THE SUNDERLAND SITE - PAGE 079
SHIPBUILDERS - PAGE 23

May I suggest that you navigate the site via the index on page 001.PRIOR PAGE / NEXT PAGE

Do you want to make a comment? A site guestbook is here.

Copyright? (100) Test.

Corrections in any of the material which follows, however tiny, would be most welcome. And additions, of course!

To search for specific text on this page, just press 'CTRL + F' & then enter your search term.

SHORT BROTHERS
SHORT BROTHERS LIMITED
SHORTS' SHIPBUILDERS

First a few images. Hover your mouse over each thumbnail to read the subject matter.

Names of just a few of the vessels constructed by Short Brothers of Sunderland - in a table in build date sequence. Clearly in business a very long time indeed.

The increasing number of listings re 'Short' built vessels has already required a 2nd page - available here.

Miramar lists, 17 pages, (highest hull number on page). It used to be that you could click on the links that follow & get to the relevant Miramar page. But no longer! The new procedure must be to go to Miramar (here) & log in (you must be registered to view any page). And once you are logged in, return to this page & all the following links should work for you:- 70, 101, 131, 162, 193, 225, 257, 286, 316, 346, 377, 410, 426, 456, 500, 517, 548. (548)

There are also references here (at bottom of page) to 'the repair ships 'Dullisk Cove' and 'Solway Firth'. And to Sambre, 5260 tons (1919) here. And Master Elias Kulukundis (1938) became Umberto D'Amico or perhaps Umberto D'Amato was an eBay sale item. Indian Prince (1886) A. Far too many to list tidily as per those listed below. - But in time, who knows?

1 Thomas Parker
1152 tons
Hull 43

62633
1871

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for James Westoll Line ('Westoll'), of Sunderland, at a cost of £16,200. See John Adamson next below for more data about Westoll. Sold to Russian owners on Jul. 5, 1889. Can you add something - anything?

2 John Adamson
1685 (or 1686 or 1722) tons
Hull 54

68871

San Martin
1872

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Lloyd's registers 1874/5 & 1887/8), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built, at a cost of £27,500, for James Westoll Line, of Sunderland, then owned in 64ths as to 70% by three families (the Westoll's, the Adamson's & the Short's, with James Westoll being the managing owner) which company carried coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & was involved also in the Black Sea grain trade. It would seem that it later became 'James Westoll (London) Ltd.' 81.2 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 266.3 (or 266.5) ft. Presumably named after John Adamson (1852/1933). On Oct. 3, 1900, the vessel was sold to Compañía Naviera La Blanca, of Bilbao, Spain. On Nov. 26, 1902, the vessel was abandoned & sank 60 miles N. of Bilbao. 3 lives were lost. Have not read the circumstances. Not an easy vessel to search for! Can you add anything?

3 Kron Prinz
1076 (or 1067) tons
Hull 56

87069

Turgot
Idraet
1873

A cargo ship. Per 1 & 2 (both are refs. to the 1874 grounding), 3 (modest image of 1874 grounding), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 67.6 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular (219.9 ft.). Built for  J. H. Lorentzen & Co., of Hamburg, Germany. On Apl. 1, 1874, while under tow, & with a cargo of 7,000 quarters of barley from the Danube, she grounded on the right bank of the Avon, at Horseshoe Bend, E. of Shirehampton, River Avon, Bristol. Hansard advises that at the time there was an insufficient depth of water in the river, but it would appear to have happened at high tide. A dangerous turn in the river, & most narrow indeed. Attempts were made to pull her off but on the ebb tide she capsized & suffered the indignity of having her masts cut away so as not to impede other traffic on the river. The cargo was all lost. On Apl. 20, 1874, the vessel was re-floated, & towed to Bristol for repairs, the damage being valued at £34,000. In 1881, she was sold to 'Rouennaise Tpts', presumably of Rouen, Normandy, France, & renamed Turgot. In 1897, she was sold to G. T. Monsen, of Stavanger perhaps, Norway, & renamed Idraet. On Mar. 10, 1899, en route from Newcastle to Bergen, Norway, with a cargo of coal, she sank in the North Sea with the loss of 12 of her crew. I have not read the circumstances of the sinking or exactly where it happened. I thank 'scott-base' whose eBay listing alerted me to this interesting story. There was another vessel of a most similar name Kronprinz, also a 'Short' vessel, whose Nov. 27, 1882 launch by F. Meier of Sunderland, as Kron Prinz, is referred to here. Hopefully that later vessel will, in due course, be listed in these pages. Can you add anything?

4 Renpor
1325 (or 1323) tons
Hull 63

67552
1874

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Renpor (2)], 2 (brief ref.), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 240 ft. long. Initially Lloyd's listed as Ronpor, registered in the name of R. Ropner soon R. Ropner & Co. of West Hartlepool. On Apl. 13, 1882, while en route from Hartlepool to Boston, U.S.A., with a cargo of iron & potatoes, the vessel was sunk in the N. Atlantic by pack ice. At approx. 45°N/48°W. Anything to add?

5 Hesperides
1401 tons
Hull 664

70706

Samuel Hansen
1875

An iron 3-masted fully rigged ship. Per 1, 2 & 3 (extensive articles / passenger lists re the May 1875 voyage to Adelaide), 4 (John Scott (1802/1885) painting of Hesperides, ex 5), 6 (image, Hesperides, iceberg), 7, 8, 9, 10 & 11 (images, Hesperides), 12 (wreck of Italia), 13 ('Wikipedia', Samuel Hansen), 14 ['doc' file in Norwegian, 1), data, Samuel Hansen], 15 (Samuel Hansen wreck ref. '1/1 1909', 85% down), 16 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 236.7 ft. long, 72.1 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters PJRW. The webmaster has a few editions of Lloyd's Register available to him ex 'Google' books - see left. The vessel, built for 'J. Patton Jr., & Co.', of London, was a frequent visitor to Australia & also New Zealand ('NZ') from its maiden voyage to thru 1903, a period of 28 years. Details follow re some but by no means all of the ship's many such voyages referenced at 'Trove', Australia. The vessel's maiden voyage was from London to Adelaide, South Australia, Morris Upton in command with a crew of 47, with 396 emigrants. The ship left London with cargo, was fitted out for passengers at Plymouth, left Plymouth on May 14, 1875 & arrived at Adelaide on Aug. 3, 1875 - without its doctor, Surgeon-Superintendent, Matthew Blood, who had died en route. Of interest to the webmaster at least, the Matron of the single women on that voyage was a Mrs. Rodgers, who was on her 18th such voyage as Matron. An amazing record considering how long it took for each return voyage. The vessel left Adelaide on Nov. 8, 1875 for London (arrived Feb. 21, 1876), with a cargo of wool, 5,363 bags of wheat, & flour. A similar voyage soon followed, from London & Plymouth (left Apl. 13, 1876) with 396 'statute adult' & a total of 464 immigrants. The vessel arrived at Port Adelaide on Jun. 28, 1875 - there were 13 deaths on the voyage all due to measles. The ship stayed quite a while. She left for London (arrived Gravesend Mar. 6, 1877) on Nov. 10, 1876 with a cargo that included copper (2,214 cakes), copper ore (2,423 bags), wool (3,518 bales) & wheat. On Dec. 28, 1878, the vessel arrived at Melbourne, reporting having seen a large iceberg en route. She left Melbourne for London on Feb. 25, 1880 & arrived on Jun. 30, 1880. In mid Oct. 1886, the ship suffered damage in a severe gale in the English Channel, while en route to Melbourne, & put into Portsmouth for repairs. In the 1887/88 edition of Lloyd's Register, J. Stewart & Co., also of London, were the new registered owners. The vessel left Antwerp on Jan. 24, 1888 & arrived at Sydney on May 5, 1888 - it left on Jun. 15, 1888, for Wilmington (Delaware?). On Jun. 12, 1892, the vessel arrived at Adelaide from Cardiff, Wales, & went on to NZ. In Sep. 1892, Italia, an Italian barque, carrying coal from Greenock to Cape Town, South Africa, caught fire at sea. Italia, Captain Rolando Peresso in command with a crew of 15, made it to Tristan da Cunha (arrived Oct. 3, 1892), where Italia became a wreck. On Jan. 4, 1893, they signalled & rowed out to Hesperides to request passage to Cape Town. R. S. Wawn, Captain of Hesperides, was not prepared to go so far off course, but offered to land them all at Melbourne - an offer they declined. On Feb. 17, 1895, the vessel left Melbourne for London with red gum timber, & also 5,663 bags of wheat. On Jan. 16, 1897, the vessel arrived at Melbourne from Fredrickstad, Norway, with a cargo of flooring boards & 'railway chairs'. On Mar. 25, 1899, the vessel left London for Melbourne (arrived Jul. 25, 1899) - en route, it encountered hurricane conditions in both Apl. & Jun. 1899, suffered significant damage, with 6 or 7 crew members hurt also. There are many more voyages referenced at 'Trove', including later voyages to Western Australia & NZ. In 1904, the vessel was sold to 'A/S Samuel Hansen', owned by Henr. Hansen, of Lillesand, Norway, & was renamed Samuel Hansen. I cannot spot, at 'Trove', that Samuel Hansen ever went to Australia or NZ. On May 14, 1905, the vessel arrived at Mobile Bay, Alabama, ex Lourenço Marques, now Maputo, Mozambique. While I have not been able to read the circumstances, in Dec. 1908, the ship was being towed from Lillesand to Fredrickstad, both Norway.  The ship ran aground, on Jan. 1, 1909, on Torbjørnskjær (a small island in the outer Oslofjord, Hvaler, Norway) & was wrecked. It would seem, if I understand a brief reference correctly, that Samuel Hansen was featured on a postage stamp. The above text may well need correction. Can you add to and/or correct the above? #1885

6 Ayton
1504 tons
Hull 76

68944
1876

A steamship, a collier. Per 1 ('pdf' file, Court Report re 1877 grounding), 2 (Summary of 1877 Court Hearing), 3 (1882 reference to the missing ship), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 76.1 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 249.8 ft., speed of 8 or 9 knots. The webmaster has a few editions of Lloyd's Register available to him ex 'Google' books - see left. The vessel was built for John S. (Storey) Barwick ('Barwick'), of Sunderland, likely 'Barwick & Co.', since there were 4 shareholders in addition to Barwick, the managing owner.  Registered at London. On Sep. 14, 1877, the vessel left the Tyne with a cargo of coal for Port Said, Egypt, under the command of Captain Mark Storey, with '20 hands all told'. On Oct. 3, 1877 the vessel arrived at Port Said & discharged her cargo. Now it had been the intention that the vessel continue eastwards to India, to trade between Calcutta & Madras (now Kolkata & Mumbai). But the ship was rather instructed by her owners to proceed in ballast to Patras, Greece (on Gulf of Corinth). At 1:40 a.m. on Oct. 12, 1877, en route to Patras, the ship ran aground (on mud) on the W. coast of Morea (Peloponnese peninsula), between Kaufkalida Island (37.56.00N/21.07.00E) & Cape Glarenza. (Ionian Sea, W. coast of the Peloponnese, opposite the Island of Zakynthos also known as Zante). The vessel tried to free itself & HMS Wizard tried to pull her off without success. 80 tons of the ship's coal was jettisoned or transferred to lighters. The ship did get free at 3 p.m. on Oct. 13, 1877, took on cargo at Patras & other Greek ports & returned to London where in dry dock it was established that the vessel had suffered no damage. The Court concluded, in a devastating report & analysis, that Captain Storey was responsible for the grounding, having neglected his duties & responsibilities - having no charts, proceeding too fast, being too close to the coast & failing to use the lead. The Court recommended that the Board of Trade suspend his certificate for 6 months but during those months he be granted a mate's certificate. On Oct. 16, 1881, the vessel, carrying a cargo of patent fuel (a briquette type coal product), was abandoned by her crew & lost either i) 100 miles from Sunderland (per Miramar) or ii) 100 miles from Spain (per 3, which indicates also that the vessel was en route from Sunderland to Cronstadt at the time). Cronstadt is 20 miles from Leningrad, at the eastern end of the Gulf of Finland. So if that reference is correct, the vessel surely did not founder near Spain. I have not read the circumstances. I wonder who was her Captain in Oct. 1881. Any lives lost? Is there anything you can add?

7 Shakespeare
1814 tons
Hull 72

73684
1876

A 4 masted fully-rigged ship. Per 1 (data), 2 (Cape Town wreck inquiry), 3 (1880/81 Lloyd's Register listing), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 84.73 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 278 ft. Built for William Adamson, of Sunderland, but registered at London, E. Bates & Sons, of Liverpool, the managers. In 1880 the vessel was sold to 'Edward Bates & Sons', of Liverpool, which company particularly served India. A short time later, in 1881, the vessel was sold to W. H. Ross & Co., also of Liverpool. Later, in 1882/83, the vessel was wrecked off the NW end of Inaccessible Island (an island without permanent settlement), Tristan da Cunha ('Tristan'), in the S. Atlantic Ocean. At roughly 37.18.9S/12.40.28W. But when did it happen? I wrote 1882/83 above most purposefully. If you read 99% of the WWW references to the wreck, you are advised that the vessel was wrecked at Pig Beach, Inaccessible Island, in 1883, with at least one reference to it being in Jan. 1883. But 1883 would seem to be in error. I believe it in fact happened on Nov. 20, 1882. An Inquiry into the disaster was held at Cape Town, South Africa, on Dec. 20, 1882, & the Master was determined to be at fault for 'incautiously running on in dense fog'. His certificate was suspended for 3 months. The crew were saved through the efforts of the Tristan islanders, who were later rewarded for their efforts & hospitality by the donation to Tristan, by the British Board of Trade (or perhaps by the British Admiralty), of a life-boat & rescue equipment. Delivered by HMS Opal on Dec. 27, 1884. It would be good to read the full text of that Inquiry Report. And learn the name of the Master & her route & cargo. Anything to add? Or correct? An image?

8   Wearmouth
1689 tons
Hull 104

82772
1880

An iron steamer, a collier it would seem. That had a very short life, indeed. Per 1 ex 2 (NY Times archives re 1882 loss), 3 (a detailed account of the loss ex NY Times archives), 4 (wreck reference), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 260.5 ft. long, signal letters TJKL. Built for J. S. Barwick, of London (1 says of Sunderland). During the summer of 1882, the vessel carried coal from Sydney to Montreal, both Canada. On Nov. 19, 1882, under the command of Captain Evan Evans, the vessel, while en route from Montreal to London via Quebec with a cargo of phosphates & timber ('deals'), went ashore at North Sand Beach, Magdalen Islands, 1 mile E. of Wolfe Island Telegraph Station, in an easterly gale & snow storm. The vessel broke into 4 pieces. Of the crew of 20, only 5 survived. The Captain was amongst those that were lost. A detailed account by survivor Robert Hutchinson, the vessel's Chief Engineer, is at 3. Alas, I did not save the article years ago when it was freely available. Is there anything you can add?

9 Westergate
1742 (or 1760 or 1794) tons
Hull 119

85063
1881

A cargo ship. Per 1 (launch of Westergate), 2 (Morel Ltd., of Cardiff, Westergate), 3 (1st item, hit mine, Jan. 01, 1915), 4 (1918 sinking, 2nd item), 5 ('uboat.net' sinking, Westergate), 6 (Miramar, link, you must be registered to access). The webmaster has a few editions of Lloyd's Register ('LR') (plus one edition of 'The Record') available to him ex 'Google' books - see left. 260.0 ft. long perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters WDCV. The vessel, built for 'Weatherley, Mead, and Hussey' ('Weatherly'), of London, was christened on Sep. 12, 1881, by Miss Fowler, daughter of Captain J. Fowler who was to be her first master. The vessel was towed to Hartlepool for the installation of 'Thomas Richardson & Sons' engines. In 1887/88, the vessel was sold to 'Westergate Steamship Co. Ltd.', of London. The vessel stranded at Breaksea Point (SW of Cardiff), in thick fog, on Mar. 29, 1889, while en route to Bristol with a cargo of barley. The vessel's hull was badly damaged (her bottom all gone), the ship was entirely under water & likely to be a total wreck. Fortunately, there was no loss of life. But she was saved & repaired & later offered for sale by auction in Cardiff on May 27, 1889. 'Morel, Bros & Co.', (or & Limited) of Cardiff, bought the vessel at such auction for £5,625. No change of vessel name in either case. On Feb. 7, 1890, en route from Cardiff to Port Said, Egypt, Westergate suffered a broken crank shaft, when at Sines, Portugal. On Aug. 19, 1891, Westergate was departing Huelva (Andalusia, SW Spain) for New York with a cargo of minerals. Travelling 'at a great rate of speed', she struck the port bow of Ulleswater, (built by Doxford in 1872) which was entering the river at Huelva & had requested a pilot. Ulleswater, arriving from Newcastle with a cargo of chemicals, suffered considerable damage & ended up ashore with 9 ft. of water in her holds. Westergate was damaged also. At a Court hearing, Westergate was held solely to be at blame. LR of 1897/98 lists the vessel as again owned by Westergate Steamship Co. Limited with 'Morel' the managers. On Jan. 01, 1915, maybe Jan. 2, 1915, the vessel, en route from Bilbao, Spain, to Middlesboro, with a cargo of iron ore, hit a mine in the Downs, 2 miles NNW of the South Goodwin light vessel. The vessel's rudder, steering gear etc. was blown away. The vessel was towed to Middlesboro, it would seem. 3 seems to indicate that Weatherley were then still involved with the vessel. Later in 1915, the vessel was sold to 'Franco-British Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Cardiff, 'Olivier & Co. Ltd.', of London, the managers, again with no change in the vessel's name. On Apl. 21, 1918, the vessel, en route from Hartlepool to Carthagena, (surely Cartagena, Spain), with 1800 tons of coke & coal, was hit & sunk by a torpedo fired by UB-80, Kapitänleutnant Max Viebeg in command. 17 miles ESE of Berry Head, 22 miles from Start Point, Devon. The torpedo hit on the port side, the ship rolled over to starboard & rapidly sank by the head with the boiler exploding. Of the 29 man crew, 24 were lost, including the Master. His name? Is there anything you can add? Another image?

10 Empress
2183 tons
Hull 125

85005
1882

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Taylor & Sanderson), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 291 ft. long. Built for Taylor & Sanderson Steam Shipping Company, of Sunderland, which company became Taylor & Sanderson Steam Shipping Company, Limited in 1899. On Jan. 23, 1915, while in ballast & en route from London to Sunderland, struck a wreck at Sheringham Shoal, off the coast of Norfolk, & sank. A difficult vessel to WWW search for! Anything you can add? Your contribution would be most welcome.

11 Newent
1051 (or 994 or 1016) tons
Hull 134

85013
1882

A cargo ship. Per 1 (1882 launch, p. 130, text now at left), 2 (Newent, wreck), 3 (Apl. 04, 1909 'Victoria Daily Colonist' loss report, ex A, a large 'pdf' file), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 216 ft. long, signal letters WMDQ, engines by John Dickinson of Sunderland. The webmaster has a few editions of Lloyd's Register available to him ex 'Google' books, thru 1890/91 - see left. Built at the cost of £26,000 for James Westoll Line, of Sunderland, with James Westoll being the managing owner, which company carried coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & was involved also in the Black Sea grain trade. Christened by Mrs. Fothergill of Newcastle. On Feb. 12, 1909, Newent left Southampton, in ballast & with a crew of 16, bound for Blyth, Northumberland. That night she was sighted by Walter Scott, off the Owers lightship, off Selsey Bill. She was never heard from again. However Inga, a Norwegian barque, (I cannot figure out which Inga), was in collision with an unknown vessel off Beachy Head, East Sussex, on Feb. 13, 1909, & was seriously damaged as a result. The weather was not an issue at the time. It would seem that the entire Newent crew were lost. Lloyd's posted the vessel as missing & there the matter stood - until Mar. 2011. Now I usually do not indicate, in vessel listings, details of ship's engines. However in this case, as you can see above, I did so - for a very particular reason. Iain Davis, of Poole, Dorset, a keen diver indeed, has advised that a brass engine plate was found on a wreck off Beachy Head, a wreck that could not previously be identified. The engine plate, John Dickinson No. 260 of 1882, can be seen at left. I can well image the excitement of Iain & his colleagues when contemporary records have proved that an engine of that number had indeed been installed by Dickinson in Newent, back in 1882. Anything you can add? An image?

12 Queen
1818 tons
Hull 143

87335

Para
1882

A cargo ship. Per 1 (1882 launch, p. 293, text now at left), 2 (Taylor & Sanderson), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 280 ft. long. Built for Messrs. Taylor & Sanderson, of Sunderland, which company became Taylor & Sanderson Steam Shipping Company, Limited in 1899. Christened by Miss Meggie Sanderson, daughter 'of one of the managing owners'. A now long gone page advised us that their early steamers traded to the Mediterranean, but their subsequent ships traded to Australia, U.S.A., South America, East Indies, etc. On Sep. 29, 1905, while unloading at Eston Jetty, Middlesboro, Thomas Turnbull, ship's Mate, fell between the ship & the jetty & presumably was crushed. He  died on Sep. 30, 1905. All as you can read here. In 1911, the vessel was sold to Otto Banck, of Helsingborg (Helsinki), Sweden (possibly later 'Otto Banck Rederi AB') & renamed Para. On Jun. 10, 1916, the vessel struck a mine off the E. coast of Sweden, & sank. At 59.01N/19.00E, SE of Stockholm in the Baltic Sea. I have not read the circumstances but did spot a reference to there being no loss of life. A most difficult vessel to WWW search for! Anything you can add? An image?

13 Cogent
2140 (or 2051) tons
Hull 142

87351

Tres Hermanos
Antonio Garcia
1883

A cargo ship, clipper rigged? Per 1 (a John Hudson painting of the ship), 2 (1929 sinking, Spanish newspaper account (A.B.C.) p.032, also 3 (p.043) & 4 (p.044), 'pdf's available), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 275.0 ft. long (83.82 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 9 1/2 knots. Built at the cost of £29,000 for James Westoll (James Westoll Line) of Sunderland, with James Westoll being the managing owner. James Westoll Line carried coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & was involved also in the Black Sea grain trade. The vessel was seized at Hamburg, Germany, at the beginning of WW1 in Aug. 1914, & served during WW1 as a collier & transport for the Imperial German Navy. In Nov. 1918, the vessel was allocated to Spain by the 'War Risk Association' & on Aug. 8, 1919, the vessel became Tres Hermanos, owned by José Martinez Fernández, of Vigo, Spain. In 1928, the vessel was sold to Francisco Garcia Fernandez, of Barcelona, Spain, & renamed Antonio Garcia. On Dec. 13, 1929, while en route from Aviles to Valencia, both Spain, with a cargo of coal, D. Ignacio Sestao in command, the vessel collided in fog with Greek owned Hydra, off Vigo, & sank. At 42.10N/9.31W, 28 miles off Cies Island, near Cape Finisterre. It would seem that Antonio Garcia sank in 6 minutes, that 4 lives were lost & more were injured. Hydra, severely damaged, was able to rescue survivors. A translation of the texts at 2, 3 & 4, would surely advance this listing. Can anybody provide a translation? So far, I have not established which vessel named Hydra it was. It is possible that it was Norman Prince, built by 'Short' at Sunderland in 1900, that became Hydra in 1920. Can you clarify the matter? Or either add to or correct my text? Images?

