Transoceanique de Transports', of Antwerp, Belgium, (R. van Hemelryck, the managers?), & renamed Sierra Blanca. In 1924, the vessel was sold again, to Queen Line Ltd., of Glasgow, (T. Dunlop & Sons the managers?) & renamed Queen Eleanor. Visited Auckland, New Zealand, 4 times between Nov. 1927 & Jan. 1935. In 1938, the vessel was sold to 'Transmediterranea S.A. di Nav.', of Palermo, Sicily, & renamed Pelorum. In 1941, the vessel was seized by the Argentine Government, became part of 'Flota Mercante del Estado', of Buenos Aires, & renamed Rio Chico. In 1946, the vessel was returned to Italy, became owned by 'Salvatore Tagliavia', of Palermo, & again named Pelorum. On Dec. 27, 1952, the vessel arrived at Palermo, Sicily, to be broken up. Was broken up in 1953. Can you add anything?

42 War Perch
5226 tons
Hull 244

142440

Trojan Prince
Hoosac
Nemanja
1918

A 'B' type dry cargo ship. Per 1 (modest data Trojan Prince, 55% down), 2 (data Trojan Prince (2) 50% down), 3 [Prince Line, Trojan Prince (2)], 4 (Warren Line, Hoosac), 5 (Nemanja), 6 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Nemanja, but I cannot check the link), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 125.6 metres (400 ft.) long, speed of 10 1/2 or 11 knots. Built for The Shipping Controller & managed by J. Westoll, of Sunderland. The vessel was sold, in 1919, to Prince Line Ltd., of Newcastle, [owned by Furness Withy & Company ('Furness')] & renamed Trojan Prince. In 1924, the vessel was transferred to Warren Line (Liverpool) Ltd. (also owned by Furness) & renamed Hoosac. In 1926, the vessel was sold to 'Atlanska Plovidba Ivo Racic', of Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia, & renamed Nemanja. The vessel was sold again, in 1930, to Petrinovic & Co's 'Jugoslavenska (or Jugoslavenski) Lloyd Akcionarsko Drustvo', of Zagreb, Yugoslavia. Just 6 WW2 convoy references, including likely 3 N. Atlantic crossings, (can only spot 2 W. bound voyages) & service to W. Africa (Freetown). I presume that there were many independent voyages, but 'convoyweb.org' denies me access to such data, but you should be able to access it OK. On Apl. 8, 1942, while en route from San Pedro de Macaris, Dominican Republic, to the U.K. via Halifax, Canada, with a cargo of sugar, the vessel was hit by a single torpedo fired by U-84 (earlier salvo of 2 torpedoes missed) & sunk, 195 miles off Cape Sable, Nova Scotia. At 40.30N/64.50W. 13 lives lost including the master (his name?), 34 survived (rescued by ?). Can you add anything?

43 War Collie
5186 (or 5114 or 5286)  tons
Hull 248

143367

Easterly
Vermont
1919

A 'B' type dry cargo ship. Per 1 (War Collie), 2 ('uboat.net', Vermont), 3 (French page, Vermont, image), 4 (Convoy HX-1), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, Vermont, one ref. only to this vessel, if it is, in fact, this vessel, since stated to have been built in 1932), 6 (French Line, CGT), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 125.6 metres (400 or 412.6 ft.) long, speed of 10 or 10 1/2 knots. Launched as War Collie for The Shipping Controller but completed as Easterly. Confusion as to who then owned the vessel. Maybe i) 'Fratres Ltd.', of London, with Brown, Jenkinson & Co. the managers, or ii) the U.S. Government, or iii) Sir R. Mathias & Co., of Cardiff, who seem to have sold it in 1921 to Compagnie Générale Transatlantique ('CGT'), of Havre, France. The build list here states, however, that Sir R. Mathias & Co. was the initial purchaser. CGT renamed it Vermont. Used on service to Gulf of Mexico. The vessel was 'désarmé' (disarmed?) on Apl. 8, 1932 at Roscanvel, Brittany, repaired at Le Havre & returned to service only in 1936. What does that all mean? 4 years to repair it? Was it totally rebuilt? It would seem that the vessel left Halifax, Canada, in convoy HX-1, on Sep. 16, 1939, for Bordeaux, France, via Liverpool where it arrived on Sep. 30, 1939, with a cargo of lead & aircraft. But see the words at the foot of 5. Link 4 says that the vessel left Portsmouth in a convoy & dispersed from it. But no Portsmouth convoy reference that I can see. Early on Oct. 15, 1939, while en route from Havre to New Orleans in ballast, & unescorted, the vessel was shelled by U-37. The crew abandoned ship & a boarding party from the submarine went aboard to place explosives. When those explosives did not detonate, the vessel was shelled & a torpedo fired to sink it. At 48.01N/17.22W. In the N. Atlantic, about 600 miles SW of Ireland. 2 lives lost. Have not read the circumstances or how & where the survivors (how many?) were landed. However, a lifeboat capsized & several crew members fell into the water. Many unclear matters in the above account, which surely need correction, if that is possible. Can you add anything?

44 Stonewall
4968 (or 5073 or 5074) tons
Hull 253

138929

Silverbirch
Ardenhall
Cefnbryn
Galeb
Vest
Siredal
Regulus
Ruth
1920

A 'B' type dry cargo ship. Which had a lot of names! Per 1 ('cigarboxlabels', a fine 1921 Stock Certificate, Garland), 2 [West Hartlepool, Ardenhall (2)], 3 (extensive data, Vest), 4 (Stonewall history), 5 [Silver Line, Silverbirch (2)], 6 [Silver Line, Silverbirch (2), 1st item on page], 7 (Norwegian page, data), 8 (2nd vessel, Regulus, with image), 9 (Norwegian page, image as Vest), 10 (WW2 convoy duty, insert Vest, but beware the result which includes many other vessels, link), 11 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 121.9 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, (400.2 ft), speed of 10 1/2 knots. Built for Garland Steamship Corporation, of New York, New York, U.S.A. The vessel was sold, in 1923, to St. Helen's Shipping Co., maybe with '(1912) Ltd.' at name end, of London, 'S. & J. Thompson', the managers, & renamed Silverbirch. In 1924, the vessel was sold to West Hartlepool Steam Navigation Company, of West Hartlepool, & renamed Ardenhall. In 1936, it was sold again, to 'Kilvey Shipping Co. Ltd.' of Swansea, (maybe Cardiff also), Wales, ('Ambrose Davies & Matthews', the managers), & renamed Cefnbryn or perhaps Cefnybryn or Cefn-y-bryn. Can anyone advise which is correct? The vessel was sold again, later in 1936, to 'Jugoslavenska Plovidba DD', of Sušak (Rijeka), Yugoslavia, & renamed Galeb. In 1939, it was sold to D/S A/S Carolvore, of Farsund, Norway, ('Lundegaard & Sønner', (i.e. 'Sons'), the managers) & renamed Vest. I believe 45 WW2 convoy references, including at least 5 crossings of the N. Atlantic, service in Mediterranean & to W. Africa (Freetown), & many UK coastal voyages. She carried varied cargoes - steel, lumber, iron ore, coal, etc. We thank particularly 3 for their extensive words about events in 1943 at Brindisi & Bari, on the Adriatic coast of southern Italy. The vessel was hit by a bomb, the bridge destroyed & the funnel lost & was, as a result, partially gutted by fire. Due to good fortune, no Vest lives were lost (many injuries however), but 1000 lives in total were lost in the overall aerial attack on Allied shipping at Bari on Dec. 2, 1943. An attack in which 17 ships were sunk & many more were damaged. Vessel was under repair for the rest of WW2. We are not done with the ownership changes! In 1950, the vessel was sold to 'A/S Norsk Rutefart', of Kristiansand, Norway, A. I. Langfeldt & Co. the managers, & next year, in 1951, was renamed Siredal. In 1954, the vessel was sold to 'Skibs A/S Motor', (Einar Salvesen, Kragerø, the manager), & in 1956 renamed Regulus. And sold for the last time, in 1959, to 'Bowring & Curry GmbH', of Hamburg, Germany, & renamed Ruth. On Oct. 29, 1959, the vessel arrived at the Hong Kong facilities of 'Chiapas Hua Manufactory Co. (1947) Ltd.' to be broken up. I guess that was yet another sale wasn't it, i.e. the sale to the ship breaker! After all of the above, I can tell you very little about where she went & what she did other than her WW2 experiences as above. Can you add anything?

45 Ramsay
5053 (later 5085 & 5207) tons
Hull 254

146146

Kerkplein
RO-23
Ossendrecht
Alstertor
1921

A 'B' type dry cargo ship. Per 1 [Bolton, history, Ramsay (2)], 2 [Bolton Steam, Ramsay (2)], 3 (data Ramsay & image, Ossendrecht), 4 (brief ref. Ramsay, 75% down), 5 (Kerkplein, aground in 1935, details & images), 6 (image, Kerkplein, aground in 1935), 7 (data, in German, mainly re RO-23), 8 (image, Ossendrecht & also -02), 9 ('Lloyds Register', data, from 1930/31, Kerkplein, see left), 10 (extensive data, in Dutch, at page bottom, with image of Ossendrecht), 11 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 400.0 ft. long, 121.9 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 (or 10) knots, signal letters PGPK, possibly DKFO & DHKW, PHJC & PFIW (last two Kerkplein). The vessel was in the process of being built when acquired by 'Bolton Steam Shipping Company Ltd.' ('Bolton'), of London, 'F. Bolton & Co.' the managers. Bolton were known as operators of small cargo vessels named after artists beginning with the letter 'R' [in this case Allan Ramsay (1713/1784)] which carried Welsh coal to Mediterranean bunkering stations & returned with grain, hemp & cotton seed from the Black Sea. The second fleet vessel of the name (Ramsay #1 of 1902). The original Bolton went into voluntary liquidation on Sep. 12, 1917. 4 years later, in 1921, a new company, of the identical name, was set up. With the decline of the Black Sea trade, the vessel was involved in the grain trade to Australia & in trading in the Far East. In 1929, the vessel was sold to N.V. Scheepvaart Maatschappij "Millingen" ('Millingen'), of Rotterdam, 'G. A. Spliethoff' the manager, & renamed Kerkplein. Was engaged in the shipment of iron ore from Narvik (northern Norway) to Rotterdam. On Nov. 16, 1930, the vessel ran aground at Narvik but it would seem it suffered no damage & loaded its cargo of iron ore for Rotterdam. On Oct. 19, 1935, the vessel was en route, in ballast, from IJmuiden, North Holland, to Rotterdam (or maybe from Narvik to Rotterdam). In a heavy SW gale, the vessel was driven aground at Egmond aan Zee, near Amsterdam & the 'van Speijck' lighthouse. Drente, an IJmuiden tugboat, came to her assistance. 3 times the Drente got a tow cable aboard but each time it broke. On the 3rd try, the tow cable fouled Drente's propeller & Drente herself was driven ashore. Her crew were rescued by an oared lifeboat which made two trips in high seas to save the entire crew. Drente ended up a total loss. Kerkplein survived the encounter being eventually towed off by tugboats Witte Zee & Ebro, of L. Smit & Co's International Towing Service. On May 15, 1940, the vessel arrived at Rotterdam from New York. It was seized by the German Government, I believe on Aug. 19, 1940, & became RO-23, a raw material carrier for Germany, for the duration of WW2. I had difficulty in WWW translating into English, the data at 8. 'RO', I learn, stands for 'Rohstoff' - raw materials, needed to supply the military machine of the Third Reich. Thanks to 'plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data for Kerkplein is WWW available re 1930/31 thru 1945/46 - see left - Lloyd's did not record the vessel as RO-23. On May 9, 1945, the vessel was at Christiansand, Norway, with 1,200 tons of ammunition & 6,000 tons of copper ore. On Aug. 8, 1945, the vessel was returned to Holland, became Dutch Government property, but was returned to Millingen, its owner. They repaired the vessel & put it back into service. On Oct. 4, 1946, the vessel, in ballast, ran aground on the N. side of Hogsty reef, southern Bahamas, while en route from Cardiff to Havana, Cuba. James H. Price came to the vessel's assistance but 'this was not a success'. It would seem that the vessel freed itself & made its way to Norfolk, Virginia, for repairs. In 1947, the vessel was sold, to 'Phs van Ommeren' (P. van Ommeren's Scheepvaart Bedrijf NV), & renamed Ossendrecht. In 1950, the vessel was sold to 'Porta Hamburg Reederei GmbH', of Hamburg, Germany, 'Fisser & van Doornum', of Emden, the managers, & renamed Alstertor. On Sep. 18, 1953, the vessel arrived at the Bremerhaven, Germany, ship breaking facilities of 'Eisen & Metall KG Lehr & Co.', to be broken up. The above text surely contains errors (& has omissions also) due to the webmaster's inability in Dutch & German - the WW2 history of RO-23 in particular. Can you correct the above and/or add anything additional? #1880

46 Malistan
5553 tons
Hull 255

148050

Marajó
1924

A tanker. Per 1 (Common Brothers history 1/3rd down), 2 (modest Malistan image), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 127 metres long, speed of 10 knots. The vessel, then with no name, was launched on Jan. 13, 1922. But was laid up until sold, on Feb. 6, 1924, to Common Bros., presumably to 'Hindustan Steam Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Newcastle, owned by 'Common Brothers Ltd.' (the ship's managers). In 1936, the vessel was sold to the Brazilian Navy & renamed Marajó. The vessel supplied the Brazilian Navy with fuel oil during WW2 when it was armed with a 120 mm cannon & a 20 mm Madsen machine gun & carried a crew of 92. Miramar indicates 'stricken' on May 30, 1950, presumably meaning being then struck off the Brazilian Navy list. Broken up at Rio de Janeiro. Can you add anything?

