THE SUNDERLAND SITE - PAGE 052
SHIPBUILDERS - PAGE 10

May I suggest that you navigate the site via the index on page 001.PRIOR PAGE / NEXT PAGE

On this page ... William Doxford Page 1, page bottom (turret & whaleback vessels).

Copyright? (100) Test.

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Corrections in any of the material which follows, however tiny, would be most welcome. And additions, of course!

WILLIAM DOXFORD (1840/1875?)
WILLIAM DOXFORD AND SONS (1875?/1890)
WILLIAM DOXFORD AND SONS LIMITED (1891/1957)
WILLIAM DOXFORD & SONS (SHIPBUILDERS) LIMITED (1957/ )

(OF COX GREEN, THEN PALLION, SUNDERLAND)

First a few images. Hover your mouse over each thumbnail to read the subject matter.

Whatever data I now have in this section, will, almost certainly expand as new data is received.

There would seem to be quite a lot of it! Indeed, the increasing number of listings re Doxford built vessels has already required a 2nd, 3rd & 4th pages - available here, here & here.

It would seem that William Doxford and Sons, Limited was established by one William Doxford (1812-1882) in 1840, building wooden boats at Coxgreen (there are a great many references to 'Cox Green' but while Cox Green was correct (a train ticket is here), I understand 'Coxgreen' is correct today), some way upstream from the centre of Sunderland. It moved its facilities downstream on the River Wear to Pallion in 1857. Pallion, is, I understand, upstream of the present rail & road bridges in central Sunderland, the shipbuilding yard being located (or I should say was located since all shipbuilding ended there in 1988) on the south side of the river close to (west of) the Queen Alexandra Bridge - about 3 miles from the mouth of the river. A larger site there was purchased, I read, in 1870, known as the 'West Yard'. I should mention, however, that the Queen Alexandra Bridge was not there in 1870. It was built rather later - completed in 1909. Do read the most interesting information available here, (the website of George H. Graham of Tulsa, Oklahoma) and the many pages available at the 'Doxford Engine Friends Association' website, available through this page. I do not know the name of the business when it was first established - maybe just 'William Doxford'?

Mainly from that first website we learn that William Theodore Doxford (1841-1916) & his brother Alfred (1842-1895) joined their father in the shipbuilding business & that both were partners by 1875. Perhaps at that point the company would have become 'W. Doxford & Sons'? Robert (1851-1932) & Charles (1856-1935), two younger sons also followed into the firm. Business must have been good, because, & I quote, 'several times the Doxfords extended their premises'.

Grace's Guide advises us (thanks!) that in 1891 the business became a limited liability company with a capital of £200,000, all owned by the Doxford family. Further, as I read it, that on Jan. 1, 1891 'William Doxford and Sons Ltd.' was registered as a public company to acquire the family limited company & its business of iron ship builders and marine engineers. William Doxford was its Managing Director.

In 1893, Doxford launched its first 'Turret Ship', designed with the objective of saving on canal & harbour dues & financed 50/50 with ship owner William Peterson. Named, the Turret. The upper deck area was reduced to a minimum, the net tonnage was reduced & the cargo area was increased. I read that Lloyd's was initially not happy that the vessel was seaworthy, but the design proved in practice to be both seaworthy & a considerable commercial success, so long as the fee computation rules remained. 176 (or maybe 177) 'turret ships' (one authoritative site says 184) were built by Doxford in the years through to 1911. (85 so far referenced in these pages.) And a few more (6) were built by others. Then with the fee rules changed, & bigger vessels being needed, the design was discontinued.

At right, a portion of an image of Doxford riveters in 1895. The source of the original image, an e-Bay item in Apl. 2012, is unknown.

World Ship Society published in 1975 'The Doxford Turret Ships' by Leonard Gray & John Lingwood. ISBN 0950004464. The cover of that volume is at left above.

This on-site page is a start of coverage of 'whaleback' ships, the U.S. design which surely was a major influence in the design of the Doxford 'turret' ships.

 

I can do no better than next quote text from George Graham's site (here): 'In 1902, the yearly tonnage output had reached 44,000 tons, but two years later, the capacity was more than doubled by the completion of the East yard. The new premises, together with a fitting out quay, equipped with a 100 ton radial crane, was commenced in 1902. The original five births were scrapped to make room for three births of greater length and breadth. This enabled the firm to build vessels up to 540 feet in length and of 20,000 tons capacity. The result of these elaborate extensions was that in the next three years, 1905, 1906, and 1907, the output was 87,000 tons, 106,000 tons and 92,000 tons. The years 1905 and 1907 found Doxfords with the highest production of any yard in the world, and 1906 was practically a ship a fortnight, which was an achievement only surpassed many years afterwards.'

The City of Sunderland advises us (a 'pdf' file) that 'In 1904 the East Yard was built, and the 3 extra berths helped Doxford's to win the blue riband in 1904 and 1907 for the highest production rate in the world.' The webmaster had thought that the term 'blue riband' was reserved for the vessel which achieved the fastest passage between Europe & North America - but it would seem that the term had other usages. The Doxford East Yard was located on the North Sands at Palmer's Hill Quay, about where the Glass Centre is now, as was the William Pile yard through 1873.

Now to build 25 or so vessels in a year & produce a total of 100,000 tons means that most of them were probably vessels of about 4/5,000 tons each. And a 20,000 tonner was the rarity.

A kind visitor to this site has provided an amazing amount of data to the webmaster about Sunderland shipbuilders & their ships. And amongst that data is a 'Report to the Shareholders' of 'William Doxford and Sons, Limited', respecting a meeting of Ordinary Shareholders held on March 11, 1907. Re Dec. 31, 1906 financials, of course. How amazing! At that date there were five directors, & every one of them was a Doxford! Sir Theodore Doxford was the Chairman. Also as directors were, Robert Pile Doxford, Charles David Doxford, Albert Ernest Doxford & Robert Doxford. John Holey at that time was the Secretary. The webmaster has spent a large portion of his life creating such documents for public companies in both Canada & the U.S. The texts must now, & probably then also, be absolutely perfect but, truth be known, the 1906 notice texts are virtually identical to what would be said today, over 100 years later. I have not provided images on site of the 4 pages since they might be of interest to relatively few site visitors.

Images of Doxford family members prominent in the history of the shipbuilding company can be seen here, in a page from a 1922 promotional booklet published by the company.

The family members depicted include William Doxford (1812/1882), founder of the company (image at left) & W. Theodore Doxford, his son, (1841/1916), later Sir Theodore Doxford (image at right). Other family members, active in the early 1920s, are shown also.

An interesting e-Bay item, in Oct. 2010, was the will of Sir W. Theodore Doxford. The webmaster bid on the item, for inclusion in these pages, but was not successful. The item sold, on Oct. 3, 2010, for GBP 26.53 or approx. U.S. $41.95. It would have been good to have been able to include the document on site. So anybody interested might be able to read it.

Marine engine building had commenced at Doxfords in 1878, but I read that in 1909 the first prototype of the Doxford Marine Diesel Engine, an opposed piston, airless injection oil engine, was built, design work having commenced some three years earlier. Development work, suspended for the duration of WW1, resumed in 1919.

The Doxford diesel engine became world famous. Doxford of course used it in vessels they themselves constructed, but over a dozen other firms were licensed to also build it.

Do please visit these pages 1 and 2 offered by the 'Doxford Engine Friends Association' for extensive data about the development of the Doxford Engine.

The image above is of a most interesting item indeed. The tiny white area in the middle at the bottom is a cog wheel & when it is rotated the pistons go up and down! To demonstrate how the engine worked. An e-Bay item that sold for U.S. $53.90 quite a while ago. Another copy of it sold for GDP 41.00 or U.S. $67.29 in Nov. 2009. The vendor stated that the 'mechanical book' was made by White & Pick Ltd., model specialists, of Birmingham.

A most interesting item came up for sale via eBay in late January 2007. It was a patent re improvements in and relating to engines. Listed essentially as follows: 'PATENT SPECIFICATION No. 163,453. APPLICATION DATE: Feb 16, 1920. SPECIFICATION ACCEPTED: May 17, 1921. TITLE: IMPROVEMENTS IN AND RELATING TO ENGINES. APPLICANT: ROBERT PILE DOXFORD and KARL OTTO KELLER both of Pallion Yard, Sunderland, County of Durham. Size: 195mm x 275mm. 6 text pages and one drawing. Brief Description of Patent: This invention relates to the construction of engines. Opposed-piston engines are already known of a type comprising a pair of parallel cylinders, two pistons in each cylinder reciprocating in them, two cranks allotted to the respective pairs of pistons, and main connecting rods each such rod operatively connecting the piston that is at one end of each cylinder with one of the cranks aforesaid.... A patent specification that has been disbound from a volume of 100 different patents - an original HMSO published item at the time.'

Could that have been the principal patent for the Doxford diesel engine? The three bidders presumably know the answer to that question! Realistically it probably was not. There surely were a bushel of patents. The modest listing image is here. The name of Robert Pile Doxford interests me. I thought that I had read that he and other family members had resigned from the company in 1919 when ownership changed. Maybe that name was to perpetuate the famous shipbuilding name of William Pile? If so, there may well be a family relationship between the Pile & Doxford families?

And there is! Arron Pile has kindly been in touch. He has been busy researching the family history & tells me that the mother of 'Robert Pile Doxford' was Hannah Pile, the aunt of William Pile (1823-1873), the famous shipbuilder. Arron tells me also that William Pile had a younger brother named 'Thomas Hunter Pile' & that Thomas is Arron's great, great grandfather. Arron, thank you so much for that most interesting information.

'Doxford Engine Friends Association' have lots more on the general subject. Including some wonderful images - see 'Gallery', via the links above.

Walter Lewis has advised (thanks Walter!) that details about a few Doxford patents are WWW available - you can find them by inserting 'Charles David Doxford patent' into a Google search box.

The Doxford family ownership connection with the yard & engine works ceased in January 1919, I read, when the company was sold to the Northumberland Shipbuilding Company (the only vessel I have so far seen referenced to 'Northumberland' is Success built 1919. But the name of Robert Pile Doxford is on that patent, filed in 1920 & described above. I now see that members of the Doxford family rejoined the company in 1922 - as senior officials or as managers.

After WW1, orders for new ships dried up, & Doxfords closed down from September 1924 to April 1927.

An image of the yard in 1921 is here.

I read that in 1946, the company took over the Palmer's Hill, Sunderland, engine works of John Dickinson & Sons Ltd.

The next image depicts the railway shed at the Doxford Pallion shipyard on Apl. 8, 1969, with five workhorse locomotives at rest. Four of the locomotives are crane tank locomotives ('Hendon', 'Roker', 'Millfield' & 'Southwick', from left to right) while at extreme right is saddle tank locomotive 'General'. A larger image of 'Southwick' is available here. I am advised that rail operations at the yard, ceased in Feb. 1971, but that all of the 4 locos at left in the image, are preserved.

In 1956 the two parts of the business were placed in separate entities - re the shipbuilding side into 'William Doxford & Sons (Shipbuilders) Ltd.' (a booklet published by that company, likely in 1962, is here) & the engineering side into 'William Doxford & Sons (Engineers) Ltd.'.

I have read that the company became 'Doxford & Sunderland Shipbuilding & Engineering Company Limited' in 1961, following a merger with 'Sunderland Shipbuilding, Dry Docks & Engineering Co. Ltd.' which company was itself the result of the 1954 merger of Sir James Laing and Sons Limited with Joseph L. Thompson & 'The Sunderland Forge & Engineering Co. Ltd.' (Note), manufacturers of switchboards, generators, alternators, electric winches, control & switch gear.

Now tracking these events at Sunderland 50 years ago is not a particularly easy thing for the webmaster to accomplish. I say that because an article published in Sep. 1959, talks about 'William Doxford & Sons (Shipbuilders) Ltd.' and its total reorganisation of the facilities at Pallion, then recently completed. Initially I had though that this referred to the 'Ship Factory' but that would seem to have been a rather later reorganisation. The earlier one, which took place over a ten year period, was intended to and apparently did achieve its objective of increasing productivity, while providing better working conditions for shipyard workers & effecting general efficiencies. The reorganisation was in progress as ships were continuously being built. The flow of steel was improved using flow-line principles & a new steel stockyard was constructed. Steel was moved to a preparation shop where it was marked, cut to shape, prepared for edge welding, drilled & countersunk as required & then moved to assembly shops. There the steel pieces were put together into sub-assemblies & assemblies of up to 20 tons & moved as one piece to the particular ship for installation. Similar flow procedures were followed with the other trades - joiners, shipwrights, riggers. painters, blacksmiths etc., with all necessary work being undertaken in modern but specialised facilities, to generally speed up the work, & consistently increase the levels of efficiency.

The company became 'Doxford & Sunderland Ltd.' in 1970.

It would be good to show these many changes step by step in date order, but I do not have the knowledge to be able to do that.

Late in 1966, on Oct. 30, 1966, seven Doxford workers were killed as a result of a fire in inaccessible places of Toronto City. Known as the 'Doxford Disaster of 1966'. I am advised (thanks Tony Frost) that a fire broke out in the shaft tunnel, when hydraulic oil escaped from an incorrectly fitted pipe coupling close to an oxy-acetylene burning torch. The resulting men's deaths were caused by asphyxia due to carbon monoxide poisoning. The verdict was accidental death.

Doxford & Sunderland Ltd. was taken over by Court Line in 1973 (page 15 here) with the company being renamed, on Mar. 5, 1973, 'Sunderland Shipbuilders Limited'

I read that in 1973, the many buildings at Pallion were torn down, & Sunderland Shipbuilders Limited built a fully enclosed 'Ship Factory' in their place. When the new facility opened in 1975, Doxford's (or we really should now say Sunderland Shipbuilders Ltd.) became the world's largest enclosed yard with a truly 'state of the art' shipbuilding facility. Now John Bage worked at that 'Ship Factory' from 1975 to 1988. And he has a number of web pages about it. The index to that section of his site is here. Do drop by and view his interesting & extensive pages!

Such data as I have so far read on the history of the company, in many different WWW sources, is amazingly confusing, with names, spellings & dates used loosely & I suspect quite inaccurately. So until I am able, if I am ever able, to clarify the history with precision, I must limit myself to saying simply that the shipyard, then the 'Ship Factory', ultimately closed in 1988. The ownership history? I cannot summarise the conflicting data that I have any better than has been done above but will do so as and when it becomes clear. Can you help?

A Doxford song, sung to 'MacNamara's Band'!

The webmaster knows next to nothing about Doxford engines. He notes in passing however that, in the 1960s perhaps, 'The Motor Ship' published a 36 page magazine devoted exclusively (I think) to the Doxford 58JS3 engine. Its title was 'The Doxford 58JS3 for smaller ships'. It would be good to be able to show its content on site for those who do appreciate & understand engines.

Build lists? A list of 'Doxford' built vessels is now on site, at page 143. Miramar has lists re 'Doxford' built vessels (highest hull number on page). It used to be that you could click on the links that follow & get to the relevant Miramar page. But no longer! The new procedure must be to go to Miramar (here) & log in (you must be registered to view any page). And once you are logged in, return to this page & all the following links should work for you:- 30, 60, 108, 119, 149, 179, 209, 239, 270, 299, 329, 362, 389, 419, 450, 495, 515, 546, 594, 627, 656, 686, 716, 746, 792, 818, 889, 870. And a list of Doxford built vessels is here (including those built at the Doxford yard in its later years after it was taken over) thanks to Fred Gooch & John Bage. Such list is presumably not complete since it commences in 1863.

Names of just a few of the vessels constructed by William Doxford & Sons of Sunderland - as I happen to spot references to them. In a table in build date sequence. And alphabetically within a year. But just a start! The first of 4 pages, the second being here. And the 3rd & 4th are here & here.

1 Elizabeth Ray
160 (later 199) tons

27212
1859

A brig, which later in life became a barquentine. Per 1 (data 90% down), 2 (wreck ref. 80% down). 84.0 ft. long, later lengthened to 100.0 ft., signal letters PQJC. The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, but only thru 1889/90, see left. The vessel was built for 'Ray & Sons' & registered at London. A puzzle perhaps is that the 'Ray & Sons' name would seem to have been deleted in the 1864/65 edition, with no new name substituted, & no owner's name at all is recorded in 1865/66. The vessel would seem to have traded to Algoa Bay, on the E. coast of South Africa. By the 1869/70 edition the vessel had been lengthened from 84.0 ft. to 100.0 ft., the tonnage had increased to 199 & the owner became 'Fraser & Co.', of Portsmouth. The Mercantile Navy List of 1870 records Elias T. Fraser & John White, both of Portsmouth, as the vessel's owners. 'J. White', also of Portsmouth is the owner in 1878/79, thru, in the available registers, 1883/84. The Mercantile Navy List of 1880, however, records Albert E. Flowers of Landport, Hants, as the vessel's owner. By 1887/88, the vessel had become a barquentine, (a major change in the rigging, perhaps), & 'A. E. Flowers', also of Portsmouth, had become the owner - thru to 1889/90 which is the last Lloyd's Register that the webmaster has available. I am not aware of the later history of the vessel but do note that a sailing vessel of the name was wrecked at 'Scoilt Nell', Tory Island, Ireland, in 1899. Tory Island is off the NW coast of Donegal, Ireland, & Scoilt is on the NW coast of Tory Island. I am not aware of the circumstances or if there was any loss of life. Can anybody provide more data?

2 Adalia
1270 tons
Hull 5

51165
1864

An iron passenger & cargo steamer. Per 1 (data & engraving), 2 (data), 3 (data), 4 (1869 voyage), 5, 6, 7 (last 3 all 'Rootsweb'), 8 (Captain Sanderson re final voyage & sinking), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 231.6 ft. long, speed of 9 knots. The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Register, ex Google Books, available to him, see left. It would seem that the vessel was initially owned by 'Gourley & Co.', of Sunderland. The 1865/6 register records Anglo-Egyptian Navigation Company Limited ('Anglo'), of London, as the owner. Could it be that the vessel was chartered to Anglo & put in their name for the duration? The vessel certainly traded into the Mediterranean. The next register available to the webmaster is re 1869/70, & the vessel has reverted to Gourley, specifically to 'E. Gourley', of Sunderland. On Nov. 29, 1869, the vessel commenced a single round trip voyage from London to Charleston, South Carolina, chartered by 'Liverpool & Charleston Steamship Line'. But may have been generally used on that route. On Jun. 5, 1872, Adalia, chartered by 'London Line' & commanded by Captain Thomas Sanderson, left London for Quebec, Canada, via Plymouth with general cargo & approximately 125 passengers. On Jun. 24, 1872, the vessel ran aground in fog on the S. side of St. Paul's Island, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, her stern 14 ft. under & her bow high out of the water. St. Paul's Island is bad news for all ships but was particularly hazardous for sailing ships in the foggy conditions which abound in the area - it is essentially in the Cabot Strait, the main access to the St. Lawrence River, an isolated island 15 miles off mainland Cape Breton & close to the shipping channels. It would appear that the vessel had stopped in the fog for a couple of hours very close to the island where it ran aground. The nearby lighthouse was supposed to fire guns under such conditions to warn mariners of the danger but apparently did not do so on that occasion. No loss of life. 'A party of wreckers were on the island and attempted to plunder, and had to be beaten off by the crew and passengers with firearms.' Passengers & baggage were taken aboard Pictou, on Jun. 30, 1872, & landed at Quebec on Jul. 4, 1872. But 6 says landed there by Briton. A 'good' part of the cargo was saved by the captain & crew who remained on St. Paul's Island to save what was possible. I presume that the vessel was a total loss. Can anybody provide more data?

3 Hesperia
449 tons

47271
1864

A barque. Per 1, 2 & 3 (Northumbria, 1869 collision), 4 (a murder aboard this Hesperia? Ex 5). 149 ft. 4 in. long, signal letters V.M.W.H., launched Jul. 1864. The vessel is not Miramar listed. The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Register, ex Google Books, available to him, thru 1880/81, see left. The vessel was built for E. Jarvis, surely Edward Jarvis, ('Jarvis') of Salcombe, Devon. The vessel likely traded to the Indian Ocean & points east, incl. Cape of Good Hope, Mauritius, Ceylon, Singapore & China. In Sep. 1864, the vessel sailed for Shanghai, China, & took much longer to reach her destination than was expected - the vessel was becalmed in the Timor Passage, for 70 days. There is a tiny reference in the 'New York Times' to an 1865 voyage from Shanghai, China, to New York, with tea. On the night of Aug. 19/20, 1869, Hesperia was at anchor off Gravesend, with cargo aboard insured for £30,000, likely prepared to soon leave port. In the early hours of Aug. 20, 1869, at 1:30 a.m., the anchored vessel was struck by Northumbria, a brand new steamship leaving the Thames on her very first voyage. Hesperia's bow was stove in & 15 minutes later the vessel sank. Her cargo was lost. Have read no word as to damage to Northumbria, nor re any salvage of Hesperia's cargo. The Hesperia crew took to a longboat & made it safely to Clara, anchored nearby, a schooner, also Salcombe based. Northumbria & its captain were placed under arrest. Later that day, the owners of Hesperia sued for £12,000 in damages & the cargo owners sued also. Hesperia was raised & repaired (I wonder where) & returned to service. The vessel stayed in Jarvis ownership thru 1878 or 1879. In the Lloyd's Register of 1878/79, the sale of the vessel to B. Balkwill & Co., fleet owners of Salcombe, is recorded. In Jan. 1880, the vessel arrived at New York ex Colombo, Ceylon. I cannot tell you what later happened to the vessel, which is however not recorded in the 1882/83 or 1883/84 editions of Lloyd's. I should indicate, however, that the vessel was still listed in the 'The Record - 1885', i.e. 'Record of American and Foreign Shipping', with a last survey date of Jan. 1880. The webmaster would welcome new data, as would Roger Barrett, the source of much of the above data, who is researching Salcombe based vessels.