14 Princess
2094 tons
Hull 138

87346
1883

An iron steamship. Per 1 (1890, Mercantile Navy List re Princess, ON 87346, in the 'steam' section), 2 (wrecksite.eu, wreck data), 3 (Taylor & Sanderson), 4 (reference to wreck of Princess), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 286.0 ft. long (87.2 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters HTSJ. Only limited data is WWW available. Built for Taylor & Sanderson of Sunderland, whom, it would seem still owned the vessel at the time of its loss, certainly thru 1892/93, the last edition of Lloyd's Register available to the webmaster. In 1890 per 1 (in the steam section), Sanderson of Sunderland was her owner. This listing was initially created when the webmaster read, by chance, a poignant story related to the 1893 wreck of a ship named Princess of Sunderland. In a nutshell, Robert Mustard was a seaman aboard a vessel in distress, a steamer caught by the massive storms off the E. coast of U.K. in Nov. 1893. Fearing for his life, he wrote a message to his wife, placed it in a bottle & tossed it overboard. The ship foundered & Mustard lost his life. 4 years later, the bottle was found at Dartmouth Harbour, Devon, the message was read & ultimately forwarded to Mustard's widow in Sunderland. The article is here, ex the Jul. 2000 issue (a large 'pdf' file) of the Northumberland & Durham Family History Society Journal. Whom we thank. Reading that article, it seemed to the webmaster to be possible that a ship named Princess of Sunderland had been built at Sunderland. An initial search produced nothing, however - there was no ship named Princess of Sunderland period. It is now clear that the ship which sank off Flamborough Head, Yorkshire, on Nov. 19, 1893, was Princess - en route from Bilbao, Spain, to Sunderland, with a cargo of iron ore. During the violent storm, the vessel, under the command of  James R. (Ronald) Nicholson, was driven onto rocks, between Thornwick Nab & North Landing. The Captain & the entire crew, a total of 19, all perished. In the appalling weather conditions it was not possible to launch the local lifeboat to attempt a rescue of the crew. However, witnesses were on hand, on the cliffs above, to watch the break up of the vessel & heard the crew's screams above the screeching winds. Alas they were unable, due to distance, to effect a rescue by rocket apparatus either. David Hodge advises that, per the Sunderland Echo of Nov. 20, 1893, Taylor & Sanderson had received a telegram from the Flamborough Signal Station as follows:- 'Steamer wrecked two miles north of Flamborough Head, 2.45 pm, all hands lost: name washed up, Princess of Sunderland.' David has kindly provided a copyrighted image (at left) of a precious family possession - the wheelhouse plaque that was aboard Princess when she was lost in 1893. The plaque was recovered amongst the wreckage that ended up on the beach, and, mounted on black velvet, was presented by Taylor & Sanderson to Sarah Annie Nicholson, the captain's widow. James & Sarah Nicholson were David Hodge's great grandparents, then living at 18, Murton Street, in Sunderland. Can you add anything? An image? #1923

15 James Westoll
1988 tons
Hull 159

87375
1884

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Westoll Line, p.154 in particular), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for James Westoll Line, of Sunderland, then owned in 64ths as to 70% by three families (the Westoll's, the Adamson's & the Short's, with James Westoll being the managing owner) which company carried coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & was involved also in the Black Sea grain trade. It would seem that it later became 'James Westoll (London) Ltd.' Joseph Conrad (1857/1924) wrote about the ship as you can read here. But did Conrad misidentify the vessel that he saw? Maciej Wilmanski alerts me (thanks!) to the fact that Conrad is referring, in those particular writings, to late 1874, which is ten years before James Westoll was even built. It would seem, in fact, (A & B) that the ship that Conrad saw in 1874 was the James Mason, even though Conrad states that he read the name, James Westoll, 'letter by letter' on the bow. There would seem, incidentally, to only have ever been one James Westoll, i.e. this one. It is all a puzzle, but a puzzle of literature perhaps. Anyway, at 3:00 a.m. on Aug. 17, 1904, while en route from Newcastle to Lisbon, Portugal, with a cargo of coal, the vessel struck Hollander amidships, in dense fog off Dungeness, Kent. Hollander, a Dutch 177 ton tug, sank in seconds with the loss of 8 lives. An expired eBay item advised that only 'C. Weltrevreden', at the wheel at the time, survived. He was able to jump aboard James Westoll which vessel, badly damaged, made it to port (Gravesend?). Hollander itself was en route from Rotterdam to Ventnor, Isle of Wight, I read. The collision resulted in a court case but am not aware of the case conclusion. On Mar. 3, 1911, the vessel collided with Bannockburn, off Dover, was seriously damaged & was broken up at Boulogne, France. Not an easy vessel to WWW search for! Anything you can add? Your contribution would be most welcome.

16   William Adamson
1981 (or 1986) tons
Hull 160

90302
1884

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Lloyd's Register 1887/88), 2 (Westoll Line, p.154 in particular), 3 (Atlantique) & 4 (link 3 translated), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 268 ft. long. Built at the cost of £26,500 for James Westoll Line, of Sunderland, [then owned in 64ths as to 70% by three families, the Westoll's, the Adamson's (25%) & the Short's, with James Westoll being the managing owner], which company carried coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & was involved also in the Black Sea grain trade. It would seem that the 'company' later became 'James Westoll (London) Ltd.' On Feb. 9, 1903, when off Lisbon, Portugal, the vessel was damaged in a collision with Atlantique, a 6705 ton passenger vessel of 'Messageries Maritime'. On Mar. 10, 1910, after having been laid up, the vessel was sold to French owners for £4,000. Miramar advises that William Adamson was broken up at Dunkirk, France, in May 1910, so likely the French purchasers were ship breakers. Not an easy vessel to WWW search for! Anything you can add?

17   Countess
2197 (or 1987 or 2130) tons
Hull 154

90324

Laertes
Etruria
Fede
1885

A cargo ship. Per 1 (1885 ref. to sea trial, p.105 & ref. on p.259), 2 (Taylor & Sanderson), 3 (Taylor & Sanderson history at foot of page), 4 (Fede sinking), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 275 ft. long. Built for 'Taylor & Sanderson Steam Shipping Company', of Sunderland, which company became 'Taylor & Sanderson Steam Shipping Company, Limited' in 1899. Named by Mrs. Dawson, of Sunderland. Captain Cook to be her first Captain. Kingfisher, built by John Knox & Co. at Hylton, was awarded £700 for salvage efforts rendered on Nov. 11, 1893 to Countess (no detail available as to the circumstances). The vessel was sold, in 1896, to 'Theophilatos Bros.', of Greece most probably, & renamed Laertes. And sold again, in 1897, to 'F. Carnevali', (of Italy?) & renamed Etruria. And sold once more, in 1899, to 'Becchi Calcagno', Italy also?, & renamed Fede. In late 1916, 'Giulio Kahn', of Genoa, Italy, was the 'operator', which I think means 'owner'. On Dec. 5, 1916, while en route from Naples, Italy, to Barry, Wales, via Huelva (Bay of Cadiz, Spain), with a cargo of chestnuts, Fede was sunk by either UB-29 or C or UC-19, 35 miles W. of Bishop Rock (W. of the Scilly Islands). At 49.52N/07.19W, or maybe at 50.55N/ 07.19W, but neither location seems to be 35 miles from Bishop Rock. Sunk by torpedo or gunfire perhaps? A most difficult vessel to WWW search for - have said that before! Anything you can add?

18 J. M. Smith
2055 tons
Hull 158

90326
1885

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 288.0 ft. long, signal letters KCNV. The webmaster has a few editions of Lloyd's Register available to him ex 'Google' books, thru 1890/91 - see left. Built at the cost of £22,500 for James Westoll, i.e. James Westoll Line, of Sunderland, with James Westoll being the managing owner. Westoll Line was noted for the carriage of coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & for its involvement in the Black Sea grain trade. On Mar. 3, 1907, (I have also read the 2nd, 4th & 13th), while en route from Hull to Hamburg, Germany, with a cargo of coal & 58 miles NW of Heligoland, the vessel was involved in a collision & sank. Heligoland is a small German archipelago in the North Sea, about 40 miles off the mouth of the Elbe River. The WWW record is silent about the collision, however. With what did she collide? Can you tell us? It appears to be open sea to the NW. Or otherwise add anything?

19   Ocean Prince
1737 tons
Hull 162

91496

Pernau
1885

A cargo ship. Per 1 (1885 ref. to launch, p.132 & ref. on p.259), 2 [Prince Line Ocean Prince (1)], 3 (NY Times, 1890), 4 (NY Times, 1891), 5 (Ocean Prince, 80% down), 6 (wreck, map, page in Danish), 7 (wreck data in German), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 262 ft. long, speed of 9 knots. Built for 'Prince Steam Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Newcastle (Mr. James Knott, Prince Line), & registered there. Named by Miss Nicholson, of Birtley. Captain Milburn to be her first Captain. In 1898, was transferred to 'Prince Line (1895) Ltd.' Ran into a hurricane in Apl. 1890, Captain Davidson in command, while en route from Gibraltar to Gloucester, Mass., via Halifax, Nova Scotia, with a cargo of salt. And in Oct. 1891, while en route from Gibraltar to New York with a general cargo, survived another hurricane described by Captain Brown as unequalled in his 22 years at sea. Sold in 1907 to Pernau Steamship (or Shipping) Co., of Pernau, SW Estonia, Russia, & renamed Pernau. On Mar. 1, 1911, while en route, in ballast, from Sarpsborg (or Sarpsberg), Norway, to Riga, Latvia, went aground on the rocks at Kullaberg, W coast of Sweden, near Mölle & was wrecked. At 56.18.223N/12.28.128E. It would seem that the Russian crew was drunken on the cliffs overlooking the wreck. Contemporary images of the wreck must exist. The wreck was purchased in 1912 & partially salvaged in 1959. Little remains today. Anything you can add?

20   Royal Prince
1852 (or 1776 or 1803) tons
Hull 155

91486

Hadrian
1885

A cargo ship. Per 1 (1885 ref. to sea trial, p.53 & Ref. on p.259), 2 [Prince Line Royal Prince (2)], 3 (1st vessel on page), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 260 ft. long, service speed of 9 1/2 knots. Built for Mr. James Knott, of Newcastle, for Prince Line, & specifically for 'Prince Steam Shipping Co. Ltd.'. At the sea trials, attained a mean average speed of 11 knots over the measured mile. Sister to Tudor Prince. In 1907, sold to Roman Steamship Co., (G. Reid & Co., the owner), also of Newcastle, & renamed Hadrian. Was apparently soon sold since in 1908, T. Pallister & Co., again of Newcastle, were the owners. On Jan. 11, 1910, the vessel was in collision in the Humber River with Mecklenburg (H. Podeus, the owner) & sank. Have not read what happened to Mecklenburg. WWW data is limited. Anything you can add? An image?

21 J. Y. Short
2217 (or 2193) tons
Hull 166

90344
1887

A cargo ship. Per 1 (loss, top item), 2 ('u-boat.net'), 3 (image), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 88.4 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 290 ft., speed ?, crew of 21. Per 'Blue Peter', the vessel had animals carved around the stern with a carved inscription which read "Safe within the ark forever". Built at the cost of £22,400 for James Westoll, i.e. James Westoll Line, of Sunderland, James Westoll being the managing owner. Named for John Young Short (1844/1900), the Short of Short Brothers. Westoll Line was noted for the carriage of coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & for its involvement in the Black Sea grain trade. Robert Eggleton would seem to have been its first Captain. I saw a 'snippet' which indicated that the vessel was stranded, off Tunstall, on the Yorkshire coast, in 1892, but have not read the circumstances. Can you help with the details? I have read also that the vessel required extensive repairs in 1893, likely related to that 1892 grounding. On Oct. 4, 1916, (have also read Oct. 3, 1916) while en route from Penarth, Wales, to Archangel (Arkhangelsk), Russia, with a cargo of coal, the vessel was captured by U-43, shelled & sunk. 80 miles E. of Vardø, Norway. At 70.14N/35.30E, in the Barents Sea. No loss of life. The crew was landed at Vardø. Have not been able to read the circumstances. Can you add to or correct the above?

22 Asiatic Prince
2183 tons
Hull 173

95250

Massalia
1888

A cargo ship. Per 1 (launch, ex 'The Marine Engineer', a 'Google' book), 2 (data, Asiatic Prince, 70% down), 3 ('wrecksite.eu', sinking data, Massalia), 4 ('u-boat.net', sinking, Massalia), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 89.0 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 292.0 ft. or 292 ft. 7 in., speed of 10 knots, signal letters KSPT, with engines by John Dickinson of Sunderland. Sister to Eastern Prince. The webmaster has a few editions of Lloyd's Register available to him ex 'Google' books, thru 1890/91 - see left. Built for Mr. James Knott ('Knott") & partners, of Newcastle. The vessel was named by Miss Daisy Teale, of Scarborough. Knott is known for Prince Line, & for 'Prince Steam Shipping Co. Ltd.', both of which he founded. The vessel was engaged, I read, on trans Atlantic service. On Dec. 15, 1892, the vessel spotted Wyer G. Sargent ('Sargent'), about 900 miles E. of Barbados. Why does this merit a reference? Sargent was a 1520 ton schooner, owned by William G. Gower & built in Sedgwick, Maine, in 1888. Captain Danse was in command when the 3 masts of Sargent were snapped off in a gale off the North Carolina coast on Mar. 31, 1891. A Norwegian barque, or maybe H. E. Thompson a schooner, rescued the crew & Sargent was expected to quickly sink. But it did not! Perhaps initially buoyed by its cargo of mahogany it floated on and on as a derelict. 1 1/2 years later it was still afloat & its name recorded on the stern was read by the passing Asiatic Prince. But .. it would seem that the vessel continued to float for another 4 plus years! Until early 1897 when it was driven aground & broke up on Conception, an uninhabited island in the Bahamas. Now I think that is all most interesting. Read the New York Times article here if you agree & this 1897 article also. In 1908, Asiatic Prince was sold to G. Coulouras ('Coulouras'), of Syra, Greece, & renamed Massalia. Coulouras went into receivership later in 1908, & the vessel, & another Coulouras ship also, was then sold to 'E. Petritzis Fils', also of Syra. On Oct. 29, 1916, while en route from Newport, Wales, to Naples, Italy, with a cargo of coal, the vessel was sunk by U-63, Kapitänleutnant Otto Schultze in command. At 36.00N/08.20W, 135 (or maybe 170) miles W. of Gibraltar. I have not been able to read the circumstances but it would seem that there was no loss of life. Can you add to and/or correct the above?

23 Gerent
2283 tons
Hull 176

95268
1888

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 88.4 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 290 ft., speed ? Built at the cost of £22,400 for James Westoll, i.e. James Westoll Line, of Sunderland, James Westoll being the managing owner. Westoll Line was noted for the carriage of coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & for its involvement in the Black Sea grain trade. The name means 'a person who manages, directs, or rules'. A 1917 court case with the owners of Os, but no detail is WWW available. In Dec. 1927, the vessel arrived at Grangemouth (Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland), which is near Inverkeithing & may possibly be related to the fact that on Apl. 13, 1928, the vessel was sold to be broken up. An easy ship to list because there seems to be no WWW data at all about her. Can you add to the above?

24 Vedra
2890 tons
Hull 177

95424

Caledonie
Vedra
1888

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 92.2 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 302.5 ft., speed ? Built for J. S. Barwick & Company, of Sunderland and/or London. In 1890 the vessel was sold to 'Compagnie Maritime Nantaise', of Nantes, France, & renamed Caledonie. In 1906, the vessel was sold again (to whom?) & was renamed Vedra. On Nov. 20, 1910, the vessel arrived at Falmouth, to be broken up. I have been unsuccessful in finding out anything at all about the vessel via the WWW. Can you add to the above?

25 John Sanderson
3274 tons
Hull 181

95284

Dashtestan
Coloane
Tai Tak
Hung On
1889

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Taylor & Sanderson), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 107 metres long. Built for Taylor & Sanderson Steam Shipping Company, of Sunderland, which company became Taylor & Sanderson Steam Shipping Company, Limited in 1899. Sold in 1921 to M. H. Nemazee & renamed Dashtestan. Sold in 1924 to H. H. Caneiro & renamed Coloane. Sold in 1925 to Chan Yau Lee & renamed Tai Tak. Sold in 1927 to Lee Ching Steamship Co. & renamed Hung On. It is possible, however, that the first three purchaser names above are not, in fact, the purchasers at all but rather are the names of the agents. On Sep. 3, 1929, vessel was wrecked at Hainan Strait (connects the Gulf of Tonkin to the South China Sea, between Luichow Peninsula & the Island of Hainan, both China. Have been unsuccessful in WWW finding anything at all re any of the many names referenced above. Presumably the vessel was named after John Sanderson, of Taylor & Sanderson. Dashtestan is a place in Iran. The other names seem to best relate to the Macau/Hong Kong area. That data may however prove to be quite irrelevant. Can you add anything?

26 Magnus Mail
2317 (or 2299) tons
Hull 184

95287

Lanthorn
1889

A cargo ship, clipper bow & clipper stemmed. Per 1 (ref. to 1917 sinking, Lanthorn), 2 (Liverpool 1908, 85% down), 3 (account of sinking at page bottom, thanks Carl Racey!, etc.), 4 (Magnus Mail), 5 ('pdf', 1895 painting, Magnus Mail, by Antonio Luzzo, p#37, true p.#35), 'Cambi' of Genoa 2003 auction), 6 ('u-boat.net'), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 88.5 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 290 ft. Built at the cost of £22,720 for James Westoll Esq. i.e. James Westoll Line, of Sunderland, James Westoll being the managing owner. Westoll Line was noted for the carriage of coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & for its involvement in the Black Sea grain trade. Named after Magnus Mail (1858/1916). In Feb. 1908, the vessel would seem to have gone aground at Liverpool, 'outside the south dock', while leaving Garston Docks for Cardiff. On Dec. 11, 1916 the vessel was sold to 'Gas, Light and Coke Company', of London, Stephenson Clarke & Co. the managers, & renamed Lanthorn. (A lanthorn is a lantern, often a ship's lantern). At 9:00 a.m. on May 22, 1917, while en route, in ballast, from London to Newcastle, & 3 miles E. of Whitby High light, the vessel was attacked by a surfaced German submarine. Shots were fired, initially from astern, the last (8th) shot devastating the engine room. The crew abandoned ship & took to the boats. 1/2 an hour later, the vessel exploded, believed to be the result of bombs being placed aboard by the submarine's crew. The submarine left the scene but Lanthorn did not immediately sink. She was taken in tow (by whom?) but eventually did sink half a mile south of Whitby rock buoy. Wreck may be at 54.28.10N/00.25.35W or maybe at 54.30N/00.29W where it may rather have been hit. No loss of life. The identity of the submarine? Said to be UB-41 but vessel is said to have borne U-46 markings. The 'u-boat.net' ref. to U-46 makes that look to be unlikely. Arie de Lange advises (thanks!) that Harald Benderd in 'Die UB-Boote der Kaiserlichen Marine 1914-1918' at p#113 states that UB-41 sank Lanthorn. Can you add anything?

27 Joseph Davis
2282 tons
Hull 197

97534
1890

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 88.5 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 290 ft. Named at launch by Mrs. Cameron, sister-in-law of the owner. Built at the cost of £25,458 for James Westoll, i.e. James Westoll Line, of Sunderland, James Westoll being the managing owner. James Westoll Line was noted for the carriage of coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & for its involvement in the Black Sea grain trade. On Feb. 10, 1919, the vessel went missing - Carisbrooke Castle apparently advising by radio that Joseph Davis was in a sinking state 25 miles NW of Ushant (an island off the French Brittany coast). About 25 lives were lost. The WWW record re the vessel is limited indeed. But we are grateful to have 2 images. Can you add anything?

28 Robert Eggleton
2308 (or 2274) tons
Hull 186

97523
1890

A cargo ship, schooner-rigged. Per 1 ('uboat.net', sinking), 2 (1917 sinking), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 88.5 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 290 ft., crew of 21. Built at the cost of £26,132 for James Westoll Esq. i.e. James Westoll Line, of Sunderland, [then owned in 64ths as to 70% by three families, the Westoll's, the Adamson's & the Short's, with James Westoll being the managing owner], noted for the carriage of coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & for its involvement in the Black Sea grain trade. It would seem that the 'company' later became 'James Westoll (London) Ltd.' On Dec. 28, 1917, while en route from Glasgow to Leghorn (Livorno, Italy) with a cargo of coal & 10 miles SW of Bardsey Island (St. George's Channel, off the coast of N. Wales), the vessel was struck by a torpedo fired without warning by U-91 & sank with the loss of one life. Can you add anything? Stephen Crunkhorn has advised (thanks!) that Robert Eggleton, for whom the ship was named, worked with & for Westoll's for over 40 years, & was a shareholder in a number of the fleet ships. Data about him is here.