47 Peterston
4680 tons
Hull 258

148561

Burhaven
Andrew T.
Raloo
Paraporti
1925

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Wikipedia, Evan Thomas, Radcliffe, Peterston 1925), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Peterston, but I cannot check the link), 3 (data, image available, Andrew T.), 4 (Paraporti), 5 ('Lloyds Register', data, Peterston, from 1930/31 thru 1945/46 ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 117.5 metres long (385.4 ft.) perpendicular to perpendicular, overall 400.0 ft., speed of 10 knots, signal letters KSGQ. The vessel was built, at a price of £84,647 I read, for 'Llangorse Steamship Company Ltd.', Evan Thomas, Radcliffe & Company, of Cardiff, the managing owners.  97 WW2 convoy references including 10 N. Atlantic crossings carrying such cargoes as grain, lumber, sugar & wood pulp. Service to W. Africa (Freetown, Takoradi) & many U.K. coastal. The vessel was independent in Australian waters from Oct. 1939 to Mar 1940, & while independent had 2 additional N. Atlantic crossings. In 1948, the vessel was sold to Gowan Shipping Co. Ltd., of London, Burness Shipping Co. likely the managers, & renamed Burhaven. In 1950, the vessel was sold to 'A. G. Tsavliris Limited', of London, & renamed Andrew T. And sold again, in 1953, to Shamrock Shipping Co. Ltd., of Larne Harbour, Ireland, & also of Cardiff, & renamed Raloo. And sold for the last time, in 1954, to 'Paraporti Cia. Nav. SA.', of Puerto Limon, Costa Rica, & renamed Paraporti. On Oct. 17, 1957 the vessel was laid up at Barrow. On Jul. 27, 1959, the vessel, towed by tug Tyne, arrived at ship breakers at Antwerp, Belgium, to be broken up. Can you add anything?

48 Badjestan
5573 tons
Hull 260

149451

Ferriby
Camerata
Maria
Somalegra
1928

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data about 53% down), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Badjestan, but I cannot check the link), 3 (Monday, 29 January), 4 (Convoy HX.16), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 408 ft. 8 in. (about 125 metres) long, speed of 10 knots. Built for 'Common Brothers Ltd.', of Newcastle. But it could have been owned instead by Hindustan Steam Ship Co. Ltd., the main ship owning arm of Common Brothers. 88 WW2 convoy references including 8 voyages across the N. Atlantic, many U.K. coastal trips, into Mediterranean (Oran & Bizerta) & Freetown, Sierra Leone. In late Jan. 1940, while part of convoy HX.16, bound from Halifax, Canada, to Glasgow with a cargo of grain, the vessel ran aground off Clachaig Point, Island of Arran, Firth of Clyde. The crew was taken off by Destroyer Maori & landed 'in the Clyde' on Jan. 29, 1940. The vessel must have been later re-floated & repaired. It was sold, in 1946, to 'Quaside Shipping Co.' (probably means Quayside Shipping Co. of Newcastle?), (Wm. Brown, Atkinson & Company Ltd., of Hull, managers), & renamed Ferriby. In 1947, the vessel was sold to 'La Tunisienne Steam Navigation Co. Ltd.', of London, (Frank C. Strick & Co. Ltd., managers), & renamed Camerata. And in 1951, sold to 'Compania Nacional Naviera S.A.', of Panama, & renamed Maria. The vessel was sold again, in 1955, probably to Spanish owners, & renamed Somalegra. As Somalegra, the vessel carried iron ore from Spain to Barrow, it would seem. On Jan. 27, 1960, the vessel arrived at Avilés, Spain, to be broken up. Can you add anything? Another image, perhaps?

49 Rajahstan
6391 tons
Hull 267

161541

Mar Terso
Marlena
1929

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Rajahstan, but I cannot check the link), 2 (Common Brothers history 1/3rd down & data 'Rajastan'), 3 (hit mine in 1947?), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 137 metres long, speed of 10 knots. Built for 'Hindustan Steam Ship Co. Ltd.', of Newcastle, owned by 'Common Brothers Ltd.' (the ship's managers). 81 WW2 convoy references including 14 voyages across N. Atlantic & many U.K. coastal trips, also to Freetown, Sierra Leone, & S. Africa (Durban & Capetown). It is possible that the vessel hit a mine on Dec. 2, 1947. Can anyone advise? See 3 for the limited data I have read about the matter. The vessel was sold, in 1949, to 'Franco Maresca & Co.', of Genoa, Italy, & renamed Mar Terso. In 1958, the vessel was sold to 'Panamanian Oriental Steamship Corporation', of Panama, (Wheelock Marden & Co., of Hong Kong, the managers), & renamed Marlena. And sold again, in 1959, for demolition & in Jan. 1960, arrived at Tokyo, Japan, to be broken up. Can you add anything? Another image, maybe?

50 Harpenden
4678 tons
Hull 270

162474

Empire Stour
Bharatjal
Al Riyadh
Spetsai Patriot
1930

A cargo ship. Per 2 (1940 torpedo damage, data & image, Harpenden), 3 (Wikipedia, Empire Stour), 4 & 5 (J. & C. Harrison & its history, 50% down at 2nd link), 6 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Harpenden, but I cannot check the link), 7 ('pdf' file, Harpenden 1940 tow, p#4 thru p#8, 'A Tiresome Tow'), 8 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire Stour, but I cannot check the link), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 122.2 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 416 ft. 11 in., speed of 10 or 10 1/2 knots. Built for National Steamship Co. Ltd., 'J. & C. Harrison' ('Harrison'), of London, the managers. Just 14 WW2 convoy references as Harpenden, including at least 2 N. Atlantic crossings, returning respectively with grain & a general cargo, also U.K. coastal. In the early morning hours of Sep. 11, 1940, Harpenden, Captain Parry in command, was in convoy OA-210, en route, in ballast, from Hull to the St. Lawrence River, Canada. The convoy was attacked by U-28, Korvettenkapitän Günter Kuhnke in command, NW of Ireland. Harpenden was hit by one of U-28's torpedoes & suffered serious stern damage. I read that the stern in fact fell off, 3 minutes after the hit, but amazingly the ship did not sink. At 55.34N/15.56W, about 215 miles WNW of Erris Head, Ireland. One crew member (D. Jones, boatswain) was lost in the attack. The vessel was taken in tow by convoy escort ship & minesweeper Jason (tow detail at 7) & after a difficult & eventful 5 day tow was safely beached at Kilchattan Bay, River Clyde - but, presumably upon inspection, declared to be a constructive total loss. A little later, however, on Nov. 19, 1940, she was taken to Greenock, & there rebuilt for the Ministry of War Transport as Empire Stour, managed by Harrison. I presume that the repairs took a while to complete - her first subsequent convoy reference is on Jan 5, 1942 ex the Clyde. 56 WW2 convoy references, including just a single voyage across the N. Atlantic but extensive service in the Mediterranean, (Augusta, Bari, Brindisi, Malta) many U.K. coastal & much independent service - in Indian Ocean (Cape Town, Karachi, Durban, Colombo, Calcutta). The list is long & my difficulty of 'convoyweb.org' access does not help me any. The vessel was sold, in 1946, to 'Bharat Line Ltd.', of Bombay, India, & renamed Bharatjal. In 1957, the vessel was sold again, to 'Linea Adriatica Gulfo Perso' ('Adriatica'), of Costa Rica, with C. A. Petroutsis, of Geneva, likely the manager, & renamed Al Riyadh, or maybe Al-Riyadh. Registered at Liberia. In 1958, many vessels in the Adriatica fleet, including 'our' vessel, were transferred to 'Cia Nav. dei Isola Spetsai', of San Jose, Costa Rica, (have also read Cia. Maritima di Isola Spetsia Limited, see following text). The vessel was renamed Spetsai Patriot. No change of registration or manager but Petroutsis is now referenced at Trieste, Italy. While I am unable to read the detail, in 1958, the vessel was mortgaged to 'Banque Genevoise de Commerce et de Credit' by 'Compania Maritima di Isola Spetsai', to secure an advance of £292,790. A court case resulted presumably related to non-repayment. And, likely related to the matter, the vessel was, in 1962, placed under arrest at Lagos, Nigeria, & was sold on Court order. On Jun. 29, 1963, the vessel arrived at Split, Yugoslavia, to be broken up. Can you add anything? Another image, maybe? Summary detail of the court case?

51 Eskdene
3829 tons
Hull 271

163535
1934

A cargo ship. Per 1 (a diorama of Eskdene, Bonhams, New York, Apl. 2010 auction), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Eskdene, but I cannot check the link), 3 (WW2 1939 attack & 1941 sinking, image), 4 (U-107), 5 (image), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 113.1 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed ? Built 'on speculation' & the only Bartram ship built between 1931 & 1936. Sold to 'Eskdene Shipping Co. Ltd.', of London, owned by 'Dene Shipping Co. Ltd.' also of London, with 'Dene Shipmanagement Co. Ltd.', the managers. 10 WW2 convoy references, mainly U.K. local, but incl. convoy HN-3 as follows. The vessel independently served Northern Russia  thru late 1939. Late on Dec. 2, 1939, under the command of E. J. Niblett, in fog & while en route from Bergen, Norway, to Hull, with a cargo of timber (loaded in Archangel, Russia), in convoy HN-3, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-56. At 56.30N/01.40W, 70 miles NE of the Tyne. The vessel was, at the time, a convoy straggler having been separated due to a gale. The vessel thought she had hit a mine, indeed many refs. including Winston Churchill refs. are to her in fact hitting a mine. The crew of 29, who abandoned the listing ship, were picked up by Hild, a Norwegian merchant ship - have not read where they were landed. Eskdene did not sink, perhaps kept afloat by her cargo of timber. She was found by an aircraft at 56.20N/00.15W & was later beached at Herd Sands (have also read 'Head Sands' which seems to be incorrect), after being towed by Bullger, a British tug. The tow was, I read, very difficult, at times at 1 1/2 knots, Eskdene rolling in gale conditions & suffering an explosion. Eskdene was refloated, repaired & returned to service in Oct. 1940. In Apl. 1941, the vessel, under the command of William J. Thomas (or William T. Joshua, have read both), was proceeding independently to Buenos Aires, Argentina, with a cargo mainly of coal ex Hull, having dispersed from convoy OG-57. Early on Apl. 8, 1941, she was hit by 2 torpedoes fired by U-107, SW of the Azores. At 34.43N/24.21W. And sunk by 104 rounds of gunfire. U-107 sunk 14 ships on that patrol, I read. All 39 crew took to 2 lifeboats & were picked up by Penhale, a British merchant ship, & landed at Pernambuco, Brazil, on Apl. 22, 1941. There are bushels of WWW references to the ship. Can you add anything? Something I have missed perhaps? Another image, maybe?