4 Catalina
515 (later 511) tons
Hull 27

87085 (later)
1868

An iron 3-masted barque. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 151.1 ft. long. The vessel was built for 'Ylurriaga & Co.', of Bilbao, Spain, for service to Ferrol, Spain, & later to the West Indies. The '& Co.', would indicate a partnership which likely included 'Ansuategui', who was the vessel's captain for its first 10 or so years until the vessel was sold. In the 1878/79 edition of Lloyd's register, 'P. Benguria', also of Bilbao, had become the owner. By 1882/83, the vessel was owned by W. O. Gilchrist, of London. The vessel, still owned by Gilchrist, became registered at Sydney, Australia, in 1887/88. By 1889/90, the last Lloyd's Register edition available to the webmaster, 'F. Hilken', of Vegesack, Bremen, Germany, had become the vessel's owner. I am unable to tell you what later happened to the vessel, but it may well have been stranded, still owned by F. Hilken. That was suggested by a Google 'snippet' re a German book entitled 'Von der Galiot zum Fünfmaster. Unsere Segelschiffe in der Weltwirtschaft 1780-1930', published in 1934. But I may have misinterpreted the snippet. Can anybody provide more data? Another image? No.1852

5 Ganymede
569 (or 573) tons
Hull 21

60041
1868

An iron 3-masted barque. Per 1 (arrival of Ganymede at Timaru, New Zealand ('NZ'), in Dec. 1881), 2 (Nelson Evening Mail, NZ, 1909 article, ex 3), 4 (image, Ganymede), 5 (An Arthur L. Haylock watercolour of Ganymede, a hulk, at Wellington, in Dec. 1920), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 167 ft. 6 in. long, iron hull & masts, accommodation for 40 passengers (20 in saloon & 20 in fore cabin), crew of 18, signal letters JHTG. The vessel was built for 'Jackson & Co.' of Liverpool, which would seem to mean 'James Jackson & Co.' Built for the 'West Coast of America copper trade'. In 1873 or soon thereafter, the vessel was sold to 'Thompson & Co.', also of Liverpool. Was engaged, it would seem, in trade between Adelaide, South Australia, Cape of Good Hope (South Africa) & Mauritius. The 1880/81 edition of Lloyd's Register records the vessel as sold to H. C. Fletcher, of Adelaide. When in Adelaide, the vessel suffered a fire which destroyed her cabin accommodation. She was especially surveyed, for the account of A. White ('White'), coal & produce merchant, of Timaru, NZ, who on or about Oct. 17, 1881 purchased the vessel & refitted her. Ganymede returned to Newcastle & left that port under the command of Captain J. Morgan (image) with a cargo of coal for Timaru. It arrived there on Dec. 2, 1881, to be greeted by the new owner, a grand reception & a banquet. The vessel was clearly in tip-top condition at that time. Registered at Lyttelton, NZ. Used in the 'Home trade'. On Feb. 17, 1889, the vessel, J. Allison in command, left Timaru for London, with a cargo that included 2,968 bales of wool. At a date unknown to the webmaster, the vessel, under the command of Captain Morton, was caught in a gale off the Snares, (an island group 200 km. S. of NZ South Island) & was dismasted. The vessel was refitted & served until 1893 when laid up at Timaru. White then had financial difficulties as a result of which the vessel was sold to W. S. Waterston, of Invercargill, NZ, who used her to serve Australia & South Africa, in the inter-colonial trade, presumably to & from England. In Jul. 1907, the vessel carried timber from Greymouth, NZ, to Melbourne. On May 31, 1909, the vessel was sold again, at Christchurch or maybe at Lyttelton. To Mr. Todd, an auctioneer of Invercargill, it would seem. On Mar. 4, 1910, the 'Evening Post' advised that the vessel had been sold by Mr. Todd to an unnamed Otago firm, for use as a hulk either at Port Chalmers or Wellington. Her last voyage would appear to have been from Hokianga (NW, North Island) to Sydney & Newcastle with timber, returning to be hulked. She was a hulk at Port Chalmers in Aug. 1910. An e-Bay item advised that the vessel was hulked, at Wellington, NZ, in 1912. But that date may well be way off. It surely was (5) a hulk at Wellington in Dec. 1920. This site advises, referenced to 'Evening Post' of May 21, 1934, as follows:- 'GANYMEDE'S LAST TRIP The Union Company hulk Ganymede, which is to be broken up at Nelson, left her moorings in Evans Bay in tow of the Titoki shortly, before 7 o'clock yesterday morning.' We thank 'paperspast' of NZ, for much of the above data. Can anybody provide more? Another image? No.1872

6 Cosmopolyta
498 tons
Hull 29

78439

Cosmopolita
Serita
Angelino
1869

A 3 masted iron barque. Per 1 (detailed history, Cosmopolita), 2 (Italian page, vessel history, image Serita), 3 (link 2 translated), 4 (Miramar, link, as Cosmopolita, you now must be registered to access). 151.4 ft. long, later 151.6 ft., signal letters WBGM, later JGRK. The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, thru 1889/90, see left. Built, as Cosmopolyta, for 'Olano & Co', of Liverpool. For service to Spain & later to the Far East (Manila, Philippines). In 1875, the vessel was transferred to 'Olano, Larrinaga & Co.', of Bilbao, Spain, & became Bilbao registered. It would seem that at that time the vessel's name became Cosmopolita. In 1881, the vessel was sold, to 'Morgan Tutton', of Swansea, Wales, & became Swansea registered. On Sep. 30, 1896, the vessel was sold to 'Nils Svensson Fex and partners', of Lerhamn, Sweden. In 1899, the vessel was sold, for SEK 30.000, to 'H. R. Lassen' ('Lassen'), of Hamburg, Germany, & renamed Serita. Many sales soon followed with no change of vessel name. In 1903, upon the death of Lassen, the vessel was sold to 'Giovanni Lubrano' or maybe 'S. Lubrano fu Z.', of Naples, Italy, & in 1905, to 'Rev. D. Gennaro Nugnes', also of Naples. In 1907, the vessel was sold to 'B. Schiaffino fu P.', of Genoa, Italy, & in 1908 was sold to 'E. Canale', also of Genoa. In 1911, the vessel was acquired by G. Montefiore, of Monaco. The vessel was sold for the last time, in 1916, to 'Ditta G. Pittaluga' of Genoa, Italy, & renamed Angelino. Later that same year, in Dec. 1916, the vessel was sold to Torre del Greco ship breakers & broken up. The WWW available ownership data re this vessel is somewhat confusing - it would be good to be able to access the data in later editions of Lloyd's Register. The American & Foreign Shipping 'Record', of 1889, reports M. Fulton, of Swansea, as then being the vessel's owner - a name not referenced above - a listing mistake, possibly. Can you add to and/or correct the above? 

7   HMS Cygnet
455 tons
Hull 60
1874

A Forester Class composite Navy steam gunboat. At its time of launch, the 15th Navy vessel of the name. Per 1 (fine & extensive history 35% down), 2 (1881 crew list), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for Royal Navy. 125 ft. long, 4-gun. In Jun. 1876, the vessel took part in a small expedition up the river Niger (West Africa) to restore British trade in the area. Also that year was in fleet that blockaded Dahomey (now Benin, West Africa) on the coast of Nigeria for 11 months. Re-commissioned in Malta in 1879. In 1882 was in the  14 ship fleet which bombarded Alexandria, Egypt. And assisted Condor in an attack on Fort Marabout, located on a promontory at the west end of the bay at Alexandria. Cygnet anchored so close to the fort that the enemy's guns could not be depressed sufficiently to attack her. In 1885, the vessel took part in the Egyptian campaign & assisted in the defence of Suakin (NE Sudan) from the Mahdists. Sold & broken up in 1889. Can anybody provide more data?

8 Delscey
704 tons
Hull 68

70954

Vidonia
1875

An iron barque. Per 1 (sale of Yorke oil painting of Delscey), 2 (image, Yorke oil painting, Delscey), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Registers, available to him, thru 1898/99, see left. 55.2 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 181.0 ft., signal letters PNTF. Delscey? An unusual name, I wonder as to its origin. Built for Shallcross & Higham, of Liverpool. By the 1894/95 edition of Lloyd's Register, Japp and Kirby, also of Liverpool, were the registered owners, with no change of vessel name. In 1897 or 1898, the vessel is said to have been sold to 'Mentz Decker & Co.', of Hamburg, Germany, & renamed Vidonia. But Japp & Kirby were still the owners in 1898/99 though the change of name, to Vidonia was noted. There are a few references to Vidonia in service in Australian waters. On Mar. 8, 1899, the vessel, Captain Voss in command, arrived at Rockhampton, Queensland, with a cargo of salt ex Sharpness, Gloucestershire, which it had left on Dec. 1, 1898. After unloading, the vessel proceeded to Newcastle, New South Wales, (arrived May 10 or 13, 1899 & left Jun. 4) to load 1174 tons of Wallsend coal for Valparaiso. There are later (1900) Australian references also. A Feb. 1905 reference seems to indicate that the vessel, en route from Petty Harbour, Newfoundland, to Bahia, Brazil, was caught in ice, off Petty Harbour, & was crushed ashore. But - it may have been another barque of the identical name. I have found no WWW references to what later happened to the vessel, but Miramar comes to our rescue. Miramar advises 'wrecked off Borkumriff 26.2.07 & BU' which would seem to indicate that the vessel was wrecked at Borkumriff, North Sea, off the Island of Borkum in the East Frisian Islands of NW Germany. But later re-floated & broken up. Thanks to Arie Jan de Lange's research of Dutch newspaper records, we can advise that the vessel, Captain Voss in command, was en route from Hamburg, Germany, to Guayaquil, Ecuador, with cargo when it went aground. Otto Hass, a lifeboat, (1 & 2 ex 3 & 4) saved seven of the crew & left eight aboard. Later, an attempt to salvage the wreck was made, but the project was abandoned. A German company with 4 large tugs then succeeded in recovering the wreck & took it to Emden, where it stayed just a couple of days - until the wreck was taken on to Hamburg with the help of two barges. And presumably was there broken up. Thanks to Arie, 5 1907 Dutch press clippings - difficult of WWW translation - are at left. I have not been able to WWW determine the circumstances of the wreck. An 1886 oil painting of Delscey by William H. (Howard) Yorke (1847/1921) was sold at Sotheby's, London, on May 29, 2002, for £7,285 - image at left & at link 2. The work depicts 'Delscey signalling for the Falmouth pilot, with a cutter in the background'. Can you help correct the above and/or add to the data? Another image? No.1831

9 Magicienne
2162 (or 2120) tons
Hull 63

Opal
1875

A British Navy steam corvette. Per 1 (data), 2 (Opal), 3 (image, left of 2), 4 (said to be a Henry King (1855/1923) photo at Sydney, dating from 1875 but more likely dating from very much later i.e. 1889/1892), 5 (correct vessel? I think so), 6 (1885 engraving. Opal firing 17 gun salute at Albany, Western Australia on Jul. 8, 1885.), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). This listing may well contain unintended errors. 12 guns, composite construction. Link 1 describes the vessel as 'Cruiser 3rd Class, late Corvette.' Ordered & laid down as Magicienne, but commissioned at Sheerness, Kent, on Jan. 10, 1876 as HMS Opal. 1879 in Pacific. 'Ordered home to Spithead. 14 guns.' In Apl. 1886 sold to Australia? Or just deployed there? The vessel was re-commissioned, on Oct. 27, 1886, at Sydney, Australia. An expired e-Bay item said 'Reduced to barque rig in 1880s'. (Which now makes some sense. Since Link 6, dating from 1885, shows a steam vessel but links 4 & here, dating I believe, in fact, from c. 1889/92 show a sailing vessel. HMS Orlando, shown in those images, was not built until 1886.) The vessel was the first 'composite' corvette built for the Royal Navy. Sold in 1890 to Australian owners? And sold on Aug. 11, 1892? Scrapped 1892 (have read 1891 also). I wonder where the vessel was scrapped? Can anybody provide more data? The data above is most confusing!

10 Glandinorwig
1107 tons
Hull 85

74870

Sivah
1876

An iron 3-masted barque. Per 1 (Norwegian page, extensive data, image, Glandinorwig), 2 (vessel history), 3 & 4 ('Vallejo Gallery' & 'Christie's', data, painting, Glandinorwig), 5 (half block builder's model of vessel), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 66.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 215 ft. 6 in., or 219.0 ft. long, signal letters WTSR, carrying royals over single topgallant sails. Have read described as 'flush decked. Glandinorwig? I think a slate mining village in N. Wales & a slate works. The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Registers, thru 1889/90, ex Google Books, available to him, see left. Built for W. E. Jones, of Port Dinorwig, Menai Strait, Caernarvon, Wales (Y Felinheli today). In May 1877, the vessel became jointly owned by Samuel Jones of Glandinowig, William Parry of Llanddeiniolan, Hugh Williams of Llanbeblig, & D. P. Williams, the latter being the managing owner. D. P. Williams was, I read a Llanberis, Caernarvon, druggist, who through either 'Gwynedd Shipping Company' or 'Eryri Shipping Company' or both, owned/managed 4 vessels engaged in the shipment around the world of Welsh slate, mined from the Snowdonia region of North Wales. Glandinorwig was one of those 4 ships, the others being the 'practically identical', Glanivor, Glanpadarn & Glanperis, all of which were also Doxford built. I read that Glandinorwig principally traded with North America, returning with either cotton from New Orleans, or Canadian timber. However the vessel would also seem to have travelled to the Far East (returning with spices, silk & silver) & to Australia. On Apl. 26, 1882, indeed, in a Port Adelaide, Australia, court, H. H. D. O'Kelly, a steward aboard the vessel, charged R. Williams, the ship's captain, with unlawfully assaulting & beating him. On Oct. 27, 1882, Thomas E. Walton, an apprentice, fell overboard during a squall. William Coleman, the boatswain was found guilty of dereliction of duty in not ensuring that the captain knew that a man was overboard.  In 1886, the vessel was sold or transferred to Williams, Jones & Co., also of Caernarvon. On Nov. 4, 1889, the vessel arrived at Sydney, Australia, from Hamburg, Germany. On Sep. 26, 1894 the vessel was at Rio bound for Portland, Oregon. In 1899, the vessel was sold to 'A/S Sivah', Hans & Axel Hanssen, of Arendal, Norway, the managers, & renamed Sivah. On May 6, 1908, the vessel was reported as being ashore at Hokianga, New Zealand, as a result of a heavy gale. In Jun. 1908, the vessel left Hokianga, for Sydney with 800,000 ft. of kauri timber. Manager changes in 1909 & 1911, to Axel Hannsen & then to O. P. Olsen. I read that in 1913 the vessel was stranded at Weymouth, Nova Scotia, Canada, was later refloated & presumably repaired. In Nov. 1913, the vessel was sold, for 45,000 Norwegian crowns, to Otto Lindell, of Eckerö, Åland Islands, Sweden, & used in the West Indies logwood trade. In Aug. 1914, the vessel was laid-up, re WW1, at Copenhagen, Denmark, thru 1916. In Feb. 1917, the vessel was sold again, for FIM 340.000, to 'Rederi A/S Sivah', George Stenius, of Helsinki, Finland, the manager, with no change of vessel name. And in 1919, the vessel was sold, for DKK 600.000, to 'Rederiet Falken A/S', Erik B. Kromann, of Svendborg, Denmark, the manager. In the 1st quarter of 1923, the vessel was broken up at German ship breakers. Can anybody provide more data? Another image?

11 Scottish Hero
911 tons (became 929 tons when re-measured Sweden May 30, 1914)
Hull 79

73670

Saturnus
1876

An iron barque. Per 1 (data), 2 [Scottish Line, Scottish Hero (1)], 3 (Ella of Quebec), 4 (images of vessel & of Captain Fraser), 5 (passenger lists - other places also), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for McIlwraith, MacEacharn & Co., of London, (Scottish Line), for the emigrant trade to Australia & New Zealand ('NZ'). 196.6 ft. long, 59.9 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters P.W.N.M. The vessel's first such voyage left London on Aug. 19, 1876, & arrived at Rockhampton, Queensland, on Nov. 28, 1876. James Fraser, the master, from 1881 to 1890. On or about Apl. 5, 1882, the vessel dragged its anchor at San Francisco & was in collision with City of Paris, which vessel would seem to have suffered the greater damage. On Oct. 20, 1883, while en route from London (Gravesend) to Rockhampton, the vessel was in collision with Ella of Quebec (a barque), at anchor in the Downs (E. Kent coast). The vessel was delayed 5 days for repairs. Slight damage to Ella of Quebec. The vessel clearly did not just travel to Australia & NZ - also Portland, Oregon, & ports in Chile, & Argentina were visited. On Dec. 7, 1889, the vessel ran aground entering Brisbane, Australia - not damaged. It was sold, in 1893, to A. H. Arnold, of Brake, Germany, & renamed Saturnus. And sold in 1900 to G. O. Köster, also of Brake, Germany. And sold again, in 1905, to 'A/S Saturnus (Chr Trondsen)', of Sarpsborg, Norway. And sold, on May 30, 1914, to 'Oscar Modén and partners', of Simrishamn, Sweden. Became 929 GRT. On Oct. 12 (or maybe Oct. 13, 1915), the vessel was abandoned, a danger to shipping in the North Atlantic (at 49.4N/29.48W), on a voyage from Miramichi, New Brunswick, Canada, to Cork, Ireland, with timber. The crew was saved by British steamer Colorado. Much of the above is thanks to Fraser Morrison, a site visitor, who has also provided an extensive listing of Scottish Hero voyages from 1876 to 1893. Can you help correct and/or add to the above?

12 Scottish Knight
916 (or 875) tons
Hull 80

73682
1876

An iron passenger/cargo barque. Per 1 (Scottish Line, Scottish Knight), 2 (maiden voyage, low on page, but arrival date, I believe incorrect), 3 (Maryborough, 80% down), 4 (4 Australian arrivals, 1887/9), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him thru 1889/90, see left. Built for McIlwraith, MacEacharn & Co., of London, (Scottish Line), for the emigrant trade to Queensland, Australia. However, in 1880, such trade ended when the Queensland Government contracted with 'British India Associated Steamers' for such service. The vessel continued to trade with Australia - carrying wool, produce & passengers, but also travelled to U.S.A., Chile etc. 196.0 ft. long, 59.7 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters P.W.N.V. On her maiden voyage, she left London (Gravesend) on Sep. 29, 1876, & arrived at Cleveland Bay, Townsville, Queensland, on Jan. 23, 1877. On Jan. 12, 1880, the vessel struck a shoal near Sandy Cape, Queensland, Australia, was beached at Port Curtis, an island off Gladstone, Queensland, & later re-floated & repaired. Arrived at Maryborough, Queensland, on Oct. 18, 1886 with 245 passengers. In Feb. 1896, the vessel was near the end of her voyage from Tocopilla (Northern Chile) to Leith (Edinburgh) via Queenstown, Ireland, with a cargo of nitrates when, on Feb. 11, 1896, in fog, it struck Longships Rocks, 1 1/4 miles off Land's End, Cornwall. The vessel was taken in tow by Henry Fisher, a steamer, but never reached safe haven at St. Ives, Cornwall. The vessel foundered 2 miles off the coast near Pendeen, at 'Three Sisters Oar'. No loss of life. The crew of 18 were landed at St. Ives by Pilot Cutter 49, of Cardiff. WWW data is limited & we thank Fraser Morrison for much of the above. Can you help correct and/or add to the data? An image?

13 Barbara
1108 tons
Hull 86

76475
1877

An iron barque. Per 1 (ref. to Barbara), 2 & 3 (both re Capt. Pritchard's watch, images), 4 (BBC Wales 3:19 min. video), 5 & 6 (reports re Board of Trade stranding inquiry ex 'Liverpool Mercury' of (5) Dec. 20, 1881 & (6) Dec. 22, 1881), 7 & 8 (two Barbara wreck videos thanks to Richard Hughes), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 220.0 ft. long, 67.1 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters QMHK. Built for Capt. William Thomas & other shareholders of Amlwch, a village on the NE tip of the Island of Anglesey, just off the North Wales coast. Capt. William Thomas (or maybe W. Thomas & Co. or Capt. William Thomas and Sons), I read, built, owned & managed schooners & ketches in the 19th century & also had a yard at Duddon in Cumberland. He had dealings with but was not related to another William Thomas - of Liverpool. But Barbara was registered at Liverpool. Under the command of Captain John Jones, (of Catherine Street, Cardigan, West Wales), Barbara was wrecked at Freshwater Bay, Pembroke, on Nov. 22, 1881, while returning to Liverpool from Rangoon (left Jun. 7) with a cargo of rice. A crew of 15 all told plus 1 passenger, the son of the principal owner. Captain Jones, previously ship's mate, assumed command when Richard Prichard, the captain, died on May 12, 1881 at age 38 on the outgoing voyage to Rangoon. The ship left Queenstown, Ireland, on Nov. 21, 1881 with Thomas Lewis (referred to as Thomas Jones in one report) as pilot. While he held a master's licence, he was unlicensed as a pilot. The ship went off course, into Bristol Channel instead of St. George's Channel, tried to correct & in high seas, indeed a major storm, found itself in Freshwater Bay. Anchors did not hold her, she dragged inshore under towering cliffs &, pounded by the waves, became a total wreck. A beach was 150 yards to the east. Captain Jones, who was swept away in the high seas & lost his life, was held to be responsible, & the 'so-called' pilot, who was saved, bore no legal responsibility. Richard Hughes, of Red Dragon Divers, advises (thanks Richard!) that the modest remains of the vessel lie in 8 metres of water, 150 yards from Freshwaterwest Beach. Those remains, found in the late 1970s by Ivor Johnson, were previously known as the G.B. wreck - because the remains were below a gorse bush which used to look like a map of Great Britain! Doubly G.B.! Anyway, in Apl. 2000, Richard Hughes found Captain Prichard's pocket watch - 119 years on the sea bed - it was later returned to the captain's closest relative today. He also advises that brass letters were found at the wreck site 10 & 15 years ago, particularly a letter 'W' and a letter 'D'. The Barbara crew were all saved by rocket apparatus, with one exception, Captain Jones himself. Most of this data is thanks to the 'digging' of historian David Roberts. I do not have an exact location, but it would be roughly at 51.42N/04.54W. Anything you could add to the above would be gratefully received. An image?

14 Caesarea
1294 tons
Hull 87

76959

Otra
1877

A 3 masted fully rigged sailing ship. Per 1 (Norwegian 'pdf', #37), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 229.1 ft. long, 69.9 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters S.G.V.K. The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, thru 1889/90, see left. Built for 'W. Pellier', of London, though 1 states William Potter, of London. In 1890, the vessel was sold to C. M. D. Jörgensen, of Hamburg, Germany. And in 1902, was sold again, to 'A/S Jernskib Otra' (Thv. B. Heistein the manager?), of Kristiansand (Oslo), Norway, & renamed Otra. Presumably named after the Norwegian river of the name which flows to Kristiansand. I think, correct me if I am wrong, that the 2nd image at left depicts a barque. So the vessel was likely re-rigged to become a barque. On Jun. 5, 1912, while en route from Libau, Latvia, to West Hartlepool, with a cargo of pit props, the vessel was stranded in fog & wrecked near to West Hartlepool. Can you help correct the above?

15 Gateacre
1409 (or 1401) tons
Hull 94

76541

Kehrewieder
Alauda
Vigo
1877

A 3 masted steel sailing ship. Per 1 & 2, (fine Alexander Wilson images), 3 (Norwegian 'pdf', #14), 4 (image, which relates in a way that I cannot today define), 5 (image, Vigo), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, thru 1889/90, see left. 231 ft. long, 70.4 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters R.C.F.K. This listing may well contain errors due to my inability in both Norwegian & Spanish. WWW translation is often most difficult. The vessel was built for C. W. Kellock and Co. of Liverpool. In 1894, the vessel was sold to C. H. H. Winters, of Elsfleth or Bremen, Germany, & renamed Kehrewieder. The vessel was sold again, in 1901, to C. F. A. Flugge, of Hamburg, Germany, & renamed Alauda. In Feb. 1905, the vessel was sold to 'A/S Vigo', of Tvedestrand, Norway, & renamed Vigo. In 1915 the managers changed? In Jul. 1916, the vessel was sold to 'Holmestrands Rederi A/S' of Holmestrand, Norway. And in Jun. 1922, the vessel was sold, for the last time, to 'A/S Fredriksen & Møller', of Mandal, Norway. On Mar. 16/17, 1923, the vessel was  shipwrecked, near Policarpo Creek, Tierra del Fuego, en route, laden with coal, from Cardiff to Antofagasta, Chile. Chilean steamer Amadeo effected the rescue of the crew on the next day. No loss of life. Can you help correct the above?

16 Duncow
1715 tons
Hull 108

78806

Michele Bianchi
Vesuvio
1878

An iron 3 masted fully rigged ship, that had the unusual 'distinction' of being abandoned twice in her lifetime. Per A (e-Bay image, Vesuvio), 1 (data in Italian, Michele Bianchi, image alas with logos), 2 (poor translation of link 1), 3 (a Feb. 1882 arrival at Melbourne, Australia), 4 (abandoned at Dunkirk in 1888), 5 (articles in Dutch re the 1888 abandonment), 6, 7 & 8 (the 'wreck' at Kangaroo Island in 1897), 9 (Report of the Court of Enquiry into the 1897 wreck/abandonment), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, thru 1889/90, see left. 252.0 ft. long, 76.8 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters RWQT. The vessel was built for 'John Houston & Co.', of Liverpool. On or about Nov. 20, 1888, the vessel arrived at Falmouth with 2200 tons of nitrate of soda ex Iquique, Chile, & was instructed to proceed to Dunkirk, France. On Nov. 25, 1888, the vessel ran aground on a sandbank off Dunkirk, heavy seas broke over her & she lost anchors & chains. Assistance was requested & the entire crew of 23 was taken off by the Dunkirk lifeboat. The overnight rising tide lifted the ship off the sandbank & it drifted in a north-easterly direction. Fishermen found her off La Panne & Blankenberg, & a Belgian tug was called in to tow her into Terneuzen, the Netherlands, on the Scheldt estuary. Why not into Dunkirk? Apparently because there would have been no salvage claim had she been taken to a French port. The fishermen claimed 1/3 of the value of the ship & cargo, a sum then estimated at over 1 million francs, as salvage. I have not read how much they ended up with! It would seem that some felt that the vessel had been too soon abandoned. We have more! Arie de Lange has kindly provided 3 newspaper articles in Dutch re the abandonment & advises that the vessel, being too heavily loaded to enter Oostende, was in fact towed by a French tug & by Remarqueur, a Belgian tug, initially to Flushing & then to Rhynkaai (not Terneuzen) harbour at Antwerp. The vessel was unloaded at Antwerp, 50 tons of nitrate of soda being found damaged. The vessel was repaired, over a 3 week period, at the cost of nearly £1,000. It would appear that the Belgian Court was to decide who were to be awarded salvage moneys, but Arie has not spotted the conclusion & whether the fishermen were successful in their claim. In 1895, en route to Chile, the vessel collided with & sank another vessel in the South Atlantic, apparently S. of Rio de Janeiro. It was, I believe, the barque Queen of the West (built in 1867 by Pile, Hay of Sunderland). The barque was in collision with Duncow & was abandoned at sea on May 14, 1895. At 27.43S/45.50W. On Feb. 25, 1897, the vessel left Puget Sound, Washington, for Port Pirie (N. of Adelaide, Australia) with a cargo of 1800 tons of Oregon pine, with Captain F. A. Graves in command & a crew all told of 26. On May 25, 1897, during a fierce storm, the vessel found herself off course & close to land. She anchored for safety close below the 300/400 ft. cliffs at Cape Couedie (or Cape du Couedic), Kangaroo Island, South Australia, located about 70 miles SW of Adelaide. At about 36.4.0S/136.41.60E. The deck cargo of 70 tons of timber was jettisoned. The storm did not abate, rather it strengthened in the next days. To ensure no loss of life, the order was given, on May 28, 1897, that the entire crew abandon the ship. They made it to shore at Smith Bay after a 22 hour row in high seas in a single lifeboat, walked 75 miles across the island to Kingscote. They eventually arrived at Queenscliffe. The vessel was reported in the press to have hit a reef & been wrecked. Yatala, a tug, was sent from Adelaide to the scene & en route picked up Captain Graves & his crew. They found that the vessel was not wrecked, rather was riding at anchor apparently with no damage. Amazingly close to the cliffs (60 ft.) & to jagged reefs. Yatala towed the ship clear of the rocks & onwards to Port Pirie where her cargo was discharged.  A Court of Enquiry was held at Port Pirie on Jun. 16, 1897. The court determined that the Captain was guilty of navigational misjudgements but also agreed that abandoning the ship in her then circumstances was the appropriate course of action. In 1899, the vessel was sold to 'Bianchi', of Genoa, Italy, & renamed Michele Bianchi. The vessel traded in the Pacific Ocean for the next 10 years. It was sold again, in 1907, to 'Michele Borrello', of Torre del Greco, near Naples, & renamed Vesuvio. Used in the Atlantic trade. On Jun. 25, 1914, the vessel arrived at Genoa with a cargo of 2250 tons of timber ex Pensacola, Florida, after a voyage of 72 days. In Dec. 1914, the vessel was broken up at Naples, Italy. In 1979, Alan Osterstock authored a limited circulation (400 copies only) volume, of 72 pages, entitled 'The Duncow Report', about the 1897 abandonment. A copy is available via e-Bay in late Feb. 2014. Can you add to and/or correct the above?