29 Nerito
2920 (later 3020) tons
Hull 206

97547

Miami
1891

A cargo ship that amazingly was wrecked twice - on both sides of North America! Per 1 (1894 wreck of Nerito, 80% down), 2 (raised in 1897, at column bottom), 3 (extensive text re Miami wreck), 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 & 9 (N.Y. Times articles), 10 (1900 wreck article, ex Victoria Daily Colonist of Jan. 27, 1900), 11 (Cohn & Cohn, col. #4, Victoria Daily Colonist of Feb. 14, 1900), 12 (1900 wreck article in 'The San Francisco Call' of Jan. 27, 1900), 13 (data, & 1897 painting of Miami, by Antonio Jacobsen), 14 & 15 (NY Times re Miami/Lampassas race & Miami fire), 16 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 97.5 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 320 ft., speed of 12 knots. Built for 'Pinkney & Sons Steamship Co. Ltd.' (have also seen reference to D. G. & T. Pinkney, (the 'D' seems to stand for David), prominent ship owners of Sunderland. However, in 1894, the vessel was owned by 'English Columbia Navigation Company'. At 6:30 a.m. on Sep. 11, 1894, while en route from Sunderland to Halifax, & onwards to Hampton Roads, Virginia, U.S.A., in ballast, Captain Skipper in command with a crew of 26, the vessel ran aground during dense fog on the S. side of Sable Island, or better at the SE tip of the island, SW of mainland Nova Scotia, Canada, about 4 miles from the east end light. In launching kedges (light anchors, dropped a distance from a vessel, used to try to move a vessel with hawsers), 4 crew members were 'thrown out' of a ship's boat but made it to shore to raise the alarm. Help came with a lifeboat & rocket apparatus. They found the ship, lying broadside, about 26 yards from the beach, imbedded 6 ft. in the sand. The wreck moved 100 yards to the eastward in the following days as efforts were made to free the vessel with kedges. No lives were lost, it would appear. Lunenberg was the first vessel to see her predicament. She took Nerito's crew to Halifax. 'Shortly afterward, Newfield sighted the abandoned vessel and stripped it of its furniture and movables.' Aberdeen, a Government steamer, went to Nerito's assistance but could not get within a mile of her. The wreck was abandoned. It was considered certain to soon break up, insurance claims were quickly settled, & the vessel was removed, in 1894, from Lloyd's Register. The wreck was apparently scavenged. The end of the story? Not at all!
The Merritt Wrecking Company ('Merritt'), having examined the wreck, thought they had pumps which could raise the ship, & it was agreed that they should receive 75% of her value should they succeed in bringing her to port. In Oct. 1894, Merritt put a pump & a boiler aboard but could do no more due to bad weather. On Jun. 15, 1895, they returned, with wrecking tug J. D. Jones, &, at a cost of $20,000, successfully raised Nerito. 40 men were placed aboard the ship. They repaired the ship's engines, lighted fires under the boilers, & soon, accompanied by J. D. Jones, Nerito, under her own power, arrived at New York. In late Jul. 1895. She anchored off Stapleton, Staten Island. (I have also read that the vessel was towed to Halifax, Nova Scotia, for partial repairs & then went to New York). Said to have been the first time a ship wrecked at Sable Island had survived the encounter. The ship was then sold to T. Hogan & Sons ('Hogan'), of New York, rebuilt by them (where I wonder) & renamed Miami. Became U.S. registered as a result of a House of Congress resolution. Most WWW references to Hogan refer to them as ships' managers & as New York stevedores & 'steamship men'. There was a 'Galveston Line', started by Hogan, that owned a vessel named Miami, which made its first trip on Jul. 10 (maybe Jul. 17), 1897 from New York to Galveston, Texas. There is more to the story as you can read here. A freight rate trade war apparently erupted between Mallory Line & the Southern Pacific Railway Company on the one hand & Lone Star Line, T. Hogan & Sons, on the other. The first battle for shipping supremacy took the shape of a race between Mallory's Lampassas & the Lone Star vessel Miami, from New York to Galveston, Texas. Both charging amazingly cheap freight rates for the cargo that they carried. The two ships left New York on Jul. 17, 1897. Now I do not think that I know who won that race! It would seem that on Jul. 24 1897, loaded with cotton & wool, Miami suffered a fire in its after compartment & put into port at Key West, Florida. But that would seem to be on the return voyage, perhaps? Anyway, this is our Miami, then rebuilt & back in service. Vessel #92685, an American vessel number & not a British O.N. number. 307.5 ft. long, signal letters KMPH. Likely in early 1899, the vessel was sold to Pacific Coast Steamship Company, of San Francisco, & provided service between Puget Sound, British Columbia ('BC') ports & San Francisco. In late Jan. 1900, Miami was en route from Oyster Harbour, Comox, BC, Canada, to San Francisco, with a cargo of 4500/5000 tons of coal, ex coal mines at Cumberland, BC. Captain Riley was in command, but a Canadian pilot was aboard (Captain H. E. Butler), as required by law. At 7:00 a.m. on Jan. 25, 1900, taking a narrow 'shortcut' between Danger Reef & White Rocks, the ship ran aground on White Rocks, on a part of Danger Reef not marked on the charts, (now partially known as Miami Reef, in honour of the shipwreck). At Stuart Channel, Chemainus, N. of Thetis Island, on the E. coast of Vancouver Island, BC. She ran aground at a rising tide. Miami was badly damaged & her situation hopeless. She lay straddled across the reef with bow & stern sections suspended over deep water, a great hole in her bottom at the engine room. Tugs Pilot & Lorne, & Bristol, a collier, came to her assistance but could do nothing. As the tide receded, Miami broke her back at or forward of her bridge, & both sections broke away & went under the surface. The ship was fully insured, for $150,000, & the cargo was insured also. It would seem that there was no loss of life. Most of the crew were taken by Lorne to Chemainus, thence to Victoria, BC, & onwards to San Francisco aboard Walla Walla. On Feb. 13, 1900, the vessel was auctioned off & sold to Cohn & Cohn, junk dealers, of Seattle, cargo included, for $4,000. The vessel's machinery & much of the cargo was then removed & the wreck abandoned. A few years later, Jack W. Hardcastle (1884/1973), a Nanaimo artist, created a painting of the vessel. It would appear that there was an investigation, held  at Victoria, into the disaster. It would be good to locate a copy of the resulting report. On Apl. 17, 1903, a navigation light was placed on the vessel's bow. In 1956, John Peters salvaged the vessel's propeller shafting & other metals. In Mar. 2011, a commemorative plaque was placed aboard the wreck. An interesting story indeed! I thank Jim McGauhey, diver & videographer of Washington State, for bringing this vessel to my attention, & also for providing significant data. Can you add anything? The inquiry report? An image? I learn that Jack Hardcastle was not the only artist who painted the vessel. Howard L. Rehs, of Rehs Galleries, Inc., of New York, NY, has been in touch (thanks!) & has kindly provided a beautiful image of an 1897 painting of Miami by Antonio Jacobsen. See link at left. Howard also advises that an 1896 sketch of Miami is in the collection of The Mariner's Museum, in Newport News, Virginia.

30   George Royle
2540 (or 2525) tons
Hull 217

99513
1892

A cargo ship, likely a schooner-rigged collier. Per 1 (1909 collision, the 3rd 'Note', about 10% down), 2 (NY Times, sinking reference), 3 (sinking detail ex a 'Blue Peter', May 21, 1977, Sunderland Echo article), 4 (wreck data), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 91.5 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 300 ft., crew of 24. Built at the cost of £26,168 for James Westoll Esq. i.e. James Westoll Line, of Sunderland, [then owned in 64ths as to 70% by three families, the Westoll's, the Adamson's & the Short's, with James Westoll being the managing owner], noted for the carriage of coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & for its involvement in the Black Sea grain trade. It would seem that the 'company' later became 'James Westoll (London) Ltd.' On Mar. 8, 1909, the vessel was in collision with Hadrian, which vessel was moored near the entrance to Tyne Dock. George Royle would seem to have suffered the greater damage, described as 'damage to bulwarks, the main rigging and the port side.'. On Jan. 15, 1915, Captain Jack in command, the vessel left the Tyne, (I doubt if it was from Hull) en route to Saint-Nazaire, France, with a cargo of coal. An hour after departure, the vessel encountered blizzard conditions & might wisely have returned to safety. But it didn't, & on Jan. 18, 1915, when off Sheringham, Norfolk, the vessel was overwhelmed by high seas & sank 1 mile NW (or maybe 1 1/2 miles E) of Sheringham Shoal. At or about 53.02.013N/ 01.10.586E. Flares were fired & seen & at 3 a.m. the Cromer lifeboat went to the rescue. But found nothing, the vessel having already sunk. 2 lifeboats later came ashore at Weybourne, empty of survivors. 5 survived, I read - I wonder how they were saved? And 13 lives were lost. A part of the above data is from a 'Blue Peter' article (3), published in the Sunderland Echo on May 21, 1977 - which article is a puzzle because another 'Blue Peter' article here states that there were, in fact, no survivors. Can you add anything?

31 John Fothergill
2730 tons
Hull 215

99306
1892

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 88.5 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 290 ft. Built at the cost of £26,927 for James Westoll Esq. i.e. James Westoll Line, of Sunderland, [about then owned in 64ths as to 70% by three families, the Westoll's, the Adamson's & the Short's, with James Westoll being the managing owner], noted for the carriage of coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & for its involvement in the Black Sea grain trade. It would seem that the 'company' later became 'James Westoll (London) Ltd.' On Aug. 14, 1908, while en route from Poti, Georgia, to Garston, Liverpool, with a cargo of iron ore, the vessel was in collision with Oural, a Belgian tanker, near Kavak (I think a little N. of the Sea of Marmara, Turkey). Any loss of life? Can anybody tell us about John Fothergill, after whom the vessel was named? WWW data about the vessel is non-existent. Can you add anything?

32 Bea Bellido
1914 tons
Hull 224

101825

Syrian Prince
Suez
Epaminondas
Marie Caroussi
1893

A cargo ship, which also carried a number of passengers (an 'Ellis Island' page references 10 passengers). Per 1 (data, Bea Bellido/Syrian Prince, 75% down), 2 (Prince Line, Bea Bellido), 3 (small image of the 1893 painting of Bea Bellido by artist Antonio N. G. (Nicolo Gasparo) Jacobsen, 1850/1921), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 84.4 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 277 ft., speed of 10 (or perhaps 12) knots. Built for 'Prince Steam Shipping Co.', of Newcastle, i.e. 'Prince Line', founded by James Knott, the managing owner. But Miramar refer to 'J. Knott' thru 1911 as being the owner rather than 'Prince Line'. The vessel was engaged, I read, on a Cuba to New York service in years 1893/6. Bea Bellido? An unusual choice of name perhaps for 'Prince Line', most of whose vessels' names included the word 'Prince'. Ex 'Google' incomplete data 'snippets', I find that the name likely relates to 'Bea, Bellido y Compañía', of Matanzas, 80 miles E. of Havana, Cuba, ship owners & sugar refiners & exporters. Could the vessel have been chartered to them? For the shipment of sugar or other cargoes including coal. Maybe named Bea Bellido for the duration of the charter? In 1897, Eduardo Bellido, manager of the firm, committed suicide, which may in some way relate to the vessel being renamed. Can you clarify any of this and/or provide ownership data ex Lloyd's Registers? At about 3 p.m. on Feb. 24, 1895, the vessel, Captain Young in command, en route from Philadelphia to New York in ballast, ran aground on the 'Brigantine Shoals', a dangerous sand-bar near Atlantic City, New Jersey, the scene of hundreds of shipwrecks in history. The vessel worked herself off, apparently. Later in 1896, the vessel was renamed Syrian Prince. In 1910, the vessel was sold to 'Cia. Marittima Siciliana', of Messina, Sicily, who renamed the vessel Suez. In 1912, the vessel was sold again, to Charilaos, Goudis & Co., of Piraeus, Greece, managed by N. Goudis, & renamed Epaminondas. In 1916, the vessel was sold to A. Caroussis & Co., also of Piraeus, & renamed Marie Caroussi. On Nov. 14, 1916, have also read Nov. 20, 1916, off the coast of New Jersey, the vessel capsized & sank. I have not been able to read the circumstances but it would seem to have been at 39.23.00.42N/074.23.28.53W. WWW data about the vessel is modest. Can you add anything?

33 Creole Prince
2047 tons
Hull 225

101827
1893

A clipper-bowed cargo ship. Per 1 (launch, ex Marine Engineer of May 1893), 2 (Prince Line, Creole Prince), 3 (data, image, Creole Prince), 4 (1894 Christall lawsuit ex 5, New York Times), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 282.0 ft. long, 86.0 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots. Built for James Knott, or perhaps 'Prince Steam Shipping Co.', of Newcastle, which company became 'Prince Line (1895) Ltd.' in 1895. The vessel was one of two vessels (the other was Carib Prince) built to be chartered to George Christall & Co. ('Christall'), of New York, i.e. 'Trinidad Line', for $700 per month each for a 4 year period, for service from New York to Grenada & Trinidad, for the Government of Grenada. Christall sued for $11,387.50 alleging that neither vessel attained the contracted speed of 10 knots. Can anybody tell us about the decision of the Court? The vessel presumably linked New York, & Caribbean ports including Grenada. On Oct. 3, 1894, Coronet, a schooner under the command of Captain Balcom, left Halifax, Canada, for Santiago de Cuba with a cargo of fish & potatoes. On Oct. 14, 1894, when 400 miles N. of Haiti, the schooner encountered a major storm, soon a hurricane. The ship lost all of its masts & sails, & was at the mercy of the sea for many days. Creole Prince rescued 3 Coronet crew members on Oct. 18, 1894, all of the others being lost. The terrifying story, ex the New York Times, can be read here. Creole Prince went from New York to Brazil, in 1895. In Oct. 1900, the vessel arrived at Syria ex Alexandria, Egypt. On Oct. 21 or 22, 1916, in fog, the vessel was in collision with HMS Narcissus, in the Straits of Gibraltar. Creole Prince sank as a result, 6 miles W. of Cape Spartel, Morocco. Any loss of life? I have not found any detail as to the circumstances - nor am I sure which particular Navy vessel named HMS Narcissus was involved. There does not seem to be much data WWW available about Creole Prince. Anything you can add? #1889

34 Westburn
3320 tons
Hull 228

99626
1893

A cargo ship, schooner-rigged. Per 1 (1916 capture etc., image), 2 (Westburn ref.), 3 (wreck dive), 4 (wreck, image of Westburn sinking & what seems to be an image of Captain Campbell, but is not), 5 (NY Times article, 1915), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 107.2 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 351 ft., speed of 7 knots, crew of 26. Built at the cost of £30,000 for James Westoll Esq. i.e. James Westoll Line, of Sunderland, James Westoll being the managing owner. James Westoll Line was noted for the carriage of coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & for its involvement in the Black Sea grain trade. James Westoll's residence was named Westburn, hence, I presume the ship's name. Am advised that on Nov. 2, 1910, the vessel ran ashore at the Bosphorus, while en route from Nicolcuff? (presumably Black Sea re grain) to the U.K. On Feb. 8, 1916, while en route from Cardiff to Buenos Aires, Argentina, with a cargo of coal, the vessel was captured by German raider Möwe, (generally referred to as Mowe), 530 miles NNE of Pernambuco, now Recife, Brazil. Möwe is an amazing ship indeed in WW1 history, but her exploits are beyond the scope of these pages. A prize crew of 8 was put aboard Westburn & the vessel was sailed eastwards towards Europe. With 206 prisoners aboard (total I think), all captured by Möwe from 5 other vessels & also from Westburn. On Feb. 24, 1916, (have also read Feb. 23), the vessel was scuttled by the Germans to avoid the ship's recapture by H.M.S. Sutlej. Now I think that the ship must have been scuttled by the prize crew from Möwe & that Möwe itself was, at that time, far to the north. Indeed it went on its own course on Feb. 9, 1916 & on Feb. 25, 1916, Möwe captured & scuttled Saxon Prince 620 miles W. of Fastnet Rock, SW tip of  Ireland. Anyway, Westburn was taken off shore within sight of land & blown up with dynamite. The coal? That had gone to Möwe. 24 crew members were landed at Tenerife & repatriated by Athenic. Westburn's Captain, A. T. Campbell, & also Charles Mattson, the ship's second officer, had been taken aboard Möwe & were landed at Wilhelmshaven, Germany - held because they had 'signalled falsely the nationality of the Westburn before her capture'. Both were interned as prisoners of war & released on Apl. 4, 1918. The wreck lies in 90 ft. of water (have not read where exactly) & is a dive site today, 40th in the list of world historic shipwrecks. It would seem that in Jan. 1919, an effort was made to re-float the vessel, presumably without success. A site visitor, Christer Eidlert, of Sweden, has asked if a list of the 24 crew members landed at Tenerife in Feb. 1916 is available. Christer's grandfather, who fashioned many objects in brass, likely was one of the 24. He made a brass cup, 70 mm tall & 65 mm diameter, visible, with comments, here. If you know, anything, or have such a list, do, please, be in touch. And be in touch also if you can add to or correct anything I have written above. Stephen Crunkhorn (thanks!) advises that Robert Eggleton, a Captain of Westburn, was his great great uncle. And that Patricia Jakes, his aunt who recently (early 2010) passed away, was most interested in Eggleton family history & particularly in the history of Westburn. She would often, I understand, relate the story of Westburn & Möwe. Her proudest possession was a water colour painting, damaged & never displayed, of the ship. Stephen, a scuba diver, accordingly tracked down & dived the wreck of Westburn, at Tenerife. And recovered some coal from the ship's hold. He wrapped it up & gave it to his aunt as a surprise Christmas present. It was the only time he ever saw her cry! Stephen advises also that Westburn's ship's bell is in a Tenerife church that overlooks the bay where she lies.

35 Britannia
3260 tons
Hull 240

104346

Georgios
1894

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Taylor & Sanderson), 2 (Taylor & Sanderson history at foot of page), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 112 metres long. Built for Taylor & Sanderson Steam Shipping Company, of Sunderland, which company became Taylor & Sanderson Steam Shipping Company, Limited in 1899. Sold in 1912 to 'Domestinis Economou' (who may however have just been the agent) & renamed Georgios. On Feb. 29, 1916, vessel left New York bound for Piraeus, Greece. Went missing. Approximately 35 lives lost. Webmaster has been unsuccessful in finding any WWW data about this vessel. Anything you can add?

36 Gladys Royle
3287 (or 3268) tons
Hull 235

104341
1894

A cargo ship. Per 1 (ref. to sinking), 2 & 3 (Luckner & Seeadler), 4 (extensive data/images re Seeadler), 5 (NY Times article), 6 (images of Felix von Luckner), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 107.2 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 351 ft., 22 crew plus 4 apprentices. Built at the cost of £29,375 for James Westoll Esq. i.e. James Westoll Line, of Sunderland, [about that time owned in 64ths as to 70% by three families, the Westoll's, the Adamson's & the Short's, with James Westoll being the managing owner], noted for the carriage of coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & for its involvement in the Black Sea grain trade. It would seem that the 'company' later became 'James Westoll (London) Ltd.' Her maiden voyage was Sunderland to Genoa, Italy, on Oct. 5, 1894. Probably in 1899, John Adam Dombroska, a stevedore, fell to his death in Gladys Royle's hold, while the ship was loading at Baltimore. His family sued the ship owners in a Maryland court, which held that the ship owners were not at fault & dismissed the case. The vessel traded to Odessa (Black Sea, Ukraine, 3 such voyages at least thru 1914)  & to Genoa, Italy. From Apl. 20 to Nov. 22, 1916, the ship was an ammunition carrier, with 12 voyages, at least 3 of which were to Archangel, Russia, with shorter trips to Brest & Nantes, both in France. On Jan. 9, 1917, while en route from Cardiff, Wales, to Buenos Aires, Argentina, with a cargo of coal, the vessel was captured by German raider Seeadler, SW of the Azores. And scuttled, 120 miles S ¼ W from Santa Maria, Azores. Seeadler (the name translates as Sea Eagle), was a 3-masted barque turned into a German armed raider, under the command of Felix Graf von Luckner (1881/1966), who is noted, I read, for waging war without casualties. Seeadler, I read, was fitted with motors, with wireless & with two 4.2" & 16 machine guns. It came upon Gladys Royle, & raised a signal requesting a time signal ('not an uncommon thing for a sailing ship long out of contact with land to do'). Then Seeadler raised the German ensign. Three shots persuaded Gladys Royle to stop. Her entire crew was taken off unharmed, the ship was boarded & scuttling charges laid. It sank stern first. The 26 man crew was landed at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, by Cambronne, a French barque & a later Seeadler victim (on Mar. 21, 1917, at 20.10S/28.05W), to whom prisoners were transferred. Cambronne's top gallant masts were removed, & spars & sails destroyed, (so Seeadler could make good her escape) & the vessel freed. Cambronne made the coast of Brazil in 9 days, arriving at Rio de Janeiro  on Mar. 30, 1917. Cambronne arrived with 263 prisoners from many Seeadler captured ships, in addition to her own crew. Can anybody clarify the facts & dates re Cambronne? And tell us about Gladys Royle, after whom the vessel was named? Seeadler & Felix von Luckner? Seeadler made it round Cape Horn into the Pacific, captured & destroyed more ships, but was wrecked on Aug. 2, 1917 by a tidal wave at Mopelia, 280 miles off Tahiti, with all the crew stranded on Mopelia Island. I have read that the vessel was beached & the hull was in process of being cleaned when the tsunami struck. Felix von Luckner was eventually captured, spent time in prison camps in New Zealand, & was repatriated to Germany in 1919. He died at age 84 in 1966 & is buried at Hamburg, Germany. Can you add anything?

37 King David
2555 tons
Hull 249

105743

Acuario
Teresa Pamies
Sac 9
Sac Santander
1895

A cargo ship which had a very long life. Per 1 [King line, King David (1)], 2 (data in Spanish & image Sac Santander, 25% down), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 92.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 knots. Built, at a cost of £25,000, for King Line Ltd., of London, (previously the King Alfred Steamship Co.), 'Philipps & Co.', the managers. Its trial trip was on Oct. 18, 1895, when it attained 'about 11 knots' over the measured mile. In Dec. 1900, the vessel was time chartered for a year at £1,100 per month for use on service to the U.S. Sold in 1905 to 'Compañía Avilesina de Navegación', of Spain, & renamed Acuario. The vessel was sold again, in 1911, to 'Fabregas y Garcia', also of Spain,  & renamed Teresa Pamies. I read that in 1924, the vessel was sold to P. Garcias, but not renamed. Is it possible that that was rather a transfer - in view of the similar names i.e. 'Garcia' & 'Garcias'? In 1932, the vessel was sold to 'La Sociedad Anónima Cros' ('Cros'), of Barcelona, Spain, & renamed Sac 9. Cros, which would seem to have been a large chemicals company, was likely renamed 'Transportes, Aduanas y Consignaciones S.A.' ('TAC') of Alicante, Spain. Or maybe TAC was a transportation subsidiary of Cros. The above are my deductions from what I have read. Are they correct? Can anybody advise? Anyway, when fleet vessels were given city names rather than numbers, the vessel, in 1950, was renamed Sac Santander. In 1956, the vessel, then over 60 years old, was broken up at Barcelona, Spain. Anything you can add and/or correct?