52 Llandaff
4825 (or 4826) tons
Hull 275

165463

Max Bornhofen
Anastassios
1937

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Max Bornhofen), 1 [Evan Thomas, Radcliffe, Llandaff (1)], 2 (page bottom with image), 3 (wreck, page in Danish, #34 p.10), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Llandaff, but I cannot check the link), 5 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Llandaff, 1937/38 thru 1945/46), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 127.3 metres long, speed of 10 knots, signal letters GZPJ. The vessel (& also Llanashe Bartram built in 1936), had engines supplied by White's Marine Engineering Co. Ltd. ('White's'), of Hebburn, Newcastle. Garyth Thomas, a site visitor, seeks data about White's - his father was a marine engineer there. If you have data about White's, do drop Garyth a line or contact the webmaster & he will gladly pass it on. Built for Wimborne Steamship Co. Ltd. ('Wimborne'), of London, with Evan Thomas, Radcliffe & Co. (Ltd.?) ('Radcliffe'), of Cardiff, the managers. Wimborne would seem to have been Radcliffe owned - but Radcliffe also managed non-fleet vessels. 63 WW2 convoy references, including at least 5 N. Atlantic crossings, service to Freetown, Sierra Leone, to Murmansk & Archangel, a single voyage to Seine Bay, France, to Port Said/Alexandria in the Mediterranean, & U.K. coastal. The vessel was sold, in 1951, to R. Bornhofen Reederei, of Hamburg, Germany, & renamed Max Bornhofen. The vessel was sold again, in 1959, to 'San Anastassias Cia Ltd.', of Piræus, Greece, but vessel likely registered at Costa Rica. (E. A. Karavias manager?) & renamed Anastassios. On Feb. 20, 1959, while en route from Ålborg, Denmark, to Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, with a cargo of cement, the vessel was wrecked at Esbjerg Roads, W. coast of Denmark. I am unable to properly WWW translate the Danish words at 3, to understand the circumstances. It would seem, however, there was no loss of life. And the vessel must later have been salvaged, since on Jul. 10, 1959 she arrived at Ghent, Belgium, to be broken up by 'Van Heyghen Freres'. The data is a bit confusing. Can you add to or clarify the above text? In particular, can you translate the Danish words? Another image?

53 Nailsea Manor
4926 tons
Hull 277

162126
1937

A cargo ship. Per 1 (extensive data incl. image), 2 (story of sinking), 3 (U-126), 4 (convoy OS.7), 5 [Ixion (2) about 50% down], 6 (Same Ixion rescue, para 11), 7 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Nailsea Manor, but I cannot check the link), 8 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Nailsea Manor, 1937/38 thru 1944/45), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 420.3 ft. long (128.11 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, maybe about 134 metres long overall, speed of 10 knots, signal letters GDGQ. Built for Nailsea Steamship Co. Ltd., of Cardiff, (E. R. Management Co. Ltd., the managers). On Nov. 14, 1938, T. W. Brooks, the vessel's master, was drowned when his jollyboat overturned close to Wallaroo, N. of Adelaide, South Australia. In 1940, Alexander C. Grant was stated to be the vessel's manager. Considerable convoy duty in WW2 - 30 convoy references - many U.K. coastal voyages but also 6 trips across N. Atlantic. On May 7/8, 1941, while part of convoy OB-318 from Glasgow to New York, played a small part in the rescue of 105 survivors of the torpedoed Ixion (which was carrying whisky, no less!), 200 miles SW of Reykjavik, Iceland. In late Sep. 1941, defensively armed, the vessel was part of convoy OS.7, bound from Newport, Wales, to Alexandria/Suez via Belfast Lough, Northern Ireland, & Freetown, Sierra Leone, with 6,000 tons of military stores, including 1,000 (maybe 4,500) tons of ammunition, & a landing craft, LCT-102, stored in 4 sections on the deck. On Oct. 1, 1941, along with Ger-y-Bryn & Hazelside, the vessel encountered bad weather W. of Cape Blanco, W. Africa. All had troubles with their deck cargoes. Cargo secured, they proceeded in the company of Violet, a British 'Flower Class' corvette. On Oct. 10, 1941, when NE of the Cape Verde Islands, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-126. Nailsea Manor, on fire, listed to starboard, & the deck cargo hung over the port side. The ship was abandoned quickly (ammunition) & all 42 aboard, including the Master, John H. (Herbert) Hewitt, were  rescued by Violet, transferred to City of Hong Kong, & landed at Freetown, Sierra Leone. The ship's cat was not rescued - it ran away, in the wrong direction it would appear! The vessel sank at 18.45N/21.18W. Can you add to or clarify the above text? Another image?

54 Ellin
4917 tons
hull 278

254
1938

a cargo ship. per 1 ('uboat.net' re sinking, image), 2 (U-37), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Ellin, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 127.2 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, (432 ft. 4 in.) speed of 10 knots. Built for 'S. B. Embiricos', of Athens (or Andros), Greece, & managed by S. B. Embiricos Ltd., of London & Athens. Just one ref. to convoy duty in WW2 - In Jun. 1940 (Convoy 64X) from Verdon, France, (Le Verdon at Bordeaux, perhaps?) to Casablanca, Morocco. On Feb. 18, 1940, the vessel was en route, unescorted, from Cardiff, Wales, to Piraeus, Greece, with a cargo of coal. When 25 miles W. of Cape Finisterre, NW corner of Spain, the vessel was hit by two torpedoes fired by U-37. The first hit had little effect but the second caused the vessel to break into 2 pieces amidships & immediately sink. Have read all the crew were saved - but I have not read how many crew there were & how they were saved. Vessel sank at approx. 44.02N/10.18W. Can you add to or clarify the above text? Another image?

55 Lodestone
4877 tons
Hull 280

166585
1938

a cargo ship. Per 1 (data re Vlasov with refs. to Lodestone), 2 (image Lodestone), 3 (image, Lodestone, also -01), 4 (Wikipedia, re 'Vlasov', in German), 5 (Wikipedia link translated), 6 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Lodestone, but I cannot check the link), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 126.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 430 ft. 10 in., speed of 10 1/2 knots. Ordered by another party but the contract was sold & the vessel was delivered to 'Alva Steamship Co. Ltd.', of London, which company i) was noted for the carriage of coal & ii) was owned by Alexandre Vlasov Group', of Italy, & managed by Navigation & Coal Trade Co. Ltd., a Vlasov London based company.  74 WW2 convoy references including at least 7 N. Atlantic crossings with cargoes such as grain, steel & lumber, service into the Mediterranean (Bari, Naples, Augusta, Port Said), to Africa (Freetown, Takoradi, Durban, Capetown), to Caribbean (Trinidad, Guantanamo, Bermuda), & many U.K. coastal. On Apl. 15, 1963, the vessel arrived at Osaka, Japan, to be broken up. Can you add to the above? Another image?

56 Pentridge Hill
7579 tons
Hull 285

168058

London Dealer
Centaurus
Najla
1941

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data & modest image, Pentridge Hill, 10% down), 2 (image, Pentridge Hill), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Pentridge Hill, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 128.4 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 434 ft. 2 in., speed of 11 knots. Built for Dorset Steamship Co. Ltd., of London, (Hall Line perhaps?), managed by Counties Ship Management Co. Ltd., a Rethymnis and Kulukundis Ltd. of London company. 39 WW2 convoy references, including at least 3 N. Atlantic crossings, service to Indian Ocean (Bombay, Calcutta, Colombo), Mediterranean (Alexandria, Oran), Africa, (Freetown, Takoradi, Capetown) & U.K. coastal. In Feb. 1949, the vessel was transferred to London & Overseas Freighters Ltd., of London, & in 1950 renamed London Dealer. In 1951, the vessel was sold again, to 'Sociedad Transoceania Canopus S.A.', of Liberia, & renamed Centaurus. Became Greek flag in 1960. In 1961, the vessel was sold to 'Compania Naviera Adriatica Ltda.', of San Jose, Costa Rica, 'Dabinovic' the manager?, & renamed Najla, but registered at Lebanon. The vessel was sold again, in 1964, to 'Jos Boel et Fils' of Tamise, Belgium. Was broken up at Tamise in Mar. 1965. Can you add to the above text? Another image?

57 Empire Ballad
6700 (or 6582) tons
Hull 290

169013
5167815

Bibury
Stad Maassluis
Jaguar
Goldfield
Poseidone
1942

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Alexander S.S., Bibury (2)], 2 (2 images Stad Maassluis), 4 (data & image), 5, 6, 7 (all images Bibury), 8 (image Stad Maassluis), 9 (I think the same ship but named Poseidon), 10 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire Ballad, but I cannot check the link), 11 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 126.95 metres (431.2 ft.) long, speed of 10 1/2 knots, signal letters BCXB. Built for Ministry of War Transport, 'Allan Black & Co. Ltd.', the managers & later 'Capper, Alexander & Co.' 48 WW2 convoy references, including at least 3 N. Atlantic crossings, service in Mediterranean (Port Said, Augusts, Naples, Bari), in Caribbean (Trinidad, Guantanamo etc.), & to South Africa (Capetown, Durban), & U.K. coastal. In 1946, the vessel was sold to Alexander Shipping Co. (or maybe Alexander Steamship Company), which company was then partly owned by Houlder Brothers & Co., & renamed Bibury. The vessel was sold, in 1950 or 1951, to 'Halcyon-Lijn', of Rotterdam, Holland & renamed Stad Maassluis). Signal letters became P.H.R.L. In Mar. 1958, maybe was laid up & out of commission at Rotterdam (tijdelijk opgelegd te Rotterdam)? It was sold, in 1962, to 'Jaguar Line S.A. Cia de Nav.' (or Jaguar Line Co. de Nav.), of Panama (Palomba & Salvatori managers?) & renamed Jaguar. In 1966, the vessel was sold to 'Olamar S.A.', of Panama. & renamed Goldfield (or per a dead Dutch web page Goldefield). The vessel was sold again, in 1968, to 'Solemar Cia de Nav.', of Panama (V. Coccoli manager?) & renamed Poseidone. Is Poseidone, in this listing, the true name or rather an Italian translation of Poseidon? In Sep. 1969, the vessel suffered damage of some sort - repaired at Naples? Arrived at Split, Yugoslavia (Gesellschaft Brodopas?) in Nov. 1969 to be broken up 'after grounding'. Need help with image identification & vessel names. And would welcome any additional data you could provide.

58 Empire Banner
6699 tons
Hull 292

169028
1942

A cargo ship, which had a very short life. Per 1 ('uboat.net', sinking), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire Banner, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Wikipedia), 5 (U-77), 6 (Lloyd's List, 1943/44), 7 (Hartmann), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 131.7 metres long overall, 125.0 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, (416 ft. 8 in.), speed of 10 knots. Built for Ministry of War Transport & managed by W. T. Gould & Co. Ltd., of Cardiff, Wales. Just 7 WW2 convoy references, including U.K. coastal & a Nov. 1942 return voyage from the Clyde to Bône, N. Africa. On Jan. 21, 1943, the vessel, under the command of Jeffrey J. (James) Bedford, with 72 aboard including 10 military passengers & 15 gunners, left the Clyde for Bône, Algeria, in convoy KMS-8 (a convoy of 60 merchant ships & 17 escorts). Most references indicate that Penarth, Wales, was the start point of her voyage. Was it in fact? It would seem that it was not. Carrying 3,800 tons of military supplies, including tanks & trucks. At 2:00 a.m. on Feb. 7, 1943, the convoy was attacked by air & by submarine. Empire Banner was hit by one of 4 torpedoes fired at the convoy by U-77, Kapitänleutnant Otto Hartmann in command. At 36.48N/1.32E, near Ténès, Algeria, W. of Algiers in the Mediterranean. U-77 broke off her attack when HMCS Camrose ('Camrose') (K154) detected her presence & vigorously counter attacked. As did an allied aircraft, it would appear. Empire Webster (built at Sunderland by Short Brothers Ltd.) was hit by another of the 4 torpedoes. Empire Banner did not sink immediately. It tried to head back to Oran but was sunk a few hours later when further attacked by German aircraft. Can anybody tell us the extent of the initial damage? No Empire Banner lives were lost as a result of either attack. But ... it would seem that the vessel may have been hit by 2 torpedoes - a second, also by U-77, a few hours after the first (per a Google 'snippet' reference to 'U-boat Operations of the Second

World War' by Kenneth G. Wynn.) The 72 Empire Banner survivors were picked up by Camrose & landed at Algiers. U-77 was later sunk, on Mar. 28, 1943, when attacked E. of Cartagena, Spain. Would welcome any corrections to the above, or additional data. An image?

59 Empire Kinsman
6744 (or 6751) tons
Hull 293

169035

Umzinto
Vastric
1942

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Bullard King, (Umzinto (3)], 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire Kinsman, but I cannot check the link), 4, 5, 6 (all images Umzinto), 7 (Lloyd's List, 1942/43), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 417 ft. long. Built for Ministry of War Transport & managed by J. D. McLaren & Co. 17 WW2 convoy references, mainly U.K. coastal, but with at least 4 voyages in Mediterranean (Port Said, Egypt), 1 voyage to Russia & 1 trans Atlantic voyage. The vessel left Loch Ewe on Feb. 15, 1943, bound for Kola Inlet, Russia, as a part of convoy JW.53. On Mar. 6, 1943, after it had arrived there, it was bombed by enemy aircraft. It must have suffered major damage because it spent 9 months in Murmansk, Russia, as a result, presumably being repaired. Can anyone provide more detail? In late 1944 & in 1945, was mostly 'independent' in the Indian Ocean with service also to South America & Africa. In early 1946, the vessel towed Sambanca, a Liberty ship, from Diego Suarez, Madagascar, to Durban, S. Africa. Sambanca had lost its propeller & suffered related damage while en route from Rangoon, Burma (now Yangon) to Laurenço Marques, (now Maputo) Mozambique, & had been towed to Diego Suarez by Cape Wrath. In 1948, the vessel was sold, for £103,300, to Bullard, King & Company Limited, of London, (Natal Direct Line) & renamed Umzinto. The vessel was sold again, in 1956, to 'Filia Compania Limitada', of Costa Rica, (V. Tricoglu the manager?) & renamed Vastric. On Aug. 30, 1966, the vessel arrived at Onomichi, Japan, to be broken up. Can you add anything? Or correct the above.