17 Scottish Admiral
986 tons
Hull 104

77111
1878

An iron passenger/cargo barque. Per 1 (Scottish Line), 2 (Trinidad, Nov 08, 1882, 20% down), 3 (image), 4 (2 Australian arrivals, May 9, 1888 & Nov. 10, 1889), 5 (ref. Scottish Admiral 80% down), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, thru 1889/90, see left. Built for McIlwraith, MacEacharn & Co., of London, (Scottish Line), for the emigrant trade to Queensland, Australia, however in 1880 such trade ended when the Queensland Government contracted with 'British India Associated Steamers' for such service. The vessel continued to travel to Australia -  & elsewhere also. 217.8 ft. (66.4 metres perpendicular to perpendicular) long, signal letters R.S.C.N. There are references to a number of voyages to Australia in 1878, 1888 & 1889 & a voyage (item 19) to Wellington, New Zealand, where it arrived on Sep. 4, 1885. On Nov. 8, 1882, the vessel arrived at Trinidad with 424 East Indian indentured labourers (port of origin not stated). In Feb. 1894, the vessel was laid up & at anchor in the River Medway, where, on Feb. 10, 1894, she was struck & sunk by the battleship HMS Edinburgh, whose steam steering gear had failed. HMS Edinburgh suffered no damage. WWW data is limited & I could find no detailed reference to what happened in Feb. 1894. We thank Fraser Morrison for that data, indeed much of the above. Can you help correct or add to the data? An image?

18 Maxima
3613 tons
Hull 116

82296

Grecian
1879

An iron passenger/cargo ship. Per 1 & 2 (Norway-Heritage pages Grecian), 3 (data, Grecian), 4 ('Sinking of La Bourgogne', 45% down with links), 5 (Allan Line, Grecian), 6 (Allan Line), 7 (Miramar, Cromartyshire, link, you now must be registered to access), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, thru 1889/90, see left. 360.5 ft. long, 109.7 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, three masts, single funnel, speed of 11 knots, signal letters TGJN. Accommodation for 820 passengers (50 in 1st Class, 270 in 2nd & 500 in 3rd). Miramar indicate the vessel to be an 1880 vessel but Lloyd's states 1879. Laid down as Maxima. But delivered to J. & A. Allan, i.e. 'Montreal Ocean Steamship Company', Allan Line, incorporated in Canada, perhaps, but of Glasgow, as Grecian. The vessel's maiden voyage, on Apl. 21, 1880, was from Glasgow to Montreal via Quebec (both Canada). Would seem to have travelled mainly to Canada & to the eastern seaboard of U.S. ex Glasgow but for a while to South America (River Plate) also. In 1882 the vessel was chartered for use as a 'Troopship for the Egyptian Expedition'. Allan Line would seem to have become 'Allan & State Line' & later maybe just 'State Line' as a result of acquisitions. See Corean for a little more of the corporate history. On Jul. 4, 1898, the vessel received 165 survivors from the collision, early in the morning & in dense fog, of Cromartyshire (a sailing ship of 1462 or 1554 tons, en route from Dunkirk to Philadelphia with coal) & La Bourgogne, 60 miles off Cape Sable. La Bourgogne sank 40 minutes after the collision. A range of 546 - 584 lives lost ex La Bourgogne, including its captain (Deloncle) & many officers. La Bourgogne was the fastest fleet vessel of Compagnie Generale Transatlantique. It was, I read, carrying 711 persons that day, was off course & travelling at an excessive speed for the conditions. It would seem that Cromartyshire, herself badly damaged (bow cut off by the impact & her foremast & main top-gallant mast carried away), rescued the 165 survivors, transferred them later that day to Grecian, which then towed Cromartyshire to Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Do read the horrific account of the disaster at 4. Only one woman survived - in part since a lifeboat carrying mostly women & children was crushed by one of the ship's funnels as it collapsed. Grecian was wrecked on Feb. 8, 1902 at Sandwich Point, Nova Scotia, while entering Halifax Harbour under pilotage in a snow squall. No loss of life. The cause of the wreck seems to be unknown, but the conditions were adverse. Can you add anything? Or correct any errors? Samantha Bradbury (thanks!) has written in to advise that 'Charles Edward Le Gallais', her GG grandfather, was Captain of the Grecian from 1880 to his retirement in about 1892/3. Lloyd's seem not to reference, for some reason, any Master's name for the Lloyd's Registers available to the webmaster of 1887/88 & 1889/90.

19 Corean
3488 tons
Hull 122

84312
1881

An iron passenger/cargo ship. Per 1 & 2 (Norway-Heritage pages), 3 (data), 4 (fine 1881 image at St. John's, Newfoundland), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, thru 1889/90, see left. 360.1 ft long, single funnel, single screw, 3 masts, speed of 11 knots, signal letters V.M.P.J. With accommodation for passengers in 1st & 3rd class. How many, I wonder? Built for J. & A. Allan, i.e. Allan Line (founded in 1846), Montreal Ocean Steamship Company, of Glasgow, incorporated in 1854. Allan Line would seem to have become 'Allan & State Line' & later 'Allan Line Steamship Company Limited' ('ALS') as a result of the acquisition in 1891 of 'The State Line Company of Glasgow' & the incorporation of ALS in 1887. The vessel's maiden voyage, on May 10, 1881, was Glasgow to Montreal via Quebec (both Canada). Would seem to have travelled mainly to Canada & to the eastern seaboard of the U.S. (New York, Boston & Philadelphia) ex Glasgow & London. On Dec. 5, 1897, the vessel was slightly damaged in a collision with Mobile off the Newfoundland Banks, but completed her voyage. The vessel arrived at Messina, Italy, on Sep. 24, 1908 to be broken up. 3 provides a source for an image. Is it possible that you have anything to add?

20 County of Pembroke
1098 (or 1065) tons
Hull 130

84171
1881

A 3-masted iron barque. Per 1 (wreck identified), 2 (data, County of Pembroke), 3 (NY Times report, it IS there but is most difficult to sensibly read, but you can read it easier here 4), 5 (ref. to Principality Shipping), 6 (William Thomas), 7 (wreck image, in 'Square Rigger Days', said to be County of Pembroke but in fact, per Vanessa Maitland ('VM'), wreck archaeologist, of Durban, South Africa, is of the Arnold, a German barque of 854 tons), 8 (a better copy of the image at 7), 9 (an image stated to be of County of Pembroke, but per VM in fact the Bramblebyte), 10 (image in 1881), 11 (1904 salvage, at page bottom), 12 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 72 metres long, 67.5 metres perpendicular to perpendicular. Signal letters WFCS. Per site correspondent Alun Jones, built to a design by William E. (Edward) Jones, shipbuilder, of Caernarvonshire. Data is most limited. Registered at Liverpool. Owned by 'Thomas & Co.' which I think means 'William Thomas & Co.' ('Thomas'), of Liverpool, 'Welsh County Line' per 'scott-base', though 5 suggests that it was owned by 'Principality Shipping Co. Ltd.' ('Principality'), ('William Thomas & Sons Co.' managers?) of Liverpool. Can anyone clarify? Perhaps Thomas owned or was a major shareholder in Principality? In c. 1899, Jimmy Bisset, aged 16, was swept overboard in monstrous seas off Cape of Good Hope, hung onto a rope & was swept back aboard with the next sea. The first mate roared 'The next time you do a thing like that, I'll log you for attempting to desert ship!' Bisset went on to a long & distinguished career with Cunard-White Star. The vessel, carrying a mixed cargo including 100 tons of 'cement powder', & under the command of Captain John Parry, was moored at Algoa Bay, Port Elizabeth, South Africa, on Nov. 14, 1903 when she & six (maybe only 5) other ships were wrecked in a SE gale. 2 says there was a collision. e-Bay vendor 'scott-base' advises 'she had been at Algoa Bay since 15th October discharging cargo, she had recently moved berth, she was secured by two anchors in rising winds and sea. She parted her cables and drove ashore becoming a total wreck.' The vessel lay on the beach, in a dangerous position until Mar. 1904, when, some repairs effected, it was towed by 2 tugs to the mouth of the Coega River, 14 km away, & scuppered. In May 1904, Messrs G. E. Austin & Co., salvage contractors of E. London & Port Elizabeth, were engaged in salving the cargo of County of Pembroke, 'on the 50 percent, no-cure-no-pay basis'. The wreck was identified in 2004 - it had to be removed so dredging work re the new Port of Ngqura could be completed. Artefacts recovered include crates of sealed bottles, with contents intact. No advice as to what the bottles contain! Probably not party time! A puzzle would seem to be the identity of the image at 7. Virtually the same image is, I understand, in 'Sail Ho!: My early years at sea' by Jimmy Bisset (Sir James G. P. Bisset), published in 1958. We thank Nigel Parry, of Kent, U.K., for his assistance concerning this listing. John Parry, who was in command of County of Pembroke in 1903, was Nigel's grandfather. Can you add anything?

21 Olive Branch
1728 (or 1721) tons
Hull 126

84993
1881

A cargo ship that had a short life. Per 1 (Branch Line & ref.), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 260.0 ft. long, signal letters W.D.Q.F. The webmaster has a couple of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, thru 1887/88, see left. Built for Nautilus Steam Shipping Co. Ltd., known as 'Branch Line', owned by F. & W. Ritson, of Sunderland. On Jun. 5, 1885, while en route from Sunderland to Palermo, Sicily, with a cargo of coal & gas fittings, the vessel was, per a site now long gone, in collision with Tudor, 20 miles S. of  St. Catherine's Point, the southernmost point on the Isle of Wight. Olive Branch sank. But now, thanks to David Wendes, I learn, from a reference in a contemporary local paper, that Olive Branch in fact collided with Tudor Prince (a Sunderland built ship), which was en route from Taganrog (Sea of Azov, Black Sea, Rostov Oblast, Russia) to Lynn (in Norfolk?). And had a very long life indeed. Olive Branch sank in just 10 minutes. Her crew of 22 were taken aboard the seriously damaged Tudor Prince, which initially anchored at Motherbank (a shallow sandbar off the NE coast of the Isle of Wight) & then proceeded to Southampton for repairs. There was dense fog at the time. WWW data is most limited. Anything to add? An image perhaps?

22 Coban
1063 (initially recorded as 1055, later corrected to 1063?) tons
Hull 132

86071
1882

A collier. Per 1 (Coban), 2 (ref. July 14, 1882, 2nd ref.), 3 (July 14, 1882, 2nd item, ref. 'steamer'), 4 (disabled in 1897), 5 (aground in 1888), 6 (1903 explosion, about 50% down, 5th 1903 item), 7 (also 1903 explosion), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 230.0 ft. long overall, signal letters WHNK. The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, thru 1889/90, see left. I used to state that the vessel was built for 'Black Diamond Steamship Co. of Montreal Limited' ('BlackDiamond'), of Montreal, Quebec, Canada, initially belonging to the port of Sunderland & later of Montreal. But I now read that the vessel was launched on Feb. 06, 1882 for Dent & Co. ('Dent') of Newcastle. It would seem likely that it was delivered to Dent also since the ship's bell (image at left), references Newcastle & Miramar reference Dent as the vessel's owner. BlackDiamond were, however, the recorded owners in & after the 1882/83 edition of Lloyd's Register. The vessel would seem to have had a history of 'scrapes'. On Jun. 17, 1882, the vessel, just 3 months old, chartered for the season to 'Block House Mining Company', went aground near 'the Northern Head of Cow Bay', Newfoundland. 'A company from Quebec, with the steamer Conquer, were using steam-pumps and other appliances for the purpose of floating the vessel, and the Dominion Wrecking Company was at hand, ready to offer their services if required. As the Coban does not appear to have sustained much damage, it is quite possible the Company will get her off during next high tide.' In 1898, the vessel was engaged in the Montreal to St. John's, Newfoundland, service via Charlottetown, P.E.I. & Sydney, Nova Scotia - for 'Black Diamond Line'. 'Dent & Co.' the managers? On Dec. 11, 1897 the vessel was disabled, having lost her propeller, 30 miles off St. Pierre. On Jun. 19, 1888, the vessel, with a cargo of 1,400 tons of coal, was aground at Green Island. On Mar. 23, 1899, the vessel was damaged in ice off Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, en route from Louisburg to St. John (means St. John's?), & put into Halifax, Nova Scotia, for repairs - such data was elsewhere (now gone) - but similar data is here. On May 21, 1903, 3 aboard were killed in an explosion, likely of coal gas, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence - William Dawe & another passenger &, I think, William Morgan, but maybe 'McGrath', a waiter. The saloon & ladies' cabin were destroyed. On Apl. 6, 1908 the vessel ran aground off Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. On Jun. 19, 1927, the vessel was wrecked in fog at Partridge Island, Bay of Fundy, en route from Sydney, Nova Scotia, to Saint John, New Brunswick, with a cargo of coal. Then owned by 'Black Diamond Steamship Co.' I presume the wreck stayed in situ. The vessel broke up in gales in Jan. 1928. 'Black Diamond' may well have owned her throughout her lifetime & leased her to Dominion Coal Company? Ashley Clarkson, of Montreal, has been in touch to advise that back in 1937 Coban's ship's bell was donated to 'The Last Post Fund's National Field of Honour' in Pointe-Claire, Quebec, Canada, & placed within the 'Gate of Remembrance' there. It was rung whenever a veteran who had died passed through those gates. Due to upkeep issues, the bell was later removed from the gate & a stained glass window took its place. Ashley has now created an exhibit to explain the significance of the Coban bell & what it's ringing used to mean for the veterans. Ashley would be happy to receive any additional data you might have about Coban's history. The bell itself? It is most distinguished - you can see it at left. Can you add anything? An image?

23 Ednyfed
1115 (later 1152) tons
Hull 141

87026
215216

Erna
Edith Jones
Edith Wolden
Oriole
1882

A 3-masted iron barque. Per 1 (R. Thomas & Co., data & fleet list), 2 (extensive data, Erna), 3 [data, Ednyfed, ex Trove, Australia, (4)], 5 (F. Hopper, 1891 oil painting, Ednyfed), 6 (image, Ednyfed), 7 (Norne, 1927 court case), 8 (Lloyd's data, Oriole, at 'plimsollshipdata.org', 1930/31 thru 1938/39, build stated as 1881), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 67.4 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 221 ft. 0 in., 3 masts, signal letters  WHBC, WHMK, & later KNVV & LHJD. The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, thru 1889/90, see left. The vessel was christened Ednyfed by Mrs. Davies, wife of the Master of the Sunderland Workhouse - named after the residence of one of the owners. The vessel was built for 'Robert Thomas & Co.', of Criccieth, Carnarvon, Wales, later of Liverpool. The vessel's maiden voyage was to Rangoon, Owen Jones in command, but after that, during its first 7 or 8 years the vessel served the W. coast of S. America. On Apl. 28, 1890, the vessel left Chatham, River Thames, with a cargo of cement bound for Port Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. And then left for Pisagua, Chile. She visited Brisbane, Queensland, in Aug. 1891 bringing a cargo which included steel rails & water pipes, & then left for Oregon in ballast. In Oct/Nov 1896 the vessel carried Wallsend coal from Newcastle, New South Wales, to the Australian west coast. It was frequently in Australian waters, ex Liverpool, in the following years generally carrying coal to ports on the W. coast of S. America. I read that on a date quite unknown, Ednyfed was 100 days overdue on a voyage from Trapani, Italy, to Gloucester, Massachusetts. I have not read the date, circumstances or outcome. In Apl. 1908, the vessel was sold to 'A/S Erna', of Porsgrund, Norway, 'Pettersen & Ullenæs', also of Porsgrund, the managers, & renamed Erna. The vessel continued to serve Australia - for example on Jan. 27, 1909 the vessel left S. Australia for Falmouth with 18,457 bags of wheat. In Jul. 1912, the vessel was sold to 'Cia. Mercantil Chubut', (Chubut Mercantile), of Buenos Aires, Argentina, & renamed Edith Jones. And in 1917, it was sold again, to H. E. Wolden, of Montevideo, Uruguay, & renamed Edith Wolden. In 1918, 'Oriental Navigation Corp. Inc.', of New York, N.Y., U.S.A., became the vessel's owners & renamed her Oriole. In 1923, then over 40 years old, the vessel was converted into a 'schooner barge', owned by 'Sipsey Barge & Towing Co. Ltd.', of New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.A., R. D. Reeves the manager. In Apl. 1927, Oriole was under the tow of 'De Bardeleben', a tug, proceeding upbound in the Mississippi river at New Orleans, with no cargo. Norne, carrying gasoline, was headed down river at speed. Norne hit the tug's tow cable, collided with both De Bardeleben & Oriole & considerably damaged both. Norne was held to have been at fault. In 1936, H. F. de Bardeleben became the vessel's manager. The vessel was shortened a little - it became 219 ft. 8 in. long in 1936/37. The vessel was reported abandoned & in the 1938/39 edition of Lloyd's was stated to have been 'broken up'. Somewhere along the way R. Jones was Ednyfed's captain. He later, in 1897, was swept off Powys Castle in giant seas & was lost. Can you add anything? No.1900

24 Hanoverian
3603 (or 3503) tons
Hull 129

85931
1882

An iron 'schooner-rigged' passenger/cargo ship. Per 1 & 2 (Norway-Heritage pages), 3 (data, Hanoverian 1882), 4 (1885 passenger list), 5 (c. 1882 image at St. John's), 6 (wreck description), 7 (inquiry report #2725, 'pdf' available), 8 (two 1883 voyage references included), 9 (Allan Line, Hanoverian), 10 & 11 (New York Times, Sep. 03 & 04, 1885), 12 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 366.0 ft. long, single funnel, single screw, 3 masts, speed of 11 knots, signal letters W.J.R.V. Accommodation for passengers in 1st & 3rd class (an 1883 voyage had 29 in cabin & 273 in steerage). The webmaster has a couple of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, see left, but the vessel is not recorded in the 1887/88 edition. Built for 'J. & A. Allan', of Glasgow, Alexander Allan being the managing owner. Most references are however to Allan Line, [i.e. Montreal Ocean Steamship Company ('Steamship')], of Liverpool, which is a puzzle because 'J. & A. Allan' clearly owned the vessel rather than Steamship. Another puzzle is that the wreck inquiry report says it was owned by 'T. & A. Allen', i.e. with a 'T' and an 'e'. Allan Line would also seem to have become 'Allan & State Line' & later maybe just 'State Line' as a result of acquisitions. See Corean for a little more of the corporate history. The vessel's maiden voyage, on May 25, 1882, was from Glasgow, Scotland, to Montreal via Quebec (both Canada). The vessel would seem to have travelled mainly ex Glasgow & Liverpool to Canada, & (from 1883) to the eastern seaboard of U.S. (Baltimore & Philadelphia). The vessel left Baltimore on Aug. 25, 1885, for Liverpool via Halifax & St. John's, with a cargo of grain, flour & meat, with passengers & under the command of Benjamin Thomson, (Lieut. B. Thomson, R.N.R., it would seem), ('Thomson'). The vessel made it safely to Halifax & left for St. Johns with 152 passengers & a crew of 78 all told. The vessel was wrecked, in foggy conditions, soon after 9:20 a.m. on Sep. 2, 1885, in St. Mary's Bay, 7 miles E. of Trepassey, Newfoundland, approx 400 yards from shore - stated to be near Portugal Cove, Trepassey Bay, in the inquiry report. Grounded on Catherine's Point with the bottom ripped out for nearly the entire length of the ship. The passengers & crew were all safely landed, with safety and rapidity, as were the mails that the vessel carried & a part of the cargo. Nimrod was sent to the scene but did not make it due to the 'impenetrable' fog. Steam tugs & other vessels also went to the scene but it would seem that H.M.S. Tenedos, a British warship, came from St. John's & carried the passengers & the remainder of the crew to that port. The Captain, along with 3 of his officers, remained at the wreck site for 6 weeks. The passengers, in a few days, continued their journey ex St. John's to Liverpool aboard Polynesian. The Inquiry found Thomson alone to be at fault for having failed to make sufficient allowance for the current & a heavy beam sea, which combined to result in the vessel being off course. Thomson believed the vessel to be on Pig Bank. The number of passengers aboard is confusing indeed. Some passengers clearly originated in Baltimore, but I presume that the official enquiry would have accurately reported the numbers of those aboard at the time of the wreck. Professor Alexander Graham Bell, aboard along with his wife & family, was, I have read, a calming voice in the disaster. He may have boarded the vessel at Halifax, but I have not read that that was so. 12 states, in error clearly, that the wreck was on Aug. 31, 1885. Anything to add?

25 Abington
2053 tons
Hull 143

87333
1883

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data, Abington), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 285.2 ft. long, single screw, 3 masts, signal letters H.D.M.W. The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, thru 1889/90, see left. The vessel was built for 'Renton & Co.', of Glasgow. But it was soon sold to 'Abington Steam Ship Co. Ltd.' ('AbingtonSteam') (Raeburn & Vérel, managers), & registered at Glasgow. In the 1887/88 edition of Lloyd's, 'J. A. Sillars' had become the owner, but the ownership would seem to have reverted to AbingtonSteam in the last register I have available, the 1889/90 edition, with J. A. Sillars the owner? or perhaps the manager? of AbingtonSteam. On Mar. 16, 1892, the vessel was involved in a collision at Antwerp, Belgium, & was beached at Palingplaat, a mud flat in the Scheldt estuary. Thanks to Arie Jan de Lange (1892 newspaper cutting at left), we can advise that the vessel was in collision with Activa, a 556 ton German cargo vessel, & broke in two. A Norwegian company failed in its attempt to salvage the wreck & in the spring of 1893 the wreck was blown up with dynamite. But Arie, who is side scan sonar equipped, advises that parts of the Abington wreck are still on the sea bed. WWW data is most limited. Can you help with more?

26 Ella Sayer
1744 (later 1694) tons
Hull 148

88744
1883

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('wrecksite.eu', wreck data), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 258.0 ft. long, signal letters HWRM. The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, thru 1889/90, see left. Built for Fisher Renwick & Co. ('Fisher'), of Newcastle. In the 1889/90 edition of Lloyd's, 'Ella Sayer Steamship Co. Ltd.', had become the owner, Fisher being, I believe, the owner of that company. On Sep. 1, 1897, while en route from Kotka, Finland, to Hull with a cargo of pit props, the vessel was wrecked about 7 (maybe 10) miles N. of Scarborough. 2 says 'wrecked N Hayburn Wyke 1.9.97 & beached'. Hayburn Wyke is on the Yorkshire coast. At 1 a.m. on Wed. Sep. 1, 1897, the vessel struck rocks & a large hole resulted in the ship's plating. The Robin Hood’s Bay Coast Guard responded, as did a steam tug. Cargo was jettisoned & the vessel was towed free but had to be pushed back on shore because so much water was entering the ship. The crew stayed aboard, but that night the weather worsened, the vessel had to be abandoned & it became a total loss. The wreck lies in 12 metres of water, at 54.22.554N/00.27.061W. WWW data is limited. Can you add anything?

27 Warrego
1552 tons
Hull 147

87149
1883

A passenger/cargo ship. Per 1 (20% down, data & image, Warrego), 2 (image, Warrego), 3 (data, Darwin), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 250.0 ft. long, signal letters H.V.W.C. The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, thru 1889/90, see left. Built for the Australian coastal trade of Queensland Steamship Company Ltd. ('Queensland') & designed to compete in the then trade war of Queensland with Australasian Steam Navigation Company ('Australasian) of Sydney, New South Wales. Registered at London. Australasian was owned, from 1886, by British India Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. In Apl. 1887, an agreement was reached & the fleets of Queensland & Australasian were combined into 'Australasian United Steam Navigation Company Ltd.' Registered at Brisbane, Australia. The vessel was later laid up. And was sold, in 1912, to the Royal Australian Navy. Was converted into a stores ship. A short lived career as such! A coal hulk at Sydney early in 1913. In Oct. 1913, as a coal hulk, the vessel was towed by Coolgardie to Darwin, Northern Territory, & beached there. In 1919, in a cyclone, the vessel, with 600 tons of coal aboard, was driven higher onto the beach near the Darwin wharf. The hull was bombed by the Japanese on Feb. 19, 1942. The remains are still there today but invisible - buried under landfill re the 1960 construction of a power station. Can you provide more data?