38   Robert Adamson
2992 (or 2978) tons
Hull 246

104358
1895

A cargo ship. Per 1 (sale in 1905), 2 ('u-boat.net', sinking), 3 (ref. to sinking), 4 (UB-16), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 102.1 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 335 ft., speed of 10 knots, crew of 25. Built, at a cost of £27,500, for 'J. Adamson' & 'M. Mail', of Newcastle and/or Sunderland, Adamson the owner as to 56/64 & Mail as to 8/64. M. Mail is presumably 'Magnus Mail' extensively referenced here. But the vessel is said to have been named for Robert Adamson, a prominent Westoll shareholder. It would seem that the vessel, carrying grain, must have run aground in 1902 at Gibraltar. The situation was referred to in the Aug. 9, 1902 edition of 'Sunderland Daily Echo', as follows:- 'The Salvage Association has received the following telegrams from Lloyd's agents, dated Gibraltar, Aug. 7th, re Robert Adamson:- Attempt to float has failed, pumping going on at the time. Another attempt this afternoon. Jettison damaged grain continues. Later; Another attempt to float has failed. Will try next tide to-morrow morning. Weather fine.' It must have been later successfully re-floated. On May 4, 1903, the vessel was in collision, in dense fog, with Queen, off West Point Lighthouse, Seattle, Washington. Both vessels were seriously damaged, I read, but there was no loss of life. Robert Adamson was en route from Port Blakely, to Buenos Ayres, Argentina, with lumber. In 1905, the vessel was bought, for £17,000 by James Westoll, i.e. James Westoll Line, of Sunderland, James Westoll being the managing owner. No change of name. On Apl. 10, 1916, while en route from Dundee, Scotland, to Le Havre, France, with a cargo of pip props, the vessel was sunk by a torpedo fired by UB-16, Paul Hundius in command, 3 miles N. by E. of the Shipwash Light Vessel in the North Sea off Harwich. Have not read who was in command of Robert Adamson, at that time. Nor have I read the exact location. No loss of life, so the crew was safely landed. The WWW record for this ship is modest - much of the above is from non WWW sources. Anything you can add and/or correct?  An image?

39 Cairnisla
1597 (or 1594) tons
Hull 252

104297

West Marsh
Popi
Mary K.
1896

A cargo ship that had a very long life indeed. Per 1 (Cairn Line, Cairnisla), 2 (1904 crew rescue, Mary A. Troop), 3 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Popi, for 1930/31 thru 1945/46), 4 (1909 image, Cairnisla), 5 (plans available?), 6 (1897 rescue of Niagara), 7 (Dutch 'pdf', brief ref., '1 Mei', to collision with Noviembre, slow to load), 8 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Popi), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 78.9 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 259.0 ft., speed of 9 knots, signal letters JHMG later SVEV. Built for 'Cairn Line of Steamships Ltd.', ('Cairns Young Noble' the managers), of Newcastle, which company initially operated tramp ships, mainly to the Black Sea, Mediterranean & Baltic. A couple of major rescues involving the ship. In Mar. 1897, Cairnisla was eastbound ex Darién, Panama, when she came across the rudderless Ward Line vessel Niagara. She towed Niagara to Charleston, South Carolina, arriving there on Mar. 24, 1897. In Mar. 1904, when 200 miles N. of Bermuda, the vessel rescued all who were aboard Mary A. Troop, a barque of Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada. That vessel had left Pensacola, Florida, for Rio de Janeiro with a cargo of pitch pine lumber & timber. It encountered a major storm, & what a storm - it would appear to have lasted at least 26 days! The vessel's main & mizzen masts were snapped off, the boats were swept away & the hatches were ripped off. There were still high seas when Cairnisla, commanded by John Band, rescued all of those aboard the waterlogged vessel, - 'wasted near to skeletons & half mad with privations' - minus one crew member, a carpenter, who had been swept overboard. The rescue was effected by Cairnisla's Chief Officer Smith, with a crew of four - P. Johansen (Danish) C. Carlsen & Paul Swanson (both Swedish) & W. Berstrom (German). A sad story which had a happy ending when the survivors of Mary A. Troop were landed at Le Havre, France. On Mar. 23, 1904 they arrived at Southampton, England. Cairnisla attempted to set Mary A. Troop afire, so she would sink & not be a danger to shipping, but did not succeed. A gunboat may have been sent to sink her. Was it in fact sent? On May 1, 1909, Noviembre, a Spanish merchant ship carrying ground nuts, collided with Cairnisla at the Rotterdam port of Maashaven. Thanks to Arie de Lange's research we can now advise you exactly what happened. Noviembre apparently collided with Cairnisla at a location between the river Maas & Maashaven. Noviembre suffered extensive bow damage in the collision while Cairnisla, damaged between engine room & stern, had to be towed to a location near the 3rd Katendrechtse dam at Maashaven, where it sank. To be raised on May 21, 1909 by a salvage company & docked for necessary repairs. In 1915, the vessel was sold to Peter Dixon & Son Ltd. ('Dixon'), of Grimsby, & renamed West Marsh, managed by Cairns Young Noble until 1922 when Dixon took over the management. Dixon owned West Marsh Paper Mills, of Grimsby. In 1930, the vessel was sold to 'M. N. Vernicos', of Piraeus, Greece, renamed Popi, & engaged in general tramping. Can anybody tell us what she did during WW2? Just 2 WW2 convoy references, one to Liverpool in Jan. 1940 with fruit, & the other from Suda Bay (or Souda Bay), Crete to Port Said, Egypt, in May 1941. In 1956, the vessel was sold for the last time, to 'Kansas Compania Naviera Ltda', of Puerto Limon, Costa Rica, P. T. Catrakis the manager?, & renamed Mary K. On Nov. 29, 1957, now over 60 years old, the vessel left Stratoni, Chalkidiki peninsula, northern Greece, for Constantza, Romania, on the Black Sea, with a cargo of iron pyrites. On Dec. 1, 1957 (but Miramar indicate 1956), when off the Dardanelles, she radioed that she was in distress, her cargo having shifted. The vessel was never heard from again, though 2 empty lifeboats were later found & a single body washed up on Skyros Island in the Aegean to the south. So the entire crew was lost. The above text may well need correction. Can you add to and/or correct the above? #1830

40 King Edgar
2552 tons
Hull 250

105807

Elorrio
Begoña No. 1
Santofirme
Vicente Figaredo
1896

A cargo ship. Per 1 [King Line, King Edgar (1)], 2 (Spanish page, Santofirme, images), 3 (link 2 translated into English), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 92.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 304 ft., speed of 10 knots, crew of about 40. Built, at a cost of £25,000, for Scottish Steamship Co. Ltd., of Glasgow, a subsidiary of 'King Line Limited', the renamed (Nov. 1893) 'King Alfred Steamship Co. Ltd.', John Philipps the principal owner. In 1901, the vessel was sold to Compagñia Estrella, of Spain, (likely of Asturias, Bay of Biscay) with Prado & Torres the managers?, & renamed Elorrio. In 1917, the vessel was sold again, to 'Compagñia Naviera Begoña', of ?, Spain, 'J. M. Urquijo y Compagñia' the manager, & renamed Begoña No.1. In 1919, the vessel was sold to 'Sociedad Luis Ibrán Armador', Luis Ibrán the biggest shareholder, of Aviles, Spain, & renamed Santofirme. Used to carry coal from mines at Villabona, northern Spain, to Barcelona & Tarragona, & also Bilbao & many other Spanish ports. Returning with cereals, pyrites, superphosphates etc. In 1921, the vessel made 2 voyages carrying troops to Melilla, an autonomous city in Spanish Morocco, re the Riff War of 1919/1926. I read that in 1924 the vessel was in collision with Eugenio Dutrus, built in 1886, as Hubbuck, by Joseph L. Thompson & Sons, of Sunderland. Thanks to Álvaro Álvarez Gascón, I can advise that the vessel essentially did not change hands subsequently. Luis Ibrán passed away in 1923 & Vicente Figaredo in 1929. And as a result of Spanish law, the ownership had to change from 'Sociedad Luis Ibrán Armador' in 1919 through to 'La Compañía Vicente Figaredo Herrero Armador' in 1927, & finally to 'Sección Marítima de Minas de Figaredo', in essence the Figaredo Family Trust. A month in dry dock in 1929. In 1931, it was renamed Vicente Figaredo. Alfonso Pais, of Pola de Siero, Asturias advises, (thanks!), re Vicente Figaredo as can be read here. In 1933, the vessel, loaded with coal for Barcelona, 'sprang a leak'. It had to be towed to Bilbao where, presumably after inspection, it was decided that the vessel should be scrapped. It was broken up at Bilbao, Spain, in Q1 of 1934. Despite the above, the WWW record for this ship is modest, especially in English. Anything you can add and/or correct? Images?

41 Lizzie Westoll
2858 tons
Hull 237

104351
1896

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('u-boat.net', sinking), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 92.1 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 302.1 ft., speed of ? knots. Built, at a cost of £26,437, for James Westoll, i.e. James Westoll Line, of Sunderland, James Westoll being the managing owner. On Dec. 13, 1915, the vessel reported striking an unknown object, off Hartlepool. On Jun. 17, 1917, while en route from Port Signa (I believe Santiago de Cuba, Cuba) to Garston (Liverpool) with a cargo of magnesite ore & volonea (what is it?), the vessel was sunk by a torpedo fired by UC-42, off the coast of Ireland, 120 miles NWxW of Fastnet Rock, at 51.39N/12.44W. No loss of life. Crew landed at County Kerry. The WWW record for this ship is modest. Anything you can add and/or correct?  Images?

42 Mary Ada Short
3605 tons
Hull 251

106412
1896

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Prinz Eitel Friedrich), 2 (Mary Ada Short loss), 3 & 4 (New York Times, 1915 reports of Captain Dobbing & Prinz's gunnery etc.), 4 (Sargasso, para 4), 5 (sinking detail ex 'Blue Peter', May 21, 1977, Sunderland Echo article), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 109.6 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 359 ft., speed ?, crew of 21 in Feb. 1915. Built at the cost of £31,800 for James Westoll, i.e. James Westoll Line, of Sunderland, James Westoll being the managing owner. Named for Mary Ada Short (1853/1932) the wife of John Young Short (1844/1900) of Short Brothers. Westoll Line was noted for the carriage of coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & for its involvement in the Black Sea grain trade. This vessel, however, was built for the Azof (Black Sea) & River Plate (Argentina) grain trade. Her maiden trip was to Genoa, Italy. On Apl. 18, 1912, the vessel was in collision with Sargasso, 1508 tons with a cargo of coal, in dense fog at the mouth of the Tyne. Sargasso sank, one life lost. Have not read who was determined to be at fault. On Feb. 18, 1915, under Captain Dobbing, while en route from Rosario, near Buenos Aires, Argentina, to the U.K., via St. Vincent, with a cargo of grain, the vessel was captured by the German auxilliary cruiser Prinz Eitel Friedrich ('Prinz'). 400 miles E. of Pernambuco, (Recife), Brazil, off Cape San Roque. At 05.49S/028.36W. The crew was taken aboard Prinz, also food & two prize pigs that I gather eluded capture! And probably also such wine & spirits as remained after the German crew 'indulged' (5)! A charge of dynamite blew out the ship's bottom, but the ship did not sink in view of its cargo. Several shells had to be fired into the ship to sink it. It would appear, however, that the gunners were not very able. They missed the sitting target with one shot! Prinz had 400 'refugees' aboard, from previous such incidents. On Mar. 10, 1915, Prinz was interned at Newport News, Virginia, & presumably the Mary Ada Short crew & other prisoners, were then released. They were indeed as per this guestbook message. Can you add or correct anything?

43   South Africa
3424 tons
Hull 268

108261

Neptuno
1897

A cargo ship. Which had a short life. Per 1 (Neptuno sinking ref., centre page 'STEAMER FOUNDERED'), 2 (page in Spanish, ref. Neptuno, & image Francisco M. Rodas), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 107.4 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 352.3 ft., speed of 12 1/2 (have also read 10) knots. Built for Southern Steam Shipping Co. Limited ('Southern'), with Lawther, Latta & Co. Ltd., of London, the managers. Southern? Have seen a data 'snippet' which stated that it was 'controlled on behalf of Shorts'. Miramar refer, however, to 'Nitrate Producers' Steamship Co., Ltd.', i.e. Anglo Line, as initial owners. In 1900, the vessel was sold to 'La Compañía Marítima Unión', of Bilbao, Spain, Francisco Martinez Rodas, the manager, & renamed Neptuno. On Nov. 25, 1902, while en route from Antwerp, Belgium, to Tampico, (Mexico I presume), with a cargo of rails & coke, the vessel foundered in the Bay of Biscay. 5 of her crew were rescued by Brynymor (not Brynymer, it would seem) & landed at Swansea, while 23 lives were lost. 5 Neptuno crew members, all firemen, took to a small boat. Were they ever seen again? Brynymor was damaged by storms in the Bay of Biscay, presumably what caused Neptuno to be lost. There was a 'Brynymor Steamship Co.', of Swansea, Wales. Not an easy vessel to WWW search for. Can you add anything? An image perhaps?

44 Spartan Prince
3299 tons
Hull 234

106627
1897

A passenger ship. Per 1 (data), 2 [Prince Line (1)], 3 (page bottom) 4 (James A. Flood print available), 5 (NY Times aground 1901), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 106.98 metres (351 ft.) long, speed of 12 (or 13) knots, with clipper bow. With accommodation for 1195 passengers, 45 in 1st class & 1,150 in 3rd. Built for Prince Line Ltd. (owned by James Knott), of Newcastle. Maiden voyage was Sunderland to New York on Dec. 22, 1897. Used on Trans-Atlantic routes from Naples, Genoa & Leghorn, Italy, thru Jul. 1902. On Feb. 12, 1901, while en route from New York to Italy, ran aground at Alcazar Point (African side of Straits of Gibraltar). Holds full of water & cargo damaged. Passengers all saved & landed at Gibraltar. From Jul. 1902 placed on New York to South Africa route. Sold by Prince Line in 1908. But was it? On Aug. 29, 1908, while en route from New York to the River Plate, vessel was sunk in a collision with sailing barque Timandra off the coast of Brazil, 150 miles from Para (close to the mouth of the Amazon, I think). Images seem to be non existent. Anything you can add?

45 T. R. Thompson
3538 tons
Hull 258

106417
1897

A cargo ship, schooner rigged. Per 1 & 2 (Sunderland Echo & BBC reports), 3 & 4 (wreck), 5 (1918 sinking), 6 ('u-boat.net'), 7 (Lohs), 8 (image), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 109.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 360 ft., speed of 11 knots, crew of 36 in Mar. 1918. Built at the cost of £32,500 for James Westoll Esq. i.e. James Westoll Line, of Sunderland, [the ship being owned in 64ths, 55% by James Westoll, 25% by Thomas Roe Thompson, after whom the vessel was named, a Westoll shareholder & agent, & 9% by John Y. Short, with James Westoll being the managing owner]. Westoll Line was noted for the carriage of coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & for its involvement in the Black Sea grain trade. The vessel's maiden voyage was from the Wear to Cardiff & on to Genoa, Italy, under Captain Robert Eggleton (for whom Robert Eggleton was named). On Mar. 29, 1918, while en route from Benislaf, Algeria, to Middlesbrough with a cargo of iron ore, defensively armed (one 4.7 in. gun on stern) & 7 miles S. of Newhaven, East Sussex, the vessel was struck by a torpedo fired by UB-57 & sank. At 3:50 a.m. at 50.40.17N/00 05.63E (or maybe at 50.41.11N/ 00.08.24W, can anyone clarify the 2 sets of coordinates?). A huge explosion. 33 lives lost, including  William S. Shewan, the Captain. Just 3 survived, landed by a trawler at Dover (a sailor, a gunner & an apprentice). I read that WW1 war records indicate that UB-57 may have sunk the vessel by gunfire. The captain of UB-57 was Johannes Lohs, an Imperial Navy decorated (Pour le Mérite or 'Blue Max') war hero, who, in his career, sank 76 merchant ships & a warship, for a total of 148,290 tons. His submarine was lost in the English Channel in Aug. 1918 & his body washed ashore near the mouth of the Scheldt river. The T. R. Thompson wreck was located in the 1980s, & Meridian Divers, of Sussex, in 2004 launched a project under the Nautical Archaeology Society's 'Adopt a wreck' scheme to explore the site & research the vessel's history. I wonder if the results of that research are WWW available? Chris Pascoe of Meridian Divers would welcome any additional data you might be able to add to the total record. The ship's bell was earlier recovered. Can you add anything?

46 Anglo-Chilian
3817 tons
Hull 276

110004

Rio Iguassu
1898

A cargo ship. Per 1 & 2 (sinking refs., Sep. 22, 1914, Rio Iguassu), 3 (detail re Rio Iguassu sinking above data box at right), 4 (ref. Zaanstroom), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 112.6 metres long (370 ft.) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 12 knots. Built for 'Nitrate Producers' Steamship Co., Ltd.', (Anglo Line), with Lawther, Latta & Co. Ltd., of London, the managers. In 1911, the vessel was sold to 'European & Brazilian Shipping Co. Ltd.', of London, (Petersen & Co. Ltd., the managers) & renamed Rio Iguassu. Something must have happened re Zaanstroom, a Dutch vessel, but have not read what it was that required a law case in 1914. On Sep. 22, 1914, while en route from Newcastle to Rio de Janeiro with a cargo of coal, the vessel was captured by the German light cruiser Karlsruhe. Rio Iguassu's sea-cocks were opened but the ship took too long to sink. So they planted dynamite in her bow & stern & sank her that way. 155 miles SW of Saint Peter & Saint Paul Rocks, Brazil, at 00.40S/31.40W. About 600 miles off the coast of Brazil. Can you add anything?

47 Blanefield
3411 tons
Hull 270

108392
1898

A cargo ship. Per 1 & 2 (wreck), 3 (collision report, Evening Telegram, N.Y., May 1, 1906, Kate Thomas), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 107.3 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 352 ft.. Notable, perhaps, because it would seem to have been equipped with a 'Bull's Metal' propeller that may have given the vessel a little extra speed. Such propeller was not of cast iron. Rather of bronze perhaps, but I have not read the actual metal. Built for 'Seafield Shipping Co. Limited' ('Seafield'), managed by  Lawther, Latta & Co. Ltd., both of London. I have read that Seafield was a single-ship company with Southern Steam Shipping Co. Ltd. an associated company, but Seafield would also appear to have owned Winkfield. Both of those companies were owned by 'Nitrate Producers' Steamship Co., Ltd.', (Anglo Line), of London. In 1899, the vessel carried grain from Philadelphia to Cork, Ireland. On Mar. 10, 1906, Blanefield, under the command of Captain Isaacs, left Junin, Peru, for Dover, with a cargo of 'nitra soda' valued at U.S. $250,000, a conversion of £50,000. On May 1, 1906, the vessel was hit by Kate Thomas, a 4-masted, 1748 ton, steel barque built by 'Doxford', off Beachy Head, East Sussex. I have not read the circumstances. Was it in fog, perhaps? While Blanefield sank with the loss of likely five lives, Kate Thomas survived but had to be towed to Southampton in a damaged condition. Note that most WWW sites refer to 36 Blanefield lives being lost. Can anybody clarify the matter, particularly in view of the New York 'Evening Telegram' report (image at left) which indicates that 24 including the Captain were likely saved, 10 including the Captain being landed at Newhaven by a pilot boat & that five persons were reported as drowned. I have since read that it was 5 only that were lost in other contemporary reports, that Blanefield sank 'in the track of shipping' & that 11 Blanefield survivors boarded Kate Thomas. I had thought that Kate Thomas was at fault. However Michael Keane, of Eastbourne, advises (thanks!) that the collision between Kate Thomas & Blanefield was the subject of a later court case, & that the court found in favour of Kate Thomas. A report in the London Times apparently 'gives a very dramatic description of the collision, from my memory the Blanefield sank in 15 seconds & the crew on the deck of Blanefield jumped onto the deck of Kate Thomas'. The Times also reported the collision on May 2, 1906. Blanefield lies at 50.41.11N/ 00.08.24W, 9.9 metres SE of Newhaven, East Sussex, in 24/30 metres of water. It would seem that the ship's bell image is courtesy of Michael Keane, who actually found the bell in 1996 (Michael is here, Sussex Wreckdiving. Can you add anything? The Court case & the May 2, 1906 London Times articles, perhaps?