60 Jersey City
6686 tons
Hull 291

165863

Jacqueline
Kopalnia Szombierki
1942

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Reardon Smith, (Jersey City (3)], 2 (Reardon Smith Line history), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Jersey City, but I cannot check the link. Note - vessels marked (II) only), 4 ('pdf' file, Peter Kearon article, pages 8/11), 5 (image, Jersey City), 6 (Lloyd's List, 1941/42 thru 1945/46, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 131.1 metres long, overall, speed of 10 1/2 knots, signal letters BDYM. Built for 'Reardon Smith Line Ltd.', of Bideford, with Sir Wm. Reardon Smith & Co. Ltd., of Cardiff, the managers. 28 WW2 convoy references, including at least 3 N. Atlantic crossings, to the Continent (Antwerp), to Africa (Freetown, Durban, Beira in Mozambique), Caribbean, & U.K. coastal. I presume that there were also 'independent' voyages that I am unable to access. Do read the article at 4 - the company nicknamed 'Starvation Smiths', the vessel described as 'a rat-run, cockroach infested utility tramp ship, war built ...', certainly not a luxury ship! At least Peter survived his 1951 experiences. In 1955, the vessel was sold, for £290,000, to 'Lion Steamship Co. A/B', of Billingsfors, Sweden, E. Kekonius, of Stockholm, the managers (have also seen 'Arnold de Champs' referenced' can anybody explain?), & renamed Jacqueline. And, also in 1955, the vessel was sold or transferred to 'A/B Billingsfors-Langed', also of Billingsfors. In 1959, the vessel was sold, for about £90,000, to Polish Steamship Co. (owned by the Government of Poland) of Szczecin, Poland, & renamed Kopalnia Szombierki. The vessel was hulked in 1964 - became a grain storage hulk 'MP PZZ-1'. Have seen references to 'Rejonowe Zaklady Zborowe PZZ', &, at about 1970, to 'Zaklady Obrutu Zbozami Importawanymi Exsportowymi PZZ' - later names for the hulk, perhaps? On Sep. 11, 1978, the vessel arrived under tow at the Faslane, near Glasgow, facilities of Shipbreaking Industries Ltd. to be broken up. Can you add anything? Or correct the above.

61 Empire Deed
6766 (or 6640) tons
Hull 295

169113

Deed
Doro
Leonidas Cambanis
Ever Fortune
Ever Happiness
1943

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire Deed, but I cannot check the link), 2 (image Deed), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 417 ft. long. Built for Ministry of War Transport & managed by Mungo Campbell & Co. In the early morning hours of May 24, 1943, the vessel was damaged at Sunderland in an aerial attack by German bombers. The 'Joseph L. Thompson' yard was seriously damaged in the attack, for the 2nd time (May 16) & much damage was caused in the city. The vessel was soon repaired - on WW2 convoy duty in Aug. 1943. 46 WW2 convoy references, incl. at least 3 N. Atlantic crossings, extensive service in Mediterranean (Port Said, Egypt, etc), to France in Jun/Jul 1944, & U.K. coastal. In 1946, the vessel was sold to Sussex Steamship Co. Ltd., of London, S. G. Embiricos, also of London, the manager) & renamed Deed. In 1951, the vessel was sold to 'Compagnia Navigazione Doro', of Panama, no change of manager, & renamed Doro. In 1956, the vessel was sold again, to Z. & G. L. Cambanis & others, of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Leonidas Cambanis. In 1964, the vessel was sold twice. First to Reliance Marine Corp., of Liberia, & renamed Ever Fortune. And later that same year to First Steamship Co. Ltd., of Taipeh, Taiwan, & renamed Ever Happiness.  In Nov. 1966, the vessel arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, to be broken up. And was broken up in Jun. 1967. Can anybody tell us about Empire Deed & the air raid at Sunderland in May 1943? Or otherwise add to or correct the above?

62 Empire Prospero
6766 (or 6379) tons
Hull 294

169108

Corinthic
Marine Flame
Shahreza
Faustus
1943

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Cockerline, (Corinthic (4)], 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire Prospero, but I cannot check the link), 4 ('Scheepvaart', image Faustus wreck, page in Dutch), 5 (3 Dutch newspaper articles, 40% down, & maybe 5 of them), 6 (Lloyd's data, Empire Prospero), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 417 (or 416.8) ft. long, cruiser stern. Built for the Ministry of War Transport, initially managed by B. J. Sutherland & Co. which changed to W. H. Cockerline & Co. Ltd., of Hull. As I read the WWW record, the vessel was sold in 1944 to W. H. Cockerline & Co. Ltd., of Hull,  who later, in 1947, renamed the vessel Corinthic. Can anybody confirm that that is correct? 27 WW2 convoy references, including 3 N. Atlantic voyages - Hampton Roads, Virginia, U.S.A. to Egypt. To ports in India in 1943 & 1944. The vessel was sold, in 1951, to Marine Enterprises Ltd., of London, (a subsidiary of Lyras Bros. Ltd., it would appear), & renamed Marine Flame. It was sold again, later in 1951, to Reliance Steamship Co., of Panama, (M. Nemazee the manager?). And in 1952, sold to 'Cia. Nav. Acapulco S.A.', of Panama, (Embiricos Ltd. (or S. G. Embiricos), of London, the managers) & renamed Faustus. Registered at Panama. On Nov. 6, 1952, while en route from Hampton Roads to Rotterdam with a cargo of coal, she ran aground in a gale off the Hook of Holland & sank the next day. Outside the northern entrance of the 'Nieuwe Waterweg' (New Waterway). Have spotted no coordinates. Possibly salvaged in 1962/3 (see book cover low on 4). I regret my inability to understand the newspaper articles in Dutch, so what happened in 1952 surely might usefully be expanded. There surely was a tug involved - which tug, I wonder? There are many images of vessels named Corinthic at 'Photoship'. I do not think that any of the images there are of this ship. Can you add anything? Another image, perhaps?

63 Empire Penang
7500 tons (became 7300 when launched & 7416 later)
Hull 301

181786

Mullion Cove
Margaret Clunies
Waynegate
Katingo
President Magsaysay
Magsaysay
1944

A 'C' type 'Empire' cargo ship which became a submarine maintenance ship. Per 1 (Wikipedia, Empire Penang), 2 (image, Waynegate, also -02), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 136.5 metres long, (431.2 ft.). Laid down as Empire Penang for the Ministry of War Transport, but the plans were changed. It was launched on Jul. 10, 1944 as HMS Mullion Cove, a submarine maintenance (hull repair) ship, for the Royal Navy. Commissioned in Oct. 1944. Served in the Far East. As I read the WWW record, the vessel was sold, in 1947, to 'Margareta Steamship Company, Limited', of  London, 'Clunies Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Greenock, the managers, converted at Greenock into a merchant ship & in 1948 renamed Margaret Clunies (registered at Gourock, Scotland). In 1950, the vessel was sold to 'James Steamship Company, Ltd.', of Greenock, with no change of manager or vessel name. In 1951, the vessel was sold to 'Turnbull Scott Shipping Company Ltd.', of London, & renamed Waynegate. It visited Auckland, New Zealand, as Waynegate, 4 times between May 1951 & Jan. 1952. In 1961, the vessel was sold to Pacifico Compagnia Navigazione SA, of  Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Katingo. (Panama flag). In 1964, the vessel was sold to Philippine President Lines Inc., of Manila, Philippines, & renamed President Magsaysay. (Ramon del Fierro Magsaysay became President of the Philippines in Nov. 1953. In office until Mar. 17, 1957, when he died in a plane crash. A U.S. postage stamp was issued in his honour). In 1968, the vessel was renamed Magsaysay. The vessel's engine room caught fire on Jul. 19, 1968, while en route from Philippines to Inchon (Incheon), South Korea - with a cargo of logs? At 34.48N/125.51E, off SE coast of South Korea. The crew abandoned ship but re-boarded her. The vessel arrived, under tow, at Pusan (Busan), E. coast of South Korea, on Jul. 22, 1968 & was after inspection declared a constructive total loss. On Dec. 30, 1968 the vessel arrived at the 'Kyong Nam Products Co. Ltd.' ship breaking facilities at Pusan to be broken up. The WWW record re this ship is modest. No references to Royal Navy service. Can you add anything? Another image, perhaps?

64 Indian City
7079 tons
Hull 299

165867

Gruz
Diamondo
1944

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Reardon Smith, Indian City (3)], 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Indian City, but I cannot check the link), 3 & 4 (images, Indian City), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 136.2 metres long overall, 129.5 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 knots. Built for Sir William Reardon Smith & Sons Ltd., of Bideford, or maybe 'Reardon Smith Line Ltd.', both most often identified with Cardiff. 23 WW2 convoy references, including 8 voyages to Seine Bay, France, in Jun/Aug 1944, re the Normandy landings, at least 1 N. Atlantic crossing, service in the Mediterranean incl. to Port Said, & to West Africa (Freetown, Takoradi). In 1957, the vessel was sold to Atlantska Plovidba DD, of Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia, & renamed Gruz. The vessel was sold again, in 1969, to  Aurora Borealis Shipping Co. Ltd., of Famagusta, Cyprus, & renamed Diamondo. On Apl. 25, 1972, the vessel arrived at the Gebze (Turkey, 30 miles E. of Istanbul), ship breaking facilities of Mehmet Colakoglu, to be broken up. The WWW record for this vessel is almost non-existent. An image of Gruz, by M. Cassar, of Valetta, Malta, exists. A modest version of the image is here. Can you add anything? Another image, perhaps?

65 Empire Aden
7308 (or 7320) tons
Hull 303

180156

Etivebank
Alcyone Fortune
Northern Venture
1945

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Etivebank), 2 & 3 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Empire Aden, 1945/46), 4 (Bank Line, Etivebank), 5 (Empire Aden), 6 (court case, Texas), 7 (image, Etivebank, also -02), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 431.2 ft. long (129.5 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 447.8 ft. long (136.5 metres) overall, speed of 10 knots, signal letters GDMK. Built for the Ministry of War Transport & managed by H. Hogarth & Sons. In 1948, the vessel was sold to Andrew Weir Shipping & Trading Co. Ltd. (Bank Line) & renamed Etivebank. On Feb. 23, 1951, Etivebank 'was damaged in an incident involving the SS Texas in the Suez Canal. The owners of Texas were unsuccessfully sued for damages, a decision which was upheld on appeal.' The vessel was sold again, in 1955, to Alcyone Shipping Co. Ltd, of London, (A. Vergottis, the manager) & renamed Alcyone Fortune. Registered at Glasgow. Frank Beech advises (thanks!) that the vessel then first went from Rotterdam to China & then was on charter to Broken Hill Proprietary Company, a giant Australian mining company, for almost 2 years & used in the coal & iron ore Australian coastal trade. The vessel was sold in 1958 to Pan-Norse Steamship Co., (possibly no hyphen in name), of Hong Kong, (Wallem & Co., of Hong Kong, the manager), & renamed Northern Venture. Registered at Panama. From 1966, the vessel was managed by Wah Kwong & Co., also of Hong Kong. On Jun. 9, 1967, the vessel, en route from Tsukumi, Japan, to Manila, Philippines, with a cargo of bagged cement (can anybody confirm that routing. I thought I had read en route to Rotterdam with coal) ran aground at Okinawa, Japan. At 26.44.45N/128.21E. At south Adaga Shima in the Okinawa group of islands. All 42 aboard were rescued & landed at Naha. The vessel broke in two - a total loss. Was scrapped locally. Have not read the circumstances. Can you add anything? Another image, perhaps?