28 Airlie
2337 (or 2338) tons
Hull 158

89595
1884

A passenger/cargo ship. Per 1 (Eastern & Australasian, Airlie), 2 (Burns Philp, Airlie), 3 (brief data), 4 (an image source), 5 (1900 grounding), 6 (data & image, 1st vessel), 7 (launch etc. data re Airlie ex 'The Marine Engineer' of 1884, a Google book), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, thru 1889/90, see left. 314.0 ft. long, speed of 14 knots, 2 masts & bowsprit, signal letters JMSK. Fitted with an aluminium propeller & aluminium was extensively used in the ship's interior. A sister to Guthrie. Built for 'Eastern & Australian Mail Steamship Co. Limited', of London, which company provided mail & passenger service from Sydney, Brisbane & other Australian ports to Japan, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Manila & Thursday Island. Melbourne soon became the Australian terminal. The owner would seem to have soon become 'Eastern & Australian Steamship Co. Limited'. In Jan. 1900, the vessel was stranded on Chapman Island, Torres Straits, off the Queensland coast. The vessel was initially thought to be a total loss, but that proved not to be so since the vessel safely made it to Sydney. Passengers were landed (where?) by Culgoa. A 'seagoing certificate' in 1901 for 128 passengers & a crew of 64. In 1904, the vessel was sold to 'Burns Philp & Company Limited', of Sydney. I need help re the next item! From Feb. 10, 1904 to Sep. 5, 1905, Russia & Japan were at war (Russo-Japanese War). It would seem that at a 1904 date that I have not read, related to that war,  Airlie was 'overhauled & boarded' by a Russian cruiser (its name?) in the Red Sea. An artwork by Hodgson, perhaps F. S. or I. S. Hodgson, depicting the incident was published in a 1904 edition of Illustrated London News & an e-Bay postcard image of that artwork is available in Dec. 2010, as this listing is updated. Can anybody tell us what really happened & why? Refrigeration machinery was added to the vessel in 1905. And in 1909, the vessel was on the Australia, Japan & China service. In Apl. 1910, the vessel picked up 78 lascars from the wreck of Satara, wrecked on Apl. 20, 1910, at Edith Breaker, 2 miles from Seal Rocks, New South Wales. The vessel was laid up in 1910. And broken up in China, in Q1 of 1911. Much of the above was provided by Mori Flapan, of Sydney, Australia (thanks!). Can you add anything?

29 Cloncurry
2662 (or 2579 or 2580 or 2963) tons
Hull 156

89623

Yoneyama Maru
1884

A passenger/cargo ship. Per 1 (McIlwraith McEacharn, Cloncurry), 2 (an 1884/85 Cloncurry arrival in Australia), 3 (article re the arrival of Cloncurry at Brisbane on Aug. 7, 1885 ex 4), 5 (Allan C. Green watercolour), 6 (image, Cloncurry, ex Trove), 7 & 8 (data re Sir Malcolm D. McEacharn), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The webmaster has a couple of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, see left. 300.0 (or 314) ft. long, schooner rigged, signal letters JPWS, crew of 51 (carrying passengers, I presume). Built for McIlwraith, McEacharn & Co. (or Ltd. or Limited?), of London, & later Melbourne perhaps, whose fleet, known as 'Scottish Line' ('Scottish') carried cargo & immigrants to Queensland, Australia. The vessel was christened by Miss McIlwraith, daughter of Sir Thomas McIlwraith, ex Premier of Queensland. On Oct. 29, 1884, the Scottish Line vessel left Glasgow for Townsville, Mackay, Rockhampton & Brisbane, all Queensland, with 265 immigrants & a varied cargo that included 5 locomotives. Scottish soon began to carry frozen meat to the U.K. from Australia. Cloncurry was chartered, from 1885 to 1888, to British India Steam Navigation Company. On Jan. 3, 1890, the vessel was in collision with Maple Branch, (built at Sunderland by Bartram & Haswell, & not Maplebranch) in Suez Bay. Cloncurry was sunk, but was re-floated & repaired. In 1905, it was sold to 'Itaya GK' of Japan & renamed Yoneyama Maru. The vessel was wrecked at Kinkazan (near Sendai, in Tohuku, Japan) on Jan. 12, 1911. WWW data is quite limited. Can you add anything?

30 Guthrie
2338 tons
Hull 157

89561
1884

A passenger/cargo ship. Per 1 (Eastern & Australasian), 2 (Burns Philp), 3 (data & image), 4 (Australia & Oriental Line), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, see left. 314.0 ft. long, speed of 12 knots, with a clipper bow & 2 masts, signal letters JLDW. Built for 'Eastern & Australian Mail Steamship Co. Ltd.', of London. By the 1887/88 edition of Lloyd's, the vessel was owned by 'W. Mactaggart', of London. It would seem that William McTaggart, of McTaggart Tidman & Co., of London, was one of the partners that created 'Eastern & Australian Mail Steamship Co.' The vessel was engaged on the Australia to Singapore run until 1902 & then on the Australia to Hong Kong & Japan route. It was sold, in 1904, to 'Burns Philp & Company Limited' ('Philp') & reverted to the Singapore route (via Port Darwin, Java & Thursday Island). I have read that the vessel was laid up in 1911. And was sold, in 1912, to G. S. Yuill and Company Ltd., of Sydney, i.e. 'Australian & Oriental Line'. Used on a single trip to Japan & then chartered to Philp. The vessel was laid up in 1913, & in 1914 was sold to White Cross Steamship Co. (A. Gallussen & Co. the manager?). 3 indicates that the vessel may then have been renamed Helvette, a name not referenced at Miramar. On Nov. 1, 1914, while en route from ? to Vladivostok, Russia, with a general cargo, the vessel was wrecked off Taku Bar, or Tientsin Bar, nr. Tientsin, 170 km. E. of Beijing, China, & its port. Am grateful for the data from a long expired e-bay listing for much of the above. But can you add anything?

31 Maelgwyn
1276 (or 1235) tons
Hull 161

89625
1884

A 3-masted iron barque. Per 1 (70% down), 2 (Maelgwyn), 3 (R. Thomas & Co.), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The webmaster has a couple of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, see left. 220.0 ft. long, 67.1 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters JQBF. Now normally there would be an owner & a manager for a ship. In this case we have 'Robert Thomas & Co.' as 'managing owner'. Shares were sold in the fleet vessels to many parties it would seem, including, of course, Robert Thomas himself. The fleet was managed, until 1899, from Criccieth, a small coastal village in North Wales, & then from Liverpool. WWW data is most limited. On Jan. 26, (or 25) 1907, Maelgwyn's ballast shifted, presumably in bad weather. She lost her masts & had to be abandoned about 20 miles NW of Lord Howe Island (off E. coast of Australia). The crew of 26 were all saved & landed at Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Can you provide additional data?

32 New Guinea
2674 tons
Hull 160

89634
1884

An iron steamer, passenger & cargo. Per 1 (data, New Guinea), 2 (text, 2 images of wreck & links), 3 ('pdf' - many references), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The webmaster has a couple of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, see left. 300.0 ft. long, single screw, schooner rigged, 2 masts, speed of 11 knots, signal letters JRFT. Built for McIlwraith, McEacharn & Co. of Melbourne, Australia. On Jun. 16, 1885, the vessel first sailed from London to Batavia (now Jakarta, Indonesia) & Brisbane. Described as a collier but link 2 indicates that its voyages from U.K. to Australia (Brisbane) from Jun. 1885 through May 1889 would be unlikely if a collier & it was probably a general cargo vessel. A new propeller shaft was fitted in 1910. On Feb. 13, 1911, still owned by 'McIlwraith' but chartered to Huddart, Parker & Company Ltd., & en route from Melbourne to Sydney with general cargo, the vessel ran aground at speed, in dense fog, W. of Green Cape Lighthouse, Disaster Bay, New South Wales. In 2 days, the vessel slipped off the rocks & sank. It would seem that the entire crew (28) survived & eventually, after considerable difficulty, landed at Eden, some 26 km. away. The Captain (Coleman) was held to be at fault at the wreck inquiry for sailing too fast in the conditions - his licence was suspended for 6 months. It would be good to be able to read the inquiry's actual report. A calm weather wreck site today. Anything to add?

33 Annie Thomas
1758 tons
Hull 165

91258

Principality
1885

A 4 masted iron ship, rigged with double top sails, single topgallant sails & royal sails. Per 1 (data), 2 (page in Spanish, Principality 80% down), 3 (data), 4 (1885 ref. to launching, p.# 188), 5 (an 1895 image of the crew of Principality), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The webmaster has a couple of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, see left. 258.5 ft. long, 78.75 or 78.8 metres, perpendicular to perpendicular. Built for Principality Shipping Co. Ltd., of Liverpool (William Thomas & Sons Co. owners & managers). Per Alun Jones, to a design by William E. (Edward) Jones, shipbuilder, of Caernarvonshire. Captain J. Jones her first Captain. Sister to Kate Thomas & Colony. Ordered as Annie Thomas but launched as Principality. In 1890, or maybe a little earlier since the vessel is listed as a barque in the 1889/90 edition of Lloyd's Register, the vessel was re-rigged as a four-masted barque. In 1895, the vessel sailed from Astoria, Oregon, to Queenstown, Ireland, in 96 days. And in 1898, it sailed from Cardiff, Wales, to Valparaiso, Chile, in 74 days. While I have no detail, G. W. Hilliard, an apprentice, was granted the prestigious Sea Gallantry Medal for an incident on Nov. 19, 1899. On May 4, 1905, the vessel left Junin, Chile, for Rotterdam with 2,600 tons of nitrate of soda. The vessel was last heard from on May 13 (or May 23, sources differ), 1905. Believed to have been lost at Cape Horn, where wreckage, identified as being from Principality, was later found. A crew of 25 were aboard - presumed all lost. Miramar states last spoken to at 23.30S/22.05W on May 13, 1905. A watercolour by Godfrey, of New South Wales, exists, but no WWW image of it seems to be available. Can you add anything?

34 Cadwgan
1303 (or 1264) tons
Hull 164

91866
1885

A steel barque. Per 1 (9th item Thomas), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The webmaster has a couple of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, see left. 222.0 ft. long, 67.7 metres perpendicular to perpendicular. Built for R. Thomas & Co. of Liverpool (or maybe, at the time, of Criccieth, in Wales). Registered at London. The vessel was possibly sold, in 1911, to French owners, per a long expired e-Bay item, 'F. Ballasky & Sons' or a name similar to that, & was hulked, in 1911, at Noumea, New Caledonia (France), in the S. Pacific. Broken up soon thereafter. Some 1886/7 documents may exist at University of Exeter (Henry Parry Collection). An image of the vessel's figurehead may be available from e-Bay vendor 'artboy53'. Can you add to the above most limited data?

35 Kate Thomas
1748 tons
Hull 163

91233
1885

A 4-masted steel barque. Per 1 (history data), 2 (data, Kate Thomas), 3 (extensive data, India & Kate Thomas), 4 & 5 (both images), 6 (1885  ref. to launching, p#106), 7 (collision report, Evening Telegram, N.Y., May 1, 1906, Kate Thomas/Blanefield, but image at bottom left), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The webmaster has a couple of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, see left. 258 ft. (78.63 metres) long, signal letters KBGF. Sister to Annie Thomas. Per Alun Jones, built to a design by William E. (Edward) Jones, shipbuilder, of Caernarvonshire. Owned by 'Kate Thomas Sailing Ship Company', of Liverpool & there registered. Thomas Williams her first Captain. Traded between British (mainly Cardiff) & Continental ports & South America with general cargo. On May 1, 1906, Kate Thomas collided with & sank the steamer Blanefield, 3411 tons, off Beachy Head, Sussex. I have not read the circumstances. It would seem however that a Court found in favour of Kate Thomas. There is some confusion as to how many died - most WWW sites state that 36 Blanefield lives were lost but read the text re Blanefield, & the bottom image at left there, which indicates that it may have been five only. Kate Thomas was towed into Southampton in a damaged condition. Also in 1906, the vessel was in collision with the steamer Pyrgos. On Apl. 4, 1910, the vessel was sunk off Pendeen Light, Land's End, while on tow, in ballast, by Belgian tug John Bull, from Antwerp to Port Talbot, Glamorgan, South Wales. Penzance steamer India, of 364 tons, ran into the starboard side of Kate Thomas at 4 a.m. There were 20 aboard, & 19 died. John J. (Jack) Nelson, an apprentice, was the only survivor. The vessel sank a few minutes (10 or 15) after the collision. India, which suffered major bow damage, did not stop at the accident scene. The Board of Trade Inquiry (3 bottom), determined that the collision was caused by the default of the India Master (Thomas F. Mitchell) in going below & leaving an able seaman in charge of the deck, & by the default of that able seaman in not keeping a proper look-out. Of interest is the fact that Mitchell did not have a 'certificate of competency'. Anything to add?

36 Richard Hayward
1687 (or 1637 or 1686) tons
Hull 162

80244
1885

A 4-masted steel barque. Per 1 (data), 2 (wreck report), 3 (1885 ref. to launching, p.78), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The vessel is not recorded in Lloyd's Registers of 1887/88 & 1889/90. 258 ft. (78.63 metres) long. Built for William Edward Jones (1844/1910), ('Jones') (or maybe W. E. Jones & Co.), of Caernarvon, Wales (but owned by 'Richard Hayward Ship Company Limited' of which Jones was the managing owner. The vessel was named by Mrs. Williams of Treborth, Bangor, & cost £15,750 or £15,850. On Jul. 11, 1885, the vessel left Sunderland on her maiden voyage, under the command of Captain Joseph G. Richardson (1828/1885) ('Richardson'), bound for Singapore with a cargo of coal - from the Dudley Pit of Cramlington Colliery, 11 miles N. of Newcastle. The vessel must have passed Cape of Good Hope & was last seen by Great Surgeon, an American barque, on Sep. 29, 1885, abandoned & on fire. At or about 38S/35E in the Indian Ocean, about 600 miles SE of the South African coast. Fire probably due to 'spontaneous combustion' of the cargo. It seems that the crew of 26 had taken to the boats, were not heard from again & all lost their lives. Alun L. Jones of North Wales advises (thanks Alun!) that Richardson lost his life as a result of the fire, as did Henry, his 19 year old son. Indeed 7 men from the village of Y Felinheli, Gwynedd, North Wales, were serving aboard Richard Hayward & lost their lives. A memorial to Richardson is in the lych gate at Llanfairisgaer Parish Church, on the mainland side of the straits at Menai, North Wales. Alun has further advised the names of the 7 village men who were lost. Here. Anything to add? Or correct?

37 Colony
1750 (or 1694) tons
Hull 167

93697

Kringsjaa
1886

A 4 masted iron vessel, rigged with double top & topgallant sails. Per 1 (data), 2 (USS Patterson, DD-36, Jun. 14, 1918), 3 ('uboat.net', sinking Kringsjaa, image) 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The webmaster has a couple of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, see left. 258 ft. (or 258 ft. 4 in.) long. Built for 'Ogwen Ship Co. Ltd.', of Liverpool, William Thomas & Co., also of Liverpool, the managers & probably the managing owners. Per Alun Jones, to a design by William E. (Edward) Jones, shipbuilder, of Caernarvonshire. In 1899, the vessel was re-rigged as a 4-masted barque. 'Went in 1899 from Flamborough to Rio in 39 days.' The vessel was sold, in Jul. 1915, to 'Skibs A/S Kringsjaa (Kr. Knudsen)' of Christiansand, Norway, for £7,500 & renamed Kringsjaa. On Jun. 14, 1918, under the command of  Captain G. Magnusdal, the vessel was sunk by German submarine U-151, while en route from Buenos Aires to New York with linseed oil. At 38.02N/71.40W, 90 miles off the Virginia coast. U-151 was commanded by Korvettenkapitän Heinrich von Nostitz und Jänckendorff. The entire Kringsjaa crew were picked up, 'one day out of Bermuda', by USS Patterson & landed at Cape May Naval station. Can you add anything?

38 Fee Cheu
1034 tons
Hull 171

94292
1887

A steel armed cruiser & cable vessel. Per 1 (Marine Engineer 1887/88, at p.66 & 144, image at left), 2 (Far East service, thanks to Richard N. J. Wright), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 67.1 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular ,(220 ft.), single screw. The vessel was fitted as an armed cruiser (4 light guns) & cable vessel (cable-layer), & attained an average speed of 12.8 knots at its trials at Whitley (North Tyneside). Built for James Whittall, Esq., of London, it would seem to the order of the Governor of Formosa. '..expected to sail shortly for the China station under the command of Captain Lugar'. 'Fee Cheu' means 'Foochow'. The vessel laid cable to connect the Island of Formosa i.e. Taiwan, (at Tamsui, northern Taiwan) with mainland China [at Sharp Peak (Foochow or Fuzhou) at the entrance to the Min river] & similarly connected? Formosa with Pescadore islands. Was at one period armed with 'two Armstrong 6in BL (breech loading guns), mounted on bow & stern' - but the guns were too heavy for the vessel & were surely removed. Her service at Formosa ended when the island was ceded to the Japanese in 1895. She was used to transport disbanded soldiers ex Formosa. Taken over by the Fukien (China) Government, possibly as Fei Chieh or Feichieh. The vessel, Fee Cheu, was at Amoy (Xiamen, Fujian Province, China) in 1908, for the visit of the U.S. battle squadron on its world tour. Richard N. J. Wright (thanks!) has kindly corrected my above text & advises that a model of Fee Cheu is in the 'Merseyside Maritime Museum'. Entry to the Museum is free, I see. Dr. Alan Scarth, Curator of Ship Models at 'Merseyside', advises, however, that the Fee Cheu model is not on public display. But he has kindly provided (thanks so much!) the splendid photographs available at left, both of which are 'Copyright of National Museums Liverpool'. Can you add anything?

39 Nulli Secunda
6037 (or 5874 or 5270) tons
Hull 166

95098

Transpacific
Durbhunga
Golconda
1887

A 4 masted 'whaleback' passenger/cargo steamer. Per 1 (4th image down), 2 (extensive data, ship's bell, Christies 2006 auction, but why engraved Glasgow?), 3 [British India, Golconda (2)], 4 (data, image link), 5 (data, sinking, p.27), 6 (image, Golconda, also -02), 7 ('uboat.net', Golconda sinking, image), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Am confused by the presently & previously available data re this vessel. The webmaster has just 2 editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, see left. 128.6 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 422.0 ft. long, 2 funnels, barquentine rig, officers & a crew of 100, speed of 12 knots. Attained 13.9 knots on her trials. Laid down on speculation as Nulli Secunda, for Guion Line. But launched as Transpacific for Canadian Pacific Railway Co. When that deal fell through the vessel was sold to a Hull owner (whom?) who named her Nulli Secondus, but that data may be incorrect, though the name appears often. 'Marine Engineer', in its Jan. 1888 issue, p.335, stated that the Transpacific had not by then found a buyer. The limited passenger capacity was, I read, a 'sales' problem, only 80 in 1st class & 28 in 2nd. The vessel was acquired, in late 1887, by British India Steam Navigation Company Ltd. ('India'), of London?, as Golconda. But 1 states that the vessel was completed only in Sep. 1888 & 2 says that it was completed Dec. 1887. The vessel was the India 'flagship' for 12 years (through 1902) with service during that period as a Boer War transport. Somehow the name Durbhunga seems to come into the history. Not sure how. Perhaps before Sep. 1888 when commissioned (as per Miramar)? It would seem that a passenger, arriving at Plymouth from India in late Dec. 1899, suffered from a mild case of the bubonic plague. 'The rats on board the steamer have been utterly exterminated by burning...'. From 1900 to 1902, i.e. during the 2nd Boer War, some 5,000 Boers were shipped by the British to prison camps on the island of St. Helena in the S. Atlantic. To camps at Deadwood Plain & Broad Bottom, with Deadwood being by far the largest. In Oct. 1902, when the war had ended, Golconda carried most of the last of the Boer prisoners held on St. Helena back to South Africa. In Mar. 1913, she was transferred to India's E. African service & in Oct. 1915, became an Indian Government (Army) transport. On Jun. 3, 1916, en route from Tees (Middlesbrough) to London, for Calcutta, India, with a general cargo, the vessel was sunk by a mine laid by UC-3, Oberleutnant zur See Günther Kreysern in command. But I have also read that the vessel was torpedoed & sunk by a German U-boat. The vessel sank, close to Aldeburgh (Suffolk, East Anglia coast). At 52.09N/01.45E. 19 lives were lost. The captain (his name?) survived. Golconda? Today a ruined city & fort, located west of Hyderabad, India, but steeped in centuries of history quite beyond the terms of reference of this site. The 'Koh-i-Noor' diamond, was likely found nearby. There were many vessels of the name. A wonderfully detailed model of the ship is in the Thomson Ship Models Collection at the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto, Canada. Images of the model are in the beautiful volume - 'Ship Models: The Thomson Collection at the Art Gallery of Ontario' Can you help with more data and/or an image about this Golconda?

40 Brenner
1878 (or 1579 or 1841) tons
Hull 176

88814

Borg
1888

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Ref. 176), 2 (Cay, Hall), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 80.8 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, about 85 metres long overall. Built for 'Cay, Hall & Co. Ltd.' ('Cay'), of South Shields, which company, originally a sailing ship owner, became a steamship owner in 1880 by buying second hand tonnage. Cay moved to Bristol in 1904. The vessel was sold, in 1920, to 'H. Uner', of Norrköping, eastern Sweden, ('R. Gohle' the managers), & renamed Borg. In 1922, the vessel was transferred to 'H. Uner A/B, also of Norrköping, with no change of vessel name. In the 3rd quarter of 1934, the vessel was broken up at Oskarshamn, Sweden. WWW data is most limited. Need help!

41   Kong Frode
954 tons
Hull 181
1888

A cargo ship which carried a few passengers? Per 1 (Norway-Heritage), 2 (#16), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 215 ft. 5 in. long. Built for 'Det Søndenfjelds-Norske Dampskibsselskab', of Kristiania (Oslo), Norway. Active in Caribbean? And Norway to Hamburg, Germany. The vessel was sold, in 1908, to 'D/S A/S Kong Frode (Lauritz Kloster)' of Stavanger, Norway. On Apl. 29, 1909, the vessel ran aground at Lighthouse Reef, British Honduras, (now Belize), while en route from New Orleans, U.S.A., to Puerto Cortés, Honduras (I think that is what link 2 (#16) says). A later ship of same name. Need help! With Norwegian also! And an image.

42 Mamari
3583 tons
Hull 186

95289

Hesione
1889

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per 1 (4 Jul. 1889, name spelled Marmari), 2 [Shaw Savill, Mamari (1) 85% down], 3 (20 Nov. 1891), 4 (45% down, image), 5 (Hesione in 1st group), 6 (image), 7 [Houston Line, Hesione (1)], 8 (U-41), 9 (sinking, image), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 360.0 ft. long, triple expansion engines, 2 masts, speed 10 or 11 knots, signal letters LFNP. Built for Shaw, Savill & Albion Line. Fitted for the New Zealand meat trade with refrigeration capacity for 40,000 carcasses. 'Suffered a broken tail shaft when rounding Cape Horn in her year of build and had to be towed to Montevideo by the steamer Gulf of Corcovado.' Known, it would seem, as 'New Zealand Thief'! I wonder why? In the 1891 reference, she carried grain & wool. The vessel was sold, in 1903, to Houston Line of Liverpool, i.e. R. P. Houston & Company, but maybe more accurately 'British & South American Steam Navigation Company', a line which specialised in refrigerated ships, & renamed Hesione. On Sep. 23, 1915, Hesione was hit by a torpedo & captured by U-41, Kapitänleutnant Claus Hansen in command, while 86 miles SE of Fastnet (SW Ireland) & en route from Liverpool to Buenos Aires, Argentina, with a general cargo. Was shelled & sunk. At 50.15N/8.30W. No loss of life. Can you add anything? And can anybody ensure that I have the correct vessel images at left - there were a number of vessels named Mamari.

43 Setiembre
2171 tons
Hull 186
1889

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Spanish page, Septiembre, image), 2 (link 1 translated), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 83.8 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of ? knots. Built for 'La Compañía Bilbaína de Navegaçión', of Bilbao, Spain, which company named its vessels for months of the year. Eduardo Aznar & Ramon de la Sota were the 2 principals, hence, perhaps, Miramar referencing 'Aznar & Co.' Spanish sites seem to consistently refer to the vessel as Septiembre. Likely used to carry iron ore from Spanish mines to English ports. In Mar. 1911, the vessel was en route from 'Porman' (per an e-Bay listing. I cannot identify the place, but likely on the N. coast of Spain) to Maryport, Cumberland, with a cargo of iron ore. On Mar. 26, 1911, the vessel ran aground on Hats Ledge, Crow Sound, Isles of Scilly, & became a total wreck. I have not read the circumstances or if there was any loss of life. Very little seems to be WWW available about this vessel. Or its wreck. The launch of the vessel was covered in 'Marine Engineer ...' of Jan. 1890, but only a snippet is WWW visible. Can you help with more data?