48 Minterne
2823 (or 2838) tons
Hull 269

108333

Nancy Lee
Grelford
Holms Island
Olavarriaga
Inocencio Figaredo
Bryansk
1898

A cargo ship. Per 1 (ref. to sinking, Bryansk, 80% down), 2 (Soviet WW2 ship losses, about 37% down, Bryansk), 3 (Peter N. Davies book, re Nancy Lee & Henry Tyrer), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 96.3 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots. Built for 'Minterne Steamship Co. Ltd.', A. F. Hood the manager, both of London. In 1903, the vessel was sold for £23,800 to Woodpulp Transport Company Limited, (owned by Preston Steam Navigation Company Limited), 'Henry Tyrer and Company', the manager, & renamed Nancy Lee. Acquired to carry wood pulp from ports in Canada for the account of 'Becker and Company' of London, Preston, etc. In 1916, the vessel was sold again, to 'Haenton Steam Shipping Company Limited', likely of Cardiff, 'J. C. Gould & Co.' of Cardiff, the owner & manager, & renamed Grelford. Next year, i.e. in 1917, the vessel was sold to 'Williams Steam Navigation Company Limited', W. Williams & Co. the managers?, & renamed Holms Island. In 1918, it was sold, it would appear, to 'Marshal Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Cardiff, with no change of name. In 1919, the vessel was sold again, to Olavarriaga Eguilear, (of Bilbao, Spain?), who renamed the ship Olavarriaga. In 1920, the vessel was sold to Luis Ibrán, likely to 'Sociedad Luis Ibrán Armador', of which Luis Ibrán was the biggest shareholder, of Aviles, Spain, & renamed Inocencio Figaredo. Thanks to Álvaro Álvarez Gascón, I can advise that the vessel essentially did not change hands until 1937/38. Luis Ibrán passed away in 1923 & Vicente Figaredo in 1929. And as a result of Spanish law, the ownership had to change from 'Sociedad Luis Ibrán Armador' in 1919 through to 'La Compañía Vicente Figaredo Herrero Armador' in 1927, & finally to 'Sección Marítima de Minas de Figaredo', in essence the Figaredo Family Trust. It was likely used, as was Vicente Figaredo, to carry coal from mines at Villabona, northern Spain, to Barcelona & Tarragona, & also Bilbao & many other Spanish ports. And returning with cereals, pyrites, superphosphates etc. In 1920, the vessel, while en route from Port Tampa, Florida, to Malaga, Spain,  was stranded off the coast of Florida. It was re-floated & taken to Key West, Florida. Alfonso Pais, of Pola de Siero, Asturias, Spain, advises, (thanks!), re Vicente Figaredo as can be read here. During the Spanish Civil War (1937/38), the vessel was confiscated, along with most of the merchant Asturian fleet, by the Asturias & León Government, then an independent territory. It made 3 trips between Spain & Odessa (Soviet, Black Sea), returning with war materials. On the 3rd trip, the vessel was seized by the Soviet Government & interned at Odessa re war materials previously sent & presumably not paid for. The ship’s crew were detained for different lengths of time; some were released after 2 years, others thru 1957 & some were never released. I had previously indicated that in 1939, the vessel was sold to 'Black Sea State Shipping Co.' likely a Soviet Union/USSR state shipping company, & renamed Bryansk. But that must have been the above seizure/internment, & not a 'sale'. On Aug. 21, 1941, the vessel was en route, in ballast, (but carrying civilian evacuees from Odessa), from Odessa to Sevastopol, with K. S. Goronenko in command. It was attacked & bombed by German/Romanian aircraft & sunk. At 46.32N/30.52E, in the Black Sea. Have read no detail of the circumstances or if lives were lost. Alfonso Pais advises also, that a diving club in the Ukraine seems to refer on their website to the Bryansk. But no details are available as this listing is created. Despite all of the above, the WWW record for this ship is modest. Most of the data was attained from 'Google Books' 'snippets' of data, hence the frequent use of the word 'likely'! Or from Álvaro & Alfonso. But ... in Apl. 2011, Igor Zaytsev, the Editor of 'Ultimate Depth magazine', a Moscow based diving magazine, has provided a 'pdf' file, in Russian, which contains, I am advised, references to Bryansk, (available here), with a translation of the Bryansk related text to hopefully follow. The 'pdf' contains underwater images by photographer Andrey Nekrasov & four of Andrey's Bryansk images are available at left. We thank both Igor & Andrey! Anything you can add and/or correct? Images?

49 Roker
3499 tons
Hull 271

106424
1898

A cargo ship, clipper bow & clipper stemmed. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 109.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 359 ft., speed? Built at the cost of £33,500 for James Westoll Esq., i.e. James Westoll Line, of Sunderland. Westoll Line was noted for the carriage of coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & for its involvement in the Black Sea grain trade. The vessel's maiden voyage was from the River Wear to the U.S.A. via Cardiff, under Captain A. B. Taylor. On Mar. 12, 1933 the vessel was sold for breaking up, & on Jul. 24, 1933, the vessel arrived at Rosyth, Firth of Forth, Scotland, to be broken up. The WWW seems to be silent about this vessel. Can you add anything at all?

50 Saxon Prince
3471 tons
Hull 282

110336
1899

A passenger ship. Per 1 (data, note that there is no 'Seagull', that word being a translation into English of Möwe), 2 [Prince Line (2)], 3 (1/2 way down), 4 (Sir James Knott & Prince Line, p.#3), 5 (ref. to 1916 loss), 6 (Granit sinking), 7 (fine data re Möwe, 70% down), 8 (Möwe, data in German), 9 (image ex 8), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 107.5 metres (352 ft. 7 in.) long, speed of 13 (or 9 or 10) knots. With accommodation for a few passengers, it would seem. Built for Prince Line Ltd. (owned by James Knott), of Newcastle, primarily for the New York to South America trade. In Dec. 1902, the vessel arrived in ballast at New York from Durban, South Africa, & was quarantined due to an outbreak of bubonic plague. It would seem that in 1906 the vessel was detained, at Japan, I presume, by Japanese warship Akashi. In Sep. 1910, the vessel was quarantined at Rotterdam, after a cook died & 4 other crew members fell ill. On Jul. 14, 1912, while en route from Middlesbrough to S. America with a general cargo, the vessel was in collision with Granit, a 972 ton Swedish steamer, in fog, between Whitby & Flamborough Head. While the bow damage to Saxon Prince was modest, Granit was holed & sunk. The crew of Granit were taken aboard Saxon Prince & transferred to tug Empress of India to be landed at Middlesbrough. On Feb. 12, 1916, the vessel sailed from Norfolk, Virginia, for Manchester, U.K., under the command of William S. (Storm) Jameson, with a varied cargo that included explosives, cotton, rye grain, eggs, cheese & steel ingots. Saxon Prince was captured by German auxiliary cruiser Möwe & scuttled with explosives. On Feb. 25, 1916, 620 miles W. of Fastnet Rock (which is the SW tip of Ireland). The crew was taken to Wilhelmshaven, Germany, where Möwe arrived on Mar. 4, 1916 with personnel taken from many vessels including Westburn. 7 Danish crew members were released (Denmark was a neutral country). The other 26 were interned at Hamburg, as prisoners of war. Möwe is an amazing ship indeed in WW1 history, but her exploits are beyond the scope of these pages. Images of Saxon Prince are scarce. Anything you can add?

51 Anglo-African
4186 tons
Hull 292

112770
1900

A cargo ship. Per 1 (wreck & image), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 370 ft (about 115 metres) long. Built for 'Nitrate Producers' Steamship Co., Ltd.', (Anglo Line), Lawther, Latta & Co. Ltd. of London, managers. On Jan. 7, 1909, while en route from Tocopilla, Chile, to Baltimore, with a cargo of nitrates, was stranded on a shoal near Smith Island, Virginia, & wrecked. 4 miles S of Cape Charles, near mouth of Chesapeake Bay. At 37.03.27N/75.54.34W. Wreck lies in 25/30 ft. of water, a dive & angling site, today. WWW data is most limited. Can you add anything?

52 Daghestan
3466 tons
Hull 296

109712
1900

A cargo ship. Per 1 [data about 48% down, Daghestan (1)], 2 (wreck detail), 3 (wreck reference), 4 & 5 (NY Times articles re sinking), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 107.6 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 353.1 ft., schooner rigged, crew of approx. 35 (in 1908). Daghestan or Dagestan? A republic in the North Caucasus region of S. Russia, near the Caspian Sea. Built for 'Hindustan Steam Shipping Co. Ltd.' ('Hindustan'), which company was owned by 'J. W. Squance & Co.', a partnership of J. W. Squance & F. J. Common. Registered at Sunderland. Hindustan became the main ship owning arm of Common Brothers Ltd., of Newcastle, formed in 1907. On Dec. 18, 1908, Captain Haig in command, the vessel was en route from New York to Marseilles, France, with a cargo of grain (the NY Times said 'a valuable cargo of miscellaneous merchandise'). The vessel was feeling its way slowly to sea in fog (described as slight or very thick in different accounts), whistle blowing & in a stiff breeze, with Harry Petersen, a pilot aboard, when, near the entrance to Gedney Channel, off Sandy Hook, New Jersey, the vessel was in collision with Catalone, 3788 tons, inbound to New York from Boston. Catalone struck the port side of Daghestan, creating a gaping hole in her hull. The vessel soon but gradually sank. Some of the Daghestan crew scrambled aboard Catalone's bow at the time of the collision, while the others took to ship's boats, made it to Catalone, & were transferred to New York, a pilot boat. No loss of life, it would appear. The vessel came to rest on a ledge but a day later slipped off the ledge into 60/70 ft. of water. The wreck is still there today, but there is very little left of it.  Catalone was scarcely damaged. Anything you can add? An image of the vessel?

53 South America
4197 tons
Hull 291

112738
1900

A cargo ship. Per 1 (wreck image, thanks to 'chill'), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 112.9 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular (370.3 ft.), speed of 11 knots. Built for Southern Steam Shipping Co. Limited ('Southern'), Lawther, Latta & Co. Ltd., of London, the managers. Southern? Have seen a data 'snippet' which stated that it was 'controlled on behalf of Shorts'. In 1907, the vessel was 'transferred' to 'Nitrate Producers' Steamship Co., Ltd.', (Anglo Line), with no change of manager. On Mar. 13, 1912, while en route, in ballast, from Hamburg, Germany, to Cardiff, Wales, the vessel ran ashore at St. Loy's Bay (Cove), Land's End, Cornwall, (9 miles W. of Penzance). A Paul Bros. (of Penzance) postcard says at 'Boscenna Bay', which seems to correctly be 'Boskenna Bay.' The brilliant image provided at top left is from an expired eBay listing, a fine glass slide of the vessel on the rocks in 1912. With tiny Abertay beside her. Abertay, 1029 tons, built 1888 in Renfrew, Scotland, & then owned, I read, by 'Soc. Bois et Charbons F. Le Brise', ran ashore at the same spot in thick fog 7 months later, on Oct. 14, 1912, while en route from Lorient, Brittany, to Barry, Wales, with pit wood (pit props?). The Abertay crew hailed South America & boarded her. The Newlyn lifeboat attended but was not required. All the images are great. Can you help with more data or imagery?

54   Anglo-Canadian
4239 tons
Hull 300

114766
1901

A cargo ship. Per 1 (60% down), 2, 3, 4, 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 380 ft. long, speed of 12 knots. Built for 'Nitrate Producers' Steamship Co., Ltd.', (Anglo Line), Lawther, Latta & Co. Ltd. of London, managers. Used as a troopship during WW1. Carried personnel to Dunkirk, France in Oct. 1914. And transported 1045 personnel from the Royal Irish Rifles to Le Havre, France in early Nov. 1914. On Nov. 29, 1914, left Southampton bound for Le Havre, with 493 military personnel & their equipment, including 513 horses. On Jan. 21, 1918, was torpedoed & sunk by U-63, 33 miles SE of Malta. At 35.15N/15.05E. 3 lives lost. WWW data about vessel is fragmentary but an image does exist (3). Anything to add?

55   Coniscliffe
3920 tons
Hull 301

114637
1901

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 108.2 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 355 ft., speed? Built at the cost of £55,000 for James Westoll, i.e. James Westoll Line, of Sunderland, James Westoll being the managing owner. Westoll Line was noted for the carriage of coal on the E. coast of the U.K. & for its involvement in the Black Sea grain trade. Its maiden voyage was on Jan. 26, 1902, from the Tyne to Genoa, Robert Eggleton in command. Indeed Robert Eggleton died of diabetes when the ship was at Odessa (Ukraine, Russia, Black Sea), at a date in 1902, & is buried in the British Cemetery there. One voyage that is briefly WWW referenced - from Bombay to Hull in 1910. On Mar. 21, 1912, while en route from Port Said to Kherson, (Ukraine, Black Sea, on river Dnieper), the vessel, in ballast, was stranded & wrecked - at Serpents Island, Sulina, Romania (also Black Sea, at a mouth of the Danube). Have not read the circumstances. Any loss of life? Can you add to the above or correct anything?

56 Hindustan
3756 tons
Hull 307

114646

Altai
San Martino
Romanitza
Treci
1902

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Hindustan fleet list, 40% down, Hindustan (2)], 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 109.9 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed? Built for 'Hindustan Steam Shipping Co. Ltd.', owned & managed by Common Brothers, both of Newcastle. In 1912, the vessel was sold to 'Northern Steamship Co. Ltd.', of St. Petersburg, Russia, & renamed Altai. The vessel was taken over by the 'Shipping Controller', i.e. the British Government, in 1918, quite late in WW1, with no change of name. Can anybody tell us about any WW1 service? In 1920, the vessel was returned to Russia (I presume to the vessel's former Russian owners), & then sold to 'Societe Maritime et Commerciale de France', of Rouen, France, & renamed San Martino. In 1922, the vessel was renamed Romanitza. In 1924 (or maybe in 1925), the vessel was sold to 'Compagnie de Commerce et d'Armement', of Dunkirk, France - with no change of name (are both those French company names correct?). In 1927, the vessel was sold to 'Prvo Dalmatinsko Trgovacko Drustvo SO', of Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia, & renamed Treci. (I saw a reference to 'Prilozi Za Povigest Jadranskih Brodovab', re the vessel, but I may be mistaken that it may relate.) On Aug. 10, 1933, while en route from Šibernik, Croatia, to Rotterdam, with a cargo of bauxite, the vessel foundered. At 41.03N/17.34E, 40 miles N. of Brindisi, Italy. I have not read the circumstances. Can you tell us what they were & if there was any loss of life? Can you add to the above and/or correct anything?

57 Coronation
3920 tons
Hull 294

114649

Coralie Horlock
Ramon Mumbru
1903

A cargo ship. With quite a history! Per 1 (data), 2 (Taylor & Sanderson), 3 (1913 wreck at Ravenscar, with postcard image), 4 (page in Spanish with image as Ramon Mumbru), 5 (re Horlock), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 111.6 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular (366 ft.), speed of 10 knots. Built for Taylor & Sanderson Steam Shipping Company, of Sunderland, which company became Taylor & Sanderson Steam Shipping Company, Limited in 1899. On Jan. 12, 1913, Nicholas T. (Thompson) Phillips in command, while en route from Bremen, Germany to Sunderland, in ballast, was wrecked at Ravenscar during a snowstorm. (Ravenscar is a coastal village in North Yorkshire, S. of Whitby & 10 miles N. of Scarborough.) The crew, I read, all made it to the shore without assistance. 'Wrecked' may be, in the fullness of time, too strong a word! Better 'stranded' perhaps. The rocks that had penetrated her hull were blasted away & the vessel damage was patched with 80 tons of cement. A number of unsuccessful attempts were made to free the vessel & in Sep. 1913 her insurers declared her to be a total loss. However (how interesting), the very next day she was floated off! But a month later 'was burnt out in Hartlepool Docks'. And presumably was then refurbished since the vessel was, in 1914, sold to Frederick W. Horlock ('Horlock'), of Sunderland, but more likely of Mistley, Essex, & renamed Coralie Horlock. In Aug. 1914, the vessel was detained at Hamburg. Extensive litigation at the time, I read, concerning non-payment of wages to her crew. It became, in 1917, a transport vessel for the Imperial German Navy & in Jan. 1918 became a submarine target vessel. What is such a vessel, presumably not an actual target? If so, how did it survive? Can anybody advise? In Dec. 1918, the vessel was recovered by her owners, presumably Horlock. It was sold, in 1919, to 'Domingo Mumbru S.A.', of Barcelona, Spain, & renamed Ramon Mumbru. On Jun. 4, 1921, while en route from Genoa, Italy, to Barcelona, Spain, in ballast, the vessel suffered a bunker explosion & was beached at Cape Taillat. The vessel was refloated, but 2 days later, on Jun. 6, 1921, it caught fire & sank at nearby Cavalaire Bay. Both places seem to be a little to the E. of Toulon, France. Anything you can add? It would be most welcome.

58 Dovedale
2907 tons
Hull 308

114436

Sibir
San Paolo
Oxholm
Psara
1903

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 99.2 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular. Built for G. H. Elder & Co. ('Elder'), of Newcastle. It would seem that Elder may have been unable to pay for the ship. A 'snippet' re a 1908 court case advises that Short Brothers Limited owned 56 shares of Elder, as collateral for a debt of £33,000. In 1906, the vessel was sold to Sunniside Steamship Co. Ltd., also of Newcastle, with no change of name.  In 1907, the vessel was sold to Northern Steamship Co. Ltd. ('Northern'), of Mariupol (SE Ukraine on the Sea of Azov), Russia, & renamed Sibir. The British Government owned the vessel in 1918 (under what circumstances? Presumably WW1 related) & in 1920 ownership reverted to Northern. In 1920 (or 1921) the vessel was sold to 'Société Maritime et Commerciale de France', of Rouen, France, & renamed San Paolo. The vessel was sold again, in 1922, to 'Rederi A/S Limfjorden', of Aalborg, Denmark, & renamed Oxholm. The vessel was sold for the last time, in 1923, to C. D. Calafatis, of Syra, Greece, & renamed Psara. On Jun. 21, 1933, the vessel arrived at Savona, Italy, to be broken up. I thank Miramar for their data - really the only data WWW available about this vessel. Can anyone add anything? Another image?

59 Kelvinbank
3676 (or 4209) tons
Hull 312

119064
1903

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per 1 (data), 2 (Mar. 22, 1916), 3 & 4 (both re Mar. 22, 1916 sinking), 5 (NY Times archive, May 25, 1907), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 362.2 ft. long, speed of 12 1/2 knots. Built for Glasgow Steam Shipping Company, of Glasgow, (J. Black & Co., the manager). On May 16, 1907, while 2 days out from Cardiff en route to New York, the vessel rescued the entire crew of Helios, a Norwegian barque which had 10 ft. of water in her hold having sprung a leak in a storm. Helios crew was transferred to the Cork pilot cutter & landed at Cork. The abandoned Helios was set on fire, presumably otherwise a danger to shipping. Kelvinbank was sunk, on Mar. 22, 1916, in the roadstead off Le Havre, France, by German submarine UB-18, having just arrived from Buenos Aires with cargo of frozen meat & oats. 1 life was lost. The 2nd thumbnail image at left shows a long expired eBay item, a splendid oil painting (25 x 39 in.) by John Henry Mohrmann 'almost certainly' of the vessel on its 1904 maiden voyage in the English Channel - with the white cliffs of Dover in background perhaps? The work was sold via eBay in Aug. 2013 - 1st thumbnail image. Can anyone add anything?

60   Anglo-Peruvian
5494 tons
Hull 324

120616
1905

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data), 2 (Canada iceberg data 55% down Anglo-Peruvian), 3 (Mohawk), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 418 ft. (about 130 or so metres) long, speed of 12 knots. Built for 'Nitrate Producers' Steamship Co., Ltd.', (Anglo Line), Lawther, Latta & Co. Ltd. of London, managers. Presumably for the South American nitrate trade. On Apl. 10, 1906, Anglo-Peruvian left the Tyne for Philadelphia in ballast, with Captain William Curtis in command. Data re what later happened off the coast of Newfoundland is in conflict. Per 4, on Apl. 21, 1906 the vessel hit an iceberg, & sank three days later, i.e. on Apl. 24, 1906. No exact location stated. 2 confirms both dates. However 1 advises that vessel encountered many icebergs on Apl. 20, 1906 & that evening, in dense fog ('thick' means 'dense fog', I presume), they saw a great bank of ice & hit it almost simultaneously. Vessel took on water & it soon became apparent that the vessel could not be saved. A few hours later, the entire crew of 37 took to the boats & the vessel then sank. Crew were rescued by Mohawk, headed eastbound, & landed at Weymouth. Anything to add? An image?

61 Cairnavon
1591 tons
Hull 325

118657

Soutra
Emmi
Schirmek
Sperrbrecher 166
Schirmeck
1905

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Cairn Line, Cairnavon (2)], 2 (data, 40% down, Cairnavon), 3 (Emmi, data), 4 (May 30, 1942), 5 (Copenhagen), 6 (Obra), 7 (extensive WW2 history, in German), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 75.9 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots. Built for the Cairn Line of Steamships, of Newcastle, who had, over time, 4 vessels named Cairnavon. In 1917, the vessel was sold to Christian Salvesen & Co., of Leith, nr. Edinburgh, Scotland, & in 1919 was renamed Soutra. In 1937, the vessel was sold to i) 'Oy Wildfart, Ltd.', of Finland, with Holger Liljestrand, of Munkkiniemi, the managers, or ii) H. Lilliestrand, of Munksnäs, Finland, & renamed Emmi. Registered at Helsinki. But have also read Estonian flag 1937/39 & Finnish 1939/42. In 1942, the vessel was seized by the Germans & renamed Schirmek. Later data is a little confusing. It would seem to have become a German Navy vessel, named Sperrbrecher 166. And on May 30, 1942 was in a collision, or maybe was sunk, by HMS Obra. Presumably raised & continued in service since on Jan. 31, 1944, the vessel was transferred to Helmsing & Grimm, of Gdansk & named Schirmeck, 'designed to help repair yard after Frederikshavn'? On Sep. 29, 1944, the vessel was involved in a collision with Bahia Camarones at Copenhagen, Denmark, & sank. The vessel was raised & under repair at Copenhagen, but on Nov. 15, 1944, it was destroyed by sabotage. The wreck was later raised for its scrap. Am unable to properly understand the extensive data at 9 in a WWW translation. So the above text most probably needs correction. Can you add to or correct the above? 

62 Cairnnevis
1587 tons
Hull 326

118660

Tolsta
Juss
Sevilla
Castillo Gibralfaro
Carlos Tartiere
1905

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Cairn Line, Cairnnevis), 2 (Christian Salvesen, Tolsta, summary data), 3 (Empresa Nacional Elcano, Castillo Gibralfaro image 90% down), 4 (Compañia Trasmediterránea, but no ref. to vessel), 5 (Vasco-Asturiana, Carlos Tartiere, 60% down), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 78.9 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 9 knots. Built for 'Cairn Line of Steamers', (or maybe 'Steamships'), of Newcastle, 'Cairns, Noble & Co.', also of Newcastle, the managers. In 1917, the vessel was sold to Christian Salvesen & Co., of Leith, nr. Edinburgh, Scotland, & in 1919 was renamed Tolsta. In 1937, the vessel was sold to 'H. Lilliestrand', of Munksnas, Finland. On Jan. 22, 1938, the vessel was captured in the Straits of Gibraltar by auxiliary cruiser Mallorca (A & B) & renamed Sevilla by the Nationalist Government of Spain. In 1939, the vessel was seized by the Spanish Republican Government, was later transferred to 'Compañia Trasmediterránea', of Barcelona, Spain, & renamed Castillo Gibralfaro. In 1948, the vessel was sold to 'Empresa Nacional Elcano S.A.', of Cadiz, Spain, with no change of name. In 1954, the vessel was sold to 'Compañia de Navegación Vasco-Asturiana', also of Cadiz, & in 1955 renamed Carlos Tartiere, (named after the founder of 'Real Oviedo', a Spanish football team). Sold again in 1964, to 'Sociedad Metalúrgica Duro Felguera', with no change of name. The vessel was scrapped in Spain in Q2 of 1974. The above text most probably needs correction. Can you add to or correct the above?