66 Empire Mauritius
7310 (or 7320) tons
Hull 302

180149

Markab
Matador
San Jeronimo
Yangtse Breeze
Ho Ping 53
Zhan Dou 53
1945

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data & image, Markab), 2 (data, in French, Empire Mauritius), 3 (mules), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire Mauritius, but I cannot check the link), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 431 ft. long, speed of 11 1/2 knots. Built for the Ministry of War Transport & managed by Maclay & McIntyre Ltd., of Glasgow. Just 3 WW2 convoy references. Incl. to New York City in Feb. 1945 returning in Apl. 1945 from Hampton Roads, Virginia, to Gibraltar, presumably en route to Karachi, Pakistan, carrying mules from the U.S.A. for the ultimate use of American & Chinese forces operating in Burma. In 1946, Counties Ship Management Co. Ltd., of London, became the managers. In 1947, the vessel was sold to Bury Hill Shipping Co. Ltd., of London, 'Phocean Ship Agency' the manager, renamed Markab & registered at Sunderland. In 1956, the vessel was sold to 'Motor Shipping Corporation of the Seven Seas', of Panama, N. M. Eustathiou, the manager, & renamed Matador. In 1958, the vessel was sold twice, first to San Jeronimo Steamship Co., of Panama & renamed San Jeronimo, & then to Cambray Prince Steamship Company, J. Manners and Co. Ltd., the managers, both of Hong Kong, & renamed Yangtse Breeze. In 1959, the vessel was sold to The People's Republic of China, of Peking, China, & was renamed. But the new name was? 1 states it became Hoping Wu Shi San, & later became Zhan Dou 53 in c.1967 & Ho Ping 53 in c.1979. Miramar, however, with data, I believe, from the ship registers, makes no mention at all of Hoping Wu Shi San & indicates it became Ho Ping 53 in 1959 & Zhan Dou 53 in 1967. The vessel is reported to have been scrapped, in China, in 1985. Can you add anything or correct the above? An image?

67 Empire Tobago
7321 (or 7256) tons
Hull 304

180170

Crowborough Hill
Gryfevale
Sterling Valour
Madda Primo
Madda Bozzo
Kriss
1945

A cargo ship. Per 1 (image, Empire Tobago), 2 (image, Crowborough Hill), 3 (image, Kriss), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 136.5 metres long overall, 129.5 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 431 ft., speed of 10 knots. Built for the Ministry of War Transport, initially managed by Sir James German & Son Ltd. of Cardiff, & then by Counties Ship Management Ltd. ('Counties'), of London. In 1947, the vessel was sold to 'Ernels Shipping Co. Ltd.', (Counties the manager? But Rethymnis Kulukundis are in some way involved) & renamed Crowborough Hill. In 1951, the vessel was sold to Andrew Crawford & Co. Ltd., or maybe 'Gryfevale Steamship Co. Ltd.', a Crawford company, of Glasgow, & renamed Gryfevale. It would seem that Buchanan Shipping Co. Ltd. became the owners (or maybe the managers only), in 1954. In 1955, the vessel was sold to Sterling Shipping Co. Ltd., of Nassau, Bahamas, (A. Vergottis, the manager), for £287,500, & renamed Sterling Valour. In 1958, it was sold to L. G. E. Fratelli Bozzo di Giuseppe, of Genoa, Italy, & named Madda Primo & then renamed Madda Bozzo. In 1963, the vessel was sold again, to Seastar Shipping Corporation, (Italmarina the manager?) of the Somali Republic, & renamed Kriss. On Feb. 21, 1968 the vessel, sold to ship breakers for $150,000, arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, to be broken up.  Can you add anything? Another image, perhaps?

68 Pemba
7449 tons
Hull 305

180795

Maqboolbaksh
1945

A cargo ship. Per 1 [British India, Pemba (2)], 2 (British India, Pemba), 3 ('pdf', history of British India, Pemba, p.93), 4 (image, Pemba), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 431.2 ft long, 449 ft. long overall, speed of 10 1/2 or 11 knots, with capacity for 12 passengers. Built for British India Steam Navigation Company Limited, of London & Glasgow too?, at the cost of £246,200. In 1960, the vessel was sold to United Oriental Steamship Company Ltd. ('United'), of Karachi, Pakistan, & renamed Maqboolbaksh. United was later nationalized by the Government of Pakistan, in 1974 perhaps. In 1972, the vessel was sold to 'Ilyas Marine Associates', of Karachi, (ship breakers, maybe?) & in Nov. 1972 the vessel arrived at Karachi, presumably Gadani Beach, to be broken up. Can you add anything? Another image, perhaps? There is, as this listing is corrected in Jan. 2013, an image of Pemba e-Bay available. Forgive me when I invite you to find it for yourself - it has what I consider to be an excessive logo across the image & I prefer not to reward the vendor by a link to his item.

69 Empire Southwold
7375 (or 7370) tons
Hull 306

180865
5244285

Hesperia
Clan Murdoch
Mustafa
Denizhanlar
1946

A 'D' type 'Empire' cargo ship. Per 1 [Houston Line, Hesperia (2)], 2 [Cayzer Irvine, Clan Line, Clan Murdoch (2)], 3 (Brian Keith article & image, Hesperia), 4 (image, Hesperia, also -02, -06, -07), 5 (image, Clan Murdoch, also -04, -05, & -06), 6 (image Denizhanlar), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 136.9 metres long overall, 129.8 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 431 ft., speed of 11 knots. Launched for the Ministry of War Transport as Empire Southwold, managed by J. & A. Billmeir, of London. But delivered as Hesperia. Its ownership, thru 1962, seems to be like a game of musical chairs. Most sites state the vessel was delivered as Hesperia to Houston Line. I believe, however, the vessel was rather delivered to 'British & South American Steam Navigation Co. Ltd.', of London, which company was owned by 'Houston Line (London), Ltd.' ('Houston'), of London, in turn managed & owned by Cayzer, Irvine & Co., Ltd. ('Cayzer'). It would seem that  the ship was registered directly in the name of Houston in 1957. In 1960, the vessel was transferred to 'The Clan Line of Steamers Ltd.', of London, also a related (Cayzer) company, & renamed Clan Murdoch. But soon, in 1962, the vessel was sold to King Line Ltd., also of London, 'Dodd, Thompson & Co. Ltd.' the managers, with no change of vessel name. In 1962, the vessel was sold, to 'Sadikzade Rusen Ogullari Kollektif Sirketi', (or maybe 'Sadikzade Rusen Ogulari Denizcilik Ltd.', of Istanbul, Turkey, & renamed Mustafa. And sold for the last time, in 1974, to 'Denizhanlar Vapuru Donatma Istiraki', also of Istanbul, Z. (Ziya) Sonmez the manager maybe, & renamed Denizhanlar. In Mar. 1979, the vessel arrived at the Aliaga, Turkey, ship breaking facilities of 'Zeki Verel', to be broken up. I have read little about her service life. Can you add anything? Another image, perhaps? #1704

70 Empire Tesville
975 or 989 (later 1098) tons
Hull 311

181126

Fusinus
1946

A tanker. Per 1 (image, Empire Tesville), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 61.3 meters long, 193 ft., speed of 11 knots. Built for the Ministry of War Transport & managed by Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Co. Ltd. ('Anglo'), of London. In 1952, the vessel was sold to Anglo & renamed Fusinus. In 1955, the vessel was sold to Shell Petroleum Co. Ltd., of London, & was lengthened to 69.3 metres with a revised gross tonnage of 1098. Was the first tanker to berth at the new Shell wharf at Pavitt Point, North Borneo, I think in 1957. Later, in 1960, the vessel was sold or maybe transferred to Shell Tankers Limited, also of London. Active in Indonesia it would seem (Benoa, Bali, in 1961). On Aug. 4, 1964, the vessel arrived at the Singapore facilities of 'Hong Huat Hardware Co. Ltd.', to be broken up. Can you add anything? Another image, perhaps?

71 Rovuma
5500 tons
Hull 314

5301148
1946

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per 1 (data Rovuma), 2 (image), 3 (Companhia Nacional de Navegação, but no vessel named Rovuma is listed. There is however a 'Bovuma' listed, of 5500 tons. An error perhaps, since Miramar do not list a vessel of such a name), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 450 ft. 1 in. long (137.18 metres) overall, 425 ft. 10 in. long (129.79 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 13 1/2 knots, crew of 42, signal letters CSAY. Built for 'Companhia Nacional de Navegação', of Lisbon, Portugal, & registered at Lisbon on Dec. 30, 1946. On Dec. 13, 1973, the vessel arrived at the Kaohsiung, Taiwan, facilities of 'Chi Shun Hwa Steel Co. Ltd.' to be broken up. Actual break up commenced on Jun. 8, 1974. WWW available data re this vessel is modest. Can you add anything?

72 Rio Tercero
5036 tons
Hull 316

5296563
1947

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Spanish page, briefest ref. to vessel, 45% down), 2 (Rio Tercero built 1948), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for 'La Flota Mercante Del Estado', i.e. the fleet of the Argentine Government. 2 advises of a vessel of identical name, built 1948 by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd. - a vessel not listed by Miramar. But does not reference a Bartram built vessel. None-the-less, it looks like our vessel. 437 ft. 0 in. long (133.198 metres) overall, 410 ft. 0 in. long (124.97 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 14 knots, signal letters LRTK. In 1961, the vessel was sold to Empresa Lineas Maritimas Argentinas of Buenos Aires, Argentina, with no change of vessel name. In Jan. 1979, the vessel was broken up at Campana, presumably the Campana in the Province of Buenos Aires - at the ship breaking facilities of Anglo-Argentino. Available WWW data about the vessel is almost non-existent. Can you add anything?

73 Alcobaça
5289 tons
Hull 318

5009295
1948

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Alcobaça), 2 (image, Alcobaça), 3 (Geral de Comércio, Alcobaça), 4 (Companhia Nacional de Navegação, Alcobaça), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 450 ft. 1 in. long (137.185 metres) overall, 425 ft. 9 in. long (129.77 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 13 knots, crew of 37, signal letters CSEQ. Built for 'Sociedade Geral de Comércio, Industria e Transportes', ('Geral') of Lisbon, Portugal, & registered at Lisbon on Jun. 12, 1948. In 1972, Geral was amalgamated with 'Companhia Nacional de Navegação', & the vessel was transferred into that ownership name. On Oct. 28, 1979, the vessel arrived at Lisbon to be broken up. It was scrapped in 1980 at the Lisbon ship breaking facilities of Joao Luis Russo & Filhos Ltda. There seems to be limited WWW data available about this vessel. Can you add anything?

74 Arraiolos
5289 tons
Hull 323

5025225
374204 (later)

Fos I
Paula
Esperos III
1948

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Portuguese page, Arraiolos), 2 (image, Arraiolos), 3 (Portuguese page, image, Arraiolos), 4 (Geral de Comércio), 5 (Companhia Nacional de Navegação), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 450 ft. 1 in. long (137.185 metres) overall, 425 ft. 6 in. long (129.69 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 13 knots, crew of 37, signal letters CSIS. Built for 'Sociedade Geral de Comércio, Industria e Transportes', ('Geral') of Lisbon, Portugal, & registered at Lisbon on Nov. 1, 1948. In 1972, Geral was amalgamated with 'Companhia Nacional de Navegação', & the vessel was transferred into that ownership name. In 1976, the vessel was sold to Madina Marine Co. Ltd., of Limassol, Cyprus, S. C. Vazeos ('Vazeos') of Piraeus, Greece likely the managers, & renamed Fos I. In 1977, the vessel was renamed both Paula & Esperos III, but the sequence of names is unclear. On Apl. 30, 1978, the vessel arrived at Gadani Beach, Pakistan, to be broken up at the ship breaking facilities of Gujran Wala Steel Industries. There seems to be limited available WWW data about this vessel. Can you add anything?

75 Alenquer
5289 tons
Hull 324

5009829

Esperos IV
Kronos II
1949

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data, Alenquer, in Portuguese), 2 (Alenquer image), 3 (Geral de Comércio, Alenquer), 4 (Companhia Nacional de Navegação, Alenquer), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 450 ft. 1 in. long (137.185 metres) overall, 425 ft. 0 in. long (129.54 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 13 knots, crew of 37, signal letters CSFW. Built for 'Sociedade Geral de Comércio, Industria e Transportes' ('Geral'), of Lisbon, Portugal, & registered at Lisbon on Feb. 25, 1949. In 1972, the vessel was transferred to 'Companhia Nacional de Navegação' when 'Geral' was amalgamated with it. In 1977, the vessel was sold to 'Dafnoussa Cia Naviera SA', of Panama, with S. C. Vazeos ('Vazeos'), of Piraeus, Greece, likely the managers & renamed Esperos IV (4 says Isperos IV & refers to a 1978 sale). In 1978, the vessel was renamed Kronos II. The ship suffered fire damage on May 11, 1978, & on Jun. 7, 1978, arrived at Gadani Beach, Pakistan, to be broken up. Can you add to or clarify the above text?

76 Ambrizete
5503 tons
Hull 320

5013935
1949

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per 1 (Ambrizete), 2 (image), 3 (Geral de Comércio), 4 (Companhia Nacional de Navegação), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 450 ft. 1 in. long (137.185 metres) overall, 425 ft. 9 in. long (129.77 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, service speed of 13 knots, crew of 37, signal letters CSJE. Named perhaps for the port city of Ambrizete, Angola, noted for the shipment of coffee. Built for 'Sociedade Geral de Comércio, Industria e Transportes', ('Geral') of Lisbon, Portugal, & registered at Lisbon on Apl. 7, 1949. In 1972, Geral was amalgamated with 'Companhia Nacional de Navegação', & the vessel was transferred into that ownership name. On Sep. 5, 1973, the vessel arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, to be broken up at the ship breaking facilities of Tai Kien Industry Co. Ltd. Do you have anything to add?

77 Andulo
5503 tons
Hull 321

501697
5501697
1949

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per 1 (Andulo), 2 (image), 3 (Geral de Comércio), 4 (a large 'pdf' file with ref. to Andulo & Statue of Liberty at page 40), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 450 ft. 1 in. long (137.185 metres) overall, speed of 13 (or 13 1/4) knots, crew of 37, signal letters CSFL. Built for 'Sociedade Geral de Comércio, Industria e Transportes', of Lisbon, Portugal, & registered at Lisbon on May 31, 1949. On Jun. 8, 1965, in good conditions & at night, the vessel was in collision with Statue of Liberty, a 22,610 ton tanker, owned by 'Grand Bassa Tankers Inc.', of the U.S., off Cape St. Vincent. At 36.56N/9.00W. No lives were lost. Andulo was taken in tow (by which vessel?) but sank en route to Casablanca on Jun. 9, 1965. It would seem that both vessels must share in the fault. While both vessels should have used radar, the cause of the collision was primarily due to the poor look-out & lack of use of radar by Statue of Liberty. The courts, as I understand it, apportioned the blame 85% to Statue of Liberty & 15% to Andulo. Kamel Benrabah, of Algeria, who has studied the collision, concludes (thank you Kamel for your input!) that Statue of Liberty may have been, in his opinion, only 80% responsible. Are the words above accurate? If not, do please advise. And we will correct this listing!

78 Dagfred
5254 or 5253 (later 7526) tons
Hull 326

5072149

Birkenau
Chrysoforos
Kostis H.
1949

A cargo ship. Per 1 (image, Dagfred), 2 (data in German, fine image Birkenau), 3 (extensive data, Dagfred. in Norwegian & English), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 459 ft. 0 in. long (139.9 metres) overall, speed of 14 knots, achieved 16.04 knots at her trials, carried a few passengers, signal letters LNYJ later DEOU. Built for  'A/S Ocean', of Oslo, Norway, with 'John P. Pedersen & Søn' ('Pedersen) the managers. In 1955, the vessel was sold to 'Bugsier Reederei und Bergungs A.G.', later 'Bugsier -, Reederei - und Bergungsgesellschaft mbH & Co. KG', of Bremerhaven, Germany, & renamed Birkenau. The vessel was rebuilt in 1956 & became of 7526 tons (I hope that I have correctly understood the data at 2). In 1962, the vessel was sold to 'Oceanica Cia. de Transportes S.A. of Piraeus, Greece, Z. E. Lemos & P. M. Ponticos the managers, & renamed  Chrysoforos. At an unknown (to the webmaster) date in 1962, Chrysoforos, en route from Hamburg to U.S.A. in ballast, was in collision with Kladno near Brunsbüttel (mouth of the Elbe River in northern Germany) & had to put back to repair her stem. Kladno had a damaged port side. In 1973, the vessel was sold again, to Draga Shipping Co. Ltd., of Limassol, Cyprus, E. Ponticos the manager, & renamed Kostis H. In late Sep. 1973, the vessel arrived at Santos, São Paulo, Brazil, with a cargo of bulk phosphates ex the Black Sea. While at her berth there, a fire broke out in her engine room on Sep. 28, 1973.  While I have not been able to read the detail, it would seem that the damage was extensive & the vessel was declared a constructive total loss. The vessel was broken up by 'Siderurgica Rio Grandense', of Porto Alegre, Brazil, (550 or so miles S. of Santos). Can you add to and/or correct the above?

79 Hulda Maersk
5720 tons
Hull 328

5156672

Martine
Silver Sea
1950

a refrigerated cargo ship, with capacity for 12 passengers. Per 1 (image, Hulda Maersk, also -04 & -05), 2 (image Hulda Maersk), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Sister to Lexa Maersk, also a 'Bartram' built vessel. Built, for '10.987.721 Dkr', for 'A/S D/S Svendborg' & 'D/S af 1912 A/S', (I believe in English, Svendborg Steamship Company & the 1912 Steamship Company), both of which companies were related to A. P. Møller, i.e. 'A. P. Møller - Maersk Line', of Copenhagen, Denmark. 459 ft. 8 in. long (140.106 metres) overall, 131.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 15 knots, with 12 tanks, for such cargoes as molasses, vegetable oil & latex, signal letters OWLX. A builders' scale model of the ship was, on Mar. 25, 2009, sold at auction at Bonhams, Knightsbridge, London. It realised £3,600 incl. buyer's premium. On Oct. 31, 1967, the vessel suffered collision damage near Nagoya, Japan, during a voyage from Osaka to Kobe, both Japan. The vessel was sold, on Mar. 2, 1968, to 'Brigantine Transport Corp.', of Monrovia, Liberia, & renamed Martine. In 1970, the vessel was sold again, to 'Greeksea Shipping Co. SA', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Silver Sea. In mid May 1971, the vessel was en route, in ballast, from Rotterdam to Jacobstad (Pietarsaari), Finland. Early on May 16, 1971, the vessel collided in fog with Moonie, in the Elbe estuary, 6 miles from the Elbe 1 lightship, off the west German coast. At 53.59N/07.54E. I have not read the detailed circumstances, but understand that no crew member was hurt, that Silver Sea suffered major damage & was towed to Cuxhaven, Germany. There it was declared to be a constructive total loss & was sold to be scrapped. Moonie was extensively damaged also & was repaired at Le Havre, France. On Mar. 23, 1972, Silver Sea arrived at the Hamburg, Germany, ship breaking facilities of 'Eisen u.Metall AG' to be broken up.  Can anybody tell us which of the two vessels was held to be at fault in May 1971, and/or otherwise add to or correct the above text? #1788

80 Kieldrecht
6354 tons
Hull 331

5186639

Spalmatori Engineer
1950

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data in Dutch, Kieldrecht, & 4 images incl a painting.), 2 [data, images, Kieldrecht (4)], 3 (image 40% down), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 476 ft. 8 in. long (145.288 metres) overall, 445 ft. 10 in. long (135.89 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 14 1/2 knots, signal letters PFJK later SWLQ. Built for 'Phs. van Ommeren N.V.' ('Ommeren'), of Rotterdam, Dutch flag of course. In 1960, N.V. Stoomvaart Mij "De Maas", also of Rotterdam, became the vessel's owner, with Ommeren the managers. A transfer, perhaps? The vessel was sold, on Nov. 28, 1969, to 'Apiganos Corp.', of Piræus, Greece, & later, in 1970, was renamed Spalmatori Engineer. On Apl. 23, 1974, the vessel was stranded on the coast of the island of Zanzibar while en route from Shanghai, China, to Hodeidah, Yemen. The vessel broke in two pieces which were towed to Mombasa, Kenya, where the vessel was declared a total loss. (I think that is essentially what a Dutch text used to say). Later towed (in 2 pieces?), to Gadani Beach, Karachi, Pakistan, where it was broken up in the period from Apl. to Jul. 1977. The links were mainly to pages in Dutch, a language of which I have no knowledge. A Google Books 'snippet' states that in 1974 the vessel was sold to Far Eastern interests for about $1,160,000 - am not sure how that fits into the history, maybe it relates to the sale of the vessel in two pieces to ship breakers? Can anybody correct my words & tell us more?

81 Beskidy
7742 tons
Hull 333

169231
5345601

Surf Pioneer
1951

A tanker. Per 1 (extensive data, Surf Pioneer, images), 2 (Wikipedia, 'Surf Class' tankers, data), 3 (minor incident, Feb. 1954), 4 (image, Surf Pioneer, also -01 & -03), 5 (image, Surf Pioneer, but you must be registered to see it), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The vessel was laid down as Beskidy for Gdynia American Shipping Lines Ltd. (Polish Ocean Lines), of Gdynia, Poland. But on Jul. 4, 1951, the vessel was commandeered by the Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA), i.e. the Admiralty. And on Jul. 15, 1951, was renamed Surf Pioneer. Was delivered on Nov. 28, 1951. Pennant No. A365. 469 ft. 6 in. long (143.1 metres) overall, 445 ft. 10 in. long (135.9 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 12 1/2 knots, signal letters MMWC. The vessel was acquired for service as a 'Surf Class' replenishment oiler during the Korean War, but may not have been used for such service. Since I read that the vessel was initially used mainly for charter work. For her entire lifetime, I read, the vessel carried the Polish Eagle embossed on its funnel. On Feb. 6, 1954, Surf Pioneer, in the Indian Ocean, lowered a ship's boat with an officer & five crew members to check the tanker's draft. The boat's engines failed & a 2nd boat was sent to its aid. Both boats were carried away by strong currents & were rescued the next day by Indian coastal ships after spending a night at sea. On Feb. 13, 1954, the vessel was refitted at Bombay, India. On Jul. 23, 1954, when at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, U.S.A., 7 crew members jumped ship. In late 1956, the vessel was used as a water carrier during the Suez crisis (Operation Musketeer). On Jul. 21, 1959, the vessel suffered an engine breakdown while in the eastern Mediterranean. HMS Brigand, a tug, sailed from Malta to stand by her. Did she tow Surf Pioneer to port, I wonder? On Aug. 13, 1960, the vessel was laid up at Devonport, Plymouth, U.K. Nine years later, on Nov. 18, 1969, the vessel was placed on the Disposal List & on Nov. 29, 1969 was advertised for sale, 'as lying' at Devonport. On Feb. 16, 1970, the vessel left Devonport, in tow, for the 'Aguilar y Peris S.A.' ship breaking facilities at Burriana, Spain (N. of Valencia in eastern Spain), to be broken up. Actual break up commenced in Mar. 1970. The above contains little data as to what the vessel actually did. Can anybody correct the above record and/or tell us more?

82 India
7631 (or 7607) tons
Hull 329

5160221
333301 (later)

Kim Hock
1951

A passenger & cargo liner (refrigerated). Per 1 (India, at her sea trials), 2 & 3 (fine interior images, India), 4 (data & images - thanks!), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for 'Companhia Nacional de Navegação', of Portugal. Registered at Lisbon. 431 ft. 10 in. long (131.623 metres) overall, 404 ft. 0 in. long (123.14 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, twin screw, speed of 14 1/2 knots, 387 passengers & a crew of 120, signal letters CSKK later 9VUH. The largest passenger vessel constructed on the River Wear since 1904, I have read. Launched on Jan. 17, 1950 & completed in Feb. 1951. The vessel's routing was from Lisbon via the Suez Canal & Aden to Mormugoa (Goa), Singapore, Hong Kong, Macao & Dili (Portuguese Timor). The vessel was out of commission (in Portugal?) in 1971. In 1973, the vessel was sold to Guan Guan Shipping (Pte.) Ltd., of Singapore, & renamed Kim Hock. But perhaps renamed in 1971. It then linked Penang (Malaysia) & Singapore with Whampoa (China). In 1978 the vessel suffered major engine damage & rather than effect repairs the owners decided to scrap the vessel, which arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, on Aug. 3, 1977, to be broken up at the ship breaking facilities of Gi Yuen Steel Enterprise Co. - sold for a price of about $73.50 per ltd.  Can anybody add to and/or correct the above text?

83 Tatry
7742 later 7797 tons
Hull 332

169230
321303
5345596

Surf Patrol
Marisurf
1951

A 'Surf-Class' tanker, a 'replenishment oiler'. Per 1 (3 images, Surf Patrol), 2 (data, mainly personnel related, Surf Patrol), 3 & 4 (images, Surf Patrol), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 469 ft. 6 in. long (143.1 metres) overall, 445 ft. 10 in. long (135.9 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, single screw, speed of 12 1/2, or maybe 13.75 knots, signal letters GMTK later 5BQE. Launched as Tatry (some sites say Tatri) for 'Polish Ocean Lines' or 'Gdynia American Shipping Lines Ltd.', of Gdynia, Poland, which would seem to effectively mean the Government of Poland. The vessel was, however, purchased (maybe seized or commandeered?) by the Admiralty for service during the Korean War. And delivered as Surf Patrol. On Jul. 17, 1951, the vessel was commissioned a Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) vessel. A357. I presume that she saw service in the Korean War (Jun. 25, 1950/Jul. 25, 1953). Yes? Despite a great many Google search pages re the vessel, I have found zero data about her service. I presume there must have been a lot of it because Lambert M. Surhone has written a book just about Surf Patrol. Can some site visitor tell us more? It would appear that the vessel went aground in 1959 at Innellan, Firth of Clyde, Scotland. The vessel was decommissioned on May 11, 1961 & laid up at Devonport. On Nov. 1, 1969, the vessel was offered for sale 'as lying' at Devonport Dockyard. And in Dec. 1969, the vessel was sold to General Carriers S.A., of Monrovia, Liberia, D. J. Chandris likely the managers & renamed Marisurf. The vessel was sold again, in 1970, to Allied Industries Ltd., of Famagusta, Cyprus, with no change of vessel name. On or prior to Jul. 21, 1980, the vessel arrived, in tow from Piraeus, Greece, at the ship breaking facilities of 'Brodospas' at Split, Yugoslavia, to be broken up. The vessel had been laid up at Piraeus from Aug. 31, 1974 thru Jul. 5, 1980. Can you add anything?

84 Timor
7656 tons
Hull 330

5361617
367889 (later)

Kim Ann
1951

A refrigerated passenger & cargo liner. Per 1 (Portuguese page, data & 2 images, Timor), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for 'Companhia Nacional de Navegação', ('Companhia') of Portugal. Registered Lisbon. 431 ft. 10 in. long (131.623 metres) overall, 404 ft. 0 in. long (123.14 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, twin screw, speed of 14 1/2 knots, 387 passengers & a crew of 120, signal letters CSKN. Out of commission (Companhia) in 1974. But the vessel was sold, in 1974, to Guan Guan Shipping (Pte.) Ltd.), of Singapore, & renamed Kim Ann. And sold again, in 1983, to Thai Guan Guan Shipping Ltd., of Bangkok, Thailand. The vessel was broken up, at Huangpu (Shanghai), China, in 1984. Can anybody clarify or add to the data?

85 Llantrisant
6140 tons
Hull 335

185357

Lake Burnaby
1952

A cargo ship. Per 1 (ref. '3/11 1958', wreck data, Lake Burnaby), 2 (image, Llantrisant, also -02), 3 (image, Llantrisant), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 145.3 metres long overall, 445 ft. 0 in., speed of 13 knots. Built for 'Anthony Radcliffe Steamship Co. Ltd.' & 'Ethel Radcliffe Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Cardiff. Built at a difficult time, most likely, since freight rates were then very low. The vessel was sold, in mid 1957, to 'Western Canada Steamship Company Limited', of Vancouver, Canada, likely managed by Ropners, & renamed Lake Burnaby. Registered however at West Hartlepool. The vessel visited Auckland, New Zealand, once only, on Nov. 11, 1957. I have read little detail about what happened in early Nov. 1958. It would appear, however, that the vessel was en route from the Philippines to Singapore for onward passage to Hamburg, Germany, with a cargo of copra. On Nov. 3, 1958, the vessel ran aground & was wrecked. At 7.57N/118.40E, on Bancoran (or Bancorran) Reef, the Philippines, in the Sulu Sea, NE of Borneo. I presume that 'Javellana Shipping & Trading' ('Javellana') of the Philippines, acquired the wreck because the stern section was, I read, later re-floated & taken under tow for their account. Did it arrive safely? I do not know. References to Javellana are few, but I have seen a WWW reference to their selling reconditioned marine diesel engines. Maybe they were either a salvage company or ship breakers? Can anybody help with more data?

86 Tjibantjet
8249 tons
Hull 334

5362465

Mercury River
1952

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Koninklijke Java China, Tjibantjet), 2 (account of the 1957 stranding, Tjibantjet, images), 3 (link 2 in Dutch, images), 4 (image, Tjibantjet, but you must be registerd to see it), 5 & 6, (images, Tjibantjet), 7 (page in Dutch, many images, including salvage of Tjibantjet in 1957, from 50% down), 8 (image, Mercury River), 9, 10 & 11 (large 'pdf' files with extensive 1957 content), 12 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for 'Koninklijke Java-China Paketvaart Lijnen NV', ('Royal Interocean Lines') of Amsterdam, Netherlands. 143.8 metres long overall, 134.7 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, accommodation for 6 passengers, speed of 15 or 16 knots. An interesting start to her life - during construction it was discovered that she was too wide to pass through a set of locks between the shipyard & the open sea, consequently the design had to be altered causing delays. The workmen called the ship the 'Jib and Jet'. Word has it that the ship got stuck & the foreman rigger, standing on the deck at the fore-end of the ship, shouted down to the Shipyard Manager - 'What are we going to do Mr. Mellanby?'. Who likely nearly had a heart attack! It would however have been re the lock from the shipyard into Hendon Dock, rather than one to the open sea - there was no such lock. Used on Indonesia – Hong Kong – Japan routes. On Sep. 21, 1957, with typhoon Gloria approaching, the vessel arrived at Hong Kong from Moji (Japan?), half laden, with 6 passengers & a crew of 74. No suitable anchorage was available, so she anchored in Junk Bay - vacant, but with a muddy bottom. The typhoon hit, the anchors failed & wind & sea contributed to the vessel ending up broadside on a rocky shelf. At Lye Mun, near Devil's Point. The ship listed heavily to port (38 or more degrees) & sank, the engine room flooding. The crew settled the ship securely on the rock shelf. During the night & early morning, most of the Chinese crew were taken ashore via rope ladders, while the 6 passengers & a number of officers were also taken ashore, the Captain & the key officers staying on board. Most of the cargo was later saved. After extensive salvage work was completed the ship was, with the assistance of 4 tugs, on Jun. 5, 1958, towed to a beach 2 miles away & on Jun. 20, 1958 was towed to dry dock at the 'Hong Kong and Whampoa Dock Co. Ltd.' Whampoa Dock, Kowloon, Hong Kong, for permanent repairs. Perhaps the world's biggest repair job? She resumed normal service on May 19, (or May 22) 1959. The Captain (his name?) received a 4-week suspension from the Raad van Scheepvaart (Maritime Court of the Netherlands), perhaps for not riding out the typhoon at sea. The vessel was sold, in 1972, to Mercury Shipping Co. Ltd., of Panama, & renamed Mercury River. On Dec. 3, 1973, the vessel arrived at the Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ship breaking facilities of 'Yun Shen Steel & Iron Works', to be broken up. Can anybody clarify or add to the data?

87 Bohème
6564 tons
Hull 337

5047429

Nils Amelon
Compass Spirit
Meandros
Newcastle Trader
Carmen
Captain Theo
1953

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Wallenius, Bohème), 2 (extensive data, Bohème, Swedish page), 3 (image Bohème), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 145.6 (or 144.8) metres long, speed of 12 1/2 or 13 knots, signal letters SHOA. Built for 'Rederi Ab Wallenco', of Stockholm, Sweden. Have also read built for 'Olof Wallenius Rederi AB Soya' (Wallenius Line), also of Stockholm.  The vessel was sold, in Apl. 1965, to Redfern Shipping Co., of Hamilton, Bermuda, & renamed Nils Amelon. It was sold again, in Oct. 1966, to Ocean Wide Shipping Co., of Monrovia, Liberia, & renamed Compass Spirit. The vessel would seem to have been sold at auction, in Apl. 1970, to El Libertad Co., also of Monrovia, & renamed Meandros. On Jul. 5, 1970, the vessel suffered an engine room fire while bunkering at Abidjan, Ivory Coast. Not sure of what next happened. Towed to North Shields to effect repairs perhaps? Would seem to have been back in operation only in Jan. 1972. In May 1973, the vessel was sold to Newcastle Shipping Co., of Monrovia, & renamed Newcastle Trader. Was renamed Carmen in Mar. 1974. In Apl. 1974, the vessel was damaged & was towed to Tampa, Florida, for repair. The vessel was sold, in Sep. 1974, to Sea Spirits Navigation Co., of Monrovia, & renamed Captain Theo. The vessel caught fire, on Jan. 1, 1976 when at Rotterdam, a total loss it would appear. It was sold in 1977 to ship breakers Van Heyghen Frères, of Brugge, Belgium, & arrived at Ghent, Belgium, on Mar. 13, 1977, to be broken up. Can anybody correct or add to the above. WWW translation of 2 is difficult. A few references I could not understand.

88 La Chacra
6072 (later 5888) tons
Hull 339

185982

Arabella
1953

A bulk cargo ship. Per 1 (data, 1st La Chacra, image), 2 (image, La Chacra), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 144 metres long (472 ft. 4 in.), speed of 14 knots. Built for Buries Markes Limited, of London, grain & coal shippers, which company was owned by S. A. Louis Dreyfus, of France. I read that the vessel, in 1955, took 3 cargoes of grain from Churchill, Manitoba (Hudson Bay) in a single summer, the first vessel to accomplish that feat. In 1961, the vessel was sold to General Shipping Inc., of Liberia, & renamed Arabella. It was possibly rebuilt with a reduced tonnage as a result? On Dec. 14, 1971, when owned by Overseas Enterprise Inc., of Liberia, & en route from Lirquen, near Talcahuano, Chile, to Buenos Aires with a cargo of wood pulp, the vessel grounded navigating English Narrows, Puerto Eden, Chile. The vessel had a list & probably for that reason was beached. I presume that she was re-floated because she was later broken up at Campana. Now there is a place of that name 75 km. from Buenos Aires. It looks on my map to be inland but is also noted for its shipyard. Can anybody fill in the details as to exactly what happened at English Narrows? Anything to add?

89 Raphael
7971 tons
Hull 336

185473
5290349

Pola Rika
1953

A cargo liner. Per 1 (text, image & plan), 2 (1967 image), 3 [Lamport & Holt, Raphael (2)], 4 (fine painting by Wallace Trickett of New Zealand), 5 (image, Raphael, but you must be registered to see it), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Completed for Lamport & Holt Line Ltd. of Liverpool. 472.7 ft. (144.1 metres) long, speed of 15 knots, accommodation for 6 passengers. 81 voyages for 'Lamport', mostly on the South American run. In 1976, the vessel was sold to Carnation Shipping Co., of Limassol, Cyprus, & renamed Pola Rika. And was sold again, to Allegro Marine Co., also of Limassol. The vessel's owners at some point (Allegro?) went bankrupt & the ship was left unmanned in Lagos Roads, Nigeria. In May 1979, the vessel was sold to Hemesa Shipbreaking, of Gijón, Spain, (via Paul Christianson, of Naksov, Denmark), & broken up. Can you add anything?

90 British Monarch
5806 (or 5795) tons
Hull 340

185003

Ardtara
Hyperion
Rosetta Maud
1954

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Moller & Co., Rosetta Maud), 2 (image, British Monarch, also -03 & -01), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for 'Monarch Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Glasgow, 'Raeburn & Verel Limited', the managers. 138.3 metres long (452 ft. 3 in.) long, speed of 11 (or 12.35) knots. In 1964, the vessel was sold to 'Mullion & Co. Ltd.' ('Mullion'), of Glasgow, or maybe instead of London & Hong Kong, who likely were the agents rather than the owners, & renamed Ardtara. In 1967, the vessel was sold twice, first to Hyperion Shipping Company Limited ('Hyperion'), of Gibraltar, & renamed Hyperion, & then to Redfern Shipping Co. Ltd., of London, & renamed Rosetta Maud. Hyperion may well have been a broker, since 1 indicates that Redfern Shipping Co., of Bermuda, was a company owned by Moller & Co., which acquired the vessel from Mullion. It would seem, however, that the vessel was owned by 'Redfern Shipping Co. Limited', of Hong Kong, when, on May 28, 1972, the vessel was abandoned 20 miles from Karachi, Pakistan, when fire broke out aboard, while en route from Karachi to Gadani Beach, Pakistan, to be broken up. Can anybody clarify the circumstances. And the dates? Miramar advises May 26, 1972, at Gadani Beach. The WWW record is modest. Can you add anything?

91 Hannington Court
6266 tons
Hull 342

186168
5125922

Gandhi Jayanti
Gandhi
1954

A cargo ship. Per 1 & 2 (images), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 145.1 metres long, speed of 12 1/2 knots, signal letters MTQX. Built for Court Line Ltd. The vessel was sold, in 1963, to Jayanti Shipping Ltd., of Bombay, India, & renamed Gandhi Jayanti - you might be interested to know that 'Gandhi Jayanti' is the name of a national holiday in India, held on Oct. 2nd each year to celebrate the birthday of Mahatma Gandhi (Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi). The vessel was sold, in 1974, to The Shipping Corp. of India Ltd., of Bombay, India, which company, in 1975, renamed the vessel Gandhi. In Apl. 1976, the vessel was broken up at Bombay. Can you add anything?

92 North Cornwall
5570 tons
Hull 344

169264
5261063

Oduduwa
Nanina
Anastasia V
1954

A cargo ship. Per 1 (image, North Cornwall), 2 (image, Oduduwa), 3 (image, Ododuwa, also -01 & -03), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 138.5 metres long overall, 129.8 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 454 ft. 4 in., speed of 12  or 12 1/4 knots. The vessel was built for North Shipping Co. Ltd., H. Roberts & Son the managers, both of Newcastle. The vessel was sold in 1959, for £400,000, to 'The Nigerian National Line Ltd.' ('Nigerian'), later 'Nigerian National Shipping Line Ltd.', of Lagos, Nigeria, & renamed Oduduwa. Oduduwa? Too difficult to explain, see here. Nigerian was 51% owned by the Government of Nigeria & 49% by Elder Dempster Lines Ltd. & Palm Line Ltd. Likely used on the company's New York service. The vessel was sold again, in 1974, for about $700,000, to 'Castrenza Cia Naviera SA', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Nanina. It was so sold in a fire damaged condition, but I have not read any details of the fire. Can you tell us? In 1977, the vessel was sold for the last time, to 'Stravon Cia. Naviera SA', of Panama City, Panama, & renamed Anastasia V. On Apl. 28, 1979, the vessel arrived at the Seville, Spain, ship breaking facilities of 'Desguaces del Guadalquivir S.A.' to be broken up. Actual break up would seem to have commenced on Oct. 1, 1979 & was completed in Dec. 1979. Much of the above is derived from WWW data 'snippets'. Can you add anything?

93 Thorpe Grange
8695 (or 8694) tons
Hull 343

186044
5360170

St. Merriel
Thorpe Grange
St. Merriel
Joo Hong
Pan Teck
Liva
Selamat Sindia
1954

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data & image 50% down, Thorpe Grange), 2 (Houlder Line, but vessel not listed there), 3 (Saint Line, but this St. Merriel not listed there), 4 (image Thorpe Grange, also -03), 5 (image St. Merriel), 6 (images, Thorpe Grange, but you must be registered to see them), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 144.8 metres long, speed of 13 knots, signal letters GRTP. Completed for Houlder Line Ltd. (or Holder Bros & Co. or Houlder Bros & Co. Ltd. ('Houlder'), of London. Engaged on the U.K. to River Plate run. Ownership of the vessel passed back & forth to 'South American Saint Line Ltd.' ('Saint'), a subsidiary of Houlder. In 1966 the vessel was transferred  to 'Saint', & renamed St. Merriel. It was laid up in 1971. Also, in that year, the vessel was transferred back to Houlder & renamed Thorpe Grange. In 1972, the vessel was transferred again to Saint & renamed St. Merriel. It was sold, in 1973, to 'Joo Hong Marine', of Singapore & renamed Joo Hong. And sold again, in 1975, to 'Li-Ta Shipping', also of Singapore, & renamed Pan Teck. In 1977 the vessel was sold or transferred to Malaysian owners & flag & renamed Liva. Have also read Li-Va? On Mar. 23, 1977, the vessel arrived at Colombo, Sri Lanka, & was placed under arrest under circumstances not known to webmaster. Was renamed Selamat Sindia, but that name apparently not officially registered. The vessel, still under arrest, broke her moorings in 1978, & was sold for breaking up in Taiwan. On Apl. 4, 1979, having been towed by tug Orinoco from Colombo, the vessel arrived at Kaohsiung, Taiwan, to be broken up. Can anybody clarify the arrest circumstances & expand the above data?

94 La Orilla
6256 tons
Hull 350

186325
5307817

Salina
Huangshi
Hong QI 128
1955

A cargo ship. Per 1 (bottom ship), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 145.1 metres (476 ft.) long, speed of 13 1/2 knots, signal letters GTSS. The vessel was ordered by 'Okeanoporos Shipping Corporation', of Greece, but the contract was purchased by Louis Dreyfus & Co. Ltd., of London, which company owned Buries Markes Limited, of London, ('Buries'). It was later launched for Buries, noted grain & coal shippers. The vessel was sold, in 1961, to 'A/S Norske Saltkompagni', of Bergen, Norway, 'Salina A/S Kommandittselskap', also of Norway, the managers, & renamed Salina. The vessel was sold, in 1966, to 'The People's Republic of China' (China Republic) & renamed Huangshi. In 1974, the vessel was transferred to 'China Ocean Shipping Co.', of Shanghai, China, which company was restyled in 1983 as 'Chinese Ocean Shipping Co.', of China. Can anyone confirm that was in fact so? In 1982 the vessel was renamed Hong QI 128. No later data except that vessel would seem no longer listed in 1992. Can you add anything?

95 Despina C
6116 tons
Hull 351

186916
5297244

Riverton
Vroulidia
1956

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Chapman and Willan, Ltd., flags & data), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 145.1 metres long, speed of 14 1/2 knots, signal letters ELXR. Built for West African Steamship Co. Ltd., of Monrovia, Liberia. The vessel was sold, in 1960, to Chapman & Willan, Ltd. ('Chapman'), of Newcastle, & renamed Riverton, the fourth vessel of the name owned by Chapman & its predecessor companies. Miramar however reference 'Somerston SG Co Ltd.' The vessel was sold, in 1968, to Demetra Maritime Corp. of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Vroulidia. On May 18, 1974, the vessel arrived at Tsingtao, Shandong, China, to be broken up. WWW data about the vessel is essentially non-existent. Can you add something? Anything?

96 Jevington Court
6248 tons
Hull 359

187488
5196713

Krishna Jayanti
Shankara
1956

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data, Jevington Court), 2 & 3 (images, Jevington Court), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 145.1 metres long, 476 ft., speed of 12 1/2 knots, signal letters GVWW. Built for Court Line Ltd., 'Haldin & Co. Ltd.', the managers, both of London. On Nov. 29, 1959, the vessel, outbound from Rosario to Buenos Aires, both Argentina, with a part cargo of cereals, grounded in the Martin Garcia Channel, Rio de la Plata estuary, as a result of negligence by the compulsory pilot & defects in the marking of a channel. A court case resulted, 'Court Line' asserting that the resulting costs were for the account of the charterer. Have not read the outcome - can you advise? The dispute may have resulted in the ship being aground for a long time - it was only re-floated  on Jan. 10, 1960. The vessel served Western Australia - twice to Bunbury, S. of Perth, once in May 1958 & again in Aug. 1962. The vessel was sold, in late 1962, to Jayanti Shipping Co. Ltd. ('Jayanti'), of Bombay, India, & renamed Krishna Jayanti. In 1973, Jayanti merged with 'The Shipping Company of India', which company became the ship's managers in 1967. In 1974, the vessel was renamed Shankara (no ownership change), On Nov. 17, 1975, the vessel arrived at Bombay, India, to be broken up. WWW data about the vessel is limited. Can you add anything?

97 Maria C
6074 tons
Hull 358

5222914

Maria K.
Astyanax
1956

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 142.4 metres long, speed of 13 1/2 knots, signal letters 5LDN. Built for Compania Maritima Samsoc Limitada, of Monrovia, Liberia & registered at Liberia. The vessel was renamed Maria K. in 1959, vessel then of Syros, also known as Syra, Greece. The vessel was sold, in 1967, to Syros Aslan Shipping Corp., of Syros & renamed Astyanax. On Dec. 24, 1976, the vessel suffered a fire at Abidjan, Ivory Coast. And on Nov. 18, 1977, the vessel was scuttled 8 miles S. of Abidjan. WWW data about the vessel is essentially non-existent. No data even about the fire. Can you add something? Anything?

98 Runswick
6229 tons
Hull 357

182389
5302269

Margaret H.
 
Osia Irini Chrysovalandou III (all one name!)
1956

A cargo ship. Per 1 (image Runswick, also -02, -04 & -05), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 476 ft 0 in. long (145.085 metres) overall, speed of 14 knots, signal letters GVFN. Built for Rowland & Marwood's Steamship Co. Ltd., of Whitby with Headlam & Son the managers. On Jun. 1, 1968, the vessel collided with Havskar, a Norwegian vessel, off the estuary of the River Schelde, Germany. Runswick was extensively damaged & Havskar grounded as a result of the collision. One of the vessels may have been carrying a nuclear cargo. The vessel was sold in 1972, to 'Chios Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Famagusta, Cyprus, & renamed Margaret H. On Apl. 27, 1976, the vessel arrived at New Orleans & was laid up there until Jul. 2, 1978. In 1977, the vessel was sold to 'Granvias Oceanicos Navegacion S.A.', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Osia Irini Chrysovalandou III. On Jul. 2, 1978, the vessel left New Orleans, U.S.A. in tow, for Tuxpan, Mexico, having been sold to Mexican ship breakers.  Later in Jul. 1978, the vessel arrived at Tuxpan, to be broken up. Miramar indicate (thanks!) that the vessel was 'not painted up' as Osia Irini Chrysovalandou III & arrived as Tuxpan as Margaret H. Can you correct the above and/or add anything?

99 Theomanna Odigitria
8424 tons
Hull 355

5117793

Formentor
Dorine Papalios
1956

A cargo ship. Per 1 (image Theomanna Odigitria), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 145.1 metres long, 476 ft., speed of 14 knots. Per Miramar, built for Theomanna Maritime Co. Ltd. of Piraeus, Greece, however the registered owner in 1957/58 was certainly A. K. Pezas, of Piraeus, Greece. No manager name was stated in 1957/58. The few references I have seen had her carrying grain. In 1958, the vessel was sold, for £640,000, to Argo Shipping Co. Ltd., of Nassau, the Bahamas, (Cove Shipping Co. Ltd., or British Colonial?, the managers, & renamed Formentor. In 1961, its main engine may have been damaged in Formosa Strait? The vessel visited Auckland, New Zealand, once, on Jun. 1, 1964, as Formentor. In 1965, the vessel, it appears, was sold for about £420,000 to 'Alkon Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Famagusta, Cyprus, & later (1967) renamed Dorine Papalios. In Feb. 1974, the vessel arrived at Shanghai, China, to be broken up. The data above is in part from WWW 'snippets' of data, so may well need correction. And new data?

100 Celtic Monarch
5800 tons
Hull 361

300173
5067039

Ardmarie
Ribot
Montana
Sovereign Grace
Grace
1957

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Ribot), 1 (extensive data & a postage stamp featuring Ribot, in the middle), 2 (image, Ribot), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 138.3 metres long overall, 129.8 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 12 1/2 knots. Built for Monarch Steamship Co. Ltd. ('Monarch'), of Glasgow, 'Raeburn and Verel Ltd.' the managers (& possibly the owners also). In 1960, Harrisons (Clyde) Ltd., of Glasgow, became the managers, I believe when Monarch was acquired (by Woodside Shipping Co. Ltd. perhaps). It would seem that the ship visited Nauru, Micronesia, many times to load phosphates. The ship visited Auckland, New Zealand, on Nov. 25, 1961. In 1964, the vessel was sold to 'Mullion & Co. Ltd.', of Hong Kong, & renamed Ardmarie. Still registered at Glasgow. In 1967, it was sold again, to Ribot Shipping Co. Ltd., of Gibraltar, & renamed Ribot. In 1971, the vessel was sold to Amazon Shipping Corp., of Monrovia, Liberia, & renamed Montana. More sales yet! In 1973, the vessel was sold to 'Tridentco Shipping Ltd.', of Famagusta, Cyprus, 'Five Continents Navigation Ltd.', of London, the managers, & renamed Sovereign Grace. In 1977, the vessel was renamed Grace. And later that same year, the vessel was sold to 'Tetarti Cia Naviera SA', of Piraeus, Greece, with no further change of name. On Jan. 13, 1978, while en route from Nordenheim to Rostock, both Germany, the vessel was in collision with Arya Taj, in Brunsbuttel Roads, Kiel Canal. Grace was so seriously damaged forward that she was declared a constructive total loss. She was sold to 'Eisen und Metall AG', of Hamburg, Germany, to be broken up, & arrived at Hamburg on Jul. 18, 1978. But she was not broken up there. Rather she was sold to Spanish ship breakers & left on Feb. 23, 1979 for Leixões, under tow by tug Caribic. I wonder why the references say Spanish ship breakers since Leixões is near Porto, Portugal. On Mar. 1, 1979, the vessel sank, at 46.21N/7.51W, in the Bay of Biscay. I have not been able to read the circumstances. Can you tell us about them or otherwise add anything? Another image?

The above is the 1st 'Bartram' page of 100 vessels - the second page is here.

There were many later ships built at the Bartram South Dock facility. Those later vessels are recorded under the name of Austin & Pickersgill Limited, who acquired Bartram's in 1968 but in a practical sense only took over in 1971 after a 3 year period of co-operation. The 'Bartram' financial results of such 3 year period were a factor in determining the acquisition price that Austin & Pickersgill Limited paid.

TO END THE PAGE

For your pleasure and amusement.

A 1910 postcard from Wales.

May I suggest that you navigate the site via the index on page 001.PRIOR PAGE / NEXT PAGE

To Thomas M. M. Hemy Data Page 41. All of the other Thomas Hemy pages, including image pages, are accessible though the index on Thomas Hemy page 05. [ ] £ é

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