44 Fazilka
4152 tons
Hull 199

98578
1890

An iron passenger/cargo steamship. Per 1 (greatest repair story), 2 (Wikipedia, Fazilka), 3 (British India, Fazilka), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for British India Steam Navigation Company, of Glasgow. 366 ft. (111.6 metres) long, speed of 12 1/2 knots. Accommodation for 12 passengers in 1st Class & 1,650 Deck Class. An e-Bay item says 'carried up to 1,667 deck passengers.' Sister to Fultala. In Oct. '1897 during a particularly bad spell of weather whilst on passage she actually ran out of coal and subsequently burnt most of her wood fittings to make port.' Used as a troop carrier re the Boer War (Transport #30) & re the Boxer Rebellion. Do read the story at 1 'Possibly The Greatest Ever Repair at Sea.' (sheared propeller shaft in Feb. 1900 while en route in ballast from Mauritius to Colombo, Ceylon, (now Sri Lanka). The vessel was given up for lost - it took 48 days to reach Colombo after the shaft sheered. There is an image of the vessel under sail there. Used to transport Indian indentured labourers to the colonies (5 such trips to Fiji, 1901 thru 1907, listed at 2 with passenger load of each trip indicated). The vessel was requisitioned, in 1915, as a troop transport & in May of 1917 came under the 'Liner Requisition Scheme'. Returned to Madras/Singapore service. On Oct. 31, 1919, the vessel ran aground on the E. coast of Great Nicobar Island in bad weather en route Penang/Calcutta (or Madras) with cargo & passengers. Vessel lost. All passengers aboard taken by Sabang to Penang. The crew was rescued also. No loss of life, it would appear, however 4 indicates that 2 lives were lost. Do you have anything to add?

45 Federal
2403 tons
Hull 195

95970
1890

A collier. Per 1 (data, image), 2 (launch, ex 'The Engineer', of Apl. 11, 1890), 3 (launch, ex 'The Marine Engineer', of May 1, 1890), 4 (an Aug. 1890 arrival at Hobart), 5 (Huddart, Parker & Co., 55% down), 6 & 7 (loss of Federal, partial crew lists), 8 & 9 (wreck data, Federal), 10 (4 images, Federal), 11 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 88.4 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 290 ft., two masts, schooner rigged, speed of 10 or maybe 11 knots. The webmaster has just 2 editions of Lloyd's Registers available to him, ex Google Books, see left. Built for 'McIlwraith McEacharn & Co. Ltd.', of Melbourne, Australia. Built to serve the Newcastle, New South Wales ('NSW'), Australia, & Melbourne coal trade. I read that in Jul. 1898 the vessel was chartered to Adelaide Steamship Co. And in early 1899, it would seem, was chartered to Huddart, Parker & Co. On Mar. 20, 1901, the vessel, Captain J. Coull in command, with a crew of 30 all told (have also read 21, 29 & 37), left Port Kembla, NSW, bound for Albany, Western Australia, with a cargo of coal. It would seem that the vessel ran into a full gale (a terrific cyclone) & possibly also fog. I find the various accounts of what happened to be a little confusing. The vessel would appear to have been seen a few miles N. of Gabo Island by Peregrine. And is said to have been last sighted by Melbourne on Mar. 21, 1901, SE of Gabo Island. Gabo Island is a small uninhabited island in Bass Strait, just 500 metres off the coast of Victoria. At 37.33.32.64S/149.54.40.95E. But I read also that Federal was sighted presumably later that day, in the afternoon, hugging the shore, by the lighthouse keeper at Gabo Island. So close indeed that he could have thrown a stone into her and could almost have spoken to the men on board. The keeper was surprised the ship was not in more open water since there are hundreds of submerged rocks along the coast, the scene of many a shipwreck. Anyway, the vessel went missing, & is understood to have foundered on Mar. 21, 1901 in the area between Gabo Island & Ram Head & Point Hicks, both of which points are on the Victoria coast. All aboard were lost. 5 lifebuoys, & a portion of the hatches, cabin fittings etc., I read, washed ashore on Gabo Island. But I also read that there was wreckage at Ram Head where bodies also came ashore. Can you help with more data?

46 Fultala
4156 tons
Hull 200

98589
1890

An iron steamship. Per 1 [British India, Fultala (1)], 2 (Wikipedia, Fultala), 3 (clearly involved with Boer War), 4 & 5 (artwork by E. Wilkinson), 6 (image 55% down), 7 (image), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 366 ft. long, speed of 11 knots. Sister ship to Fazilka. If so, may also have had accommodation for 12 passengers in 1st Class & 1,650 Deck Class. Built for British India Steam Navigation Company. Used as troop carrier re Boer War. And, on Jan. 20, 1900, carried 280 horses contributed by Indian princes, to Durban ex Bombay. Used to transport Indian indentured labourers to Fiji (4 such trips, 1901 thru 1906 listed at 2 with passenger load of each trip indicated). Maybe requisitioned in 1914 as a troop transport? 1923 scrapped at Bombay, India. Can you help with more data?

47 Mary Beyts
3790 (or 3764) tons
Hull 193

98053

Hestia
1890

An iron steamship. Per 1 (Donaldson Line, Hestia), 2 (data, painting, Hestia), 3 & 4 (Hestia, wreck detail, including a list of those aboard), 5 & 6 (NY Times articles), 7 (p#1 of a 216 page transcript of the Montreal hearing), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 111.2 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 365 ft., speed of 10 knots, signal letters LPTC, expressly designed for the Bombay, India, trade. The vessel's topmast could be lowered in case it used the Manchester Ship Canal. The webmaster has just 2 editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, see left. Built for 'Bombay, London Steamship Co. Limited', of London, with Beyts, Craig & Co., also of London, the managers. In 1893, the vessel was sold to Donaldson Bros, of Glasgow, Scotland, & renamed Hestia. Probably primarily for their Glasgow, to Quebec & Montreal, Canada, service. On Oct. 10, 1909, with Captain H. M. Newman in command, a crew of 35 all told & five passengers, Hestia left  Glasgow for Saint John, New Brunswick, & onwards to Baltimore, Maryland, with, I have read, a cargo of sugar. However the cargo would seem to have been, in fact, most varied & included carpets, fabric, rope, horses, tombstones, 900 tons of iron, Scotch whisky & pickles. More about the last two a little later on. 4 of the 5 passengers were young boys from Glasgow tending farm horses. It is thought that the vessel misidentified a navigation light - regardless, the vessel was off course when, at 1:10 a.m. on Oct. 25, 1909, during a heavy north-easterly gale, the vessel ran ashore at Old Proprietor Ledge, off Seal Cove, Grand Manan Island, Bay of Fundy. At 44.33N/66.40W, 4 miles ESE of Southwest Head Light. The bow of the ship became 'impaled on a rock, and her after part, swinging free, was tossed high by the heavy seas'. Three ship's boats would seem to have been launched. The first was lost at its launch. The second, launched with very great difficulty, either soon after impact or 4 hours later, had 16 aboard including 4 of the young horse handlers. It capsized during launch. Two crewmen survived the turbulent seas & were able to scramble back aboard the ship while 2 others were taken aboard the 3rd boat. The third boat was launched with 18 aboard including the Captain. All aboard that boat were lost. Left aboard were two men from the first ship's boat, (who declined to board the 2nd boat), & 4 others. But it may rather be that there was simply no space for them in the 3rd boat. They prepared a raft for a possible escape, but instead lashed themselves to the upper rigging. After 24 hours, fearing that the mast would topple, they made it to the ship's bridge, still above the surface, but that position was untenable & they had to return to the rigging. Now the ship had gone aground way off the main shipping lanes. Grand Manan fishermen realised the ship's predicament on the afternoon of Oct. 26, 1909, & a score of small craft tried to get near the wreck. Eventually, lifeboats were sent from Seal Cove Station & they rescued the six survivors, by then all in pitiable condition after 38 hours in the rigging. So 34 lives were lost & just 6 survived (but there are many references to 35 being lost, & there being 41 aboard). The ship's boats drifted ashore as did many bodies of the drowned. I read that local fishermen salvaged everything that floated. The ship of course broke up. On Nov. 10, 1909, a hearing was held at Montreal, Quebec, into the disaster. The causes were believed to be i) compass error, possibly due to the iron in the cargo, ii) a lack of depth soundings being taken, iii) an insufficient allowance for tide & wind, iv) the Captain's error of judgment in misinterpreting the light that the vessel did see. The whisky & the pickles? I read that in the 1970's three cases of Scotch whisky, a part of the ship's cargo, were found intact on the seabed. It sounds like it still tasted pretty good! You might term it naturally aged? 'Allaby, Cook and Green', a team of divers, found pickles, now in the New Brunswick Museum, that also were part of Hestia's cargo. I rather doubt if anyone chose to taste them! I have not spotted what wreckage exists at the site today. There are inconsistencies in the WWW available accounts. So the above will surely need correction. Can you add to and/or correct the above? An image?

48 Hawkes Bay
4583 tons
Hull 201

98893

Chasehill
1891

A refrigerated cargo ship. Clipper bowed. Per 1 (1st item), 2 [Tyser, Hawkes Bay (1)], 3 (Essex Steamship, Chasehill), 4 & 5 (Kronprinz Wilhelm), 6 & 7 (NY Times archive items), 8 (Guadelupe), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 383 ft. 1 in. long, speed of 13 knots. Built for Tyser Line Ltd., of London (or maybe G. D. Tyser & Co.) & in fact their first steamship. Engaged in the shipment of refrigerated meats from Australia & 'one of the finest looking vessels operating in Australian waters'. The vessel was sold, in 1912, to Chasehill Steamship Co. Ltd. (which company was wound up in 1915, but is stated as being 'restyled' as Essex Chase Steamship Co.), (Kaye Son & Co. managers) & renamed Chasehill. In 1915 Essex Steamship Co. Ltd., of London, (Meldrum and Swinson the managers) became her owner. In early WW1, Chasehill rammed Prinz Eitel Friedrich in an attempt to sink her. Chasehill made it to New York with her bow stove in. On Feb. 22, 1915, the vessel, en route from Newport, Wales  to Zarate, Argentina, with a cargo of 4,000 tons of coal, was captured by the successful German Armed Merchant Cruiser Kronprinz Wilhelm ('Wilhelm'), off the E. coast of S. America. At 06.15S/28.15W. But was soon (Mar. 9, 1915) released (absent most of her coal & heavily damaged), at 06.57S/26.05W, with 400 captured prisoners, largely from passenger liner Guadelupe, that Wilhelm was unable to accommodate or feed. Chasehill made it to Pernambuco, Brazil, on Mar. 12, 1915. On Jan. 18, 1916, the vessel foundered (at approx. 40.00N/63.00W) while en route from New York to Le Havre with a varied cargo for the French Government. Under what circumstances? Her crew of 32 was rescued by Mar Adriatico, & landed - at Gibraltar? Can you help with more data?

49 Manchester
3046 (or 2851) tons
Hull 211

99391
1892

A 4-masted steel barque. Rigged with royal sails over double top & topgallant sails. Doxford's very last sailing ship. Per 1 (data), 2 (ref., 50% down), 3 (plans available), 4 & 5 (1901 articles re loss), 6 (image, State Library of Victoria), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The last sailing ship built by Doxford. Not built for speed. 95.31 metres (312' 9") long. Built for Manchester Single Ship Co. Ltd., of Liverpool, (or maybe J. Joyce & Co., also of Liverpool). In 1899, the vessel sailed from New York to Shanghai, China, in 127 days. And, later that year presumably, sailed from Shanghai to Puget Sound, Washington, U.S.A., in 23 days. In Sep. 1900, the vessel left New York bound for Yokohama, Japan, Captain N. F. Clemens in command, with a cargo of kerosene & a crew of 25. The Captain's wife & 2 children were also aboard. The last contact with the vessel was on Sep. 23, 1900 at 12N/29W (SW of Cape Verde Islands). It was never heard from again. Now Carl Holmberg, of Hawaii, is researching Bikar Atoll, an uninhabited atoll in the Ratak Chain of the Marshall Islands in the Pacific Ocean - for a Wikipedia article. And Carl has advised (thanks!) that, per a Nov. 7, 1901 article in 'The Republican' of Estherville, Iowa, (at left) that 'Wreckage and signs of habitation was discovered on Bikar in 1901, suggesting that the ship had come to grief there, and that the survivors had pushed off in lifeboats shortly before the discovery. No sign of the crew or passengers has since been found.' I have since located an earlier article, ex the New York Times of Oct. 14, 1901 (also at left). Which article states that some of the wreckage had the vessel's name upon it & that one body was also found. It must then be that it foundered at or near Bikar Atoll. Can you help with more data?

50 Sagamore
2140 tons
Hull 218

Solideo
Ilva
1893

A self-powered 'whaleback' ship (most of them were towed barges). The available data re this vessel is, to me at least, confused. While I provide the best data I can locate, this listing may well contain unintended errors. Per A (e-Bay, builder's model, Sagamore), 1 (ref.), 2 (Wikipedia, whaleback), 3 (whalebacks), 4 (text, & image), 5 (image), 6 (image Sagamore 90% down), 7 (Johnston Line, Sagamore), 8 ('uboat.net', sinking, Ilva), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 94.8 metres long. I believe that the vessel was initially owned by 'Belgian American Maritime Co. S.A.', (or maybe 'Belgian American Maritime Co.' which was restyled 'Belgian American Maritime Co. S.A.' in 1896), of Antwerp (manager W. Johnston & Co.). But 7 includes vessel as a 'Johnston Line' ship. 1 indicates vessel was built under licence from Alexander McDougall (1845-1923, a Scottish born Great Lakes ship's master from Duluth, Minnesota). While 2 used to state that the Doxford vessel was unapproved & not therefore built under licence. She was, I read (4), refused registry in the U.K. (because of unconventional design!) & was registered instead in Belgium. Most of the above is consistent, or so it seems to the webmaster - i.e. in substance, Captain McDougall developed the concept of the whaleback design in the U.S. And Doxford built a single 'whaleback' vessel, i.e. Sagamore, & then went on to develop its own series of 'turret' ships, similar in appearance to a 'whaleback' but with one continuous turret rather than individual turrets. It's whaleback 'prototype', i.e. Sagamore, had to be registered outside of the U.K. The vessel was at Sharpness Docks, Bristol, in Feb. 1904. In 1911, the vessel was sold to Cogneti Schiaffino, of Genoa, Italy, & renamed Solideo. In 1916, the vessel was sold to 'Soc. Anon. Ilva' & renamed Ilva (maybe A. Piaggio of Genoa) (Ilva is the Latin word for Elba). (But 4 says renamed Ilva in 1914 & sold in 1916). While en route from Genoa to Barry Roads, Ilva was sunk by submarine UC-69, Oberleutnant zur See Erwin Waßner in command, 5 miles from 'Isla Colleira', Spain, (Atlantic coast) on May 4, 1917. No loss of life. Any help you could provide to clarify the above data would be surely welcomed!
Now there was a vessel named Sagamore, that would seem to have been 'defensively armed' when on Mar. 3, 1917 it was torpedoed without warning & sunk in North Atlantic, 150 miles west of Fastnet, (SW tip of Ireland) with the loss of 52 lives, including the Master. But I believe that to be a quite different vessel of 5197 (or 5036) tons. See A, B (3 March 1917). And also see C re what was said to be 'our' Sagamore, in which the bridge would seem to have jumped from amid-ships to the stern. A confusing vessel indeed. Built in 1892 by Harland & Wolff & owned by White Diamond Steamship Co.

51 Turret Age
2232 tons
Hull 219

101841

Firth of Forth
1893

A 'turret' steamer, the 2nd ship built to such design. Per A (e-Bay image, Turret Age), 1 (1898 collision, Lloyd S. Porter), 2 (New York Times archive, 1898 ice flow damage), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 94.8 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 311 ft., speed of about 11 knots, with engines aft. Could carry 3,700 tons of coal. Built for Petersen, Tate & Co. ('Petersen'), of Newcastle, which operated through 'Turret Steam Shipping Co.'. In Apl. 1898, while en route from Maryport, Cumberland, U.K., to Louisburg, (can anyone tell us where Louisburg is?) her propeller was damaged by contact with ice floes off St. John's, Newfoundland. On Oct. 23, 1898, Turret Age, of Black Diamond Steamship Line, (Can anyone explain? Did Black Diamond charter the vessel?) & while en route from Picton (Cape Breton, Nova Scotia) to Montreal, Quebec, both Canada, with a cargo of coal, under the control of a pilot, was in collision with Lloyd S. Porter ('Porter'), a 536 ton steam barge, near Ste. Croix, about 40 miles above Quebec City on the St. Lawrence river. Porter proceeded to shore but sank within 5 minutes in 45 plus feet of water. Porter was soon re-floated, by 'Donnelly Wreckage & Salvage Company', while Turret Age suffered negligible damage. I read that the owners of Porter took legal action re the matter & while I have been unable to WWW read the court's decision it would seem that Porter was, in a manner of speaking, 'in the wrong lane'. The vessel was sold, in 1902, to 'Firth Steamship Co.', A. Tate the manager, & renamed Firth of Forth. On Jul. 25, 1903, while en route from Hamburg, Germany, to Vladivostok, Russia, (Sea of Japan), with a general cargo, the vessel foundered 25 miles off Cape Bengut, (near Algiers), Algeria.  It may, during its lifetime as Turret Age, have grounded & put in at Stockholm as a port of refuge. Can anyone clarify? The WWW record re the vessel is modest. Can you add anything?

52 Bencliff
2210 tons
Hull 224

102718

Caroline Hemsoth
Holland
1894

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (extensive data, thanks to John D. Stevenson), 2 (data Caroline Hemsoth), 3 (Lloyds), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 297 ft. (about 95 metres) long, speed of 8 1/2 knots. Built for George Horsley & Son, (or per Lloyds List G. Horslay & Son), of West Hartlepool. In 1899, the vessel became a 'Horsley Line Ltd.' vessel, with M. H. Horsley the manager. I read that 'Horsley's' were both ship owners & managers & operated a timber importing business in West Hartlepool. The vessel 'often carried coal out/timber home (Baltic) although she was to be found in Trieste/ New Orleans and east coast of the USA'. The vessel was sold in 1913 to 'Wilh. Hemsoth'?, (Wilhelm Hemsoth A.G., the managers) of Emden, Germany, & renamed Caroline Hemsoth. The vessel was a WW1 war prize & became owned by the Shipping Controller, of London, (J. & J. Denholm managers). In 1921, the vessel was sold to 'Alfred Calvert Ltd.' & registered at Poole. It was intended that she be renamed 'Maud Larssen' but that did not happen. Rather the vessel was resold to 'Wilh. Hemsoth' in 1922. It was sold again, in 1926, to "Holland" Sciffahrts G.m.b.H., 'C. F. Schutt & Co.' the managers, of Lübeck, Germany, & renamed Holland. And sold again, to 'Zerssen & Co.', of Rendsburg, Germany, in 1930. Broken up at Flensburg, Germany, in May 1931. Can you add anything?

53 Carlisle City
3002 tons
Hull 221

102717

Oracabessa
Belem
1894

A cargo ship which carried some passengers also. Per A (e-Bay image, Oracabessa), 1 (Norway-Heritage), 2 (Furness Withy, Carlisle City), 3 (Elders & Fyffes, Oracabessa), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 345 ft. long, speed of 11 knots. Built for Furness Withy & Company. The vessel was chartered, in 1896, by Beaver Line (Canada Steamship Lines), for two return voyages from Liverpool to Montreal (via Quebec). In 1903, the vessel was sold to 'Elders & Fyffes Shipping Ltd.' (of Avonmouth?) & renamed Oracabessa. In 1909, it was sold to W. Garthwaite & Co., of Hartlepool. And sold again, in 1916, to 'Soc. Anon Martinelli', of Rio de Janeiro, & renamed Belem. In 1925, the vessel was sold for the last time, to 'Lloyd National, Martinelli'. Hulked at Rio de Janeiro in 1932. And scrapped that same year. Can you add to or correct the above? Another image?

54   Celaeno
2704 tons
Hull 222

Prado
Begoña No. 2
Sodupe
1894

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data Celaeno, 90% down), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 300 ft. (about 95 metres) long, speed of 8 knots, single screw. Built for 'Hudig & Veder's Stoomvaart Maats' (Hudig & Veder, managers), of Rotterdam, Netherlands, & Rotterdam registered. In 1912, the vessel was sold to 'J. L. Prado' & renamed Prado. and sold again, in 1918, to 'J. M. Urquijo' & renamed Begoña No. 2. And sold for the last time, in 1926, to 'Maura y Aresti', of Bilbao, Spain, & renamed Sodupe. The vessel was broken up in Spain in the 4th quarter of 1933. WWW data is limited. Can you add more? An image?

55 Turret Bell
2211 tons
Hull 231

104263

Kwasind
1894

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (Toronto Marine Historical Society), 2 (data, Kwasind), 3 (11 Mar 1917), 4 (2nd item down, Source of article (links 5 & 6) re 1906 wreck & salvage - 'The Island Magazine' #24 of 1988), 5 (3 page illustrated article re 1906 wreck), 6 (the cached version of link 5, which I cannot access), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 297 ft. (90.5 metres) long, speed of 10 knots. Owned 1894 thru 1907 by 'William Peterson Ltd.' ('Peterson') which company secured a contract in 1900 to haul coal from Sydney, Nova Scotia, to Montreal, Quebec, (both Canada), for Dominion Iron & Steel Co. Ltd. Turret Bell was one of at least 7 turret steamers engaged in that trade. Peterson it would seem operated as 'Turret Steam Shipping Co. Ltd.' (Wm. Peterson Ltd. - Peterson, Tate & Co.) The vessel was too long to be able to transit the St. Lawrence & Welland canals without being 'cut down' in size. Before that could be done, on Nov. 2, 1906, (then registered at Newcastle), the vessel ran into one of the worst storms ever in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Turret Bell, en route from Montreal to Port Hastings, Cape Breton to load a cargo of coal, was driven ashore at Cable Head, St. Peters, on the N. shore of Prince Edward Island ('PEI'). The article linked above (do read it!) states that the vessel was then owned by 'MacKenzie & Mann' of Montreal (I had read that in 1907, the vessel was owned by Canadian Lake & Ocean Nav. Co. Ltd.) & chartered to 'Inverness Railway and Coal Company' of Port Hastings. She ended up upright, 150 yards offshore, on a rocky ledge. The storm continued to rage & the ship was soon driven inland to just 20 yards from the shore. Captain Murcassen was brought ashore in a boatswain's chair & his wife too a little later, while the crew stayed aboard until the wreck could be surveyed. As a result of that survey, the vessel was abandoned, & declared a constructive total loss. It is interesting to note that three other ships were also wrecked in that storm, all on a 20 mile stretch of PEI coastline. The vessel lay there for the better part of 3 long years. An attempt was made to free her in the summer of 1907 but it failed. Further most difficult efforts followed & eventually, Reid Wrecking Company completed the task. On Jul. 31, 1909, Turret Bell was towed to Charlottetown by wrecking tug James Reid. Very very rusty but substantially intact. On Aug. 13, 1909, the vessel was towed to Quebec & repaired. ...'the versatile Capt. Tom Reid of Sarnia and Port Huron eventually salvaged her and sent her back to salt water service as KWASIND'. Reid Wrecking Co., of Sarnia, Ontario, took over ownership in 1907 (not 1909?) It was owned (1912-1917) by Arctic Steamship Co. Ltd. ('Arctic'), of Quebec. The vessel returned to 'salt water' in 1912. Name changed (1912? but maybe in 1911), to Kwasind. In early 1917, (thanks Michael Lowery), Arctic was part owned by 'W. F. Bentinck-Smith' of Quebec, Canada. On Mar. 11, 1917, when en route from Bilbao, Spain, to Hartlepool with a cargo of iron ore, Kwasind hit a German mine, laid by German minelaying submarine UC-4, off the E. coast of England. Have read near Southwold, Suffolk but have also read near Southend, Essex, both U.K., but I believe that Suffolk is correct. (52.08N/1.45E). 10 lives lost (names listed at 2) or perhaps 12. The captain survived. Can you add anything?