63 Salient
3879 tons
Hull 323

119210
1905

A cargo ship. Per 1 (article re Arthur McClelland's diary, now a book, re maiden voyage), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 110 metres long, (346 ft.) speed of 10 knots. Built for James Westoll ('Westoll'), of Sunderland, managing owner of the vessel. At a cost of £36,000. 25 crew & 4 apprentices. The vessel's maiden voyage, in Mar. 1905, was to carry coal (& 2 passengers) from South Shields to Genoa, Italy, then into the Black Sea to load grain at Kherson, Ukraine, for a return voyage to Rotterdam. A minor collision, on that maiden voyage, at Kherson with Tregarthen. WWW data about vessel seems to be essentially non-existent. Per Miramar, on Jul. 10, 1935 the vessel arrived at Blyth to be broken up. But ... Clive Ketley's notes indicate that the vessel was sold on Jul. 31, 1936 to Leeds Shipping Co., of Cardiff. If you can clarify the above or add anything, your input would be welcomed.

64 Wallace
3930 tons
Hull 320

119206

Wooburn
1905

A cargo ship, a collier. Per 1 (Taylor & Sanderson history at foot of page), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 355.3 ft. long (108.3 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 9 1/2 knots, signal letters HBTV. Built for 'The Taylor & Sanderson Steam Shipping Co. Limited' ('Taylor'), of Sunderland & maybe of London also. Possibly named for John Wallace Taylor (1844/1928), who was for many years the managing director of Taylor, a coal exporting company which went into voluntary liquidation in 1917. James Smith advises (thanks!) that from Feb. 5, 1916 thru Mar. 20, 1916 the vessel was requisitioned by the Admiralty for service as a collier - pennant No. Y 3.976. In 1917, presumably a part of the Taylor fleet disposal process, the vessel was sold to English Steamship Co. Ltd., of Swansea, Wales. And in 1919, was sold again, to Lewis Steamship Co. Ltd., also of Swansea, in both cases with no change of vessel name. In 1925, the vessel was sold to Britain Steamship Co. Ltd., of London, & renamed Wooburn. Wooburn? A village in Buckinghamshire. On Jan. 3, 1933, the vessel arrived at Savona, Italy, to be broken up. The WWW seems to be silent about this vessel, so I am particularly grateful for James Smith's data & also that of Miramar. If you can add to the above, your input would be welcomed.

65 Anglo-Mexican
4796 tons
Hull 342

125666

Respice Patriam
Monreale
1908

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 120.1 metres long between perpendiculars, speed of 12 knots. Built for 'Nitrate Producers' Steamship Co., Ltd.', ('Anglo Line'), Lawther, Latta & Co. Ltd. of London, the managers. Presumably for the South American nitrate trade. In 1927, the vessel was sold to 'Fratelli S. & E. Accame', of Genoa, Italy & renamed Respice Patriam. ('Fratelli' means 'brothers'). And in 1928, it was sold again, to 'Navigazione Alta Italia S.A.', ('Creole Line'), of Genoa, & renamed Monreale. On Apl. 13, 1932 the vessel arrived at the Savona, Italy, ship breaking facilities of 'Balla & Vervloet' to be broken up. I could find very little on the WWW re this vessel. Anything to add? Another image?

66 Octo
1620 tons
Hull 360
1910

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 78.9 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots. I am grateful for a 'scott-base' eBay listing for knowledge about the vessel. Without that source I would have no data at all. Built, I believe, for 'Akties Helkla', with 'Mail & Holby', of Kristiania (Oslo), Norway, likely both the owners & managers. In 1910, the vessel was on a regular route of Hull, U.K., to Saint Petersberg, Russia. On Jun. 13, 1918, the vessel hit a mine & sank approx. 4 miles E. of Zembra Island, a small island in the Gulf of Tunis, Tunisia. Could find nothing on the WWW re this vessel. Anything you can add? Another image?

67 Anticosti
4836 tons
Hull 364

131314

Batiscan
1911

A self-trimming collier. Per 1 & 2 (sinking refs., Batiscan), 3 & 4 (relief to Belgium), 5 (data & image, Batiscan), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 114.3 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular (375 ft.), speed of 11 knots (attained 12 1/2 knots at her sea trials held on Jan. 31, 1911), signal letters HSDG, constructed on the 'Isherwood' system. The vessel was specially designed to be chartered by Dominion Coal and Iron Co., of Sydney, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada, & engaged in the shipment of coal from Sydney to Montreal, Quebec, Canada, in summer months & to Halifax, Saint John &  Boston in the winter months. The vessel featured 10 very wide hatches, & holds clear of all obstructions, to permit rapid loading & unloading of cargo. The names? Both are Quebec, Canada names. 'Anticosti' - a large island in the middle of the St. Lawrence River, & 'Batiscan' - a river that runs into the St. Lawrence River NE of Trois-Rivières (Three Rivers), Quebec. The vessel was launched as Anticosti for 'Sydney, Cape Breton & Montreal Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Liverpool, E. F. & W. Roberts the managers, but delivered as Batiscan to the same company.  On Dec. 5, 1914, the vessel left Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, with 6,700 tons of wheat & grain under the auspices of 'American Commission for the Relief of Belgium' ('American'), sailing with 'safe conduct' approval of the German Government. The vessel on Feb. 18, 1915, chartered to American, carried relief supplies, mainly food, from Brooklyn, New York, to Rotterdam. Also in 1915, the vessel was sold, to 'Laurentian Steamship Co. Ltd.', managed by 'Edward Roberts & Herbert Roberts', both of Liverpool, with no change of vessel name. In Aug. 1915, the vessel, en route from Falmouth to Montreal, was in collision with Bengore Head, which had left Montreal for Belfast, Northern Ireland. Off Hare Island, about 4 miles above Cape Dogs, in the lower St. Lawrence River. Bengore Head had to be beached on Hare Island reef, & it would appear suffered damage estimated at $30,000. Batiscan, less damaged, was able to continue. An Inquiry was held in Canada into the matter & Batiscan was held to be at fault. The licence of the Batiscan captain was suspended for 2 years & both pilots were also held to be at fault - the licence of the pilot of Bengore Head had his license cancelled while the pilot of Batiscan was fined $100. The above ex Google 'snippets'. What later happened to Batiscan? WWW data is fragmentary. And absent access to Lloyd's Register data, I cannot confirm the accuracy of the above data re owners, managers & charterers. So often such data is mis-recorded. It would seem that in Mar. 1918, the vessel, (then said to have been owned by Dominion Coal Company of Sydney), left Louisburg, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, (perhaps ex Sydney), for Saint John, New Brunswick, with a cargo of coal. The vessel went missing in a storm & it would appear that all hands were lost. I have read that the applicable date was either Mar. 10, 1918 or Mar. 15, 1918, & that the Captain's name was either 'Scanlan' or John Evans, of Cardigan. Where did it happen? I read i) in the Tusket Islands, S. of Yarmouth, Nova Scotia & ii) off Gannet Rock, in the Bay of Fundy, S. of Grand Manan Island. Both locations are on the vessel's likely course but are about 80 miles apart. I have not read anything about the circumstances. Anything you can add? Or correct? Another image? #1833

68 Burmese Prince
4825 tons
Hull 360

129765

Lucille de Larrinaga
1911

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Burmese Prince), B (e-Bay image, Lucille de Larrinaga), 1 (Prince Line, Burmese Prince), 2 (Larrinaga Line, Lucille de Larrinaga), 3, 4 & 5 (NY Times articles), 6 (Ellis Island, 1919 passenger list) 7 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register listings, Lucille de Larrinaga, 1930/31 thru 1934/35), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 396.0 ft. long (120.70 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 knots, accommodation for 12 passengers, signal letters HSKC later GCRB. Built for Prince Line Limited, owned & managed by James Knott, which company from 1917 was owned by Furness Withy & Co.  It would seem that the U.S. Government considered buying the ship in 1914. The vessel clearly had a close association with France during WW1, but I have not really understood her role. On Oct. 7, 1919, the vessel, en route from Le Havre, France, to New York, put into Queenstown, Ireland, with a fire in her bunkers. On Oct. 27, 1919, the vessel arrived at New York from Le Havre with 67 passengers aboard - it was this vessel, I presume, since there was only one of the name. In 1920, the manager was Herbert E. Weddell. On Nov. 24, 1924, James Anderson, an able seaman, fell into the ship's hold & died. In 1926, the ship carried 16,500 bales of cotton to Boston, Massachusetts. In 1927, the vessel was sold, for £22,000 or U.S. $155,200 to 'Miguel de Larrinaga Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Liverpool, with William M. Clarke the manager (in 1930 at least) & renamed Lucille de Larrinaga. Larrinaga & Co. Ltd. became the managers in 1930/31. The owner from 1931/32 was rather 'Larrinaga Steamship Co. Ltd.' On Jun. 2, 1934, the vessel arrived at Blyth, Northumberland, to be broken up at the shipbreaking facilities there of Hughes Bolckow Shipbreaking Co. Anything you can add? Another image?

69 Wabana
4804 (2676 net) tons
Hull 367

131402

Canby
1911

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Canby), 2 & 3 ex 4 (collision with Annie Roberts), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 375 ft. (about 120 metres) long, speed of 10 1/2 knots, featuring hinged hatch covers to speed up the loading of iron ore loaded ex the Bell Island, Newfoundland & Labrador, iron mine. Built for British & Chilian Steamship Co. Limited, (W. Lowden & Co. the manager) of Liverpool. On Oct. 22, 1913, when outside Sydney Harbour & during a storm, Annie Roberts, a Newfoundland schooner, ran into Wabana, resulting in the instant sinking of Annie Roberts & the loss of 4 of the five Annie Roberts crew members. Wabana was, at the time, under charter to Dominion Coal Co. The vessel was later sold to Wabana Steamship Co. ('Wabana') of Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. In 1931 the vessel was purchased by Pool Shipping Company (Ropner) from Wabana & renamed Canby. On Feb. 19, 1934 the vessel grounded & was wrecked 1 mile E of Guion Island, SE coast of Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, while en route from Saint John, New Brunswick, to Louisbourg, Nova Scotia, in ballast. The wreck lies in 50 ft. of water. It would seem that an official inquiry was held into the wreck, but I have not no far located a copy of the resulting report. A builder's model of Wabana, painstakingly restored by museum staff & about 9 ft. long, is on display at the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic in Halifax. 

70 Anglo-Californian
7333 tons
Hull 372

132711

Vandalia
1912

A cargo ship. Which became a horse transport vessel in WW1. Per 1 [Vandalia (1)], 2 (Vandalia, 9.6.1918), 3 (NY Times archive Jul. 1915), 4 (July 1915), 5 (data 90% down), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 129.5 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 12 knots. I should state that a number of sites state that the vessel was built by Caird & Co, of Greenock. I think incorrectly, see Miramar data via 6. Built for 'Nitrate Producers' Steamship Co., Ltd.', (Anglo Line), with Lawther, Latta & Co. Ltd. of London, the managers. Engaged in the South American nitrate trade. Chartered by the Admiralty re WW1 & became a horse transport vessel. On Jul. 4, 1915, while unarmed & en route from Montreal, Canada to Avonmouth (Severn Estuary at Bristol) with 927 horses, was chased & attacked by the surfaced U-39, (this German page says by U-38 assisted by U-20) some 90 miles SW of Queenstown, Ireland. The vessel survived due to the incredible bravery of Captain Frederick D. Parslow, & his son, also named Frederick Parslow. An amazing story. See the webmaster's extensive page re that attack at 4. The father, who died when hit by a shell during the attack, was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross, while his son, who continued the defensive manoeuvres, was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. The vessel was sold in 1915 to Cunard Steamship Company, Limited (or maybe just Cunard Line), & renamed Vandalia. Sold, it is stated, by Lawther, Latta & Co. Ltd., which is a puzzle. Since they were, I thought, the managers & not the owners. On Jun. 9, 1918, while en route, in ballast, from Liverpool to Montreal, Canada, Vandalia was torpedoed by U-96 & sunk in St. George's Channel (between Ireland & Wales), 18 miles from 'the Smalls', at 51.44N/6.10W. No loss of life. It would seem that an image of the vessel was in the Jul. 17, 1915 edition of Illustrated London News. Anything to add?

71 Anglo-Egyptian
7379 (or 5758) tons
Hull 376

135166

Olovsborg
Lesteloide
1912

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Lloyd Brasileiro, Lesteloide), 2 (page in Finnish with 2 images) 3 ('pdf' re 1940 storm, L. column, Olovsborg), 4 (A25), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy data, Lesteloide), 6 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyds Register data, Olovsborg, 1930/31 thru 1941/42), 7 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyds Register data, Lesteloide, 1941/42 thru 1945/46), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 129.5 metres long, speed of 12 (or maybe 14) knots. Built for 'Nitrate Producers' Steamship Co., Ltd.', (Anglo Line), Lawther, Latta & Co. Ltd. of London, managers, presumably for the South American nitrate trade. In Sep. 1914, the vessel was converted at Cockatoo Island Drydock, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, to transport 127 troops & 552 horses. The vessel was used as an Australian troopship during WW1, it would seem, through to Apl. 16, 1917. The vessel specifically carried the 4th & 8th Light Australian Horse Regiments to Egypt in Dec. 1914 & in Feb. 1915. The vessel was sold, in 1927, to J. A. Zachariassen, of Nystad, Finland, & renamed Olovsborg. On Jan. 24, 1940, while en route from Norfolk, Virginia, for Japan, via the Panama canal, the vessel lost one member of the crew in an intense storm. Four others suffered severe injuries, & all of the lifeboats were lost, so the vessel returned to Norfolk for extensive repairs. In 1941, the vessel was seized by the Government of Brazil, & in 1942 was transferred to 'Lloyd Brasileiro' & renamed Lesteloide. 28 WW2 convoy references as Lesteloide, all in the western Atlantic (New York, Guantanamo, Trinidad, Bahia, Key West). On convoy duty in Apl. 1944 Recife to Trinidad. In 1948, the vessel was transferred to the Brazilian Navy for use as a training ship. Was broken up at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 1955. Can you provide more information? Perhaps translate the above page written in Finnish?

72 Daghestan
3691 tons
Hull 375

132070

Antium
Bainsizza
Alberto Fassio
Essex Judge
Thorpehaven
Castillo Guadalest
1912

A cargo ship. Per 1 [data about 48% down, Daghestan (2)], 2 (Hansard, Thorpehaven), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 110 metres long, speed of 8 1/2 knots. Built for 'Common Brothers Ltd.', of Newcastle. But it could have been owned instead by Hindustan Steam Ship Co. Ltd., the main ship owning arm of Common Brothers. Sold in 1916 to Rome Steam Shipping Co., of London, (Fisher, Alimonda & Co. managers). In 1920, sold to Italian State Railways, of Rome, Italy, & renamed Antium. In 1923, sold to Parodi & Corrado, of Genoa, Italy, & renamed Bainsizza. In 1924, sold to 'Società Italiana di Navigazione Mercantile Villain & Fassio', also of Genoa, & renamed Alberto Fassio. In 1927, sold to Essex Transport & Trading Co., of London, (Meldrum & Swinson managers), & renamed Essex Judge. In 1937 sold to The Thameside Shipping Co. Ltd., of London, (P. B. Pandelis, managers?) & in 1938 renamed Thorpehaven. On Jun. 7/8, 1938, vessel, with a cargo of corn, was bombed by Spanish Nationalist aircraft, & on Jun. 10, 1938 was sunk at Alicante, Spain. But later raised & owned by the Spanish Government. In 1941, returned to service as Castillo Guadalest. In 1942, transferred to 'Empresa Nacional Elcano de la Marina Mercante, S.A.', of Madrid, Spain. On Aug. 24, 1951, 'sprang leak' & was abandoned in the western N Atlantic. At 39.33N/57.41W. Vessel foundered the next day, i.e. Aug. 25, 1951. Have not read the circumstances. Loss of life? WWW data is most limited. Am grateful for the data at 1. Can you add anything? Another image, perhaps?

73 Anglo-Brazilian
7468 (or 7494) tons
Hull 381

135294

Chepstow Castle
1913

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Chepstow Castle), 2 (modest Anglo-Brazilian image), 3 (investigation data available), 4 (Union-Castle), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 425 ft. 6 in. (about 130 or so metres) long, speed of 12 knots. Built for 'Nitrate Producers' Steamship Co., Ltd.', (Anglo Line), Lawther, Latta & Co. Ltd. of London, managers. Presumably for the South American nitrate trade. Involved in an accident perhaps (4) in 1914? Sold in 1915 to Union-Castle Mail Steamship Co. 'to augment ships requisitioned for war service' & renamed Chepstow Castle. In 1927, the first ship to berth at newly built port at Walvis Bay (Namibia, I believe). On Apl. 7, 1932, was wrecked at Toward Point, Rothesay Bay, & on May 10, 1932 arrived at Port Glasgow (both Scotland) to be broken up. Two of the above links say, however, broken up only in 1933. Anything to add?

74 Ellin
4577 (or 4575) tons
Hull 378

Odysseus
1913

A cargo ship. Per 1 (1917 u-boat attack), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy data, Odysseus,  but the Greek vessel only), 3 ('warsailors' - SC 165), 4 (wreck chart, #33), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 118.9 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, (405 ft. 6 in.), speed of 9 or 9 1/2 knots.  Built for 'S. G. Embiricos Ltd.' of London & Athens, Greece. Vessel registered at Andros, Greece, perhaps. On May 4, 1917, the vessel was torpedo attacked by U-82 when NW of Ireland. The vessel, damaged, was able to make port & no lives were lost. The vessel was sold in 1936 to 'Panaghis Ant Yannoulatos', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Odysseus. There would seem to be 51 (or maybe 60) WW2 convoy references for the vessel including 12 N. Atlantic crossings, service in Canadian waters, in the Indian Ocean (Bombay) & in the Mediterranean (Port Said) & also U.K. & N. America coastal. On Jan. 16, 1945, the vessel left Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, in Convoy SC 165 for Swansea Bay, with a cargo of grain & tanks (8 Fads). Are 'Fads' a reference to a type of tank? 4 indicates the cargo was grain & general. Now the 'convoyweb' listing indicates that the vessel 'returned' & was wrecked off Ketch Harbour on Jan. 17, 1945. It ran ashore & became a total wreck, at Sambro Island, or at Cape Sambro, or just west of Chebucto Head (all are said to be the wreck sites). The local divers call the wreck 'The Greek', I read. At 44.28N/63.33W. But I have not read the circumstances or read whether there was any loss of life. Can you add anything? Another image, perhaps?

75 Rose Castle
7546 (or 7803) tons
Hull 388

137438
1915

A cargo ship, used as a collier/ore carrier. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy data, Rose Castle), 2 ('u-boat.net', wreck data, & image), 3 [Lancashire Shipping, Rose Castle (2)], 4 (events of Sep./Nov. 1942), 5 (the words of Gordon Hardy, a 1942 survivor), 6 (Montrose 1928 collision), 7 (wreck images), 8 (wreck site, image), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 138.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 knots. An early ship fitted with 'Hogg-Carr Patent Steel Hinged Hatch Covers', it would seem. Built for 'Lancashire Shipping Co. Ltd.' ('Lancashire'), 'J. Chambers & Co.' of Liverpool, the owners & managers. But I have also read, in a Google 'snippet' ex a 1915 issue of International Marine Engineering, Vol. 20, that the vessel was built for 'Rose Castle Steamship Company, Limited' ('Castle'), of Liverpool, to carry coal from Sidney [sic], Cape Breton, to Montreal, Quebec, both in Canada. Not sure how that 'fits' with the rest of the available data including the later data as below. I presume, however, that Castle was owned by Lancashire, though I have read nothing which says that was so. In 1917, the vessel was sold to 'T. Lewis' & in 1920 sold to 'Dominion Shipping of Canada' ('Dominion') - vessel not renamed on either occasion. On Jul. 27, 1928, in poor conditions, Rose Castle was in collision with C.P.S. Montrose, with over 1,000 passengers aboard, in the neighbourhood of buoy 39-C, Becancour Traverse, near Three Rivers, St. Lawrence River. Both vessels were badly damaged. Rose Castle was beached off Becancourt, but was re-floated & repaired at the 'Davie' drydock at Quebec. At the Aug. 1928 Inquiry, Montrose was found solely at blame for the collision. Rose Castle was then said to be a 'Dominion Coal Company' vessel. From 1930 to 1937, 8 advises that the vessel was owned by Port Line Ltd. (Commonwealth & Dominion Line). In early 1942, the vessel was owned by 'Rose Castle Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Halifax perhaps, (from 1937 to 1942. Same company as above? A company then related to Dominion perhaps?), 'Donaldson Brothers Ltd.' the managers. A few weeks before WW2 broke out, the vessel, while in the St. Lawrence River, was rammed by a German ship, (its name?) which had slipped its lines in Montreal & was making a dash for the open Atlantic. 42 WW2 convoy references all of which were Eastern Canada local voyages (between Wabana on Bell Island, St. John's, Sydney). On Oct. 20, 1942, the vessel, probably in convoy BW.9, when 16 miles SE of Ferryland Head, was hit by a dud (faulty detonator) torpedo, fired by U-69, Ulrich Gräf in command, which submarine, out of torpedoes, was unable to press the attack with its guns due to bad weather. Rose Castle suffered no damage it would appear. On Nov. 2, 1942, the vessel, Walter J. MacDonald in command, was at anchor at Bell Island, Conception Bay, Newfoundland, with a cargo of iron ore ex Wabana, waiting to sail with convoy WB-12 for Sydney, (most sites state WB-9, from Sydney, Nova Scotia to the U.K., a convoy number that seems not to be correct). Soon after 7:00 a.m. on Nov. 2, 1942, the vessel was hit by two torpedoes, fired, 3 minutes apart, by on-the-surface U-518, Friedrich-Wilhelm Wissmann in command (Wissman was on a mission to land a spy, Werner Alfred Volgmar Von Ianovski, in Eastern Canada - he was landed at 'Point de New Carlisle', in the Gaspé). Hit while at anchor, at 47.36N/52.57.30W. The vessel sank less than 90 seconds after the 2nd hit. How many lives were lost? A question not easy to answer. 23, 24 or 28 is stated at various WWW sites. And also 30 - I read (footnote #29 at page bottom) that 'The Canadian Book of Remembrance lists 28 crew deaths and two DEMS gunners.' The Captain, along with 17 crew & 2 gunners, were rescued by Royal Canadian Navy Fairmile motor launches. Those numbers may similarly be confused. The ship's bell hangs today in the Royal Canadian Legion on Bell Island. The ship? A wreck site today, located in 160 ft. of water, near Lance Cove, still in fine condition, upright & intact but damaged - with torpedo holes! Have seen references that the vessel carried iron ore to the U.K., but have seen no WW2 convoy references to that effect. In many cases, WWW data re particular vessels is in conflict, but such conflicts are often easily resolved. Not so easy in this case. Can you add anything? Another image, perhaps?