56 Elm Branch
3258 (or 3265 or 3416) tons
Hull 239

106404

Wisla
Ellen Jensen
Purley Beeches
1895

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (vessel launch ex Marine Engineer... of Dec. 1, 1895), 2 (Nautilus, Elm Branch), 3 (1899 loss of propeller), 4 (Polish-American, Wisla), 5 (image, Wisla, the correct one?), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 103.6 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 340 ft., speed?, signal letters (as Ellen Jensen) NFRJ, accommodation for 3 passengers. Built for Nautilus Steam Shipping Co. Ltd., F. & W. Ritson the managing owners, both of Sunderland. Launched, on Nov. 18, 1895, by Mrs. W. Ritson, the wife of the owner. ... the officers' quarters are superior to those in most ocean liners, They are fitted up in bird's-eye maple and mahogany and, instead of stoves, have dainty fireplaces inclosed in handsome tile work. As times goes by, more & more old newspapers become WWW available. It is clear that the vessel travelled much of the world - ports mentioned in such newspapers are Adelaide, African coast, Antwerp, Astoria, Durban, Mediterranean, Newchang (China), New York, Pensacola, San Francisco & Vancouver. On or about Jan. 12, 1900, during a voyage in ballast, Captain Iliff in command, from Nagasaki, Japan, to Puget Sound, Washington, U.S.A., under charter to Pacific Export Lumber Company,  the vessel lost a propeller & anchored near the Umatilla lightship. Off Cape Flattery. The newspaper references are 'difficult' but you can read a summation here:- 3. Elihu Thompson found Elm Branch & tried, unsuccessfully, to tow her to port, but her tow hawser separated. She did, however, raise the general alarm as to Elm Branch's predicament. Wahtenau, a collier, also tried to tow her. It was a 'Puget Sound Tugboat Company' tug however, Tyee I believe, one of two tugs (Tacoma was the other) that attended the scene, that brought Elm Branch safely to Seattle, being later awarded $8,500 for her efforts by a Seattle court. I read that in Jul. 1919 the vessel was sold to Christoffer Hannevig, of Norway, for £76,000, before being resold, in Aug. 1919, for $550,000, to Polish-American Navigation Corp.', of New York, & renamed Wisla. A series of later sales one after the other - in 1922 to Wisla Steamship Corp., of New York, in 1923 to Wabash Steamship Corp., also of New York or maybe of Delaware. Both with no change of vessel name. And then, in 1924, to 'Jensen Linien Aktieselskab', (H. Jensen), of Copenhagen, Denmark, & renamed Ellen Jensen. And sold again, in 1926, or perhaps in 1927, to T. E. Evans & Co., of London, & renamed Purley Beeches - though there may have been a sale ahead of that one, to 'D/S Codan'. Frederick H. Gethring, of Aberavon, was her captain for a number of years from Ellen Jensen thru to Purley Beeches. On Mar. 29, 1928, the vessel arrived at Bo'ness, i.e. Borrowstounness, Firth of Forth, Scotland, to be broken up. Anything to add?

57 Forest Abbey
1777 tons
Hull 229

104276

Stiklestad
1895

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (Norwegian page, image, English translation), 2 (data & image, Stiklestad (1), 50% down), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 280 ft. long. Built for Forest Oak Steam Shipping Co. Ltd. of Newcastle (H. Sherwood the managers). In 1898, the vessel was sold to 'A/S D/S Stiklestad' (A. F. Klaveness & Co., the managers), of Sandefjord, Norway, & renamed Stiklestad. The managers moved (the owners also?) to Kristiania (Oslo) in 1907.  On Nov. 23, 1908, the vessel left Glasgow for Sydney, Cape Breton, Canada, with a cargo of bricks & clay & with a crew of 20. The vessel was never heard from again. Anything to add?

58 Scottish Hero
2202 (or 2201) tons
Hull 235

105718
1895

A 'turret' steamer. That was cut into two pieces twice! Per 1 (Toronto Marine Historical Society), 2 ('Alpena County Public Library', data & four images), 3 (data search alphabetically), 4 (10 June 1917), 5 (1905 stranding), 6 ('uboat.net', 1917 sinking), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 297 ft. long (95.5 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 315 ft. 6 in. overall. Ray Lloyd advises that the vessel was built for 'Scottish Line Ltd.', of London, but was sold in 1899 to 'Scottish Hero Steamship Co. Ltd.' of Newcastle. McIlwraith, McEacharn were the vessel's managers. Under contract, the vessel carried  coal from Sydney Mines, Nova Scotia, to Montreal, Quebec, both Canada. In foggy conditions, the vessel was on Apl. 30, 1905 stranded, 22 miles E. of Halifax Harbour, Nova Scotia, Canada, while en route from Sydney, Nova Scotia to Havana, Cuba. 5 describes the grounding as a partial loss. The damage was presumably repaired. The vessel was sold, in 1907, to 'Canadian Lake & Ocean Navigation Company, Limited'. Being of too long a length to be able to transit the then St. Lawrence & Welland canals, the vessel was cut into two pieces at Levis, Quebec, & in 1907, brought up through those canals to the Great Lakes & there the pieces were 'rejoined'. I wonder where they were joined together? The vessel was sold, in 1913, to 'Canada Steamship Lines, Limited', of Montreal. The vessel was requisitioned for war service in 1916. Accordingly, it again had to be cut in two - at Ashtabula, Ohio, to be able to return to the Atlantic (in 1917). It was sold in 1917 to 'Hero Steamship Company' of Halifax, Nova Scotia. On Jun. 10, 1917, while en route from Sydney, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada, to Le Havre, France, with a cargo of steel products, the vessel was captured by submarine U-155, Kapitänleutnant Karl Meusel in command - & sunk by gunfire, in the N. Atlantic, 440 miles 'W by S 1/2 S' from Fastnet (SW tip of Ireland). At 46.59N/18.12W. One life was lost. I have not spotted his name. 6 indicates that at the time of her sinking the vessel was owned by 'Merchants Mutual Lake Line, Ltd. (Canada Steamship Lines, Ltd.)'. The above may well require correction.  Need an image!

59 Turret Cape
1827 (became 2079 in 1941) tons
Hull 234

104283

Sun Chief
Walter Inkster
1895

A 'turret' steamer with a turtle-backed forecastle. Per 1 (Toronto Marine Historical Society page), 2 (trial trip), 3 (a mid-ship section), 4 (September 28, Mon), 5 (Australia), 6 (1942 rescue, Alcoa Mariner), 7 (20% down), 8, 9 & 10 (images), 11 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 253 ft. long, speed of 9 knots. Owned, from 1895 thru 1907, by 'William Peterson Ltd.' ('Peterson') which company secured a contract in 1900 to haul coal from Sydney, Nova Scotia, to Montreal, Quebec, (both Canada), for Dominion Iron & Steel Co. Ltd. But ... 10 states built for 'Turret Steam Shipping Co. Ltd. (Petersen, Tate)', of Newcastle. Turret Cape was one of at least 7 turret steamers engaged in that trade. In 1899, the vessel was in collision with Australia, a tug, off Gravesend, River Thames. The vessel was brought to Great Lakes. Owned by Canadian Lake and Ocean Navigation Co. Ltd. 1907 thru 1913 & then Canada Steamship Lines Ltd. (absorbed the owning company) thru 1916. (Chartered 1915 by Canada Steamship Lines to Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Company.) The vessel was requisitioned in 1915 for WWI service. Owned by Turret Steamship Co. Ltd. (Dominion Iron & Steel Co. Ltd.) of Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada in 1916/17. Thru 1925 owned by Cape Steamship Co. Ltd (Dominion Iron & Steel), of Halifax. Operated in the 1920s on the lake & river trade. Thru 1937 was owned by International Waterways Nav. Co. Ltd. (R. W. Campbell & J. E. Russell), of Montreal. The engines were condemned in 1930. The vessel lay idle until 1937 when sold to Fort William-Montreal Nav. Co. Ltd. (Robin Hood Flour Mills Ltd.). & converted to a flour storage barge. 10 states, however, a dumb barge from 1933 to 1941. The barge was sold, in 1941, to Saguenay Terminals Ltd., of Montreal, Quebec, & rebuilt in 1941, Montreal, as a diesel stemwinder for the bauxite trade (to Port Alfred, Quebec) with British Guiana. On Sep. 28, 1942, the vessel rescued 41 merchant seamen & a 13-man armed guard from U.S. freighter Alcoa Mariner, torpedoed off the Orinoco River, Venezuela, & landed them at Georgetown, British Guiana. Was converted in 1943 to a suction dredge for the Demerara River. In 1948, the vessel's name was changed to Sun Chief, (or maybe Sunchief). In 1947 (or 1949) the name changed to Walter Inkster (R. Scott Misener). The vessel returned to the Great Lakes in 1949. A gap in the ownership data, it would seem (1949/51).Was inactive at the Lakehead for some years. Owned by Colonial Steamships Ltd. (1951-56). The vessel was sold, in 1956, for scrap to A. Newman & Co., of St. Catharines, Ontario but was actually scrapped at Port Dalhousie in 1959. 8 says arrived at Port Weller, Ontario, on Aug. 17, 1959 to be broken up. Lots of data. A long & interesting history. Can you add anything? Images maybe?

60 Turret Crown
1827 tons
Hull 233

104279
1895

A 'turret' steamer with a turtle-backed forecastle. Per 1 (Toronto Marine Historical Society page, image Turret Crown), 2 (90% down), 3 (image), 4 (image), 5, 6 & 7 (fine Wm. Notman & Sons 1895 images at Lachine Canal & Locks, Montreal, Quebec), 8 (c. 1916 image at Seward Dock, Alaska), 9 (1917 image at Anchorage, Alaska unloading Panama freight), 10 (1895 collision), 11 (article, p.9, nr. bottom of 'pdf'), 12 (an 1896 voyage from Cadiz), 13 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 253 (or 258) ft. long, speed of 9 knots. Owned 1895 thru 1907 by 'William Peterson Ltd.' ('Peterson') which company secured a contract in 1900 to haul coal from Sydney, Nova Scotia, to Montreal, Quebec, (both Canada), for Dominion Iron & Steel Co. Ltd. But ... 13 states built for 'Turret Steam Shipping Co. Ltd. (Petersen, Tate)', of Newcastle. Turret Crown was one of at least 7 turret steamers engaged in that trade. Registered at Newcastle. A minor collision on Jun. 8, 1895, 15 miles off Cape Rosier, Gaspé, Quebec. Brought to the Great Lakes (have read in Sep. 1902). The vessel, on Jul. 22, 1903, was in collision with & sank Waverley, off Harbor Beach, Michigan. Was beached, trying to make harbour, in a storm off Grand Marais, Michigan, in 1907 or earlier. And, on May. 4, 1913, was in collision with William C. Mack near Sault Ste Marie, requiring repairs to Turret Crown at Collingwood, Ontario. Owned by Canadian Lake & Ocean Nav. Co. Ltd. 1907 thru 1913 & then Canada Steamship Lines Ltd. thru 1915. The vessel was requisitioned for WWI service in 1915. 'Operated late in war on Pacific although owned in Toronto'. Owned by Turret Crown Ltd., 1915 to 1916 & by Coastwise Steamship & Barge Co., of Vancouver, 1916-18. In 1918/21 the vessel was owned by Commonwealth Steamship Co. Ltd., (or maybe Navigation Co.) of Toronto. The vessel returned to the Great Lakes in 1922. Owned 1921/22 by W. J. & S. P. Herivel, of London, & 1922/24 by A. B. MacKay, of Hamilton, Ontario. On Oct. 9, 1922 the vessel was grounded on Cove Island. But salvaged. On Nov. 2, 1924, the vessel was driven ashore in a gale & snowstorm at Meldrum Bay Point, N. side of Manitoulin Island, Lake Huron, Ontario. No loss of life. 2 advises 'some reports claim that vessel was run ashore intentionally'. Vessel abandoned & destroyed in winter storms. Cut up for scrap in 1923. However, I have also read 1926, while 1 says removed for scrap in WW2. The vessel was owned by Capt. William C. Jordan, of Goderich, at the time of loss, it would appear. Can you add anything?

61 Ashmore
3461 tons
Hull 241

106420

Almond Branch
1896

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (1/2 way down Almond Branch), 2 (27 Nov. 1917, Almond Branch), 3 ('uboat.net', sinking, Almond Branch), 4 (image, of the correct almond Branch?), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access), & also kind e-mail messages from e-bayers 'lat50south' & 'gales-of-november'. Built for Belgian-American Maritime Co. Soc. Anon., of Antwerp (W. Johnston & Co. managers) which company was 'restyled' & became Belgian Maritime Trading Co. Soc. Anon. Sold 1897 to The Nautilus Steam Shipping Co. Ltd. of Sunderland (F. & W. Ritson managers), known as 'Branch Line', & became Almond Branch. On Nov. 27, 1917, defensively armed, Almond Branch was torpedoed without warning by UB 57, Kapitänleutnant Otto Steinbrinck in command, & sank, 2 miles SE of Dodman Point (S. coast of Cornwall), while en route from London to S. America via Port Talbot, Wales, with general cargo. At 50.12N/04.45W. 1 life lost. It would appear that the wreck has never been located. Can you help with more data?

62 Castello
3635 tons
Hull 246

106727

Grigorios Anghelatos
1896

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (Wilson Line, Castello), 2 ('uboat.net', sinking, Grigorios Anghelatos), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 107.0 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 351 ft. (about 110 metres) long overall. Built for Thomas Wilson, Sons & Co. Ltd. (Wilson Line), of Hull. The vessel was sold, in 1913, to 'Anghelatos Bros', of Constantinople (Istanbul) or maybe to 'D. Anghelatos' of Piraeus, Greece, (who owned the vessel in 1916) & renamed Grigorios Anghelatos. On Dec. 5, 1916 (Greek registered then), en route to Genoa, Italy, with a cargo of coal, the vessel was torpedoed & sunk, by U-63, Kapitänleutnant Otto Schultze in command, 20 miles S. of Genoa. At 43.52N/08.49E. No loss of life. WWW data re this vessel is most limited. Can you add anything?

63 HMS Hardy
295 (or 260) tons
Hull 226
1896

A 'Hardy' class torpedo boat destroyer. Per 1 (Wikipedia), 2 (Haughty Class, near top of page), 3 (first), 4 (data), 5 (commission date, many images), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 196 ft. long, speed of 26.8 knots, armed with one 12 pounder & 2 torpedo tubes, complement of 53 (or 50). Built for the Royal Navy. The class is confusing! Only two vessels in 'Hardy Class', i.e. this vessel & HMS Haughty, built by Doxford in 1895. But 2 says was 'Haughty' class & not 'Hardy' class. And 3 says was instead 'Havock (A) Class', & built by 'Northumberland Shipbuilding Company' of William Doxford & Sons. Those are words that I do not presently understand since i) ownership of Doxford's would seem to have been sold to 'Northumberland' only in 1919, & ii) 'Northumberland', even in 1919, would seem to have been a shareholder rather than a shipbuilder. I read that Royal Navy vessels named 'Hardy' are named after Sir Thomas Masterman Hardy (1769-1839), Captain of HMS Victory during the Battle of Trafalgar. The ship was commissioned on Aug. 1, 1896. Served 'in home waters'. It was present, I read, at the Naval Review at Spithead in celebration of the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria. On Jul. 17, 1911 the vessel was sold off, to 'Garnham', of Chatham, to be scrapped. Need help!

64 HMS Haughty
295 (or 260) tons
Hull 225
1896

A 'Hardy' class torpedo boat destroyer. Per 1 (Wikipedia), 2 (Haughty Class, near top of page, with images), 3 (data), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 196 ft. long, speed of 27 knots. Armed with one 12 pounder, & 2 torpedo tubes. Complement of 50 or 53. Built for the Royal Navy. Only two vessels in 'Hardy Class', i.e. this vessel & HMS Hardy, built by Doxford in 1896. But 5 says was 'Haughty' class & not 'Hardy' class. Cannot spot when commissioned. Served 'in home waters'. Was present, I read, at the Naval Review on Jun. 26, 1897 at Spithead in celebration of the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria. On Apl. 10, 1912 the vessel was sold off, to be scrapped. Need help!

65 Imperialist
3442 tons
Hull 242

106016

Clan Shaw
Vine Branch
1896

A refrigerated 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (data, about 30% down, Imperialist/Clan Shaw), 2 [Clan line, Clan Shaw (1)], 3 (Nautilus, Vine Branch), 4 (1898, Cashmere), 5 (1909 voyage to Sydney, Australia), 6 (a turret ship at Fitzroy Dock, Sydney, Australia. The webmaster believes that the vessel depicted is Vine Branch), 7 ('uboat.net', sinking, Vine Branch), 8 (U-55), 9 (data), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 103.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 340.2 ft., speed of ? knots, a crew of 44 in 1909, carried a few passengers. Built for Angier Line (1877) Ltd., owned & managed by Angier Brothers of London. It would seem that the vessel was acquired by 'The Clan Line of Steamers Limited' ('Clan'), of Glasgow, as an experiment to gain experience with a 'turret' ship, which experience was positive since they ended up owning 30 ships of the design. I have read that Clan bought the vessel in Sep. 1896, & renamed the vessel Clan Shaw. On Aug. 8, 1898, the New York Times reported that Clan Shaw, en route from the Clyde to Bombay, India, had towed Cashmere, (1,695 gross tons, should be 2,593 tons, en route from Aden to Bombay), for 250 miles until the tow hawser parted. Cashmere had lost her rudder & rudder post in a storm. Clan Shaw continued to Bombay & help was sent to Cashmere. The matter was the subject of a later court case, in which the meanings of the words 'towage' & 'salvage' were important. I have not WWW read details of the case. In 1898, the vessel was sold to Nautilus Steam Shipping Co. Ltd. ('Nautilus'), F. & W. Ritson the managers, both of Sunderland, & renamed Vine Branch. I have read also that the renaming was in 1900, but that would seem to be unlikely since there are many 1899 & forward references to Vine Branch being in Australian & New Zealand waters. The vessel carried many cargoes of oats, frozen meat, livestock, & general cargo to Durban & Capetown, South Africa, related, I believe to supplying the British forces in the Boer War. One reference indicates that the vessel carried 140 horses on deck in one such voyage. Another indicates that the vessel was owned by the 'Australian-South African Steamship Company Limited', but it may be that the vessel was rather chartered by them. It did not only carry such cargoes. It frequently carried coal & grain also. On one voyage from Lyttleton, New Zealand, to Albany, Western Australia, the vessel encountered heavy seas & lost 160 tons of coal overboard. There are a great many references to the vessel at Trove, Australia, thru 1910, & indeed later than that re WW1. It is possible that Vine Branch was requisitioned by the British Government for service during WW1. Can anybody confirm that? It was reported, falsely, that Leipzig, a German cruiser, had sunk Vine Branch off the W. coast of S. America in Nov. 1914. Early in 1917, Vine Branch, defensively armed, left Valparaiso, Chile, for Liverpool, with a cargo that included nitrates & frozen meat. The vessel safely reached Dakar, Senegal, & left there on Mar. 23, 1917 for Liverpool. On Apl. 6, 1917, Vine Branch, was SW of Ireland. She was struck in the engine room by a single torpedo fired by U-55. The vessel sank, with the loss of all aboard including the Master (44 lives). At 50.02N/13.58W, but 6 says rather at 49.45N/14.08W. Both are about 400 miles SW of the southern tip of Ireland. Only on Jul. 4, 1917 was the vessel posted missing by Lloyds. U-55, mostly captained by decorated Oberleutnant zur See Wilhelm Werner (Blue Max & other medals), sank 64 ships in WW1, took 2 vessels as prizes, & damaged 7 more (all, except 4 sunk, by Wilhelm Werner). U-55 surrendered to Japan in Nov. 1918. I find what then happened to her a bit confusing. Despite the above, the WWW record for the vessel is scanty. Can you help with additional data?

66 Turret Chief
1881 (or 1850) tons. Became 1731 tons in 1928 as a barge.
Hull 248

106605

Vickerstown
Jolly Inez
Salvor
1896

A 'turret' steamer. Quite a history! Lots of material. Abandoned twice & resurrected. The vessel ended its 34 year life as a barge! Per 1 (Salvor) (2nd), 2 (Toronto Marine Historical Society article, image as Jolly Inez), 3 (1913 grounding image), 4 (fine Bowling Green State University image, other images & text), 5 (1913 storm, brief ref. Turret Chief, 1/3 down), 6 (1903 image), 7 (8/11 1914), 8 (a 1923 image of Jolly Inez used to be here), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 253 ft. long (have read 273 ft. also). Owned 1896 thru 1907 by 'William Peterson Ltd.' ('Peterson') which company secured a contract in 1900 to haul coal from Sydney, Nova Scotia, to Montreal, Quebec, (both Canada), for Dominion Iron & Steel Co. Ltd. But ... 9 states built for 'Petersen, Tate & Co.', of Newcastle. Maybe they were the managers for Dominion Turret Line Ltd. Turret Chief was one of at least 7 turret steamers engaged in that trade. Sold to Canadian Lake & Ocean Nav. Co. Ltd. & worked on Great Lakes 1907 thru 1913. Was briefly owned by Canada Steamship Lines Ltd. On Nov. 8, 1913, owned by Merchants Mutual Line of Toronto, the vessel was stranded 6 miles E of Copper Harbor, Michigan, (Keewenaw Peninsula, Lake Superior) while en route from Midland, Ontario, to Fort William in ballast, & abandoned, in a hurricane & snow-storm - the hurricane of the century - 12 vessels (maybe 19) foundered in Great Lakes that day. The vessel was salvaged in 1914, rebuilt at Port Arthur & became owned by Entente Steamship Co. of London. There may be an owner Turret Chief Ltd., of Canada, at about this time? The vessel was requisitioned re WW1 service & carried munitions from the U.K. to Archangel, Russia. It would seem that the vessel was sold, in 1915, to Leopold Walford, of London & renamed Vickerstown. The name was changed again, in 1918, to Jolly Inez. I wonder why that name? The vessel came back to the Great Lakes in 1922 & was owned by International Waterways Nav. Co. Ltd., 1922 thru 1927. On Nov 26, 1927, the vessel was stranded 'under peculiar circumstances' (what were they?) on Saddlebag Island, False DeTour Channel, Lake Huron. En route from Milwaukee to Fort William. It was again abandoned. It was salvaged, in 1928, by T. L. Durocher, of Detour, Michigan, & converted to a steel lightering barge & became Salvor, a 'stone-hauler and wrecker'. On Sep. 26, 1930, when carrying stone, the barge broke loose from the tow of tug Fitzgerald (or maybe Richard Fitzgerald) in a gale & foundered in Lake Michigan almost 3 miles N. of Muskegon, Michigan, in 25 ft. of water, near the pier it was helping to build. All 5 aboard (maybe 11) were lost (data conflicts). Vessel is a dive site today. Quite a story indeed. Have I missed anything significant?

67 Turret Court
1879 tons.
Became a barge in 1930 Hull 249

106608
1896

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (extensive NY Times article, Mar. 1903), 2 (Toronto Marine Historical Society article, informative page, many references), 3 (click on Waverly), 4 (Acadia), 5 (Waverly), 6 (data, Turret Court), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 77.1 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 253 ft., speed of 10 1/2 knots, machinery & bridge amidships. The vessel was owned, 1896 thru 1907, by 'Turret Steam Shipping Co.', owned or managed by 'Wm. Peterson Ltd.' ('Peterson') which company secured a contract in 1900 to haul coal from Sydney, Nova Scotia, to Montreal, Quebec, (both Canada), for Dominion Iron & Steel Co. Ltd. But ... 7 states built for (or maybe managed by) 'Petersen Tate & Co.', of Newcastle. On Jul. 28, 1898 the vessel may have hit a bridge, possibly Black's Bridge, in Montreal. On Aug. 5, 1899, the vessel's steam steering gear failed, & the vessel veered to port & collided with Ramillies, 1 1/2 miles below Pointe à la Citrouille lighthouse, Batiscan, Quebec. Per the NY Times, she first came to Montreal in May 1902 & lay there until the fall of 1902 when she carried coal from Cleveland to Fort William. It would appear that she was a tight fit in the Welland Canal & was stuck, for a short while, 'in the bridge at St. Catharine's'. Then used to carry western grain from Fort William to ports in Georgian Bay. 2 however states, incorrectly it would seem, that she first came to the Great Lakes in 1907. On Jul. 22, 1903, indeed, the vessel was in collision with bulk freighter Waverly, which was at the time towing W. S. Crosthwaite, a schooner, 5 miles S. of Harbor Beach, Michigan, Lake Huron. Turret Court's steering failed, causing the collision & Waverly sank. Have not read what happened to Turret Court nor to W. S. Crosthwaite, but no loss of life aboard Waverly. On Dec. 2, 1904, the vessel ran aground, in a snow storm, near Vermillion, Michigan, perhaps? The vessel was sold to 'Canadian Lake and Ocean Navigation Co. Ltd.', of Toronto, Ontario, R. O. & A. B. MacKay of nearby Hamilton, the managers, & worked on the Great Lakes 1907 thru 1913. Briefly owned (company absorbed) by Canada Steamship Lines Ltd. (1913 thru 1916). The vessel was requisitioned re WW1 service, but where did it serve? From 1916 to 1925, the vessel was owned by Turret Steamship Co. Ltd. (Dominion Iron & Steel Co. Ltd.), of Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. At an un-stated date in or about 1921, the vessel was in collision with & sank Acadia, a barge, in Montreal harbour. And then was owned, 1925 to 1930, by International Waterways Navigation Co. Ltd. Was engaged in lake & river trade in the 1920s. The machinery was condemned in 1930, & the vessel was converted to a salvage barge. Was owned in 1931 by Sin-Mac Lines Ltd., of Montreal & (1935 thru 1940) by Sincennes - MacNaughton Tugs Ltd., (or possibly Lines Ltd.), also of Montreal. But inactive at Sorel, Quebec, for a long period. In Nov. 1940, the vessel was broken up at the Hamilton, Ontario, facilities of Steel Company of Canada Ltd. Much of the above references are from incomplete 'snippets' of data. Can you add anything?

68 Clan Murray
4839 (or 4830 or 4835) tons
Hull 251

106077
1897

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 [Clan Line, Clan Murray (2)], 2 ('uboat.net', UC 55), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 400 ft. (about 126 metres) long, speed of 11 or 12 knots. Built for 'The Clan Line Steamers Limited', of Glasgow (Cayzer, Irvine & Co., the manager). At 4 a.m. on May 29, 1917, under the command of Captain John E. Woodall, while en route from Port Pirie, S. Australia to Belfast with a cargo of wheat, the vessel was torpedoed by UC 55, Oberleutnant zur See Theodor Schultz in command, 40 miles WxS of Fastnet (SW tip of Ireland). At 50.57N, 10.21W. It was armed with just one recently installed gun. The Captain & the 3rd officer, A. G. Macpherson, were 'blown off the bridge by the force of the explosion'. The Captain recovered somewhat, stopped the engines, went below to destroy the code books & was never seen again. Macpherson was taken aboard UC 55, & taken to Germany as a prisoner. And maybe the 3rd Engineer also, however 2 does not so indicate. 64 persons died - nearly all on those on board. Can you help with additional data?

69 Maud Cassel
3917 (or 3924) tons
Hull 247
1897

A 'turret' steamer. Probably an ore carrier since Oxelösund was the port from which iron ore from the mines in central Sweden was shipped. Per 1 (Batavier Line, Maud Cassel), 2 (22/2 1906), 3, 4 & 5 (images), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 115 metres long, speed? Built for 'N.V. Maats SS Maud Cassel' (Wm. Müller & Co. the managers? But maybe also the owners), (Batavier Line) of Rotterdam, Holland. Miramar state Wm. H. Muller & Co's 'Algemeene Scheepvaart Mij'. On Feb. 22, 1906, Master 'de Jonge' in command, while en route in ballast from Rotterdam to Oxelösund, Sweden, the vessel grounded in heavy weather at Arköbådan (but sometimes Arköbåden) Reef, near the Oxelösund pilot watch station called Hävringe, about 2 miles from Oxelösund. The crew were all saved. Two salvage ships, Belos & Argo (both 'Bergningsbolaget Neptuns') tried to refloat the ship, but their efforts were not successful. The vessel later broke in two & sank. We thank Björn Waldenström for his kind guidance re Swedish place names. And for the links to vessel images that he provided. WWW data about vessel is limited. Can you add anything?

70 Pearlmoor
3480 tons
Hull 257

108272
1897

A 'turret' steamer, that had a short life. Per 1 (builder's model of ship, Bonhams, New York, Apl. 2010 auction, sold for $30,500 incl. premium), 2 (1963 sale of the builder's model, realised $8,125) 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 103.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed? Built for 'South Shields Steam Ship Co.', presumably a company owned by Moor Line Ltd., of London, Walter Runciman & Co. Ltd., the owners & managers. On Nov. 17, 1904, the vessel went ashore on or near the Kuria Muria Islands, during the SW monsoons & became a total loss. The 5 island group, located in the Arabian Sea, lies 40 km off the SW coast of Oman. In 1904, the islands were British, but in 1967 they were returned to the Sultanate of Muscat & Oman. Have not read the grounding circumstances. Any loss of life? The WWW record for this ship is essentially non-existent. Can you add anything?

71 Clan Macfarlane
4823 tons
Hull 261

108742
1898

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 [Clan Line, Clan Macfarlane (1)], 2 ('uboat.net', sinking, image), 3 (U-38), 4 (data, 75% down), 5 (1910 voyage, Wellington & Napier, NZ, to London & Antwerp with 15,800 bales of wool, at page bottom), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 122.1 metres (400.2 ft.) long, speed of 12 knots. Built for 'The Clan Line of Steamers Limited' ('Clan'), of Glasgow. Clan became 'Cayzer, Irvine & Company, Limited' in 1907. Possibly the line was named 'Union-Clan Line' in 1902? Was chartered to Mr. G. H. Scales in 1910. On Dec. 30, 1915, Clan Macfarlane was in the eastern Mediterranean, en route from the Clyde & Liverpool to Bombay, India, with a general cargo. It was torpedoed & sunk by U-38. At 34.06N/26.08E, per U-38's KTB ('kriegstagebuch' or war diary) or 34.50N/25.55E per Miramar, or 34.05N/25.44E, 66 miles SExS of Cape Martello, Crete. Of the 75 aboard, 52 lost their lives, including the Captain. U-38 sank 138 vessels in its long career. It was captained by the much decorated (including 'Pour le Mérite', i.e. the Blue Max) Max Valentiner who was responsible for the sinking of 143 merchant ships, 1 warship, with others captured & damaged. Can you help with additional data?

72 Guernsey
4375 tons
Hull 262

Walsung
1898

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 [Wilh. Wilhelmsen, Guernsey (2)], 2 (text in Norwegian? & English & image), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 365.6 ft. (111.4 metres) long, speed of 10 knots. Built for A. N. Hansen & Co. of Copenhagen, Denmark & registered at Tønsberg, Norway, in the name of a company in which Wilh. Wilhelmsen was a shareholder. Listed (1) in the Wilh. Wilhelmsen Line fleet. On Dec. 22, 1922, the vessel was sold to Emil R. Retzlaff, of Germany, & renamed Walsung. In 1923, the vessel was registered to 'Dampfer Reederei "Merkur" (1922) Gmbh. (Emil R. Retzlaff, of Szczecin (Stettin) the managers), of Germany'. The vessel was wrecked, on Jan. 21, 1925, at Stangholmen Light near Trannoy, Norway, en route from Stettin (Szczecin), Poland, to Narvik, Norway, in ballast. Can you add anything additional?

73 Sylvia
350 tons
Hull 253
1898

A 'turtleback-back' or 'turtle-bowed' destroyer. Per A, B (e-Bay images), 1 (about 70% down), 2 (data & images), 3 (data), 4 & 5 (both images), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 3 funnels, 210 ft. long, speed of 30 knots (though in normal service 27 knots). Initially of 'Violet' class but became C Class in 1913. Russell Kennedy advises, (thanks!), that on Aug. 30, 1912 the Admiralty directed that all destroyer classes were to be designated by alpha characters starting with the letter 'A'. Since Sylvia's design speed was 30-knots & she had three funnels she was assigned to C Class. After Sep. 30, 1913, she was known as a C Class destroyer & had the letter ‘C’ painted on the hull below the bridge area and on either the fore or aft funnel. She would appear to have later become 'D' Class- D 23 on Dec. 6, 1914. Became D 69 in 1918, & then D 84, & finally H 03. Was commissioned on Jan. 1, 1899. Armed with a single 12 pounder gun, five 6 pounder guns & two 18-inch torpedo tubes. Complement of 63. 4 states that the distinctive 'turtleback', intended to clear water from the bows, 'actually tended to dig the bow in to anything of a sea, resulting in a very wet conning position and poor seaboats that were unable to reach top speed in anything but perfect conditions.' An e-Bay item advises that HMS Sylvia spent her entire career in home waters attached to the Devonport Flotilla & by the beginning of WW1 was a tender to HMS Leander. On Jul. 23, 1919, the vessel was sold for breaking up at Ward, New Holland (where is New Holland? North Lincolnshire perhaps. 'Ward' surely means Thomas W. Ward Ltd. who had ship breaking yards in many places). It would seem that there also was HMS Violet, built by Doxford in 1898. Those 2 destroyers (Sylvia & Violet) constituted the entire 'Violet Class'. But 3 states that HMS Lee, built 1899, was also part of that Class. But was it? The reference relates, I believe, to HMS Lee, a 350 or 365 ton destroyer, also built by Doxford, which vessel was launched in 1899 but only completed in 1901. Can anyone add anything? And explain the '6' on the image at the thumbnail?

74 Violet
350 tons
Hull 252
1898

A 'turtleback-back' or 'turtle-bowed' destroyer. Per 1 (Violet Class), 2 (about 70% down), 3 (data & images), 4 (data, C Class), 5 (image), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 3 funnels, 210 ft. long, speed of 30 knots (though in normal service 27 knots). Built for The Admiralty. Initially of 'Violet' class but became C Class in 1913. D 09. Became D 73 in 1918, & then D 94. Was commissioned on Jun. 1, 1898. Armed with a single 12 pounder gun, five 6 pounder guns & two 18-inch torpedo tubes. Complement of 63. Served in home waters throughout WW1. 4 states that the distinctive 'turtleback', intended to clear water from the bows, 'actually tended to dig the bow in to anything of a sea, resulting in a very wet conning position and poor seaboats that were unable to reach top speed in anything but perfect conditions.' On Jun. 7, 1920, the vessel was sold for breaking up at J. Houston, at Montrose (NE of Dundee, Scotland?). It would seem that there also was HMS Sylvia, built by Doxford in 1898. Those 2 destroyers (Sylvia & Violet) constituted the entire 'Violet Class'. But 4 states that HMS Lee, built 1899, was also part of that Class. But was it? I have not yet tracked HMS Lee. Can anyone add anything?

75 Beechmore
3314 tons
Hull 268

110333

Inverness
Flamingo
Trento
1899

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (image, Inverness, p.#22, Ships Monthly, July 2009), 2 [Sutherland, Inverness (1)], 3 ('uboat.net', sinking, Trento), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 102.4 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed? Was built for 'Belgian Maritime Trading Co. Ltd.' (or S.A.), of Liverpool, W. Johnston & Co., the managers, & registered at Belgium. Later in the year of delivery, i.e. 1899, the vessel was sold to Sutherland Steamship Co. Ltd. ('Sutherland'), of Newcastle, & renamed Inverness. In 1901, the vessel was sold again, to 'Burrakur Coal Company Ltd.' ('Burrakur'), W. L. Hunt, of London, the manager, & renamed Flamingo. Now Burrakur would seem to have been, indeed may well have been until quite recently, a long established coal company based in Calcutta, India, controlled then perhaps by 'Andrew Yule' & 'Bird & Company'. Known as 'Bird Line'? It would seem that they owned also Florican, another Doxford turret steamer yet to be site listed. In 1912, the vessel was sold to A. Parodi, of Genoa, Italy, 'Soc. Anon. Ilva', of Genoa, the managers?, & renamed Trento. On Aug. 7, 1917, while en route from Cardiff, Wales, to Torre Annunziata, Naples, Italy, with a cargo of coal, the vessel was captured & sunk by U 61, Kapitänleutnant Victor Dieckmann in command, approx. 150 miles WSW of Ushant. Any loss of life? The WWW record for the vessel is most scanty. Can you help with additional data? Images?

76 Clan Colquhoun
5856 tons
Hull 269

111187

Nasco
Cengio
1899

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 [Clan Line, Clan Colquhoun (1)], 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 134.1 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, (440.0 ft.), speed of 12 knots. Built for 'The Clan Line of Steamers Limited', of Glasgow (2 used to say Sir C. W. Cayzer - a related party). It would seem that a model of the rigged ship is, or maybe from 1965 was, on display in the Science Museum in Kensington, London, however the related WWW image would seem to have gone missing. Possibly the line was named 'Union-Clan Line' in 1902? I read that on Nov. 25, 1916, the vessel was attacked by gunfire from a submarine in the Mediterranean, but escaped the encounter. I have WWW read no detail as to the circumstances or detail, except a brief reference to the vessel having suffered a dynamite explosion. The vessel was sold, in 1925, to 'Villain & Fassio', of Genoa, Italy, & renamed Nasco. And was sold again, in 1927, to 'Soc. Anon. Parodi & Corrado', also of Genoa, & renamed Cengio. The vessel arrived (was it not already there?), at Genoa, Italy, on Jun. 26, 1929 to be broken up. And maybe was broken up in 1930. WWW data is quite limited. Can you help with additional data?

77 Clan Urquhart
5855 tons
Hull 272

111219

Generaldirektor Sonnenschein
1899

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 [Clan Line, Clan Urquhart (1)], 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 134.1 metres long. Built for 'The Clan Line of Steamers Limited', of Glasgow (2 says Sir C. W. Cayzer - a related party). The vessel was sold, in 1929, to 'Retzlaff, Rostock' (maybe name relates to Emil R. Retzlaff, above re Guernsey), & renamed Generaldirektor Sonnenschein. The vessel was broken up, I read, at Stettin (Szczecin), Poland, in late 1933. But stop the presses! It would seem that is not so! On Jun. 7, 2008, a Dutch dive team of 'Duikteam Zeester', dived a wreck in the North Sea near the Dutch island of 'Schiermonnikoog', one of the West Frisian Islands. Visibility was poor - 2 metres & murky. The team found that the wreck has a brass bell inscribed 'CLAN URQUHART 1899 GLASGOW'. We thank Remy Luttik, of Bellingwolde, Netherlands, for this exciting new data. And we have an image of the bell, no less! Thank you, Remy, so very much! Arie Jan de Lange advises (thanks!) that he has checked all of the 1927/33 Dutch newspapers, especially those from the N. of Holland, but could find no reference to the ship being sunk there. Can you help with additional data? WWW data is most limited.

78 Skandia
4336 tons
Hull 274
1899

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (Batavier Line/Müller, Skandia), 2 (Gränges fleet), 3 & 4 (both data in Swedish with images), 5 (the correct Freikoll? 80% down. Built 1905), 6 (Skandia page), 7 (fine image Skandia ex 'Sunderland Tugs and Shipbuilding in pictures'), 8 (Miramar, who indicate 1900 built, link, you now must be registered to access). 123.0 (or 121.6 or 121.85) metres long, 16 knots (probably truly 11 or so knots). Built for Wm. H. Müller & Co.s 'Algemeene Scheepvaart Mij', of Rotterdam. The vessel was sold, in 1905, to 'Rederi AB Luleå-Ofoten' (P. A. Welin), of Stockholm, Sweden ('Luleå'). On Nov. 9, 1915, the vessel sank after a collision with Freikoll, a small Norwegian vessel, nr. Haugesund, Norway (W. coast of Norway, S. of Bergen). 7 indicates collision was outside Aalesund (N. of Bergen). We thank Björn Waldenström for advising the collision circumstances. 'Skandia was at night anchor because of the ongoing war, which did not allow for night travel. The little steamer Freikoll saw the light from the huge Skandia but thought it was from two different ships and planned to pass between them. But it was one long ship… Four people died. The Skandia was loaded with iron ore and sank very fast.' He also advises that Luleå changed it’s name to Trafikaktiebolaget Grängesberg-Oxelösund in May 1916, which name was shortened to Gränges Shipping in 1971. Anything to add?

79 Tullochmoor
3520 tons
Hull 270

110130
1899

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 ('uboat.net', 1915 sinking), 2 & 3 (NY Times archive, sinking), 4 (U-41), 5 (ref. to sinking), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 340 ft. (about 109 metres) long, 103.6 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 knots. Built for Moor Line Ltd., of London (Walter Runciman & Co. Ltd., of Newcastle, the managers). On May 28, 1915, while under the command of Captain Holford, & en route, in ballast, from Genoa, Italy, to the Tyne, the vessel was captured by U-41, Kapitänleutnant Claus Hansen in command. At 49.19N/05.21W, 52 miles N. of Ushant, off Brittany, France. A shot was fired by U-41 from 15 yards distance. The crew were given 10 minutes to abandon ship & take to the boats. And then the vessel was shelled (almost 40 shells) until it sank. Tullochmoor was not boarded. Before it sank, Engineer Dockeray swam back to the ship & rescued the ship's papers. No lives were lost. After 3 hours in the boats, the entire crew of 26 were rescued by the Spanish ship Olizarra & landed at Barry, Wales. Anything to add? Another image?

80 Banca
5995 tons
Hull 275

109708

Taiyu Maru
1900

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (P&O Line, Banca), 2 (image, Taiyu Maru), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 134.0 metres long, speed of 11 1/4 knots. Per a long expired website, named for 'Bangka', an island & strait off the northeast coast of Sumatra. Built for Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Company ('P&O') at a cost of £77,879 - the only 'turret' ship owned by P&O. The vessel's maiden voyage was from London to China & Japan. In 1914 the vessel was used in Rangoon to Bombay service carrying coal, & after WW1 was used on the India to Japan & India coastal services. In Aug. 1923 the vessel was sold for £13,500 to 'Hinode Kisen Kabushiki Kaisha', of Dairen, Japan & renamed Taiyu Maru. Used on service between Japan & Siberia & also on transpacific services. The vessel was sold, in 1930, to Japanese ship breakers. 1932 broken up at Yokohama, Japan. Can you add anything additional?

81 Clan Lamont
3594 tons
Hull 278

111280
1900

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 [Clan Line, Clan Lamont (2)], 2 (Naldera), 3 (image), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 108.2 metres long. Built for 'The Clan Line of Steamers Limited', of Glasgow. The vessel was requisitioned, I read, for WW1 war service during the period of 1917/1919. On Jul. 29, 1921, Naldera, a 15825 ton Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Company passenger liner, ran into Clan Lamont, which was lying at anchor in Bombay Harbour. No reference to damage to Clan Lamont. The vessel was broken up at the Bo'ness, River Forth/Firth of Forth, Scotland, ship breaking facilities of P. & W. MacLellan Ltd. in late Nov. 1928, I read 'after engine damage'. Can you help with additional data? Data is most limited.

82 Clan Ranald
3596 tons
Hull 279

111290
1900

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (extensive 2 page 'pdf'), 2 [Clan Line, Clan Ranald (2)], 3 (55% down, Clan Ranald), 4 (wreck detail, Clan Ranald), 5 (full page of wreck data), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for 'The Clan Line of Steamers Limited' ('Clan') (I think - company names are often referenced inexactly), which company, I read, bought 30 of such steamers & was engaged in trade with S. Africa, India & Australia. 355 ft. long (about 112 metres), 108.2 metres perpendicular to perpendicular. Registered at Glasgow. Clan became 'Cayzer, Irvine & Company, Limited' in 1907. The vessel arrived at Port Adelaide, South Australia, on Jan. 15, 1909, in ballast, from Mauritius (Captain Arthur Gladstone), to take on a cargo for Durban, East London & Capetown, S. Africa - 39,862 bags of wheat & 28,451 bags of flour. The water ballast tanks were emptied. The vessel 'listed' as the cargo & also 638 tons of coal was being loaded, (170 tons of coal on the top decks). On Jan. 31, 1909, it was towed by tug Eagle & commenced its voyage to Africa. 64 in total crew, largely (50) of Asian & Indian origin (lascars). The wind increased & in rough seas, when S. of Troubridge Island on Yorke Peninsular, the ship lurched to starboard at a 45° angle. 8 hours later the vessel capsized & sank, & came to rest upside down in 20 metres of water, 700 metres from an inhospitable rocky shore. The lifeboats had been destroyed. 24 survived, 36 were found dead, battered & mutilated by the seas at the foot of the rocky cliffs. A total of 40 were lost. The 'Marine Board Inquiry' did not determine the cause of the disaster, but it would seem that the lack of ballast may have been a major contributing factor. I read that 2 fires had broken out in the coal bunkers during her loading & that the 170 tons of coal were as a result stored on deck. That coal may have also affected her stability. The non-white survivors were extradited to Colombo, then Ceylon, (with the best wishes of the Mayor of Adelaide), being considered to be illegal immigrants (what a way to disembark)! Captain Gladstone did not survive. The dead that were found were buried in nearby Edithburgh Cemetery. A dive site today, currents dangerous, however. Can you add anything?

83 Argyll
3547 tons
Hull 287

114403
1901

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 ('uboat.net', sinking), 2 (U-84), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 340.3 ft. (about 109 metres) long, 103.7 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 9 1/2 or 10 knots. Built for 'Sutherland Steam Ship Co. Ltd.' of Newcastle (A. M. Sutherland the managers). On Aug. 12, 1915, 'Shipbuilding and Shipping Record' reported the sale (A) of the vessel, to an unnamed buyer, for £42,500. That buyer presumably was Routhi SS. Co., Ltd., since 1 refers to 'Routhi SS. Co., Ltd.' (Lykiardopulo & Co.), of London, being the operators (perhaps the owners) of Argyll at the time of the sinking. On Apl. 13, 1917, while en route from Port Kelah, Algeria, to Middlesbrough with a cargo of iron ore, the vessel was torpedoed & sunk by U-84, Kapitänleutnant Walter Roehr in command, at 49.23N/09.07W, 110 miles W. of Bishop Rock (Isles of Scilly). 22 lives were lost, the Captain was amongst the survivors. Rhys Jones advises (thanks) that Argyll was at the time, in fact, registered at Newport, Wales. Rhys (e-mail) seeks data re his ancestor John Parry Williams, the vessel's 3rd Engineer in Apl. 1917. Have not read how the survivors were rescued. Little data is WWW available. Can you clarify that data and/or help with anything additional?

84 Blakemoor
3748 tons
Hull 292

114820

Wye Valley
Yorkvalley
1901

A 'turret' steamer, described at first 2 links as being 'schooner', presumably meaning schooner rigged. Per 1 & 2 (same data), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 104.4 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 342.4 ft., speed of 9 knots. Built for North Moor Steamships Ltd. (Walter Runciman & Co. Ltd.), of London. In 1906 the vessel was transferred to Moor Line Ltd., of London. The vessel was sold, in 1920, to 'Berg Shipping Co. Ltd.', 'T. G. Berg' the manager, & renamed Wye Valley. And sold again, in 1923, to 'Monument Steam Navigation Co. Ltd.', of London, Richards Longstaff the managers, & renamed Yorkvalley. In Apl. 1926, the vessel arrived at Venice, Italy, to be broken up. Can you add anything?

85 Ivydene
3541 tons
Hull 288

114405
1901

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (17/3 1918), 2 (name ref.), 3 (Keighley), 4 (sinking, Ivydene), 5 (UB-52), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 310 ft. (about 108 metres) long, 103.6 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular. Built for Dene Steam Shipping Co. ('Dene'), of Newcastle (J. T. Lunn & Co., ('Lunn') managers). Miramar states however that the vessel was initially owned by Lunn, & the owner became Dene only in 1905. The vessel was later sold, at a date unknown to the webmaster, to 'Keighley Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Hull, (Bell James & Co. or James Bell & Co., the managers), who owned it in Mar. 1918. On Mar. 17, 1918, while en route from Sfax & Bizerta (both Tunisia) to Gibraltar with a cargo of phosphates, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by UB-52, Oberleutnant zur See Otto Launburg in command, & sank. At 38.49N/06.32E, in the Mediterranean, 36 miles NNE of Cape Bougaroni, Algeria. One life was lost. Can you add anything?

86 Jerseymoor
3746 tons
Hull 291

114763
1901

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (1902 image, Jerseymoor, 2nd image down), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 104.2 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 9 knots. Built for Moor Line Ltd., of London (Walter Runciman & Co. Ltd., of Newcastle, the managers). But maybe 'North Moor Steamship Co.' was the registered owner. On Jun. 23, 1915, while en route from Bombay, India, to Liverpool, with a cargo of wheat, the vessel ran aground & was wrecked at Burbo Bank, at the entrance to the River Mersey. The WWW record re this vessel is non-existent. Can you add anything?

87 Lee
350 (or 365) tons
Hull 263
1901

A 'turtleback-bowed' destroyer. 'Violet' class. Per 1 (data, C Class), 2 (data, 20% down), 3 (data, 1909-01-01), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 210 ft. long, 3 funnels, speed of 30 knots (though in normal service 27 knots). Armed with a single 12 pounder gun, five 6 pounder guns & two 18-inch torpedo tubes. Have read that the vessel was 'wrecked near Blacksod Bay' (County Mayo, W. coast of Ireland) on Oct. 5, 1909. A collision it would seem (2). Or maybe (or as well) grounded (3). Construction was maybe delayed - launched Jan. 27, 1899 & completed in Mar. 1901. Data incomplete. Can you add anything additional?

88 HMS Success
385 tons
Hull 282
1901

A 'Doxford Special' torpedo boat destroyer. Per 1 (Wikipedia, data), 2 (fine image), 3 (B Class), 4 (2 images), 5 (bottom), 6 (#10), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for the Royal Navy. Became B Class in 1913. Maybe 'Greyhound' class earlier [6 (#10)]? 210 ft. long, speed of 30 knots, complement of 60, 4 funnels. Armed with one 12 pounder gun, five 6 pounders & 2 torpedo tubes. Launched Mar. 21, 1901 & commissioned May 1902. Had the misfortune to be the first British WW1 destroyer loss, when on Dec. 27, 1914, under the command of Lt. William Pennefather, the vessel ran aground & was wrecked off Fife Ness, Fifeshire, Firth of Forth, North Sea, in very heavy seas. Have read i) that 60 survived & ii) that the complement was 60. So presumably no loss of life? Can you add anything?

89 Sutherland
3542 tons
Hull 284

110369
1901

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (data 11th item), 2 (U-35), 3 ('uboat.net', sinking & image, Sutherland), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 103.6 metres (340 ft.) long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots. Built for 'Sutherland Steamship Co. Ltd.' of Newcastle (A. M. Sutherland managers). On Jan. 17, 1916, while en route from Bombay, India, to Hull with a cargo of manganese ore & seeds, the vessel was captured, shelled & sunk by U-35 near Malta (at 34.43N/18.08E). 192 miles SE by E of Malta, perhaps. One life lost. U-35, at the time, was commanded by Kapitänleutnant Lothar von Arnauld de la Perière, who apparently sank 54 ships totalling more than 90,150 tons during just a single cruise in 1916. In its lifetime, U-35 (4 commanders), sunk an amazing 224 ships for a total of 546,988 tons in its career of about 4 years. Including Sutherland. Can you help with additional data? Because little data is WWW available. An image?

90 Aviemoor
3715 tons
Hull 301

115910

Naderi
Ise Maru
1902

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 & 2 (Moor Line), 3 [Bombay & Persia, Naderi (2)], 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 104.2 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 8 1/2 knots. Built for 'Moor Line Ltd.' ('Moor'), owned by Walter Runciman (1874/1937), (Walter Runciman & Co., managers), of Newcastle, but registered at London. In 1916, the vessel was sold to 'Bombay and Persia Steam Navigation Co. Ltd.', of Bombay, (now Mumbai), India, but still registered at London, with no change of vessel name. In 1919, the vessel was renamed Naderi. In 1923, the vessel was sold to 'Naigai Kisen Kabushiki Kaisha', of Amagasaki, Japan, & renamed Ise Maru.  Miramar advises that on Apl. 21, 1940, the vessel went aground at Shinyasaki, Japan. The vessel suffered major damage but I presume it was re-floated, since it was scrapped in 1941. I have read no detail as to the grounding circumstances, & cannot even learn exactly where Shinyasaki is located. Any loss of life? Can you help with additional data?

91 Bleamoor
3745 (or 3755) tons
Hull 302

115930
1902

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 & 2 (Moor Line), 3 & 4 (data re sinking), 5 (alternate wreck site?), 6 (A. J. Tennent volume), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 342 ft. (about 107 metres) long, speed of 9 knots. Built for 'Moor Line Ltd.' ('Moor'), owned by Walter Runciman (1874/1937), (Walter Runciman & Co., managers), of London (but I thought I had read was based in Newcastle). It is possible that the vessel was sold since 3, 4 & 6 all reference 'Bombay & Persia Steam Navigation Co. Ltd.', of Bombay (now Mumbai), India, as being the owner in 1917. Perhaps that company was related to Moor (but it would seem not)? No WWW data that I can find until 1917. On Nov. 27, 1917, defensibly armed & en route from Hull to Falmouth with a cargo of coal, the vessel was torpedoed & sunk by UB-80, Kapitänleutnant Max Viebeg in command, 4 miles SSE of Berry Head, Devon, near Brixham, (at 50.22.43N/03.25.14W). 8 lives were lost. The captain survived. Some doubt as to whether the wreck at the above location is Bleamoor or Kendal Castle. Bleamoor may instead be at 50.22.72N/03.25.22W or at some other nearby location - the many WWW dive site pages are, to the webmaster at least, confusing. Can you help with additional data?

92 Clan Chattan
3938 tons
Hull 300

115711
1902

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 [Clan Line, Chan Chattan (1)], 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 109.7 metres long, 359.8 ft. Built for 'The Clan Line of Steamers Limited' ('Clan'), of Glasgow, Cayzer, Irvine & Co., of Glasgow, the managers & majority owners. Clan became 'Cayzer, Irvine & Company, Limited' in 1907. I read that the vessel was requisitioned in 1917 by the British Government for service during WW1. And was returned to its owners in 1919. In 1930, the vessel was sold to P. & W. MacLellan Ltd., ship breakers of Bo'ness, River Forth/Firth of Forth, Scotland. The vessel was broken up at Bo'ness in Dec. 1930. Can you help with additional data? Data is most limited.

93 Clan Lindsay
3935 tons
Hull 299

115704
1902

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 [Clan Line, Clan Lindsay (2)], 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 109.8 metres long, 360.2 ft., speed of 11 knots. Built for 'The Clan Line of Steamers Limited' ('Clan'), of Glasgow. Clan became 'Cayzer, Irvine & Company, Limited' in 1907. The vessel was requisitioned during the period of 1917/19 by the British Government for service during WW1. On May 3, 1916, the vessel was attacked by gunfire from a submarine, when in the Bay of Biscay - but escaped. On Jan. 20, 1931, the vessel arrived at the T. W. Ward Ltd. ship breaking facilities at Inverkeithing, Firth of Forth, Scotland, to be broken up. Can you help with additional data? Data is most limited.

94 Clan Shaw
3943 tons
Hull 297

115691
1902

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (image, but you must be registered to see it), 2 [Clan Line, Clan Shaw (2)], 3 ('uboat.net', sinking data), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 109.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 360.0 ft., speed of ? knots. Built for 'The Clan Line of Steamers Limited' ('Clan'), of Glasgow. But per Miramar, for Sir Charles W. Cayzer, of Glasgow. Miramar also indicate that in 1913 the vessel was registered to 'The Clan Line of Steamers Limited' ('Clan'), also of Glasgow. Now Clan had, I understand, become 'Cayzer, Irvine & Company, Limited' in 1907. So I believe that the vessel would have been registered to 'Cayzer, Irvine & Company, Limited', when transferred in 1913. It is likely that the vessel was requisitioned by the British Government for service during WW1. Can you confirm that? What we do know is that in early 1917, Clan Shaw, defensively armed, was returning from Chittagong & Calcutta to Dundee via London, with a cargo of jute. On Jan. 22, 1917, UC-29, Oberleutnant zur See Ernst Rosenow in command, laid mines in the Firth of Tay & on the next day, i.e. on Jan. 23, 1917, Clan Shaw hit one of those mines. At 56.27N/02.38W, 8 miles NE of St. Andrews. Two lives were lost. The vessel was beached at the mouth of the River Tay but became a total loss. The WWW record for the vessel is scanty. Can you help with additional data? Images?

95 Lime Branch
5379 tons
Hull 293

114639

Konsul Carl Fisser
1902

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (1902 voyage, 75% down), 2 (Nautilus, Lime Branch), 3 (image, Lime Branch, thanks to Newcastle Libraries. A large & fine set of largely Newcastle images is available here 4), 5 (Fisser und Von Dornum), 6 ('uboat.net', 1917 attack, Lime Branch), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 120.7 metres long, speed of 8 1/2 knots. Built for 'Nautilus Steam Shipping Co., Ltd.', of Sunderland, which company served the W. coast of S. America (Gulf Line). The vessel left Newcastle for San Francisco on Aug. 11, 1902 with a record 7,936 tons of Wallsend coal. In the spring of 1917, the vessel, was en route from Punta Arenas, Chile, to London with a varied cargo that included 5,000 tons of nitrate of soda, cotton & cotton cake, oats & wool. It had left Las Palmas, Canary Islands, & was struck at 3:58 p.m. on Apl. 13, 1917 by a torpedo fired by U-84, Kapitänleutnant Walter Roehr in command. At 48.27N/08.30W, 242 miles off Plymouth. The vessel was hit in No. 2 hold & the hole in the hull was 30 x 22 ft. in size. While seriously damaged, all the other holds were intact & the vessel was able to continue. It was attacked again at 8 p.m. but the torpedo just missed. The vessel made Plymouth, escorted by torpedo destroyer G67. The vessel may well have been permitted to continue its voyage to London, under escort, without immediate repair of the damage. In 1925, the vessel was sold to 'Fisser und Von Dornum', of Emden (now of Hamburg), Germany, which company was engaged in the coal & timber trades, & renamed Konsul Carl Fisser. In Q1 of 1933, the vessel was broken up at the 'Nordseewerke' facilities at Emden, Germany. Much of the above data came, I believe, from a now vanished website. Can you help with additional data? WWW data is really quite limited.

96 Ross
3734 tons
Hull 295

114423

Inverness
Morais
1902

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 [Sutherland, Inverness (2)], 2 (builder's model, Inverness, sold at a 'Tennants Auctioneers' of Leyburn, 2010 auction), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 104.4 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 9 1/2 knots. Was ordered by Sutherland Steamship Co. Ltd. ('Sutherland'), of Newcastle, as Ross, (launched, as Ross, I wonder?), but delivered to Sutherland as Inverness. In 1920, the vessel was sold to 'Anglo-Celtic Shipping Co. Ltd.', of London, J. Griffith, of Cardiff, the managers, with no change of vessel name. In 1929, the vessel was sold to Stepho G. Farkouh, of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Morais. On Apl. 2, 1933, the vessel arrived at Savona, Italy, to be broken up. The WWW record for the vessel is most scanty. I have not been to find any references to the vessel's service in WW1, indeed any references whatsoever to the vessel. Can you help with additional data? Images?

97 Clan Forbes
3946 tons
Hull 306

115762
1903

A 'turret' steamer. A collier. Per 1 [Clan Line, Clan Shaw (2)], 2 (9/6 1918), 3 (Clan Forbes), 4 (an image of a ship model, but you must be registered to see it), 5 ('uboat.net', sinking, Clan Forbes), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 109.8 metres long, 360.3 ft., speed of 11 knots. Built for 'The Clan Line of Steamers Limited' ('Clan Line'), of Glasgow. In 1904 maybe, transferred to the ownership of Sir Charles W. Cayzer & in 1913 ownership reverted to Clan Line. Per an expired e-Bay item, in 1916, at a date unstated, the vessel was attacked by UB-47. Clan Forbes fired back & when its 5th shell came close to the submarine, UB-47 gave up the chase. No detail of the incident has come to hand. On Jun. 9, 1918, defensively armed, while en route from Newport, Wales, to Port Said, Egypt with a cargo of coal, the vessel was torpedoed by UB-105, Kapitänleutnant Wilhelm Marschall in command, & sunk in the Mediterranean, 115 miles WNW of Alexandria, Egypt. At 31.55N/27.50E. 2 lives were lost. Can you help with additional data? Data is most limited. But ... I seem to have said that for so many of these listings!

98 E. O. Saltmarsh
3630 tons
Hull 310

118321

Wanaheim
1903

A 'turret' steamer. A collier. Per 1 (Louisville & Kentucky, p#107 & image on p#101, & also at p#194 here), 2 (E. O. Saltmarsh, ref. to vessel model 80% down), 3 (modest image, E. O. Saltmarsh), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 110 metres long, speed of 10 knots. Built for 'Pensacola Trading Co. Ltd.', ('Trading') of London (Watts, Watts & Co., the managers), which company owned two ships based at Miscogee Wharf, Pensacola, Florida, U.S.A. Trading was then owned by Gulf Transit Company, in turn owned by The Louisville & Nashville Railroad ('L&N'), of Kentucky, U.S.A. Vessel 'plied the waters of the Gulf & Caribbean, delivering coal to foreign ports, and returning to home base at Pensacola with tonnage of a highly diversified nature'. The vessel was named for Ernest O. (Olmstead) Saltmarsh, 1848/1933, a L&N superintendent, who was presented 'with an expensive and elaborate model of it encased in a Mahogany trimmed Glass Case, mounted on a mahogany base. It was about three feet long and was precise down to the slightest detail.' That model may well be in a Maritime Museum in California. In 1915, Trading was sold to 'C. C. Mengel & Brother Company', of Louisville, Kentucky. The vessel was then used to carry mahogany from S. American ports. One of the crew was granted a 'Silver War Badge' a most rare badge indeed, for war service during WW1. Such a medal was only issued to those who were incapacitated in war service. Have no detail as to the recipient or the circumstances. The vessel was sold, in 1923, to Emil R. Retzlaff, of Stettin, Germany, & renamed Wanaheim. And in 1931, was sold again, to "Pommerania" Schiffahrts GmbH, also of Stettin, with no change of vessel name. The vessel arrived at Rosyth, Firth of Forth, Scotland, on May 8, 1933, to be broken up. Can you help with additional data?

99 Grängesberg
6749 (or 6801) tons
Hull 305

Beukelsdijk
1903

A 'turret' steamer. An ore carrier (Grängesberg is the name of an iron-ore mine in Sweden). Per 1 (Batavier Line, Grängesberg), 2 (Holland America Line, Beukelsdijk), 3 (data & image Beukelsdijk), 4 (2 images Beukelsdijk & 1 as Beukelsdyk), 5 (data Beukelsdijk), 6 (image Beukelsdyk & data, 90% down), 7 (fine image Grängesberg, but you must be registered to see it), 8 (Norwegian page, image, stranded in Jan. 1923), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 440 ft. 2 in. (138.83 metres) long, speed of 10 (or 10 1/2) knots. Built for 'Wm. Müller & Co.', (or 'W. H. Müller & Co's Algemeene Scheepvaart Maatschappij') (Batavier Line) of Rotterdam, Holland. On Jun. 2, 1907, while en route from Oxelosund to Rotterdam, the vessel ran aground in fog at Falsterborif (Denmark?). The vessel was freed on Jul. 4, 1907 - I think that is what 6 says. On Jan. 27, 1916, the vessel was sold to 'Nederlandsch-Amerikaansche Stoomvaart Maatschappij' (Holland America Line), also of Rotterdam, & renamed Beukelsdijk. Can anyone explain the matter of the vessel's new name? Most references are to Beukelsdijk, but 6 refers to Beukelsdyk. And 4 has an image of the vessel with that name on its side. Are not vessels registered? And the exact name as registered should govern? The vessel was used to transport grain. On Mar. 6, 1917, the vessel ran aground in Halifax Bay during a heavy storm. Was re-floated, I presume. On Mar. 21, 1918, the vessel was taken over by the U.S. Navy at San Juan, Puerto Rico, commissioned (as ID 3135) & assigned to 'Naval Overseas Transportation Service'. Complement of 62. Two guns, one 3 in. & 1 six-pounder. Was used on South American run carrying coal to Latin America (Bahia, Santos, & Rio de Janeiro) & returning with coffee. In Jul. 1918, she travelled in convoy to France. She reached Brest to effect boiler & engine repairs after a slow trip (had to stop 4 times with engine problems). Then to St. Nazaire to discharge her cargo but she could not leave until Oct. 13, 1918 due to an outbreak of Spanish influenza. She disembarked her sick sailors at Quiberon Bay, suffered a fire in her coal bunkers & eventually reached New York, where lengthy repairs were effected. Early in 1919, the vessel carried a cargo of cotton & oil from Galveston, Texas, to Le Havre, France. While discharging, one of her boilers exploded, killing 2 men. After repairs, she sailed to Rotterdam, where she was returned to her owners, Holland America Line, on May 18, 1919. On Jan. 29 1923, (per 8, Jan. 28, 1923), while en route from Rotterdam to Narvik (far north of Norway & another iron ore port), in ballast, the vessel ran aground & was stranded at Stótt, near Bodõ, Vestfjord, Norway. At 67.00N/13.40E. The vessel broke in two & sank. Can you add anything? An image?

100 Harefield
3617 tons
Hull 311

118626

Dunrobin
1903

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (data Dunrobin), 2 (nr. page bottom Dunrobin), 3 (24 November 1917), 4 & 5 (both U-53), 6 ('uboat.net', sinking, Dunrobin), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 108 metres (339.9 ft.) long, speed of 9 or 10 knots. Vessel was ordered as Harefield. By, I presume, Dunrobin Shipping Co. Ltd., (A. M. Sutherland), of Newcastle, who changed the name to Dunrobin. The vessel was sold, in 1906, to Sunderland Steam Ship Co. Ltd. ('Sunderland') (J. J. Browne), of Newcastle. And was sold again, in 1909, to Munro Shipping Co. Ltd., (B. J. Sutherland & Co), of Newcastle. And was sold in 1911, to Sunderland for the 2nd time (A. M. Sutherland). On Sep. 26, 1916, Dunrobin fought off an attack by U-35, Kapitänleutnant Lothar von Arnauld de la Perière in command, between Cape San Sebastian, Spain, & Majorca. On Nov. 24, 1917, while en route from Almeria, Spain, to the Tyne with iron ore & grapes, & defensively armed, the vessel was torpedoed by U-53, Kapitänleutnant Hans Rose in command, & sunk 49 miles off the Lizard. 31 lives were lost including the captain. Can you help with additional data?


There are more (later) vessels built by 'Doxford' on the 2nd 'Doxford' page available here. And on the 3rd & 4th pages also, here & here.

TO END THE PAGE

For your pleasure and interest.

Many of the vessels listed on the first two Doxford pages on this & the following page are 'turret' ships. A 'Doxford' design, produced in considerable numbers by 'Doxford' in the years of 1893 thru 1911. 'Doxford' themselves built 176 or 177 of them, a handful (6) were built under licence at other U.K. yards, & at least one was built in Germany.

A list of 'turret ships' will soon be available, I hope, on a later page. But most of them are listed here, lower on this page.

Now while the 'turret' design was developed for a particular reason, specifically to have lower operating costs in the application of the then Suez Canal transit fee computation rules, the origins of the design, or many of its characteristics at least, came from the United States. There, from 1887 to 1898, 42 'whaleback' ships were built. They were mostly used in the Great Lakes, & were constructed to the design of Alexander McDougall (1845-1923, a Scottish born Great Lakes ship's master from Duluth, Minnesota). One of them however, the Charles W. Wetmore, ran the turbulent Lachine rapids at Montreal with a cargo of grain from Duluth, & went to Liverpool where it was of great interest & curiosity. Doxford's first effort at something similar, the Sagamore, was or was not built under licence from Alexander McDougall, according to whom you believe. The Sagamore listing provides links to sources which say it was or was not so licensed. If it was, in fact, a 'whaleback' ship, which seems to the webmaster not to be so, since the appearances of the designs are so different, the 42 stated above, the number built in the U.S., would become a world-wide total of 43. The webmaster must leave the resolution of such matters for historians & researchers to address.

But, what did a 'whaleback' ship look like?
Follow this link to a page, in the course of construction, that will answer that question. With a wonderful image of a cigar box, of all things!

To whet your appetite, here is an image of the only passenger 'whaleback' vessel - Christopher Columbus, built in 1893.

May I suggest that you navigate the site via the index on page 001.PRIOR PAGE / NEXT PAGE

To Thomas M. M. Hemy Data Page 41. All of the other Thomas Hemy pages, including image pages, are accessible though the index on Thomas Hemy page 05. [ ] £ é ö

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'Turret' ships, referenced in these pages. 90 so far, I believe. In groups of 25.

Admiraal de Ruijter, Argyll, Ashmore, Atland, Aviemoor, Banca, Beechmore, Belle of France, Bencliff, Blakemoor, Bleamoor, Blötberg,
Claveresk, Claverley, Cairntorr, Carthusian, Castello, Clan Buchanan, Clan Chattan, Clan Colquhoun, Clan Forbes, Clan Lamont, Clan Lindsay, Clan Macfarlane, Clan Murray,

Clan Ranald, Clan Shaw, Clan Sinclair, Clan Urquhart, Countess Warwick, Dalemoor, Drumcondra, Duffield, Eaton Hall, Elgin, Elm Branch, E. O. Saltmarsh, Ethelwynne, Forest Abbey, Galavale, Garfield, Garryvale, Gellivare, Grängesberg, Grindon Hall built 1905, Grindon Hall built 1908, Guernsey, Harefield, Hatumet, Imperialist,

Inland, Ivydene, Jerseymoor, Kiruna, Komura, Koromiko, Lime Branch, Maud Cassel, Mersario, Nairn, Newbiggin, Newbridge, Nonsuch, Nordland, Orangemoor, Österland, Oxelösund, Pearlmoor built 1897, Pearlmoor built 1905, Queda, Querimba, Inverness, Redbridge, Ryall, Ryton,

Scottish Hero, Siward, Skandia, Sutherland, Trowbridge, Tullochmoor, Turret Age, Turret Bell, Turret Cape, Turret Chief, Turret Court, Turret Crown, Walküre, Wellington, Whateley Hall. (15)

Turret ships built at Sunderland, not yet in these pages, as I spot the names:

Angus, Belle of England, Blake, Braziliana, Breconian, Bullionist, Caithness, Cheltenham, Clan Alpine, Clan Cameron, Clan Farquhar, Clan Fraser, Clan Gordon, Clan Graham, Clan Grant, Clan Leslie, Clan Macdonald, Clan Macdougall, Clan Maclean, Clan Macnab, Clan MacNeil, Clan Monroe, Clan Robertson, Clan Stuart, Claremont,

Clintonia, Clodmoor, Diciembre, Drumeldrie, Duffryn Manor, Dunbarmoor, Dunrobin, Elaine, Euphorbia, Fairport, Fife, Florican, Forest Castle, Gafsa, Glenaen, Glenesk, Good Hope, Greenbank, Haigh Hall, Heathdene, Holland, Hopedale, Horsley, Irismere, Lady Carrington,

Laureldene, Lotusmere, Malmland, Meridian, Montgomery, Nelson, Nereo, Noranmore, Norman Isles, Nyland, Oak Branch, Penrose, Penvearn, Polymitis, Poplar Branch, Progressist, Quiloa, Reidar, Royal Sceptre, Royalist, Sanctoria, Serbury, Sheila, Silksworth Hall, Silverdale,


Titania, Torrington, Tredegar Hall, Tunstall, Turret, Turret Bay, Turrethill, Vesterland, Walhalla, Wotan. (10)

Turret ships NOT built at Sunderland.

Just for interest, supposed to be 6 of them built in British yards. Items 1 thru 6 below. And one more, Narvik, built in Germany. Built under licence. The vessels that follow have not been researched by the webmaster, so the data presented is limited.

There is an amazing amount of data about 'Turret' ships at Wikipedia (here).

1   Forest Brook
2689 tons
Hull 269

104291

Ibex
Patras
1895

Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built by Swan, Hunter, & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., at Wallsend, for Forest Oak Steam Shipping Co. Ltd., of Newcastle. In 1906 sold to S.S. Ibex Ltd. & renamed Ibex. In 1909 sold to Anglo-Hellenic Steamship Co. Ltd., of Greece, & renamed Patras. The vessel was sold again in 1914 to 'Filli', of Denegri, Italy, with no change of name. Broken up at Genoa, Italy, in 1927.

2   Mayo
1778 tons
Hull 215

1896

Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built by Swan, Hunter, & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., at Wallsend, for Cia. Bilbaina de Navigation ('Bilbaina'), of Spain. In 1899 the vessel was sold to Aznar y Cia, also of Spain, but in 1903 reregistered to Bilbaina. On Sep. 8, 1916, while en route from Newport to Bordeaux, the vessel was torpedoed & sunk by a German submarine at 48.54N/5.28W.

3   Norham
1791 tons
Hull 208

106406
1896

Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built by Swan, Hunter, & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., at Wallsend for Thompson Steam Shipping Co. Ltd., of Sunderland. On Jan. 9, 1904, while en route from Bilbao, Spain to Middlesbrough with a cargo of iron ore, was wrecked on the Longsand.

4   Clan Ferguson
4808 tons
Hull 267

108779
1898

Per 1 (model), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built by Vickers, Sons & Maxim Ltd. at Barrow, for Cayzer, Irvine & Co., of Glasgow. On Sep. 6, 1917, the vessel was torpedoed & sank 15 miles NW of Cape Spartel. At 35.50N/6.10W. With the loss of 10 lives.

5   Heathdene
3542 tons
Hull 364

106644

Forest Dale
Cleveland Prince
Giuseppe G.
1898

Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built by R. & W. Hawthorn Leslie & Co. Ltd. at Hebburn for J. T. Lunn & Co., of Newcastle. Later in 1898, the vessel was sold to Forest Oak Steam Shipping Co. Ltd., of Newcastle, & renamed Forest Dale. In 1910, the vessel was sold to Neptune Steam Navigation Co. Ltd., of West Hartlepool, & renamed Cleveland Prince. In 1913, the vessel was sold to Fratelli Gavarone, of Italy & renamed Giuseppe G. In 1917, the vessel was sold to Soc. Anon. Ilva, also of Italy. And sold again, in 1918, to Lloyd Mediterraneo Soc. Italiana di Navigation, of Italy. On Jul. 24, 1918, while en route from Buenos Aires to Rio de Janeiro with a cargo of wheat & oats, an explosion occurred off Cape Polonio & the vessel sank.

6   Clan Cumming
4808 tons
Hull 268

108797

Ettore
Elisa Campanella
1899

Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built by Vickers, Sons & Maxim Ltd. at Barrow for Cayzer, Irvine & Co., of Glasgow. In 1925, the vessel was sold to Soc. Anon. Cantieri Olivo, of Italy & renamed Ettore. In 1926, it was sold to Tito Campanella Soc. Anon, also of Italy, & renamed Elisa Campanella. On Feb. 5, 1932, the vessel arrived at Savona, Italy, to be broken up.

7 Narvik
3576 tons
Hull 107
1905

Per 1 (Lloyds List, 1907/08), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built by Friedrich Krupp AG, at the Germania shipyard, Kiel, Germany, for L. Possehl & Co., iron ore dealers, of Lübeck. 342.2 ft. long, signal letters PBMR. The ship capsized, in 1913, off Borkum, & they bought Drumcondra, a 7 year old turret ship, as replacement. Thanks Björn Waldenström. I am advised that Lloyds Register refers to this vessel as being a 'Turret deck' vessel. So it is possible that Narvik is not the one Doxford design 'turret' said to have been built under licence in Germany. Can anybody clarify the matter?

Have read that the design was developed by Arthur Havers who was employed by Doxfords in Sunderland.