76 X-75
130 tons
Hull 401

Moiler
1915

A landing craft, later a barge. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). I have read very little about this modest vessel but thank 'riverseainternational', now long gone alas, for providing what little data we have - ex Coastal Ships, by D. Ridley Chesterton, published by Ian Allan Ltd. in 1967. The vessel was built for the Royal Navy as a landing craft. One of many such vessels built for the Gallipoli campaign - Short built many of them. Powered by a 'J. & C. G. Bolinders Co.', of Stockholm, 2 cyl. 'hot bulb' oil engine. In 1916, it became Moiler, owned by Ham River Grit Co. Ltd. ('Grit'). Ham River seems to be in Richmond, Surrey. Grit were granted a lease to extract gravel from lands there in 1904. The vessel was presumably used as a motor barge to transport sand & gravel from many places up to London. It later was owned by 'Hall Dredging Ltd.'. Can you add anything? Another image, perhaps?

77 Anglo-Chilean
9097 (or 9036 or 6987) tons
Hull 276

139163

Heraclides
Hermes
St. Francois
Alcamo
1916

A cargo ship, which certainly carried passengers also. Per 1 (1917 ref., 80% down), 2 [Houston, Heraclides (2)], 3 (image, Anglo-Chilean), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 491 ft. (or 470 ft.) long, speed of 11 or 12 1/2 knots. Built for 'Nitrate Producers' Steamship Co., Ltd.', (Anglo Line), with Lawther, Latta & Co. Ltd., of London, the managers. On May 13, 1917, the vessel exchanged fire with a German submarine in the Mediterranean, possibly sinking the submarine. In Nov. 1917, the vessel acted as leader of a convoy of ships between New York & the U.K. In fact, Anglo-Chilean made 18 trips to the U.S. in years 1917/1922, with cargo I presume, & passengers, as many as 69 on one 1920 voyage. The vessel visited Port Pirie, South Australia, in 1928. In 1930, the vessel was sold to R. P. Houston & Company (Houston Line), which company provided a Liverpool to Buenos Aires, Argentine, service, & renamed Heraclides. In 1939, the vessel was sold to Hermes Steamship Co. Ltd. (Vergottis Ltd., of London, the managers), & renamed Hermes. On Jun. 29, 1940, Hermes was seized at Algiers by the Vichy French Government, & renamed St. Francois. In Dec. 1942, the vessel may have been seized by the Germans & became owned by the Italian Government, & renamed Alcamo. On Feb. 24, 1943, the vessel, en route from Bizerta to Naples, was bombed by RAF aircraft & on Feb. 25, 1943 was sunk by a torpedo fired from an aircraft, 62 miles NNE of Marettimo (an island W. of Sicily). At 39.14N/12.30E. Can you add anything?

78 Celerol
2649 tons
Hull 410

140348
1917

A tanker. Per 1 (extensive historical data, 2 images, Celerol), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Celerol), 3 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyds Register data, Celerol, 1930/31 thru 1945/46), 4 (modest image, Celerol), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 342 ft. 6 in. or maybe 335 ft. long overall, 97.5 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular (320.0 ft.), speed of 14 (or 12) knots, signal letters GQMN later GVFY. How many in her crew? Built for The Admiralty. An 'RFA' (Royal Fleet Auxiliary) tanker, which carried petroleum & later carried oil products. Thru Nov. 9, 1919, 9 of the crew members deserted the ship - was that unusual? I do not recall reading of any other site listed vessel with so many desertions. Served in Norwegian waters & in the Baltic. On Jan. 28, 1920, the vessel left Latvia for Copenhagen, Denmark, & on the next day it ran aground off Amager Island, Drogden Channel, Latvia. She was unable to free herself, & many ships (HMS Grenville, HMS Caledon, tug St. Faith & others) helped her before she was pulled clear on Feb. 6, 1920 - it would seem by Kattegat, a Danish salvage ship. She sailed under her own power to Copenhagen & on Feb. 16, 1920 arrived (some mishaps along the way - a fire & a steering engine breakdown), at Rosyth, Firth of Forth, Scotland, for dry dock at Fife & repairs. An Inquiry was held into the grounding, but I have not read its conclusion. From Jan. 1926 to an unstated date in 1935, the vessel was in reserve at Rosyth. Was on the Bermuda station it would appear - on Nov. 4, 1936, Celerol commenced towing HMS Challenger, a survey ship whose boilers with major defects had 'collapsed', almost 2,000 miles from Port of Spain, Trinidad, to Bermuda, a rapid voyage of just over a week. On Oct. 26, 1937, the vessel assisted HMS Southampton in landing, at La Pallice (La Rochelle), France, 291 starving Spanish Civil War refugees, ex Maria Tero, a Spanish trawler which had broken down. Was in reserve at Devonport (Plymouth) at the start of WW2 in Sep. 1939. 22 WW2 convoy references, mainly, from May 1943, in the Mediterranean (Malta, Bizerta, Toulon, Naples, Ancona, Bari, etc) & (earlier) U.K. coastal incl. to Reykjavik, Iceland & service, likely in Jul. 1942 to Feb. 1943, in Norwegian waters & at Iceland. On Aug. 18, 1940, the vessel was attacked by German aircraft off Portland, Dorset, English Channel - no fatalities resulted. On Nov. 6, 1940, Neuralia dragged her anchors in the River Clyde & collided with Celerol as a result. On Apl. 16, 1941, the vessel collided with HMS Prince of Wales, a battleship, at Scapa Flow. On Jan. 4, 1943, the vessel collided with Namsos, while proceeding from Akureyri, to Hvalfjord, both Iceland. In Aug. 1944, the vessel participated in the Allied invasion of the South of France. In 1946, the vessel became 'Base oiler' at Hong Kong. On Mar. 29, 1953, the vessel was laid up at Rosyth. The vessel's end came in 1958. In Jun. 1958, the vessel was sold to BISCO (British Iron & Steel Company) to be scrapped. It arrived, on Jul. 9, 1958, at the Rosyth ship breaking facilities of 'Shipbreaking Industries Ltd.' but it was soon transferred to the nearby 'P. & W. MacLellan Ltd.' ship breaking facilities at Bo'ness, i.e. Borrowstounness, Scotland, where it arrived on Jul. 17, 1958. And was there broken up. We thank the folks at 1 for their comprehensive & most interesting history of the vessel. Can you add anything? #1866

79 Celtic Prince
8655 (or 8558 or 8559) tons
Hull 396

140717

Schönfels
Bahia Blanca
1918

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Prince Line, Celtic Prince (1)], 2 (image Celtic Prince, 5th image down), 3 [Hansa Line, Schönfels (2)], 4 [Hamburg South American Line, Bahia Blanca (2)], 5 [Celtic Prince (1)], 6 (extensive data page in German, many images), 7 (German data with image 50% down), 8 (data re sinking, with map & internment data), 9 (Wednesday, 10 January), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 449 ft. 6 in (141.61 metres) long, speed of 11 or 12 knots. Built for 'Prince Line Ltd. of Newcastle, (owned by Furness, Withy). Sister to Gaelic Prince. The vessel went aground at Île Saint-Barnabé, (Rimouski, St. Lawrence River, Canada), in Jul. 1918. Sold in 1926 to 'DDG Hansa' (Hansa Line - Deutsche Dampfschifffahrts-Gesellschaft "Hansa"), of Bremen, Germany & renamed Schönfels. Sold in 1938 to 'Hamburg-Sudamerikanische Dampfschifffahrts-Gesellschaft' (Hamburg South American Line) & renamed Bahia Blanca. On Sep. 11, 1939, vessel arrived at Rio de Janiero disguised as a Greek ship. On Jan. 9, 1940, trying to avoid the British blockade of Germany, & while en route from Rio De Janiero to Germany with a mixed cargo which included iron ore, tobacco & coffee, vessel hit an iceberg in the Denmark Strait (between Greenland & Iceland) & suffered extensive damage. 2 days later, on Jan. 11, 1940, the British light cruiser Newcastle sank the vessel with gunfire. At 66.09N/26.20W. I read that the crew of 62 reached Reykjavik, Iceland, aboard Hafstein (or maybe Hafsteinn), an Icelandic trawler, & there awaited repatriation to Germany. On May 10, 1940, Iceland was occupied by the Allies. The crew were arrested & transferred to internment camps in Great Britain & later in Canada. Anything to add?

80 Gaelic Prince
8579 or 8580 or 8634 (or 6506) tons. Can anybody tell us what happened, tonnage wise?
Hull 395

140711

Rheinfels
Bahia Castillo
1918

A cargo ship. Which would seem to have had more than its share of problems! Per 1 [Prince Line, Gaelic Prince (1)], 2 [Hansa Line, Rheinfels (3)], 3 [Hamburg South American Line, Bahia Castillo (2)], 4 [Gaelic Prince (1), at page bottom], 5 (NY Times 1919 article), 6 (1921 coconut oil story), 7 (German site, many wonderful images in the 3 vessel names), 8 (May 1, 1940, Bahia Castillo), 9 (Lloyd's Register data, Bahia Castillo, 1938/39 thru 1945/46 ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 137.0 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, (449 ft. 6 in.) speed of 11 (or 12) knots, signal letters JSVT, QMCV, DOFT. Built for 'Prince Line Ltd.' of Newcastle, (owned by Furness, Withy). Sister to Celtic Prince. In 1919, but at dates I have not yet read, Gaelic Prince towed Katrina Luckenbach approx. 1,350 miles to Hampton Roads & was awarded $93,000 respecting her salvage efforts. On Oct. 9, 1919, ex Manila & Cristobal, Panama, approaching New York & in the Ambrose Channel, Gaelic Prince was rammed in the port bow & holed above & below the waterline by Antigone, a U.S. Army Transport vessel (previously the German Neckar). Rain & mist at the time. In danger of sinking, Gaelic Prince proceeded at full speed to get beached - near the Roamer Shoals Lighthouse. Nobody hurt on either ship. A major & most interesting lawsuit resulted, which it would seem (yes?) was won by the owners of Gaelic Prince. The vessel went ashore again on the U.S. E. coast, on Mar. 30, 1921, at Great Round Shoal, Nantucket, & 8 days later jettisoned 900 tons of liquid coconut oil to permit the vessel to be re-floated. The oil congealed in the sea & was salvaged by the locals. The interesting story is linked above. On Jul. 16, 1926, the vessel collided in thick fog with Trelawny in the N. Atlantic, 400 miles W. of Bishop Rock (W. of Scilly Islands), & Trelawny sank. No loss of life (other than the ship's cat!). The vessel was sold in 1926 to 'DDG Hansa' (Hansa Line - Deutsche Dampfschifffahrts-Gesellschaft "Hansa"), of Bremen, Germany & renamed Rheinfels. And was sold in 1938 to 'Hamburg-Sudamerikanische Dampfschifffahrts-Gesellschaft' (Hamburg South American Line) & renamed Bahia Castillo. She arrived at Murmansk, Russia, on Aug. 29, 1939 from Santa Cruz (Tenerife), on a blockade breaking voyage. Can anybody explain the meaning of that? Became a naval troop transport at Hamburg, Germany, & on May 21, 1940 (date seems wrong or the next date may be wrong) was returned to Hamburg South American Line. On May 1, 1940, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by British submarine HMS Narwhal (N45) which was on a mine-laying mission. At  57.05N/11.35E, S.E. of Skagen near Hertha, N. of Denmark. The vessel was badly damaged, a total loss it proved to be, losing her rudder & screws. 10 lives were lost, 23 were wounded & 26 horses were lost also. The vessel was towed to Frederickshavn, Denmark, & then to Kiel, Germany, to be broken up in Sep. 1940. Can anybody explain the tonnages? Quite different numbers are stated & surely they cannot all be correct. The vessel was changed a little as is visible in the linked images. But enough to explain a 2,000 ton difference? It was Lloyd's Registered thru 1945/46. Anything to add?

81 Teakol
1137 tons
Hull 412

142290

San Dario
1918

A tanker. Which had quite a long life. Per 1 (data, see Sprucol), 2 (image, 1st row), 3 (Thomas Deas), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy data, San Dario), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 64.0 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, (210 or 220 ft.), twin-screw, speed of 9 1/2 knots, crew of 19. Built for the Admiralty for use as a WW1 Royal Fleet Auxiliary oiler. In 1920, the vessel was sold to The Eagle Oil Transport Co. Ltd., ('Eagle') of London, (or maybe 'Eagle Oil & Shipping Co. Ltd.'), & renamed San Dario. Was it involved in WW1 & WW2 duty? On Nov. 20, 1936, while at anchor at Milford Haven, & under charter to Shell Mex & B.P., the vessel was hit by Thomas Deas, a 276 ton trawler, steaming at 6 knots. San Dario was holed in No 5 tank above the water on the port side & several plates & frames were indented & buckled. The vessel was not in danger of sinking. Thomas Deas would seem to have not been damaged. I have seen a 'snippet' reference to San Dario being sold to 'Bisco' (British Iron & Steel Corporation) for demolition. On Sep. 30, 1957, the vessel arrived at Grays, Essex, to be broken up at the T. W. Ward Ltd. facilities there. That is not very much data! Can you add anything?

82 War Seagull
5217 (or 5190 or 5215) tons
Hull 403

142827

Hindustan
Zinzan Maru
Jinzan Maru
1919

A cargo ship, which carried passengers also. Per 1 [data about 52% down, Hindustan (5)], 2 (War Seagull), 3 (ref. 1918), 4 (Guardfish, 16 Jul, 1944), 5 (Lloyd's Register data, Hindustan, 1930/31 thru 1938/39 ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 6 (Lloyd's Register data, Zinzan Maru, 1938/39 thru 1945/46 ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 440 ft. (about 139 metres) long overall, 400.0 ft. perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots, signal letters GPKZ, JQKM & JZOM. Launched, in total darkness it would appear, in the early hours of Dec. 23, 1918, as War Seagull, for 'The Shipping Controller'. But in 1919 was bought while fitting out by 'Hindustan Steam Ship Co. Ltd.', of Newcastle, owned by 'Common Brothers Ltd.' (the ship's managers). The 5th 'Common Brothers' vessel of the name (they had 8 over the years). In 1938 (or 1939), the vessel was sold to Kokoku Sangyo K.K., of Tokyo, Japan, & renamed Zinzan Maru, & later Jinzan Maru, (or are those 2 names rather a translation issue? Lloyd's Register seems to rather say Zinzan Maru. Can anyone advise?) Used as a Japanese transport ship in WW2. On Jul. 16, 1944, Jinzan Maru, in convoy, was torpedoed & sunk by USS Guardfish, SS-217, a U.S. Gato class submarine under the command of Lt. Cdr. N. G. Ward, off Cape Bojeador, Luzon, Philippines, (75 miles off the NW coast of Luzon Island), at 19.17N/120.15E (or 19.21N/119.43E or 18.20N/119.42E). Any loss of life? It is interesting to note that Guardfish torpedoed & sank Mantai Maru, of 5863 tons, just 2 minutes after hitting Jinzan Maru. Can you add anything? Perhaps clarify the Japanese names?

83 Cordillera
6865 tons
Hull 398

144239

Bransfield
1920

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per 1 (Donaldson Line, Cordillera), 2 (Donaldson Line history), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, Cordillera, but I am unable to check the link. But beware! The page that you come to includes La Cordillera also), 4 (image, Cordillera), 5, (image, Cordillera, also -01 & -05), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 127.7 metres between perpendiculars, 434 ft. 11 in., speed of 13 (or 12 1/2) knots. Built for 'Donaldson Line Ltd.' of Glasgow, & specifically for 'The Donaldson South American Line Limited', which was owned as to 50% by Donaldson interests, with John Black & Co.’s Glasgow Steamship Co. owning 30% & Vickers Ltd. owning 20%. Donaldson Bros Ltd., later Donaldson Bros & Black Ltd., were the managers. The vessel likely primarily served South American ports including Montevideo & Buenos Ayres, ex Glasgow & Liverpool. 66 WW2 convoy references, (I think), including at least 3 N. Atlantic crossings, service to Africa (Freetown, & Cape Town), a number of voyages to Buenos Aires, Argentina, into western Mediterranean & U.K. coastal. It would seem that when later sold, the vessel was owned by 'Donaldson Atlantic Line Limited'. In 1948, the vessel was sold to Hector Whaling Limited, of London, (part of the Hector Whaling Group of Tønsberg, Norway), Bugge & Krogh-Hansen the managers, for use as a store ship and/or whale meat processing & transport ship. She was thoroughly refitted for her new role & was renamed Bransfield. Presumably she was named after Edward Bransfield (c.1785/1852), a mariner/surveyor who, on Jan. 30, 1920, sighted Trinity Peninsular, the northernmost point of the Antarctic mainland. The first to discover Antarctica accordingly, though there is also a Russian contender for that honour. In the spring of 1958, the vessel returned to the Tyne from service in the Antarctic, for overhaul. It was likely laid up there for a while. It soon was sold for scrap at £6 per ton gross & towed by Kiel tug Strande to Hamburg, Germany. On Jul. 19, 1958, the vessel arrived at the Hamburg, ship breaking facilities of Eckhardt & Co. to be broken up. Can anybody add anything?

84 Corrientes
6863 tons
Hull 397

144218
1920

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Corrientes), 1 [Donaldson Line, Corrientes (1)], 2 (Donaldson Line history), 3 ('uboat.net', data & image re 1940 sinking), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, Corrientes, but I am unable to check the link), 5, 6 & 7 (all images, Corrientes), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 127.7 metres between perpendiculars, 435 ft., speed of 12 knots. Built for 'Donaldson Line Ltd.' of Glasgow, & specifically for 'The Donaldson South American Line Limited', which was owned as to 50% by Donaldson interests, with John Black & Co.’s Glasgow Steamship Co. owning 30% & Vickers Ltd. owning 20%. Donaldson Bros Ltd., later Donaldson Bros & Black Ltd., were the managers. The vessel primarily served South American ports including Montevideo & Buenos Ayres, ex Glasgow & Liverpool. On May 16, 1937, Corrientes, proceeding up river in St. Clement's Reach, River Thames, off Greenhithe, was in collision, in fine conditions, with Umtali heading downstream, both with qualified pilots aboard. It would seem that as a result, Corrientes had to be pushed onto a sandbank by six tugs to avoid blocking the navigation channel. A court case resulted & the initial finding was that both vessels bore equal responsibility. However, there were appeals, & the Court of Appeal held Umtali to be solely at blame. The case then went to the House of Lords but the Google data 'snippets' I have seen do not permit me to advise the final conclusion.  Just 12 WW2 convoy references, including at least 2 N. Atlantic crossings, & service to Freetown, Sierra Leone. On Sep. 21, 1940, the vessel left Liverpool in convoy OB-217, bound for Halifax & Montreal, Canada, with '1800 tons of general cargo and bricks' ex Glasgow. Thomas H. Y. (Halliday Young) Stewart was in command. On Sep. 25, 1940, the convoy dispersed & the vessel proceeded westwards independently.  U-32, Kapitänleutnant Hans Jenisch in command, was in her vicinity & indeed chased the ship for 6 hours. At 2:34 a.m. on Sep. 26, 1940, Corrientes was hit in the engine room by a torpedo fired by U-32. The crew abandoned ship, but Corrientes did not sink. U-37 came upon the abandoned vessel a few days later, & at 10:00 p.m. on Sep. 28, 1940, the vessel was hit by a 2nd torpedo, fired by U-37, Fregattenkapitän Victor Oehrn in command. An hour & 40 minutes later, U-37 sank Corrientes by gunfire. At 53.49N/24.19W. I have read that that is about 400 or 600 miles W. of Ireland, but it seems to me to be closer to 1,000 miles W. of Ireland. There was no loss of life. All 50 aboard were picked up by the Swedish Kolsnaren & landed at Philadelphia. Can anybody add anything? The Court final decision?

85 Eugenie S. Embiricos
4882 tons
Hull 394
1920

A cargo ship. Per 1 (1942 wreck report), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, link. I hope that link is in order. I am not permitted to check it), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 127.9 metres, perpendicular to perpendicular, 419.5 ft., speed of 9 1/2 knots. Built for 'S. G. Embiricos Ltd.' of London & Athens, Greece. Vessel registered at Andros, Greece, perhaps. Just 7 WW2 convoy references, including at least 1 N. Atlantic crossing, service to Mediterranean (Piraeus, Port Said, Alexandria) & Indian Ocean (Bombay). There surely were independent voyages, but I am denied access to them. On Jan. 21, 1942, in gale conditions & heavy seas, the vessel went aground near Leanish Point, Isle of Barra, Outer Hebrides. At 56.23N/7.05W, close to the wreck of R. J. Cullen, which went aground there on Jan. 15, 1942. The Barra lifeboat was initially unable to get close to the wreck but was on the next day able to rescue 28 crew members in 3 trips by floating down a Eugenie S. Embiricos ship's boat to the wreck. 2 survivors had swum ashore & 4 including the Captain (name?) were left aboard. The 4 were landed on Jan. 23, 1942 by a fishing boat. And later 16 live sheep were brought ashore. Miramar, amongst others, refers to the vessel hitting a submerged object on Jan. 19, 1942. Can anybody explain that reference?

86 George M. Embiricos
5728 tons
Hull 409
1921

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Ellis Island), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, link, am unable to check the link), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 134.6 metres, perpendicular to perpendicular, 459 ft., speed of 9 1/2 knots. Built for 'S. G. Embiricos Ltd.' of London & Athens, Greece. Appears to have arrived at Ellis Island, New York, on Sep. 20, 1922 with 38 passengers. But that listing may well rather be for Berengaria? I read that the vessel collided with Modica in the India Channel, River Plate, on Jul. 20, 1924. 'Our' vessel possible at greater fault. Only 6 WW2 convoy references, service in Mediterranean & in early 1945 to Far East - Papua, New Guinea & Indonesia. But probably travelled independently for most of the war years. Visited Auckland, New Zealand, twice between Jan. 1940 & Jan. 1945. In 1943, was in collision with Koonda at Port Phillip Bay, S. of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. On Nov. 16, 1959, vessel arrived at Singapore to be broken up. Have not read the circumstances re the 2 collisions. Anything to add?

87 Sandown Castle
7607 (or 7634) tons
Hull 407

146167
1921

A cargo only ship (but maybe not). Per 1 & 2 (Sandown Castle), 3 (brief ref. in table), 4 (image), 5 (image, also -01, -02, -04), 6 ('Ships Nostalgia', & image available, but you must register to see the image!), 7 (data 40% down), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 445 ft. (about 135 metres) long, speed of 12 1/2 (or 10 1/2) knots. Built for 'Union-Castle Mail Steamship Company, Limited', noted for its lavender hulled liners with black & red funnels. Link 3 above, & a National Archive page I cannot link to, suggest she in fact carried passengers. Engaged primarily on U.S.A. to South Africa service but occasionally to U.K. Laid up for several months in 1922. In 1924, she carried 330 head of live cattle from South Africa to Birkenhead the intention being to create a market to rival that of the River Plate. However, the post-slaughter price was too high and the venture was discontinued in the same year. It would seem that her hull was painted black. But, during 1946, her hull was painted a lavender colour, but soon reverted to black with a white band. She was known in UCMS as the "Rundown Castle"! The line, however, was 'known affectionately as the Lavender Hull Mob'. In Aug. 1950, was broken up at Dunston (River Tyne, Gateshead). Anything to add?

88 Sandgate Castle
7634 (or 7607) tons
Hull 408

146633
1922

A cargo ship, with some limited passenger accommodation. Per 1 (Board of Trade Wreck Report), 2 & 3 (Sandgate Castle), 4 (image), 5 (data 40% down), 6 (Empire State, 1st item), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 426 ft. (about 135 metres) long, speed of 12 or 12 1/2 knots. A sister to Sandown Castle. Built for 'Union-Castle Mail Steamship Company, Limited', noted for its lavender hulled liners with black & red funnels. Launched on Dec. 23, 1920 & delivered in Sep. 1922. She 'spent some lying idle in the London Docks before commencing service'. In 1924, as did her sister, she carried live cattle from South Africa to the U.K. In 1925, was engaged on the U.S.A. to South Africa service. I read that on one occasion she carried sand as ballast from Durban, South Africa, to New York & that sand, which normally would be dumped at sea, was instead off-loaded at New York & used in the construction of the Empire State Building. On May 24, 1937, the vessel left Hull for Philadelphia after overhaul & repairs. At Philadelphia she was partially loaded with lubricating oil, kerosene & 'gasolene', and proceeded to New York where she completed her loading - of a varied cargo which included paint, motor cars, breakfast cereal, refrigerators & folding chairs. On Jun. 23, 1937, under the command of Captain Hans C. (Charles) Bergen, she left New York for Cape Town, South Africa. When 350 miles NE of Bermuda, at  36.51N/60.05W, she caught fire at or about 10:00 a.m. on Jun. 26, 1937 & at about noon that day she was abandoned. The crew were rescued from lifeboats by President Pierce. Vessel was seen afloat on Jun. 30, 1937 by Conte de Savoia & is believed to have sunk soon thereafter. I refer you to the Board of Trade Report for the detail but the fire would seem to have been caused by an engineer, unaware of the ship's design, whose actions resulted in the spilling of oil which then caught fire. That fire was extinguished, but soon fire broke out in the cargo holds. The Court suggested that the vessel may well not have sunk had the fire been fought properly, held Capt. Bergen responsible for the loss & censured him severely. Anything to add?

89 Carlton
5162 tons
Hull 415

148059
1924

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Chapman and Willan, Ltd., flags & data), 2 (sinking Calvi), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, am unable to check the link), 4 (23 Octobre 1940), 5 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, 1930/31 thru 1940/1941), 6 (Miramar, Pietro Calvi, link, you now must be registered to access), 7 (Miramar, Carlton, link, you now must be registered to access). 390.0 ft. long (118.87 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 402.0 ft. long (122.53 metres) overall, signal letters KQJP later GKPQ. Built for R. Chapman & Son, ('Chapman'), of Newcastle. Over time, Chapman owned 6 vessels of the identical name, including another Carlton built by 'Short' in 1964. Just a few references to WW2 convoy duty (for this Carlton). On Dec. 20, 1940, while en route from Newport, Wales, to Buenos Aires, Argentina, & part of convoy OB 260 (started from Liverpool), Carlton attacked Italian submarine Calvi 'con una grossa mitragliera' i.e. with a large machine gun. Lorenzo Colombo advises (thanks Lorenzo!) that he has read that Carlton in fact tried to ram the submarine - also that Carlton would almost certainly have used her guns rather than her machine guns, Calvi being well armed (two 120 mm guns & two 13.2 mm. machine guns in addition to eight 533 mm torpedo tubes). Lorenzo does not believe that Calvi would have been forced to submerge by just machine guns. Carlton was soon sunk by a Calvi torpedo. About 550 miles W. of Ireland. At 54.30N/18.30W. 31 lives were lost (30 crew & a gunner), & only 4 survived. I have been advised that the 4 were picked up by Antiope (4545/1930) on Jan. 7, 1941, when 200 miles SW of Iceland, presumably after 18 days in a lifeboat. Of note, even though links above (& the text) reference Calvi, it would seem that the submarine was properly named Pietro Calvi. Lorenzo further advises that the submarine was named after Pietro F. (Fortunato) Calvi, a hero (1 & 2 translated), of the First Italian War of Independence (1848/49), & that ships named after a person are often referred to by just that person's surname. Lorenzo Colombo adds. Anything you can add?

90 Kafiristan
5193 tons
Hull 417

148088
1924

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Jun. 16, 1935 accident, with image), 2 ('uboat.net' page, with image), 3 (Common Brothers history 1/3rd down), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 390 ft. (about 126 metres) long, speed 10 knots. Built for 'Hindustan Steam Ship Co. Ltd.', of Newcastle, owned by 'Common Brothers Ltd.' (the ship's managers). On Jun. 16, 1935, the vessel, described as a collier, collided with Canadian Pacific ('CP') liner Empress of Britain in thick fog, near the Magdalen Islands in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Part of Kafiristan's bow was completely sheared away & sank. 3 of the crew, working on the forecastle, were killed & several others injured. Empress of Britain suffered minor damage, & continued on her way to Britain after mounting rescue operations. Beaverford, another CP ship, took Kafiristan in tow. Franklin, a tug it would seem, arrived some time later, took up the tow, 'built a cofferdam in the casualty to stop the incoming water, and delivered the ship safely to Sydney, NS'. On Sep. 17, 1939, under the command of John Busby & with a crew of 34, vessel was en route, unescorted, from Jucaro, Cuba to Liverpool with a cargo of sugar. It was attacked by U-53 (Korvettenkapitän Ernst-Günter Heinicke), at  50.16N/16.55W, 300/350 miles west of Cape Clear/Fastnet, SW tip of Ireland. The first torpedo missed, the second did not. The Karifistan crew abandoned ship, but the 1st lifeboat, launched while Karifistan was still moving, capsized with the loss of 6 lives. It should be mentioned that Heinicke offered i) to tow the other lifeboats towards land, & ii) send an SOS message, but U-53 submerged when attacked on the surface by a British bomber with machine-gun fire & 2 bombs. The 29 survivors were picked up by west-bound American Farmer & landed at New York. Can you add anything?

91 Selvistan
5136 tons
Hull 416

148070
1924

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('uboat.net' page, with image), 2 (Common Brothers history 1/3rd down), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, Selvistan, am unable to check the link), 4 (Convoy ONS-5), 5 (extensive 'Ahoy' data re ONS-5), 6 (Selvistan ref.), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 390 ft. (about 126 metres) long, speed of 10 knots. Built for 'Hindustan Steam Ship Co. Ltd.', of Newcastle, owned by 'Common Brothers Ltd.' (the ship's managers). On Oct. 10, 1941, while in convoy ON-23 from the Tyne to Halifax, Canada, vessel was in collision with Warkworth, 4941 tons, which sank with the loss of 13 lives. At 58.24N/22.28W, 500 miles SSW of Iceland. Does anybody know the circumstances? Late on May 5, 1943, while part of Convoy ONS-5 bound from Liverpool to Halifax, Selvistan, in ballast, was hit on the port side by 2 torpedoes, fired by U-266 (Kapitänleutnant Ralf von Jessen), & sank, stern first, within 2 minutes. At 53.10N/44.40W, (S. of Cape Farewell, Greenland, & NE of Newfoundland). Six aboard Selvistan, 5 gunners & a crew member, lost their lives. 40 survivors, including the Master [George E. (Edward) Miles], were picked up by HMS Tay & landed at St. John's, Newfoundland. In fact, two other convoy vessels, Gharinda & Bonde, were also sunk in the same attack, even though it would seem that U-266 only fired 4 torpedoes. And 13 of the 46 merchant ships in the convoy were sunk. Can you add anything? 

92 Waziristan
5135 tons
Hull 414

148048
1924

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('uboat.net' page, with image), 2 (Common Brothers history 1/3rd down), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, Waziristan, but am unable to check the link), 4 (Convoy PQ.7A), 5 (Steinbek), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 118.9 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, (about 126 metres overall) long, 390 ft., speed of 10 knots. Built for 'Hindustan Steam Ship Co. Ltd.', of Newcastle, owned by 'Common Brothers Ltd.' (the ship's managers). 30 convoy references in WW2 including 6 voyages across the N. Atlantic, generally carrying scrap metal or grain, & coastal voyages. On Nov. 23, 1941, under the command of Ronald Tate, Waziristan left New York for Sydney, Cape Breton, with a cargo of military supplies for the war effort of Soviet Russia. The first British vessel, in fact, to carry war supplies directly to Russia from the U.S.A. At Sydney, Nova Scotia, she joined E. bound convoy SC-57 & safely arrived at Iceland. On Dec. 26, 1941, she left Hvalfjord, (Reykjavik), Iceland, with just one other cargo ship (Cold Harbor) & 2 minesweepers bound for Murmansk, Russia. Convoy PQ.7A. Bad weather was encountered, & in a fierce easterly gale & thick ice, the vessels became separated. Cold Harbor last saw Waziristan at 4 p.m. on Jan. 1, 1942. Waziristan was torpedoed on Jan. 2, 1942, by U-134 [Kapitänleutnant Rudolf Schendel ('Schendel')]. The first 2 torpedoes apparently missed but the 3rd hit home. U-134 saw the crew abandon ship - a complement of 47 which included 10 gunners - before the vessel broke in two & sank. All 47 lost their lives. At 74.09N/19.10E, said to be about 300 miles NW of Jan Mayen Island, but that seems not to be so. In the Norwegian or Barents Sea. It is interesting to note that on the immediately prior U-134 patrol, Schendel had sunk a single ship, on Dec. 9, 1941 off Tanafiord, Norway - a ship that proved to be a German ship - the 2184/5 ton Steinbek. It would seem not to be known if there was any loss of life. Waziristan? A mountainous region of NW Pakistan, bordering Afghanistan. Perhaps where Osama Bin Laden was hiding at one time - before he was killed in his Pakistan compound at Abbottabad, Pakistan, on May 2, 2011. Can you add anything?

93 Anglo-Indian
5531 tons
Hull 421

148665

Baxtergate
Artygia
Domina
Lily Michalos
1925

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Anglo-Indian), 1 (data), 2 (Turnbull Scott history lower on page), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, Baxtergate, am unable to check the link), 4 (1951 collision with Steel Flyer), 5 (image, Anglo Indian, also -01, -02), 6 (image, Baxtergate, I think, also -03), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 426 ft. (about 135 metres) long, speed of 11 knots. A corrugated ship. Built for 'Nitrate Producers' Steamship Co., Ltd.', (Anglo Line), Lawther, Latta & Co. Ltd. of London, the managers. Visited Auckland, New Zealand, a couple of times. In 1937, the vessel was sold to Turnbull Scott & Co., of London, for £50,000, & renamed Baxtergate. 'She was kept on the Pacific phosphate and nitrate trading of her previous owner.' 111 WW2 convoy references, including at least 9 voyages across the N. Atlantic, service in the Mediterranean, to W. Africa (Freetown, Takoradi) & to South Africa & lots of local U.K. voyages. Many independent voyages also. With varied cargoes such as wheat, phosphates, lumber & steel. In 1947, the vessel was sold to 'Panamanian Tramp Shipping Co.', (Stathatos & Co., of London, the managers), & renamed Artygia. In 1948, the vessel was sold again, to 'Compania de Navegacion Cebaco, S.A.', of Panama, with C. Michalos & Co. the managers, & renamed Domina. On Mar. 28, 1951, while en route to Baltimore with a cargo of iron ore, the vessel collided with Steel Flyer in Chesapeake Bay. The vessels were on crossing courses. Steel Flyer was guilty of gross negligence but Domina was negligent also. Did not spot the extent to which either ship was damaged. There may be later WWW court data that I have not read. In 1955, the vessel was sold or transferred to Michalos Bros, of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Lily Michalos. On Aug. 21, 1959, she arrived at Hong Kong to be broken up. Anything to add

94 Newbrough
5342 tons
Hull 419

148124
1925

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Sea Gallantry Awards), 2 ('Canberra Times', Australia, 1933 newspaper article, 4th item), 3 (Common Brothers history 1/3rd down, no ref. to Newbrough), 4 (NY Times article available, with ref. to ship being abandoned), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 126 metres long, speed of 12 knots, maybe. Built for 'Northumbrian Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Newcastle, owned by 'Common Brothers Ltd.' (the ship's managers). On Dec. 24, 1932, Newbrough was stranded in heavy weather on a reef off Morant Cay, 60 miles from Kingston, Jamaica. What happened is confusing indeed. i) 2 says that the entire crew were rescued by Norseman by breeches buoy. ii) However, two prestigious 'Sea Gallantry Medals' were awarded re the disaster & the story as to why they were awarded is very different. 1 states that the first Newbrough lifeboat made it to the South-East Morant Cay. And the 2nd lifeboat eventually did also. Thanks to the bravery of both Ernest H. Halliday & Antonio M. Viana, respectively Chief Officer & Boatswain of Newbrough, who swam in the pounding surf & found openings in the reef. Both received 'Sea Gallantry Medals' for their bravery. The entire Newbrough crew of 31 was saved & taken off the Cay by Norseman, an 1844 ton cable ship owned by Western Telegraph Co. Can anybody clarify exactly what did happen that day? Can you possibly add anything?

95 Simonburn
5213 tons
Hull 420

148140
1925

A cargo ship. Per 1 (wreck ref. 80% down, but Sep. 30, 1940 date is wrong, should be Oct. 30, 1940), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, Simonburn, am unable to check the link), 3 (Common Brothers history 1/3rd down, no ref. to this Simonburn), 4 (convoy WN.27), 5 (convoy SC.6), 6 (Oct. 1940 lifeboat rescue), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 390 ft. (about 126 metres) long, speed of 10 knots. Built for 'Northumbrian Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Newcastle, owned by 'Common Brothers Ltd.' (probably the ship's managers). 13 convoy references early in WW2 including 3 voyages across the N. Atlantic & coastal U.K. trips. On Sep. 27, 1940, Simonburn, left Sydney, Cape Breton, Canada, in convoy SC.6, with a cargo of wheat from Montreal, intended for delivery at London. On Oct. 27, 1940, she left the Clyde for Methil (Firth of Forth), in convoy WN.27, of 11 merchant ships, with, presumably, that same cargo of wheat. WN.27 ran into a major storm & high seas & suffered major losses. On Oct. 30, 1940, Simonburn was driven ashore in severe weather conditions at Rattray (Aberdeenshire, NE tip of Scotland), drifted off & sank 4 miles off Rattray Head. Alcora & Lisbon were also driven ashore that day at Rattray, while Baron Minto suffered a number of air attacks & was driven ashore at nearby Strathbeg Bay (but not, it would seem, wrecked there because she was later bombed & sunk on Feb. 14, 1941). Eros arrived at Methil damaged. I read that Patia was also driven ashore at Rattray that day, which is a puzzle & I think in error (read Patia data via 2, data which I am myself unable to again access. The folks & computer at 'convoyweb.org' act as though I am 'mining' Arnold Hague's data for profit! Arnold would not, I suspect, were he alive, wish me such a problem). 93 in total are said to have been rescued that day from the 4 ships. Simonburn had 39 aboard. All were rescued by the Peterhead lifeboat Julia Park Barry of Glasgow. In two trips, & landed at Fraserburgh. The lifeboat was at sea in appalling conditions for over 9 hours that day & the heroic crew rescued an amazing total of 93 persons. Can you add anything? Another image perhaps?

96 Anglo-Peruvian
5457 tons
Hull 423

149698
1926

A cargo ship. Per 1 (image), 2 (wreck), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, Anglo Peruvian, am unable to check the link), 4 (Convoy OB-288), 5 (sinking), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 426 ft. (about 135 or so metres) long, speed of 11 knots. Built for 'Nitrate Producers' Steamship Co., Ltd.', (Anglo Line), Lawther, Latta & Co. Ltd. of London, managers. Presumably for the South American nitrate trade. 16 convoy ref. in early WW2 including 2 voyages across N Atlantic & U.K. coastal voyages. Vessel left Liverpool on Feb. 8, 1941, as part of convoy OB-288, bound for Boston, Massachusetts, with a cargo of coal. At 9 p.m. on Feb. 23, 1941, when dispersed from the convoy & located S. of Iceland, was twice torpedoed by U-96. Vessel broke in two & sank within 3 minutes. At 59.30N/21.00W. 29 were lost including Cyril M. (Mervyn) Quick, the Master. 17 survivors were picked up from a life-raft by Harberton & were landed at Halifax, Nova Scotia. Anything to add? An image?

97 Demeterton
5251 tons
Hull 422

149406
1926

A cargo ship. Per 1 (image), 2 (Chapman and Willan, Ltd., flags & data), 3 (Birkenhead drydock 55% down), 4 (Saturday, 15 March), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, Demeterton, am unable to check the link), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 410 ft. (about 126 metres) long, speed of 10 knots. Built for R. Chapman & Son, ('Chapman'), of Newcastle. Or maybe by 'The Carlton Steamship Company Ltd.', which was related to the owners of Chapman. Over time, Chapman owned 3 vessels of the identical name. In Dec. 1940, when in drydock at Birkenhead, the vessel was hit by a 100 lb. bomb which exploded in the lower hold with no loss of life. Many references to convoy duty in WW2 - mainly North Atlantic but also in Mar. 1940 (HN 22) Ålesund, Norway, to Methil (Firth of Forth) with iron ore bound for Cardiff. On Mar. 15, 1941, while in convoy HX 42 & en route from the U.S. to Falmouth, U.K. with a cargo of grain, the vessel was attacked by battleship Scharnhorst during operation 'Berlin', the entire crew being taken prisoner. The vessel was sunk on Mar. 16, 1941 at 45.58N/44.00W, SE of St. John's, Newfoundland. On that single day, Scharnhorst & Gneisenau together sank 16 ships in the North Atlantic. Data about Chapman companies is modest indeed. A 1965 volume, entitled 'CHAPMAN OF NEWCASTLE - The Story of a Tyneside Tramp Shipping Company' by John Lingwood & Harold Appleyard, presumably covers the company & its fleet. Anything to add?

98 Anglo-Australian
5456 tons
Hull 424

149817
1927

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data), 2 (image) 3 (Board of Trade Loss Inquiry report), 4 (data), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 426 ft. long, speed of 10 1/2 knots. Built for 'Nitrate Producers' Steamship Co., Ltd.', (Anglo Line), Lawther, Latta & Co. Ltd. of London, managers. On Mar. 8, 1938, vessel left Cardiff, Wales, in ballast, for British Columbia, via the Panama Canal, to pick up a cargo of lumber. On Mar. 14, 1938 she passed Fayal, Azores, & was never heard from again. Vessel is believed to have foundered in severe gale conditions approx. 60/70 miles NW of Fayal. All 38 aboard were lost. The Captain was Frederick Parslow, who won the DSC for his actions on Jul. 4, 1915 re the Anglo-Californian (1, 2). Actions in which his father died & was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross. The Board of Trade, at its Oct. 1928 Inquiry, concluded that the most probable cause of the loss was the buckling of the shelter deck with subsequent complete fracture from deck to keel. The vessel had had a history of cracks in the structure of the shelter deck. Which cracks had been routinely repaired. Anything to add?

99 Holystone
5462 tons
Hull 427

149450
1927

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, Holystone, but am unable to check the link), 3 (Common Bros history 40% down, but no ref. to Holystone), 4 & 5 (convoy OB.284), 6 (insert 101 & then Holystone), 7 (data & image), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 397 ft. (about 126 metres) long, speed of 10 or 11 knots. Built for 'Northumbrian Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Newcastle, which company was a ship owning arm of Common Brothers Ltd. 16 convoy references early in WW2 including 3 voyages across N Atlantic & coastal UK trips. On Feb. 10, 1941, under the command of Capt. John S. (Stewart) Bain, vessel left Oban, Scotland, in ballast for Halifax, Canada (voyage originated at Hull). Vessel joined convoy OB.284 which left Liverpool on Feb. 9, 1941. Last heard from on Feb. 14, 1941, on which day vessel was torpedoed & sunk by U.101 (Korvettenkapitän Ernst Mengersen). At or about 54.10N/18.50W (or 53N/18W), W. of Ireland. All aboard were lost - 40 lives including 2 passengers. Can you add anything?

100 Irene S. Embiricos
4164 tons
Hull 426

Xmas
1927

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, Irene S. Embiricos, but am unable to check the link), 2 (image, Irene S. Embiricos), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 119.8 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 409 ft. 6 in., speed of 9 or 9 1/2 knots. Built for 'S. G. Embiricos Ltd.', of Athens, Greece), & managed by Embiricos Ltd., of London. In Apl. 1942, the vessel carried grain from Bahia Blanca to Genoa, Italy. Just 11 convoy references in WW2 in the period of Dec. 1942 to May 1944, mostly 'shorter convoy series' in the Indian Ocean (Aden, Durban, S. Africa, Mombasa, Kenya (Kilindini), Mozambique (Lourenco Marques now Maputo), Vizagpatnam (SE India), Colombo (Ceylon now Sri Lanka). Surely independent voyages also, but I am not permitted access. In 1960, the vessel was sold to 'H. Sienmin & Sons', described as Hong Kong trading buyers. And renamed Xmas. On Apl. 19, 1961, the vessel arrived at Koyagishima, Nagasaki, Japan, to be broken up. At the facilities of Kawanami Heavy Industries?? The WWW record for this ship is modest. Can you add anything?

There are more (later) vessels built by 'Short' on the 2nd 'Short' page available here.

May I suggest that you navigate the site via the index on page 001.PRIOR PAGE / NEXT PAGE

To Thomas M. M. Hemy Data Page 41. All of the other Thomas Hemy pages, including image pages, are accessible though the index on Thomas Hemy page 05. [ ] £

To the Special Pages Index.

A SITE SEARCH FACILITY
Search for
Get a Free Search Engine for Your Web Site

THE GUEST BOOK - GO HERE

E-MAIL THIS LINK

Enter recipient's e-mail: