THE SUNDERLAND SITE - PAGE 083
SHIPBUILDERS - PAGE 25

May I suggest that you navigate the site via the index on page 001.PRIOR PAGE / NEXT PAGE

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On this page ... T. Stonehouse, Sunderland Shipbuilders/Shipbuilding Co., Sunderland Shipbuilders Limited, Sunderland Shipbuilding Dry Docks & Engineering, Swan Hunter, & Wigham Richardson, Thomas Young & Sons (Shipbreakers) Ltd.

Copyright? (1 + 40 + 22 + 20 = 83) Test.

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Corrections in any of the material which follows, however tiny, would be most welcome. And additions, of course!

T. STONEHOUSE
THOMAS STONEHOUSE

OF SUNDERLAND

Can you help with the history of this shipbuilder? The webmaster little about him.

Now these pages today include extensive lists of the ships built at Sunderland, lists which while often incomplete are steadily improving. From those lists, I can see that T. Stonehouse and/or Thomas Stonehouse would seem to have been in business for about 11 years, from 1856 thru to 1866. Over that period his yard built just a few vessels each year. The following vessels included - 1856 Jane Lacy & New Barque, 1857 William, 1858 Mary & Elizabeth, 1859 Stagshaw, 1860 Gulnare, 1861 Veleda, 1862 Moderation & Nancy Bryson, 1863 Belle of the South & Pyrus, 1864 Bernecia, Eglantine & Ortive, 1865 Scotland, 1866 Three Sisters.

Do be in touch if you have any information about the builder.

1   Nancy Bryson,
later
Nancy Brysson (a barque)
390 tons

45070
1862

The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1862/63 thru 1876/77, owned thru 1870/71 by R. Whyte of Sunderland. For service from Sunderland to India, but in the following years ex Liverpool, Plymouth & also ex London. The Mercantile Navy List of 1870 lists Robert Whyte of Aldgate, London, as the then owner of Nancy Brysson. Note that in 1862/63 LR names the vessel Nancy Brysson, but thereafter, until 1873/74, LR consistently records the vessel's name as Nancy Bryson. In 1870/71, C. S. Caird & Co., of Greenock, River Clyde, Scotland, became the vessel's owner. LR from 1872/73 thru 1874/75 records no owner's names. However, LR of 1876/77 lists R. (Robert) W. (William) Hickson, of London, as her then owner - it also says 'foundered'. 119.0 ft. long, signal letters VBRN. Steve advised in my guestbook that the vessel had been wrecked in 1877. Yes indeed. On Nov. 28, 1876, the vessel left Pernambuco, Brazil, for New York with a cargo of sugar under the command of Hugh Duncan (died Apl. 11, 1897), Steve's great grandfather. With a crew of 11. All went well until Dec. 28, 1876 when the vessel encountered gale conditions. At midnight on Dec. 29, 1876, the vessel was hit by a 'tremendous' sea which caused enormous damage to the vessel. 4 of the crew were swept overboard but were recovered. The damage resulted in the barque leaking badly, & the crew were unable to keep up with the inflow of water. At about noon on Dec. 30, 1876, two boats were launched, one of which sank immediately. The other boat, with the entire crew aboard, left the vessel which a few minutes later 'gave a tremendous plunge & disappeared' from sight. At 73N/34.35W, essentially off Cape Hatteras, South Carolina. At daylight the next morning, the crew were rescued by A. J. Pettingill, a brig under the command of Captain Hull, bound from Philadelphia to Matanzas, Cuba. The crew were landed at Matanzas on Jan. 11, 1877, made their way to Havana and there embarked on City of Vera Cruz for New York which they reached on Jan. 24, 1877. The vessel would seem to have then been owned by Hickson, Sykes & Co., of London (text). I thank the New York Times for their article (source) of Jan. 26, 1877 from which much of the detail above was summarised. #1920

SUNDERLAND SHIPBUILDERS CO.
SUNDERLAND SHIPBUILDING COMPANY, LIMITED

OF SOUTH DOCK

It would seem that in about 1960, a brief history booklet was privately published entitled 'Slipways to Success', the story of the 'Sunderland Shipbuilding Group'. Just 20 pages but with brief (very brief) histories of the seven companies which then comprised the group. I presume that the two names above would be amongst the companies referred to. If anybody has that booklet, scans of the pages for inclusion on site, would be welcomed.

Elsewhere on this site, re Iliff & Mounsey, I wondered where exactly the Sunderland Shipbuilding Company yard was located. In the following words:-

I note, however, that Miramar in its references to the 'South Dock' shipbuilder refers to a number of names - John Haswell, Iliff and Mounsey, Mounsey, Mounsey and Foster, & Sunderland SB Co. Vessels built by 'Iliff' seen to have their own short numbering system commencing in 1872. The last reference to Mounsey seems to be in 1879.

The reference to 'South Dock' is a puzzle to the webmaster. It would seem that George Bartram retired from his business in 1871 & that after he retired the 'Bartram' business moved to what I termed on page 045 'a new shipbuilding yard' at South Dock. Which sounds as though the site to which they moved had not been previously occupied by other shipbuilders. But in 1882, at a site described also as being South Dock, Sunderland Shipbuilding Company took over a site previously operated by Haswell, Iliff, Iliff & Mounsey & Mounsey & Foster. So it would seem that there were 2 shipbuilders at South Dock at least from 1871? We can see on page 045, where the Bartram yard was located. I wonder exactly where the 'Haswell thru to Sunderland Shipbuilding Company' yard was located? There are words about the situation in 'Where Ships Are Born' & since those words have a relevance to this matter, I repeat them here.

"Sunderland Shipbuilding Company, known locally as The "Limited" Yard, took over a South Docks site where wood ships were built in the eighteen-sixties by John Haswell. Iliff and Mounsey were launching little iron sailing ships and steamers there in the early 'seventies, after which the business was conducted as Mounsey and Foster. This latter firm built several large iron sailing ships from 1873, among them being the Duchess of Edinburgh, Eastern Monarch, Roderick Dhu, Senator and Kingdom of Sweden, each of which was famed among the medium clippers of the period.

After Mounsey retired, Robert Foster continued for only a very short time and then the business passed into the hands of the Sunderland Shipbuilding Company. Commencing about 1882, their record was a splendid one in the steamer class, and included ....."

Later words make it clear that the Sunderland Shipbuilding Company site was on the beach since the text refers to broadside launches into the open sea.

Miramar lists, 8 pages, (highest hull number on page). It used to be that you could click on the links that follow & get to the relevant Miramar page. But no longer! The new procedure must be to go to Miramar (here) & log in (you must be registered to view any page). And once you are logged in, return to this page & all the following links should work for you:- 132, 163, 193, 223, 254, 283, 313, 332. (233)

Names of just a few of the vessels constructed by Sunderland Shipbuilders Co. of Sunderland (or whatever!) - in a table in build date sequence. And alphabetic within a year.

1 Abergeldie
2863 (or 2929) tons
Hull 111

84358
1462

Fukui Maru
1882

An iron, single screw 'barkentine' passenger ship. Per 1 (thanks to Gilbert Provost), 2 (same data but with an 1884 reference?), 3 (image, Abergeldie, ca. 1889), 4 (#9, which refers to a 62 day voyage from São Miguel, Portugal, to Hawaii in 1883 with 938 passengers aboard), 5 (1883/85 voyages to Australia), 6 (NY Times, Mar. 31, 1904), 7 (NY Times, Apl. 1, 1904), 8 (book extract), 9 (a ref. to Abergeldie on a page from the Mercantile Navy List and Maritime Directory - for 1887), 11 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 315.0 ft. long perpendicular to perpendicular, 3 masts, signal letters WJSF. Initially registered in the name of Adam Bros. & Co. which soon became Adam Steamship Co. Ltd. of Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Registered at Aberdeen. The vessel clearly travelled to Australia & to Hawaii. the vessel was sold, in 1894, to Japanese owners (G. Ukon the manager only?) & renamed Fukui Maru. In late Mar. 1904, during the Russo/Japanese War of 1904/05, a Japanese fleet under Admiral Togo was 10 miles off Port Arthur, Manchuria. On Mar. 27, 1904, under cover of darkness, Fukui Maru, together with 3 other steamships (including Chiyo Maru), all loaded with cement & stones & escorted by 11 destroyers & 6 torpedo boats were detached from the fleet & approached Port Arthur, a Russian naval base, in an attempt to block access to the harbour via the narrow west channel. The approach was noticed when 2 miles out & a furious fire fight developed. Fukui Maru was hit by a Russian torpedo & sank in its targeted position. Yonemara Maru was also sunk by a Russian torpedo. The 2 other steamships were successfully scuttled. It would seem that 4 were killed in the engagement including 2 of the Fukui Maru's crew; Lieutenant-Commander Hirose Takao & a warrant officer (Sugino) responsible for the firing of the sinking charge. Do read the accounts at links 7 thru 9 above. Takao was posthumously decorated & a statue was erected to his memory in Tokyo. The attack was considered to be a great success even though a narrow access passage still remained open. Can you add more?

2 Castleford
3044 tons
Hull 118

87852
1883

An iron cargo ship. Which had a short life. Per 1 (1887 wreck & rescue, p.2/3), 2 (image Gipsy/Gypsy, 90% down on page), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 321.0 ft. long perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters HSFB. Built for Castleford Steamship Co. Ltd., of Liverpool, with 'Thomlinson, Thomson & Co.' likely the managers. On Jun. 8, 1887, while en route from Montreal, Quebec, Canada, to London, the vessel was driven ashore in thick fog at Crebawethan Rock, Western Rocks, off St. Agnes, Isles of Scilly. The vessel was a total loss. Two St. Agnes gigs (6 oared open boats), named Gipsy & O&M, rescued the passengers & crew & returned to salvage the cargo which included 450 (have also read 460) live cattle which had been spilled into the sea (& their handlers). Most WWW sites state that most of the cattle were saved. 1 states that all of the cattle were saved & transferred to a small island nearby to await the arrival of another ship to complete their journey. How tough a job that must have been, dragging terrified animals out of the sea one by one & manhandling them into a small boat! John Fowles, in 'Shipwreck', advises that 'cattle-ship wrecks were popular with the islanders, since salvage money ran as high as £5 a head. Even burying the drowned carcasses was profitable. The islanders refused to inter those from the Castleford for less than thirty shillings each'. Gipsy, built 1858, (later renamed Gypsy), still exists today, it would appear, owned by the Padstow Regatta Committee. And when they acquired it, in 1955, it still had a repaired hole in the hull from the horn of one of those deranged animals. WWW references are modest. Can you add anything?

3   Gian Paolo
461 tons
Hull 127
1885

A cargo ship. Which had a very short life. Per 1 (1885 ref. to launch, p.132, & ref. on p.261), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for Messrs. Giacopini Bros. (Link 1 says 'Gracopini'), of La Spezia, Italy. 152 ft. 6 in. long, designed to service the wine trade. At launch, was named by Miss Wilson, of Sunderland. Captain Reboa to be her first Captain. In Aug. 1888, the vessel was wrecked at Tarifa, Spain (W. of Gibraltar). No detail re wreck. WWW references are non-existent. Can you add anything?

4 Heathpool
975 (or 974) tons
Hull 128

90321
1885

A cargo ship, a collier/ore carrier. Per 1 (1885 ref. to launch, p.78, & ref. on p.261), 2 (NY Times archive, sinking), 3 (wreck), 4 (ref. in French, col.#1), 5 (image, Heathpool, in 'Mines de Lambton', an 1891 volume), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for H. T. Morton, or perhaps rather 'H. T. Morton & Co.', of Sunderland. 210 ft. long. At launch, was named by Miss Wilson, of Sunderland. Later owned by 'The Lambton Collieries Limited', of Sunderland, which company became 'Lambton & Hetton Collieries', & later still 'Lambton, Hetton and Joicey Collieries'. On Mar. 31, 1899, while en route from Sunderland to Ste. Nazaire, France, with a cargo of coal, the vessel was run down by Ethelhilda (built 1897), which was en route from 'Buenos Ayres' to Antwerp & was damaged in the collision. Off Beachy Head, Sussex, or, per Miramar off the Royal Sovereign light vessel (located off Eastbourne). At 50.41.6N/00.26.7E. 8 lives were lost of the crew of 16. 8 were landed at Dover, Kent, 7 of them by Ethelhilda. Can you add anything?

5   Semiramis
432 tons
Hull 129?

90069
1885

A passenger/cargo ship. Per 1 (1885 ref. to launch, p.133), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for William Watt, of Helensburgh (River Clyde opposite Greenock). However Lloyd's Register of 1887/88 states C. J. Paterson of Glasgow to be the registered owner. 152 ft. 6 in. long, accommodation for 1st class passengers amidships, expected to have a speed of 12 knots. At launch, the vessel was named by Mrs. Watt, wife of the first owner name mentioned. Michael Bouck-Standen, of the U.K., advises (thanks Michael!) that in the 1890s the vessel was owned by 'G. O. Joly Victora & Company Limited', an English company registered in 1886, of Smyrna, Turkey, which company owned a small fleet of vessels which traded between Smyrna, the Syrian coast & Syra, a Greek island in the Cyclades (Syros or Siros) & presumably to other Greek Islands also. The vessel's end came, it would seem, with an explosion on Dec. 26, 1894, which explosion was said, per Michael, to have been caused by a cargo of smuggled gunpowder. The explosion occurred at Finika Bay or Phinika Bay or Phoenix Bay, (said to be near Adalia), a natural harbour on the S. coast of Crete settled since Roman times, where today's Loutro is located. Crete, now Greek, at that time & thru 1913 was Ottoman, i.e. Turkish ruled, since 1669. Years ago, the webmaster hiked the Samaria Gorge, & Agia Roumeli is the southern, coastal end of that hike. There being no roads in the area, the webmaster may well have visited or certainly passed Loutro, travelling by boat eastwards from Agia Roumeli along the coast to Hora Sfakion. WWW references are modest & we thank Michael for his input. Can you add anything?

6   Azalea
503 (or 493) tons
Hull 132

91895
1886

A cargo ship. Per 1 (1886 ref. to launch, p. 297), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for Leach & Co., of London, agent, it would seem, for London & Ghent Line. Registered in the name of 'C. F. Leach'. 162 ft. 6 in. long. At launch, was named by Miss Hands. I presume from the above, the vessel traded with the continent. The end would seem to have come on Dec. 24, 1903, when Azalea was as in collision in Crosby Channel, the main shipping channel of the Mersey River, near Liverpool. I have not read what she collided with, nor the circumstances. WWW references are non-existent. Can you add anything?

7   Maria P.
722 tons
Hull 130
1886

A passenger/cargo ship, schooner rigged. Per 1 (1886 ref. to launch, p. 325), 2 (NY Times archive re 1895 collision), 3 (Ortigia, page in Italian), 4 (Link 3, Ortigia, WWW translated), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for Angelo Profumo, of Genoa, Italy, for the Mediterranean trade. 190 ft. long, saloon 'handsomely fitted up for 20 first-class passengers'. At launch, was 'gracefully' named by Miss Lewis, of London. Later (1895) owned by Marini Brichetto, of Genoa. At 1:30 a.m. on Jul. 21, 1895, Captain Ferrera in command, & bound from ? to Naples with 178 passengers aboard, vessel was in collision with Ortigia (built 1873, owned by 'Florio', 1895 renamed Adria). The passengers were all emigrants, to be transshipped to Sud America at Genoa for their onward journey to South America (River Plate). The accident happened at the mouth of the Gulf of Spezia, off Isola del Tino. Maria P. was struck 'squarely on the starboard side' & was penetrated to the depth of 18 ft. When Ortigia backed out, water flooded into Maria P., which quickly sank. Truly major panic & terror. One small boat was launched, & 14 of the crew of 17, & 30 passengers were saved. It is not clear to the webmaster, from what he has read, which vessel launched that one boat. Probably 144 passengers lost their lives, plus some crew. It would seem that Ortigia had a troubled history of disasters (many similar sites to that linked above), being involved additionally in accidents in 1880 (in which Oncle Joseph was sunk), 1885 & 1890, in which, collectively, 200 to 300 persons lost their lives. Can you add anything?

8   C. A. Bade
635 (or 560) tons
Hull 138

Presidente Saenz Penna
Previsor
Everett
1888

A most difficult WWW search, so I am grateful for what little I could find. Per 1 ('Neptun Lin', C. A. Bade), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for Dampfschiffahrts Gesellschaft Neptun (Neptun Lin), of Bremen, Germany. In 1909, the vessel was sold, to J. Constant, of London, & in 1910 was renamed Presidente Saenz Penna. That vessel name may relate to Roque Sáenz Peña, President of Argentina, 1910 thru 1914. And if so, the vessel name may correctly have been Presidente Saenz Peña. There are many limited references to 'J. Constant' who would seem to have been a shipowner (mainly tugs & barges), a yard owner & a broker. It may well be that the sale to J. Constant was to him in his capacity as a broker & he sold the vessel to South American or Spanish interests. The vessel was sold in 1917 to L. Baldor & renamed Previsor. And sold again in 1925 to 'I. de Garay' & renamed Everett. Both of those purchaser names may, however, be the names of the vessel managers rather than the owners. Vessel was, per Miramar, broken up in Q3 of 1934. Need help! Can you add anything?

9 Rosedale
1040 (later, in 1891, became 1507) tons
Hull 147

95265
1888

A cargo ship, with an iron & steel hull. Per 1 (1897 ref. para #1), 2 (data galore, Rosedale), 3 (data at page bottom, 1898 image, 1897 ref., etc.), 4 (many data references to Rosedale), 5 (data re 1897), 6 (Luella, & 1919 data), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 173.0 ft. long perpendicular to perpendicular, 180 ft. long overall, but became 246 ft. 1 in. long when lengthened in 1891, signal letters KRTN. The vessel's registered initial owner was to be 'Hagarty & Crangle' which became 'Hagarty & Co.', of Sunderland. But it would seem that the vessel was built for 'Canadian Northwest Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Port Arthur (now Thunder Bay), Ontario, Canada. (Thos. Marks & Co. the managers). Not sure how Hagarty & Co., of Sunderland fits into the picture, since John H. G. Hagarty, Capt. Samuel Crangle & wharfinger W. A. Geddes, would all seem to have been prominent citizens of Toronto, in business transporting grain down the Great Lakes. Built at a cost of U.S. $75,000 (value from a U.S. site). Her maiden voyage was from London to Chicago via the St. Lawrence River & the Welland Canal, the first ever such direct voyage without transhipment. Became Canadian registered in 1890. Known as a difficult ship to handle because of her steering gear of the "armstrong" variety". In the 1890/91 edition of Lloyd's Register the vessel had become owned by St. Lawrence and Chicago Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. ('Chicago') of Toronto, Canada, with T. G. Beatley & Sons the managers. The vessel was rebuilt & lengthened in 1891, at Kingston, Ontario, to increase her cargo capacity, by the insertion of a new section between the bridge & engine room, both of which were amidships. At a cost of U.S. $30,000 (value from a U.S. site). 3 indicates her owners (in 1896) to be John H. G. Hagarty, Captain Samuel Crangle & W. A. Geddes, of Toronto, who were the owners of Chicago. Employed in the grain trade between Duluth, Minnesota, & Kingston, Ontario, with Capt. James Ewart her master. On Dec. 5, 1897, the vessel, carrying a cargo of grain, stranded at East Charity Shoal, (then unmarked) at the eastern end of Lake Ontario, during a NW gale. In U.S. territory (New York State). No loss of life. She was balanced with a huge rock under her keel amidships. It was at first feared she had broken in two, but that was not the case. Recovered two weeks later, she was towed to Kingston, Ontario, and abandoned to her underwriters, but was rebuilt several years later. A second rebuild, it would seem. I wonder when & where? Sold in or about 1910 to Rosedale Ltd., a Hamilton, Ontario, subsidiary of Inland Lines Ltd. which company was absorbed into Canada Steamship Lines in 1913. Data in conflict however. 3 states that on Apl. 20, 1916 Chicago (including this vessel) was purchased by Canada Steamship Lines Ltd., of Montreal. Returned to salt water in 1916 when requisitioned for WW1 service. On Apl. 18, 1919, while en route from Cardiff, Wales, to Bordeaux, France, with  a cargo of coal, the vessel was in collision with USS Luella, a refrigerated cargo ship, in the Bristol Channel & sank. I presume no loss of life. 6 says the collision was when USS Luella was departing St. Nazaire, France, on Apl. 20, 1919 & that Rosedale sank in eight minutes. Luella was badly damaged in the collision & out of action for 3 1/2 months while repairs were effected. A few inconsistencies in the data, but a good record none the less. This summation surely needs to be revisited with all of the detailed data that is available. Can you add anything?

10 Serica
2652 tons
Hull 143

95513
1888

A cargo ship. Per 1 (wreck data), 2 (wreck data, #15), 3 (map which shows 'Serica Rock', a distance below 'SAINT MARY'S ROAD'), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for R. Gordon & Co., of London. 98.0 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 321.5 ft., 'clipper bowed'. In Nov. 1893, while en route from Barry Dock, Wales, to Port Said, Egypt, with a cargo of coal, the vessel suffered extensive storm damage & put into the Isles of Scilly on Nov. 19, 1893 to seek shelter & effect temporary repairs. A few days later, she sailed for Plymouth, & on Nov. 24, 1893 hit an uncharted rock (now named 'Serica Rock'). She was run aground near Woolpack Beacon or Point, St. Mary's Island, St. Mary's Sound, Isles of Scilly. Does that mean that she hit the rock, was freed & then moved closer to Woolpack Point? I think it does. The vessel became a total wreck. I presume no loss of life. Wreck lies at 49.54.2N/06.19.2W in 3 (or maybe 13) metres of water. A slightly different wreck location at 2. WWW data is limited. Can you add anything?

11 Narrung
5078 tons
Hull 186

105873

Mexico City
1896

A passenger ship. Per 1 (data which includes built by Doxford & that the sink date was in 1917, which data is incorrect, it would seem), 2 (P&O Line), 3 (data), 4 (Boveric), 5 (Blue Anchor 30% down), 6 (pencil drawing by Allan C. Green, 7 (radio ref. 3/4 down to 1912 SOS), 8 (3rd item), 9 (Blue Anchor Line, Narrung), 10 (Lloyds List, 1907/08), 11 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Single screw steamer, 400 ft. (121.88 metres) long, with accommodation for 50 1st Class passengers 'plus emigrants' or (elsewhere) 'plus a large number of third class' passengers. Speed 13 knots. Built for Blue Anchor Line Ltd. (Wilhelm Lund & Sons, managers), of London. Used on the U.K. to Australia service via Cape of Good Hope. In 1902 it towed back to Freemantle, Australia, (5 days, 876 miles) the 'Howard Smith' steamer Boveric which had lost her propeller & drifted for 37 days. Boveric was en route from Sydney to Durban, South Africa, with 965 horses for the Boer War. Only 52 horses were lost. 1905 registered in the name of 'Blue Anchor Line Ltd.' May 19, 1910, sold for £21,317 to The Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company (P&O Lines) as part of their purchase of the entire Blue Anchor fleet. Then became 3rd Class only but see N. Borneo reference below. It would seem that on Boxing Day 1912, while in the English Channel en route to Australia, it ran into a storm, hit 70 ft. waves in the Bay of Biscay, broadcast an SOS message & had to return to England. On Apl. 16, 1913, Narrung was sold for £23,633 to Mexico Steamship Co. Ltd., of Hong Kong ('Eng Hok Fong Steamship Co.' the manager), & renamed Mexico City. It survived a torpedo attack in the Mediterranean on Jun. 25, 1916. In Apl. 1917, was stranded off British North Borneo, but re-floated after her cargo of copra had been discharged into small craft. Cargo later reloaded at Sandakan. On Feb. 5, 1918, the vessel was torpedoed by U-101 & sunk 15 miles from South Stack, Holyhead, Anglesey, North Wales. 29 lives lost including the Captain. Can you add anything? An image, perhaps?

12 Russie
2015 (or 1934) tons
Hull 192

Urania
1897

A passenger/cargo ship. Per 1 (data Urania), 2 (Société Générale, Russie), 3 (image, page in Finnish), 4 (image Urania), 5 (Meteor), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 90 metres long, speed of 14 (or 15) knots. Capacity for 600 passengers, 102 in 1st, 48 in 2nd & 450 in 3rd Class. Built for 'Société Générale de Transports Maritimes à Vapeur', of Marseilles, France. Registered France. The vessel was engaged on the Marseilles to Oran, Algeria, service. On Jan. 8, 1902, the vessel went aground in the mouth of the Rhone river. Was re-floated & repaired. On May 26, 1913, the vessel was sold to 'Finska Ångfartygs Aktiebolaget', of Helsinki, Finland (Finland Steamship Co.) & renamed Urania. Was rebuilt at Hull by Earle's Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. Ltd. In Dec. 1913, the vessel entered the Finnish ports/Copenhagen/Hull service. Was at Hull when WW1 was declared & laid up there until Apl. 1915 when chartered by the Russian Admiralty. On Jul. 12, 1915, (have also read Jul. 14 & 25) while en route from Liverpool to Archangel with general cargo, the vessel struck a mine laid by minelayer Meteor, in the White Sea - off Sozonovets Lighthouse, 12 miles from Cape Gorodetsk (or Gorodetskiy) on the Kola Peninsula. The vessel sank in 57 seconds! No loss of life. A wreck listing, now long gone, referred to the vessel then being owned by 'L. Krogius'. Can you add anything? Translate the Finnish page, perhaps?

13 Wakool
5014 tons
Hull 196

109996

Kwanto Maru
Le Myre de Villers
1898

A passenger/cargo ship. Per 1 (Blue Anchor Line, Wakool), 2 (2 images, Wakool, ex expired eBay items), 3 (2 images, of Le Myre de Villers or whatever), 4 (immigrants ex Chile), 5 (St. Elmo's Fire), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 121.9 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 400 ft., 2 masts, speed of 13 knots, crew of 55 all told, in Jan. 1914 when named Kwanto Maru, probably much more earlier as a passenger liner. A sister to Narrung & Wilcannia. Capacity for 100 passengers, 50 in 1st, & 50 in 2nd class. One passenger, Percy Grainger, described the vessel as 'the best he had been on'. Her trials were on Oct. 26, 1898. Wakool? A small town in New South Wales ('NSW'), Australia. Built for 'W. (William) Lund & Sons', i.e. 'Blue Anchor Line', of London. Thru 1909 the vessel was engaged carrying passengers, often immigrants, to Melbourne & Sydney, Australia, via Cape Town, South Africa. On Jun. 14, 1899, the vessel arrived at Melbourne, with 'a number of her plates started and a large portion of the cargo damaged'. On Apl. 3, 1901, the vessel left Southampton for the Boer War in South Africa, via Queenstown, Ireland, with 742 troops aboard. On Oct. 5, 1904, during a blizzard with snow on the vessel's decks, St. Elmo's Fire was 'transfixed to the top of the foremast of ... Wakool, above the masthead light'. Of a deep limpid blue colour - lasted for 15 minutes. On Oct. 31, 1905, the vessel left London for Sydney via Adelaide, (reached in 44 days plus) with 4 cabin passengers & 55 in third class. The vessel carried a 25-ton gun for the naval depot at Garden Island. En route a young sailor named Everett fell overboard - the ship searched for about 2 hours but found no trace of him. On Jul. 20, 1910, the vessel was transferred to 'The Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company', perhaps re the purchase of the entire Blue Anchor Line in liquidation. For use on what was known as 'P. & O. Branch Service'. In 1912, but have also read in Mar. 1913, the vessel was sold to 'Goshi Kaisha Kishimoto Shokai', of Japan, & renamed Kwanto Maru. Registered at Dairen, now Dalian, China. Would seem to have become a 'repair ship' during Japanese operations against Tsing Tao, now Qingdao, China. The vessel was chartered to carry coal to Java. On Dec. 2, 1913, a sailor named Yenowe was shot & killed aboard the ship, as a result of a dispute with the boatswain. In late 1913 carried coal to Lyttelton, New Zealand, ex Newcastle, NSW, & in 1915 carried 220 immigrants to Darwin via Melbourne & Sydney, ex Talachuano, Chile. In early Apl. 1916, the vessel attempted to help Chiyo Maru, in distress & abandoned at Tam Kan or Lema Island, Hong Kong, but could do nothing practical. In 1917, the vessel was bought by the French Government to replace war losses, was placed in the stewardship of  'Compagnie des Messageries Maritimes', & renamed Le Myre de Villers - the name is confused, see images via link above. 'Briefly chartered in 1919 and sold to Brabant by the state and Pruvost.' In 1925, (have also read in 1923) the vessel was broken up at Spezia, Italy. Can you add anything? Or correct the above. #1851

14 Wilcannia
4953 tons
Hull 199

110154

Shinkoku Maru
Dumont d’Urville
André Chénier
1899

A passenger liner. Per 1 (P&O), 2 (Messageries), 3 (page in French with images), 4 (image, Wilcannia), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 400 ft. long, speed of 13 knots, single funnel. A sister to Narrung & Wakool. Built for W. Lund & Sons ('Lund'). In 1905, the vessel was registered in the name of Blue Anchor Line Ltd. (managed by 'Lund'). The vessel was transferred, in Mar. 1910, for £35,152, to 'The Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company', perhaps re the purchase of entire Blue Anchor Line, & refurbished. 50 saloon passengers plus steerage. Engaged thru 1914 in emigrant service to Australia via Cape of Good Hope. On Mar. 19, 1914 the vessel was sold, for £17,277, to 'Goshi Kaisha Kishimoto Shokwa', of Japan & renamed Shinkoku Maru. And sold, in 1917, to the French Government & renamed Dumont d’Urville (then 5145 tons & later 5295 tons). More a cargo vessel at that time, it would appear, but with facilities for 74 passengers (34 in 1st Class & 40 in 3rd). The vessel was sold again, in 1919, to 'Societe des Services Contractuels des Messageries Maritimes', of France. In 1921 the vessel was renamed André Chénier (often written as Andre Chenier). In Mar. 1924, crew refused to operate the vessel in view of it carrying 500 tons of gasoline. The ringleaders were sentenced to 20 days in prison 'with deferment' (not sure exactly what that means). In 1926, the vessel was sold to 'Societa Ligura di Produce Metallica', of Italy for demolition at Spezia. Wilcannia is, I read, a small town on the Darling River in western New South Wales, Australia. Can you help any? Perhaps with an image as Wilcannia.

15 Riverdale
4206 tons
Hull 205

110300

Nivôse
1900

A cargo ship which was launched on Sep. 11, 1900 & completed in Oct. 1900. Per 1 (image & data, Riverdale), 2 (James Smith 'pdf' Riverdale study), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 360.0 ft. long (109.73 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 9 knots, signal letters RWKD, 351 HP engines by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd. of Sunderland. Built for The "Riverdale" Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Glasgow with 'J. Little & Co.', of Glasgow, (James Little of Greenock) her managers. The Mercantile Navy List of 1910, says that the owners were then of Liverpool, but the ship was registered at Glasgow. In 1914, the vessel was acquired by 'Borderdale Shipping Company Ltd.', of Glasgow, with no change of vessel name or manager. The vessel was sold again, in 1916, to 'Plisson Steam Navigation Co. Ltd.' ('Plisson'), of Cardiff, though London & Glasgow are also both referenced, with no change of vessel name. James Smith advises that on Apl. 4, 1917 the vessel was requisitioned by the Admiralty for WW1 service & provides, in his study, detail of her WW1 service. Plisson, owned by Ernest Plisson, a Frenchman, renamed the vessel Nivôse in 1920. Registered at London, as listed in the Mercantile Navy List of 1920. There were no later changes in the vessel's name. In 1920, the vessel, bound from Galveston, Texas, to Barcelona, Spain, grounded at its destination, but I have not been able to read any detail. I read that from 1922 the vessel carried Welsh coal. In 1924, the vessel was sold to 'Soc. Terrena Spedizioni e Traffica', of Naples, Italy. And in 1925 was sold to 'Nivose Societa Anonima di Navigazione', also of Naples, A. Scinicariello likely the managers. On Apl. 16, 1929 the vessel arrived at Genoa, Italy, to be broken up. The WWW record for this ship is almost non-existent. Can you add anything additional? Another image?

16 Cheviot Range
3458 (later 3485) tons
Hull 220

114658

Fedora
1903

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('Plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register listing data, Fedora, re 1930/31), 2 [Neptune, Cheviot Range (1)], 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 105.2 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 345.0 ft., speed of 11 1/2 knots, signal letters NPBS. Built for 'Neptune Steam Navigation Co. Ltd.', of Sunderland, which company in 1906 & in 1910 became owned by Furness Withy & Company, of Liverpool. In 1912, the vessel was sold to 'Nav. a Vap. M. U. Martinolich & Co.' of Mali Lošinj, (known as Lussinpiccolo in Italian), Croatia, Austro-Hungarian Empire, & renamed Fedora. The sale was likely early in the year because I spotted a brief reference to the vessel leaving Newport News for Genoa & Trieste, both Italy, in Apl. 1912. And another brief reference to the vessel carrying munitions in Jun. 1918 or 1919. In 1920, the vessel's owner became 'Soc. Anon. di Nav. Marco U. Martinolich', of Lussinpiccolo, Italy. On Jan. 14, 1932, the vessel arrived at Pola, Croatia, to be broken up. The WWW record for this ship is almost non-existent. A later vessel of the name, i.e. Cheviot Range built in 1914, was captured & sunk by gunfire & torpedo, on Feb. 21, 1918, close to The Lizard, with the loss of 27 lives. Can you add anything additional? Another image? #1862

17 Sherwood
1353 tons
Hull 221

118369

Suntrap
1903

A collier that was launched on Dec. 17, 1903 & completed in Jan. 1904. Per 1 (Wm. France, Fenwick & Co., history & fleet), 2 (wrecksite.eu, Suntrap wreck), 3 ('uboat.net', Suntrap sunk), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 230.0 ft. long (70.1 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 8 or 9 knots, signal letters VMHC, defensibly armed (1-18 pounder gun), 159 HP engines by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., of Sunderland. The vessel was built for Wm. France, Fenwick & Co. Ltd., noted for the shipment of coal to London, of & registered at London. In 1910 & 1915, per the Mercantile Navy List, Sydney G. Higgins was the vessel's manager. James Smith advises (thanks!) that on Apl. 24, 1915, the vessel was requisitioned by the Admiralty for WW1 service. In 1916, the vessel was sold to Gas Light & Coal Co. ('Gaslight'), also of London, with Stephenson Clarke & Co. her managers. Gaslight owned gas plants in London & owned a fleet of vessels to supply such plants with coal. In early Nov. 1917, while under the command of W. Clayburn, & en route from the Tyne to London with a cargo of 1900 tons of coal, the vessel was attacked, in fine weather, by German submarine UB-22, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Karl Wacker. Karl Wacker, in his brief career as a submarine commander, sank 8 allied vessels during WW1. At 4:30 p.m. on Nov. 7, 1917, UB-22 fired a single torpedo at Suntrap, which then was 2 1/2 miles E. of South Cheek, Robin Hood's Bay, North Yorkshire - at 54.25.18N/ 00.25.45W. The torpedo struck the after part of the vessel's after hold, totally destroyed her stern & caused a fire to break out. The vessel sank 20 minutes later. The 19 man crew took to their boats & were rescued by armed drifters Brighton & Rising Sun & were landed at nearby Scarborough, Yorkshire. The wreck of the vessel would seem to still on the seabed today. Can you add anything additional? #1946

18 Eros
754 (or 858) tons
Hull 228

4384
1905

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('uboat.net', 1918 sinking), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 61.0 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed? Built for 'Rederi A/B Luggude', then owned by Nils Christian Corfitzon, of Helsingborg, (Helsinki), Sweden. In 1913, Otto Hilding Hillerström, also of Helsingborg, became the company's owners & managers. On Mar. 20, 1918, B. Nilsson in command, the vessel was en route from Lorient, Brittany, France, to Newport, Wales, in ballast. The vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by UB-103, Kapitänleutnant Paul Hundius in command, & sank 8 miles W. (or 5 miles WSW) of the Lizard. At 49.56N/05.25W. I read that 3 lives were lost. The WWW record for this ship, other than re the sinking, is non-existent. Can you add anything additional? Another image?

19 Dunelm
2319 (or 2318) tons
Hull 246

123950
1907

A C1 'bulk canaller' which term means a vessel small enough to navigate the pre St. Lawrence Seaway lock system. Per 1 (30% down), 2 (data), 3 (Oswego, New York, 1915 newspaper cutting), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 76.2 metres (250 ft.) long, wheelhouse forward. Owned by Dunelm Ltd., of Sunderland, 1907 thru 1912, & from 1912/1914 by Inland Lines Ltd., a Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Steamship Lines company (1 says sold 1913 to Canada Steamship Lines). But... I have also seen a reference to the vessel having been built for R. O. & A. B. MacKay, of Hamilton - the managers perhaps? On Dec. 6, 1910, the vessel ran aground off Isle Royale, Lake Superior, ex Port Arthur, & was heavily damaged. It would seem, per 3, that the vessel in early 1915 was owned by Canada Steamship Lines but chartered to Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Company. Link 1 also refers to a 'difficult' voyage (from U.K.?) to Canada in 1907 (Nov. 10/ Dec. 13, 1907). Lost at sea with all hands (20) en route from Sydney, Nova Scotia, to Manchester, U.K., in Oct. 1915, laden with steel products from Dominion Iron & Steel Co. Captain Baxter Barbour in command. Last seen, per a 'Sydney Post' reference, passing Cape Race on Oct. 18, 1915 (we thank Dave Murphy). En route to Manchester. Probably lost due to heavy weather & not enemy action. Would seem that documents & an image of the vessel exist in 'Library and Archives Canada'. Can you help any?

20 Leif
2134 (or 2195) tons
Hull 244

167436 (later)

Brynhild
Komodore Hakki Burak
1907

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data, Brynhild), 2 ('pdf', ref. in Danish, item #177, Leif), 3 (DFDS, Brynhild), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Brynhild), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 86.9 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 296 ft., speed of 9 knots. Miramar refers to A. O. Andersen & Co. re this vessel, re both Leif & Brynhild, which I believe means A. O. Andersen & Co. Inc., of Copenhagen, Denmark. Possibly on Mar. 16, 1909, the vessel went aground (where?) while en route from Sunderland to Stettin (then Germany, now Poland) with a cargo of coal. Renamed Brynhild in 1914. In 1926, the vessel would seem to have been sold to 'Det Forenede Dampskibs-Selskab A/S ('DFDS') (The United Steamship Company), & renamed Brynhild. Registered as British? - 130 WW2 convoy refs. re Brynhild, incl. 4 N. Atlantic crossings, extensive service to Reykjavik, Iceland, service to France in Jun/Sep 1944, to Antwerp & extensive U.K. coastal. On Jul. 3, 1952, the vessel was laid up at Copenhagen. On Oct. 9, 1953, the vessel was sold to 'Sadikzade Nazim Ogullari Vapurculu Komandit Sirketi', of Istanbul, Turkey, & renamed Komodore Hakki Burak. On May 15, 1965, the break up of the vessel commenced at the Istanbul facilities of 'Sabri Kirzil ve Sukru Turk'. Despite all of the above, WWW data about the vessel is most limited. Can you add anything, and/or correct the above?

21 Odland
1244 (or 1241 or 1243 or 1303) tons
Hull 248

7447
180693

Odland I
Brita
Desiderius Siedler
Empire Connell
Ballyholme Bay
Laurie Pattison
1908

A cargo ship. This seems likely to be a long listing with the vessel having many names & even more owners in its 44 year life. Per 1 ('Wikipedia', extensive data, Brita), 2 (ownership data, low on page, image), 3 (Norwegian & English text, data, Odland I), 4 (Lloyd's register, Brita, 1930/31 - many more such registers may be available via 'Plimsoll'), 5 (data, Connell, 65% down), 6 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Brita). Beware! Only 4 of the 280 convoys listed at the page that you come to relate to this vessel. No such page for Empire Connell), 7 (image, Odland I), 8 & 9 (images, Brita), 10 (image, Ballyholme Bay), 11 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 70.4 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 227 ft. 4 in., speed of 9 knots, signal letters KGNJ & later SDMI & GNMN. The vessel was built for 'Dampskibsakties Odland' & managed by H.  Fredriksen, both of Oslo, Norway. I read that the vessel was driven ashore, in 1909, at Murray Bay, (now La Malbaie), N. shore of St. Lawrence River, Quebec, Canada. Have read no detail, but clearly the vessel survived the experience. A number of changes of ownership without a change of vessel name. In 1918, to 'D/S A/S Bris', of Oslo, managed by Nils M. Thomas, & also in 1918, to 'Grefstads Rederi A/S', managed by Bendix J. Grefstad, of Arendal, Norway. In 1920, to 'A/S D/S Odland', managed by J. A. Jespersen, of Tønsberg, Norway. On Mar. 16, 1920, the vessel rescued the crew of Rosa Harriette, a schooner that had been adrift for 16 hours - off St. Catherine's Point, Isle of Wight. The Board of Trade honoured the rescue by awarding the Odland's captain with a plate, presumably of silver. Miramar does not list the vessel. There was a 124 ton schooner of the name built in 1864, which was still active in 1906. Could that be the correct Rosa Harriette, I wonder? In 1921, 'A/S Orange', of Tønsberg, acquired Odland & renamed it Odland I., managed by N. Bugge. Two more changes of ownership without a change of vessel name. To 'Borre Dampskibsselskap AS', managed by Louis Hannevig, both of Oslo, in 1922, & to 'Dampskibs AS Martha', managed by Hans Hannevig & later by Chr. & Hans Hannevig, of Horten, Norway, in 1924. In 1928, the vessel was sold to 'Rederi A/B Väsby' of Lerberget, Sweden, managed by either Filip Ohlsson or Joel A. Ohlsson, & renamed Brita. Later manager changes - to Joel Fänge in Aug. 1931 & to 'Fänges & Påhlssons Rederi', in 1936. Just 4 WW2 convoy references as Brita, both to Norwegian waters in Feb. & Mar. 1940 returning to the U.K. with railway sleepers. In Apl. 1940, the Germans invaded Norway. On Apl. 9, 1940, when at Bergen, Norway, en route from Sweden to France with a cargo of wood pulp, the vessel was seized by German forces. In May 1940, the vessel was transferred to Germany. A German Prize Court, in Dec. 1940, declared her cargo to be contraband & the vessel became owned by the German Government, managed by 'F. G. Reinhold', of Danzig, Germany, & renamed Desiderius Siedler. 2 refers to 'Tatt in Anspruch' re that ownership - can anybody explain the meaning? And who was Desiderius Seidler? Have seen a reference dating the German seizure as being rather on May 25, 1940. In May 1945, the vessel was seized by British forces at Copenhagen, Denmark, became owned by the Ministry of War Transport, & was renamed Empire Connell, managed by Charles M. Willie & Co. (Shipping) Ltd., of Cardiff. In 1947, the vessel was sold to 'Irish Bay Lines Limited', managed & maybe owned by Henry P. Lenaghan & Sons Limited, both of Belfast, Northern Ireland, & was renamed Ballyholme Bay. And sold for the last time, in 1950, to 'Pattison Orient Line Ltd.', of Hong Kong, & renamed Laurie Pattison. Links 1 & 5 state 'Laure Pattison'. In the 3rd quarter of 1952, the vessel was broken up at Hong Kong. Despite all of the above, WWW data about the vessel is most limited, particularly about her service. Can you add anything, and/or correct the above text?

22 Oakmere
1251 tons
Hull 259

124289

Bazan
Thorpehall
1910

A cargo ship launched in Jul. 1910. Per 1 (Thorpehall), 2 (data in Spanish, Thorpehall, Google translated into English here), 3 (data), 4 (06 April, about 60% down), 5 (about 10% down p 96/7), 6 (ref. Thorpehall), 7 (Lloyd's Register data, Bazan), 8 (Lloyd's Register data, Thorpehall), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 245.0 ft. long, (about 80 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular 254.5 ft. long overall, speed of 10 1/2 knots, signal letters HRKN, later GJYM, 170 HP. Built for Watson Steamship Co. Ltd. (H. Watson & Company managers), of Manchester, & registered there. Watson, was a ship owner who operated a fleet of ships (including Oakmere) suitable for the transport of palm oil from West Africa to Port Sunlight (Merseyside). And 'for their Manchester & Mediterranean fruit trade'. The company, it would seem, was purchased in 1916 by 'Societé Anonyme des Huileries du Congo Bela', owned by William Lever (Lever Brothers/Unilever), which company soon (also 1916) changed its name to Bromport Steamship Company Limited (H. R. Greenhalgh, manager). The Bromport fleet was sold in 1923; Oakmere to MacAndrews & Co., of Manchester & Liverpool, & renamed Bazan. The vessel was sold in 1936 to Westcliff Shipping Co. Ltd. (P. B. Pandelis Ltd., managers), of London, renamed Thorpehall, & registered at London. It would seem that the vessel was chartered by the Basque Government to bring food to the blockaded Bilbao during the Spanish Civil War. On Apl. 6, 1937, the vessel was blocked by Spanish Nationalist (pro-Franco) ships from entering Bilbao (in Loyalist hands) with a cargo of food. But reached Bilbao with assistance from HMS Brazen & other vessels. On May 25, 1938, while en route from Marseilles to Valencia with wheat & military supplies, the vessel was bombed & sunk by Spanish Nationalist aircraft 1 mile off Valencia, Spain. Can you help any? Another image, perhaps?

23 Saskatoon
1798 (later 1752) tons
Hull 256

123965

Rosemount
Willowbranch
Empire Tadpole
Basingcreek
Coastal Creek
Creek Transport
Ile de Montreal
1910

A canaller, built for the then St. Lawrence River system. Which became a tanker & had multiple names over 66 years of life. Per 1 (extensive data & 2 images), 2 (40% down Coastal Creek), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 250.2 ft. long, speed of 10 knots. Most of the following references are to Canada. Built for Colonial Transportation Co. Ltd. of Sunderland. But later in 1910 the vessel became owned by Merchants Mutual Line Ltd., of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Sold in 1914 to Canada Steamship Lines Ltd. ('CSL'). On Jul. 24, 1914, was damaged when stranded in the St. Lawrence River near Port Neuf, Quebec, westbound with a load of pulpwood. In WW1, she was requisitioned for, it is believed, coastal service in the U.K. Sold in 1920 to Canadian Maritime Co. Ltd., of Montreal, & sold again, in 1922, to Interlake Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. In 1927, became, through a fleet acquisition, a CSL vessel again & since CSL had acquired a new vessel named Saskatoon, our vessel was renamed Rosemount. Laid up at Montreal during the Depression & used to store coal. In 1936, she sank at her dock! Raised up, she was sold in 1937 to Les Chantiers Manseau Ltee. (which in 1939 became Marine Industries Ltd. ('Marine'), who converted her to a tanker of 1752 tons. In 1940, was renamed Willowbranch & in 1940 became owned by Branch Lines Ltd., a subsidiary of Marine. Requisitioned in WW2, she served the British Admiralty under charter to Coastal Tankers Ltd. In 1945 was renamed Empire Tadpole. What a wonderful name! Sold in 1947 to Basinghall Shipping Co. Ltd., of London, (P. Bauer manager?) & renamed Basingcreek. Continued to be used on the coasts of U.K. In 1950, was sold to St. Lawrence Drydocks Ltd., of Montreal but soon was transferred to Coastalake Tankers Ltd. (which in 1965 became Canadian Sealakers Ltd.), of Ottawa, an affiliated firm. Renamed Coastal Creek. Operated for Petrofina Canada Ltd. & B.P. Oil Ltd. but ownership unchanged. Sold in Jul. 1968 to Hall Corporation of Canada Ltd., & in Aug. 1968 renamed Creek Transport. Laid up in 1969 at Montreal. In 1972 sold to 'McNamara Corp et al' of Sorel, Quebec, & renamed Ile de Montreal. Broken up at Montmagny, Quebec, in 1976. The data via 3 is often a little different than the splendid & most detailed account at 1 (thanks!). Can you add anything?

24 Signe
2095 tons
Hull 258

Quernstad
Halse
1910

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data Halse), 2 & 3 (Norwegian pages, Halse & Quernstad), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Halse), 5 (image, Halse), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 88.4 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 290 ft., speed of 9 knots. Built for 'A/S Signe', owned (or maybe managed) by M. S. Pedersen of Tønsberg, Norway. In 1915, the vessel was sold to Grefstad & Herlofsens Dampskibsselskap A/S, of Arendal, Norway, & renamed Quernstad (2 suggests possibly named Quærnstad). And in 1916 sold again (or transferred), to 'Grefstad Rederi', owned or managed by Bendix J. Grefstad, also of Arendal. In 1917 sold to P. Dedekam, of Arendal. In 1921, it was sold again, to Jørgen Ø. Bugge, of Mandal, Norway, & renamed Halse. Just 2 WW2 convoy references, in Feb 1940 to Liverpool ex Bergen with wood pulp. And a return to Norway in Mar. 1940. The vessel came under German control, (presumably soon thereafter?), but have read no detail. Returned to its Norwegian owners, at Kiel, Germany, in May 1945. On Apl. 15, 1954, the vessel arrived at Blyth, to be broken up. Is there anything that you can add?

25 Redesmere
2123 tons
Hull 266

124298
1911

A cargo ship that was launched on Sep. 7, 1911 & completed in Oct. 1911. Per 1 (Sep. 1911 launch), 2 ('wrecksite.eu', loss of Redesmere & names of 18 of the 19 who were lost), 3 (data re Watson/Bromport, image Redesmere, ex 'Ships That Came to Manchester' by Nick Robins), 4 (UB-40) & 5 (Hans Howaldt, her commander), 6 (sinking detail, letter R, low on page), 7 (detail of sinking, thanks 'Tymeric'), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 290.0 ft. long (88.4 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 9 or 10 knots, 226 or 266 HP engines (which is correct?) by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd. of Sunderland, signal letters? Redesmere was built for Watson Steamship Co. Ltd. ('WatsonCo'), of Manchester, intended for the carriage of grain to Manchester from the Black Sea & the Danube. Watson Herbert & Co., also of Manchester, were the vessel's managers. The vessel was requisitioned for service as a WW1 Collier transport on Aug. 28, 1914. In Dec. 1916, William H. (Hesketh) Lever (1851/1925), of Lever Brothers fame, bought WatsonCo, renamed it Bromport Steamship Co. Ltd. ('Bromport'), & repurposed it to import palm oil from West Africa to Port Sunlight, at Wirral, Cheshire - the origins of Lever's much later Palm Line. Harold R. Greenhalgh of Liverpool became the ship's manager. Please note that I have also read that William Lever rather purchased WatsonCo's 8 ships & then formed Bromport. On Oct. 28, 1917, the vessel was en route from Barry, Wales, to Southampton with a cargo of 3600 tons of coal. D. Jackson was in command, John Lee was her first officer. The vessel was hit just aft of the engine room by a torpedo fired by German submarine UB-40, Kapitänleutnant Hans Howaldt in command, & sank when 6 miles WSW of St. Catherine's Point, S. coast of the Isle of Wight. At 50.29.56N/01.21.27W. Hans Howaldt, a decorated officer, was responsible for the sinking of 55 allied ships & damaging 10 more during WW1 when in command of UB-40. UB-40 itself sank a total of 99 ships & damaged 15 more during its complete career. The vessel was hit at 4 a.m. There was, I read, a massive explosion & the vessel is said to have sunk within 1 or maybe 2 minutes. There were 25 aboard the vessel & 19 of them were lost. The survivors, blown into the water by the force of the explosion, clung to wreckage & an upturned boat, were picked up by Naval vessel P18 after five hours & landed at Portsmouth. The vessel's remains may have been located on the Channel seabed. James Smith has kindly provided this 'pdf' study of Redesmere's history, including its WW1 service. The webmaster likes to check original documentation re vessels that are detail listed on site. He has, alas, not been able to read any edition of Lloyd's Register that lists Redesmere. Is there anything that you can add? Another image? #1932

26 Walter Dammeyer
882 tons
Hull 262

131222

Polzeath
Margretha
Teane
1911

A cargo ship, schooner rigged. Per 1 (launch etc. data, Walter Dammeyer, ex Marine Engineer, 1911, ex 'archive.org'), 2 (5 page Wreck Report, Teane, 'pdf' available), 3 ('wrecksite.eu', loss of Teane), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 62.5 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 205 ft., speed of 9 knots. At her official trials however, on Mar. 11, 1911, she attained a mean speed of 10 1/2 knots & that is her speed as stated in the official wreck report. Built for 'The Lynn and Hamburg Steamship Co. Ltd.' ('Lynn'), a single ship company, of King's Lynn, Norfolk, Hermann Dammeyer ('Dammeyer') being the majority owner. Some Google 'snippets' seem to indicate that Dammeyer, while naturalised, considered himself to be German, & once WW1 was declared, the right to register the vessel in England was challenged. As a result the vessel was requisitioned by the Admiralty for WW1 service, possibly without compensation. And was renamed Polzeath. Can anybody tell us about the related legal cases? Have not read about her WW1 service. In 1922, the vessel was sold (by whom?) to P. H. Schmidt & Co., of Hamburg, Germany, (H. H. Schmidt the manager) & renamed Margretha. On Dec. 31, 1926, the vessel was sold for the last time, for £8,250, to John Fowler, of the firm of Turner, Edwards and Company, of Bristol, & renamed Teane. Registered at Bristol. In Jan. 1928, the vessel was under charter to D. M. Stevenson and Company, for the carriage of coal from Swansea, Wales, to Oporto, Portugal. On Jan. 25, 1928, the vessel left Swansea with a cargo of almost 1000 tons of coal, bound for Oporto. A. F. Newbury was her Captain, with a crew of 12 all told. The vessel is reported to have passed Lundy Island (12 miles N. of the Devon coast in the Bristol Channel), on Jan. 25, 1928 & was never heard from again. Presumably all of the crew was lost & the exact date & where the vessel foundered is not known. Teane would have encountered exceptionally heavy weather in the English Channel/Bay of Biscay on & after Jan. 27, 1928. The Court was unable to state definitely the cause of her loss, but it was likely due to i) exceptionally heavy weather and/or ii) the shifting of the cargo as a result of inadequate trimming of the cargo. Can you add anything? An image?

27 Easton
1757 tons
Hull 270

132069
1912

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data), 2 (5 images), 3 (Lloyd's Register data, 1930/31 thru 1945/46, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org', image soon at left), 4 (Lloyd's Registers, 1930/31 thru 1945/46, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 76.2 metres (250.0 ft.) long perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters VCNK. Almost all of the following references are Canadian. Owned from 1912 to 1933 by Mathews Steamship Co. Ltd. of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, A. E. Mathews the manager, registered at Toronto but initially where built at Sunderland. In 1934, the vessel was sold or transferred to Colonial Steamships Limited, R. Scott Misener the manager, of Toronto. who owned the vessel from 1934 to 1951. From 1941 to 1947, the vessel was, I have read, requisitioned for war use. From 1951, the vessel was owned by Iron Ore Transportation Co. Ltd., of Montreal, & from 1955, by Quebec, Labrador and North Shore Railway Co., Ltd., of Montreal, Quebec. The vessel was scrapped in the 3rd quarter of 1961 at Century Metals & Equipment Co., of Lachine Canal, Montreal. Anything you can add?

28 Tiara
4068 (later 4129) tons
Hull 275

133529

Camboinhas
1913

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Camboinhas), 2 (page in Portuguese, modest images of vessel aground. Google translated here), 3 & 4 (images aground), 5 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, 1930/31 to 1932/33, Tiara), 6 (Lloyd's Register data, 1932/33 to 1945/46, Camboinhas, 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 7 (Portuguese page re Camboinhas grounding, with images, Google translated here), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 364 ft. 0 in. long (110.95 metres) but I cannot tell you if that is overall or perpendicular to perpendicular but I suspect the latter, speed of 9 knots, signal letters JBVS later PUNA. Built for Hall Brothers Steamship Company Limited, of Newcastle, with Hall Brothers the managers. The vessel was sold, in 1933, to 'Companhia de Cabotagem de Pernambuco', of Pernambuco, Brazil, & renamed Camboinhas. And sold again, in 1946, to 'Companhia de Navigação Pan-Americana', also of Pernambuco. Later, certainly in 1957/58, the vessel was recorded as being of 4129 tons gross. On May 29, 1958, loaded with a cargo of steel ex Argentina, the vessel broke, in high winds, the tow of Falcon, (Falcão), a tug, assisting after Camboinhas suffered an engine failure when S. of Rio de Janeiro. Camboinhas was driven onto the beach at 'Itaipu Beach', (now Camboinhas Beach), Niterói, Brazil, just E. of Rio de Janeiro. At 22.57.66S/43.03.68W. A Brazilian Navy corvette named Angostura (V20), was sent to help but it also went aground. The site became a giant local tourist attraction & folks climbed up the side & all over the stranded Camboinhas - not Angostura however - that was off limits being a Navy vessel. Trident, (Tridente), Triunfo & Comandante Doral, all of them tugs, were sent also as was Borocacha, a steam cargo ship sent by the vessel's owners to lend assistance. Trident ended up ashore as did, if briefly, Borocacha. When the weather improved, a dredge was sent to the scene - Trident & Angostura  were successfully pulled off but nothing could be done for Camboinhas which had been massively damaged by the pounding waves & was high & dry on the beach. The cargo was recovered & the vessel was broken up in situ. The backbone of the ship is still visible at low tide today, I learn. There was no loss of life. Can anybody provide a better translation of the detail in Portuguese at 2 - it would seem that many vessels were involved & three of the 'rescuers' ended up, temporarily at least, on the beach. Much of the above detail is thanks to Felipe Ferreira, a shipping agent of nearby Piratininga. Felipe indicates further that two other vessels also participated in the operations - namely Imperial Marinheiro (V15) & Solimões (V24), respectively a frigate & a corvette of the Brazilian Navy. You can read Felipe's words here. Can you add anything else?

29   W. H. Dwyer
1770 tons
Hull 277

132073
1913

A 'canaller', i.e. a freighter of a size built to be able to operate in the St. Lawrence River, Canada, lock system of its time. Per 1 (canallers), 2 (dive page), 3 (Word file) 4 (26 August 1917), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 250 feet long, crew of 22 (at least on final voyage). Built for Forwarders Ltd. of Sunderland, W. H. Dwyer, the agent & possibly the owner? But presumably was requisitioned for WW1 service. On Aug. 26, 1917, while in ballast and en route from Rouen, France, to Newport (Wales, I presume), defensively armed, it was torpedoed without warning and sunk by U-38 15 miles from Berry Head, near Torbay, Devon, U.K. Sank in 10 minutes. No loss of life. Was then owned by Forwarders Ltd. A dive site today - in 55 metres of water in Lyme Bay. Can you help any, perhaps with early ownership data & an image. Link 2 has images of similar vessels.

30 Koolonga
4260 tons
Hull 280

132450

Iron Monarch
Paz
Hatsu Maru
 
1914

A cargo ship, an iron ore carrier perhaps. From 1 ('Flotilla-Australia', extensive data), 2 (80% down, #8, most informative, & #7 also), 3, 4 & 5 (all Koolonga images), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 364 ft. (110.9 metres) long, single screw. Built for McIlwraith McEacharn Limited, (or McIlwraith, McEacharn Line Pty. Ltd.), of Sydney, New South Wales ('NSW'), Australia (or maybe of Melbourne). The vessel was requisitioned by the Royal Australian Navy on Aug. 6, 1914, for service as a collier, & in May 1915 was returned to its owners. I do not find the next period in the vessel's ownership history to be very clear. Either a) the vessel was sold on Nov. 22, 1917 to William Scott Fell ('Fell'), of Newcastle, NSW, (joint ownership with BHP?), of Sydney - Miramar states 'Scott Fell & Co.' Or b) in late 1919 the vessel was purchased by Fell with financing by BHP Ltd., which I believe means 'Broken Hill Proprietary Ltd.' ('BHP'). However 'Flotilla-Australia' indicate specifically (thanks!) that in Oct. 1917, the vessel was purchased as to 11/64 by Scott Fell & Co. & as to 53/64 by BHP. Note that the BHP holding was in the nominee name of Edward Simpson, a Sydney solicitor representing BHP. On Jul. 30, 1918 (have also read 1917) the vessel was renamed Iron Monarch. 'Fell & Simpson' or maybe Wm. Scott Fell (data differs) would seem to be the recorded owners in Lloyd's Register of 1920. The vessel was transferred in 1923 to 'Interstate Steamships Ltd.' ('Interstate'), a company set up by Fell. Did 'BHP and/or Simpson' continue to have their prior major interest in the vessel via Interstate, I wonder? Can anybody tell us? On Jul. 7, 1933, the vessel ran into a breakwater at Port Kembla, NSW, during a 100 mph squall. It was towed free by Newcastle tugs Rollicker & St. Giles. On Aug. 8, 1933, the vessel ran onto 'Nobby's Breakwater' (Newcastle, NSW) when its steering jammed. The vessel was towed free by Newcastle tug Heros. On Oct. 23, 1934, the vessel ran aground 'in dense fog at Cape Three Point, Broken Bay. The vessel quickly freed itself; damage £1,763; Captain T. J. Wilson, found guilty at inquiry of 'poor navigation', & had his licence suspended for 3 months'. On Nov. 26, 1934,' the vessel 'ran aground approaching Newcastle Steelworks (on 'Stockton rock breakwater') when loaded with 6,600 tons of iron ore from Whyalla, South Australia. Almost half the load had to be dumped; vessel seriously damaged; temporary repairs were effected; repaired at Cockatoo Dock, Sydney, NSW, at cost of £8,985. In 1937, Interstate was restyled as 'Interstate Steamships Pty Ltd.' The vessel was sold, in 1937, to 'Madrigal & Co.', of Philippines, & renamed Paz. In Mar. 1942, the vessel was scuttled at Sourabaya Harbour, Java, was salvaged by Japanese forces & became Hatsu Maru owned by the Government of Japan. The vessel was bombed by U.S. carrier based aircraft at Manila Bay, Philippines, on Nov. 13, 1944 & was sunk. Can you add anything?

31 Veendijk
6874 tons
Hull 279
1914

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data & image, Veendyk, 70% down), 2 (U.S. Naval Historical Centre, Veendijk, image), 3 (Holland America, Veendijk), 4 (detail of WW1 service), 5 (6 images), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 129.5 (or 133.35) metres (434 ft.) long, speed of 10 (or 12) knots. Built for 'Nederlandsch-Amerikaansche Stoomvaart Maatschappij' (Holland America Line). In 1918, the vessel was seized by the U.S. Government, refitted & commissioned as USS Veendijk (ID # 2515), for the Naval Overseas Transportation Service. Complement of 70. Two guns, one 5 in. & one 3 in. Completed 3 round trip voyages to France (Brest & St. Nazaire) before Armistice on Nov. 11, 1918. And later voyages to each of France & Montevideo, Uraguay (and/or Buenos Aires, Argentina). Was de-commissioned in Aug. 1919, & then returned to Holland America Line. On Jan. 19, 1933, the vessel arrived at 'N.V. Frank Rijsdijk's Industriële Ondernemingen.', at Hendrik Ido Ambacht, a town in the Western Netherlands, to be broken up. Broken up in Q2 of 1933. Can you translate the Dutch text at 1 re J. & C. Harrison. It maybe was initially ordered for them as Harlingen? Can you add anything? Or correct the above text?

32 HMS Mantis
645 tons
Hull 294
1915

An 'Insect Class' gunboat. Per 1 (data & image 20% down), 2 (1939 fine image), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Originally intended to be transported overland in sections & re-assembled on the Danube, to fight the Austro-Hungarian Danube flotilla. To conceal their objective, they were ordered as river gunboats for the Chinese rivers - hence their name of 'China Gunboats.' HMS Mantis served, I read, in the Persian Gulf in 1916, on the Tigris River. After WWI, HMS Mantis was sent to West River, Hong Kong. Sold in Shanghai, China, Jan. 20, 1940. Can you improve or expand the above?

33 X-57
130 (or 186) tons
Hull 299

Fence
Peter P.
J. J. Prior
1915

A landing craft, later a barge. Per 1 & 2 ('riverseainternational.co.uk', data, X-57, about 25% down & 7 images), 3 (data, John Dunford ref., you must register to see images), 4 ('Prior' family & business history), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 105.5 ft. long, powered by a 'Skandia', 2 cyl. oil engine. I have read little about this modest vessel but thank 'riverseainternational' for providing what little data we have. The vessel was built for the Royal Navy as a landing craft. One of many such vessels built for the Gallipoli campaign, Sunderland Shipbuilders alone built 15 of them. In 1920, it was sold to 'Renwick, Wilton & Co. Ltd.', coal merchants & ship owners, of Dartmouth & Torquay. Miramar advise us that at a later date the engines were removed but were re-installed in 1938, in which year the vessel was sold to J. J. Prior (Transport) Ltd. ('Prior'), of London & renamed Fence. Was re-engined, with a 2 cyl. 'Skandia' (is that correct, i.e. as initially engined? Possibly rather with a Kelvin T8 engine?) & lengthened a little to 110 ft. I believe that Prior had concrete ready-mix facilities in the E. end of London & that the vessel was likely used as a motor barge to transport sand & gravel from the Colchester area up to London - have read the vessel termed a 'sand carrier'. Was renamed Peter P. in 1964 & was rebuilt. In 1998, the vessel was renamed J. J. Prior. And laid up on the Medway for possible preservation. In 1998 (or per 3 in 1999), the vessel was sold, it would seem to John Dunford, who planned to install an Iveco 8610 engine. In Jul. 2010, the vessel is moored up on the River Roding/Barking Creek, in Barking. Possibly used as a houseboat. Can you add anything?

34 HMS Moth
645 tons
Hull 295

HIJMS Suma
1916

An 'Insect Class' Large China gunboat (see text above re HMS Mantis). Per 1 (3 images about 2/3 down page), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 72.4 metres long, crew of 53, speed of 14 knots, her armament in 1916 was 2 x 6 inch -  2 x 12 pdr & 6 machine guns (Maxim type). HMS Moth was, I read, towed to the Persian Gulf in 1916 for service in the WW1 Mesopotamian Campaign on the Euphrates & Tigris rivers. It later returned to U.K. & was towed to Hong Kong in 1920. The vessel joined the Far East Fleet in Dec. 1941 & suffered bomb damage & was scuttled at Hong Kong, on Dec. 12, 1941. The vessel was raised by the Japanese & re-commissioned in 1942 as HIJMS Suma, a Japanese gunboat. The vessel was sunk by a mine in the Yangtze River, near Nanking, China, on Mar. 19, 1945. Anything you can add?

35 Abereden
5536 (or 4372 or 5516)  tons
Hull 292

139801
507

Afghanistan
Lucrino
1917

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data, Afghanistan, about 70% down), 2 (ref. to Lucrino, '26.– 29.8.1944 Mittelmeer', almost at bottom), 3 (WW2 convoy duty, Lucrino), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 117.3 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 385 ft., speed of 10 knots. Built for Adam Steamship Co. Ltd., of Aberdeen, Scotland. In 1918, the vessel was sold to Hindustan Steam Shipping Co. Ltd., the main ship-owning arm of Common Brothers, of Newcastle, & renamed Afghanistan. (possibly however only renamed in 1919). The vessel was sold, in 1938, to 'Achille Lauro', of Naples, Italy, & renamed Lucrino. The vessel came under Allied control after the surrender of Italy in Sep. 1943. 8 WW2 convoy references, all in the western Mediterranean (Algiers, Tunis, also Naples, Brindisi & other Italian ports). On Aug. 29, 1944, while en route (I think) from Bizerta (Tunisia) to San Antioco (Sardinia), via Cagliari (also Sardinia), the vessel hit a mine in Cagliari Roads, S. of Cagliari, & was beached. 'Am 29.8. wird die ital. Lucrino (5536 BRT) südlich von Cagliari (Korsika) durch Minentreffer beschädigt.', which translates, roughly, as: 'on Aug. 29, the Italian vessel Lucrino... hit a mine(s) south of Cagliari (Corsica)'. I read that the vessel was re-floated in 1946, repaired & converted to a motorship or motor vessel (i.e. burned oil rather than coal). It later, in Nov. 1960, arrived at Fiumicino, near Rome, Italy, to be broken up. Can anyone tell us i) exactly where she was beached, ii) why the reference to Corsica, iii) what happened to increase her gross tonnage. Anything to add?

36 Cairnmona
4666 tons
Hull 313

140707
1918

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per 1 [Cairn Line, Cairnmona (2)], 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Cairnmona), 3 (sinking data & image), 4 & 5 (Czarina rescue), 6 (River Lossie, 65% down), 7 (Englishman tow, 'Monday, 30 October'), 8 (1918 damage), 9 (Miramar, River Lossie, link, you now must be registered to access), 10 (Miramar, Cairnmona, link, you now must be registered to access). 390.2 ft. (about 125 metres) long, speed of 12 knots. Built for Cairn Line of Steamships Limited, (Cairns, Noble & Co. Ltd., the managers), of Newcastle. On Jun. 15, 1918, vessel was damaged when hit by a torpedo fired by UC 40, 3-4 miles E of Coquet Islands (off Amble, Northumberland). A most famous rescue in 1923. On Dec. 28, 1923, Cairnmona rescued 8 crew members of Czarina, a barquentine of St. John's Newfoundland, in the N. Atlantic. Czarina lost her sails & spars overboard & her sole lifeboat was smashed in a hurricane force gale. A Cairnmona lifeboat was launched & rescued the entire Czarina crew. The rescue was chosen by the 'Shipwrecked Fishermen and Mariners Royal Benevolent Society' as the most outstanding rescue by a British ship during the year 1923. 5 prestigious Sea Gallantry medals in silver were awarded re the rescue - to Chief Officer John T. (Thompson) Baker, in charge of the Cairnmona lifeboat & to each of the crew of 4 (Edmund Smith, a carpenter, & Robert Inglis, Daniel Gimblett (or maybe Gimlet) & William Stewart, all able seamen). A single convoy ref. during WW2, the voyage on which she was sunk. On Oct. 17, 1939 Cairnmona left Halifax, Canada, under the command of Frederick W. (Wilkinson) Fairley, in convoy HX.5, with Leith & Newcastle her destination, with i) a cargo of wheat or ii) maybe with a general cargo, including wool, copper & grain, (but read words below re copper), ex Montreal. Dispersed from the convoy, she was hit, on Oct. 30, 1939, by torpedoes fired by U-13, Korvettenkapitän Karl Daublebsky von Eichhain in command, & rolled over in flames and quickly sank. At 57.38N/1.45W, 3 miles NE of Rattray Head, NE tip of Scotland. 3 lives (all firemen) were lost. 42 survivors (including the Master) were picked up by River Lossie, a 202 ton Aberdeen trawler (which later, in 1940, was requisitioned for WW2 service as an auxiliary patrol vessel), & possibly by the nearby Peterhead lifeboat. It is difficult, even reading many WWW pages, to learn the complete & accurate story & quite impossible to do so reading a single page. 7, a site of some authority, states that Cairnmona was hit E. of the Orkneys, taken in tow by tug Englishman & sank, still in tow, on Oct. 30, 1939 - a very different version of the day's events. But ... Alan Fairley, son of Captain Fairley, advises me (thanks!) that Cairnmona was not taken in tow. Per his father's Captain's report, the vessel sank by the head about 1/4 hour after the survivors had left the ship in 2 lifeboats. Alan adds that in 1953 he observed a salvage vessel recovering copper from the sunken ship. Can you add to or correct this listing? Or provide another image?

37 Cairnvalona
4929 tons
Hull 314

140718
1918

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per 1 (Cairn Line), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Cairnvalona), 2 (ON-176), 3 (Clover ref., page bottom), 4 (page bottom, Beverley), 5 (24.10.1940 near bottom), 6 (1932 image Cairnvalona, but you must be registered to access it), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 430 ft. (about 132 metres) long, speed of 12 knots. Accommodation for 10 passengers. Built for Cairn Line of Steamships Limited, (Cairns, Noble & Co. Ltd., the managers), of Newcastle. 130 convoy ref. during WW2. Service included at least 24 voyages across N Atlantic & many U.K. coastal voyages. On Oct. 24, 1940, in the North Sea, was damaged by an air torpedo. Would not seem to have been in a convoy at the time. During one of the N Atlantic voyages, ON-176 (Liverpool to New York), vessel collided on Apl. 9, 1943 with Destroyer HMS Beverley (H 64), one of the many escort ships, S of Greenland or SW of Iceland. Beverley was considerably damaged, damage which included putting her anti-submarine gear out of commission. 30 hours later, on Apl. 11, 1943, Beverley was sunk by 3 torpedoes fired by U-188, with only 4 survivors of the crew of 155. 4 however, says 139 were lost. I read that Clover, also an escort vessel, fired  depth-charges towards U-188, & by accident the charges hit the already sinking Beverley & her crew in the water. '1952 scrapped after 180 round voyages to Canada.' Sold to British Iron & Steel Corp. for that purpose. On Jun. 30, 1952, arrived at the Clayton & Davie Ltd. facilities at Dunston (Gateshead, Tyne & Wear) to be broken up. Very few WWW ref., in fact, to Cairnvalona, other than WW2 references. Can you add to or correct this listing? Or provide another image?

38 War Thrush
5513 (or 5314) tons
Hull 327

141914

Goalpara
1919

A cargo ship. Per 1 [British India, Goalpara (2)], 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Goalpara), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 121.9 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 412 ft. 6 in., speed of 10 or 10 1/2 knots. The vessel was laid down as War Thrush, for the Shipping Controller, the second vessel of the name. But delivered as Goalpara to 'British India Steam Navigation Co. Ltd.', of London. Goalpara? A town located on the Brahmaputra river in Assam, India. I have read nothing about her service. She maybe was engaged in trade to & from India? Just 4 WW2 convoy references, all of which, I think, were in or into the Mediterranean. I presume that there were independent voyages also, recorded at 'convoyweb.org', but I am alas denied access to such data re any vessel. On Apl. 6 & 7, 1941, the port of Piraeus, Greece, was attacked by German aircraft. Clan Fraser was hit in the attack. On Apl. 7, 1941, her cargo of TNT exploded causing massive damage to the port & to shipping. Goalpara was damaged in the explosion. On Apl. 15, 1941, the vessel was hit by bombs dropped by German Junkers Ju 88 aircraft, when at Eleusis Bay, Piraeus. The vessel caught fire, was beached & abandoned. All 74 aboard survived. Or perhaps the vessel was rather sunk or later sank. Since I read that in 1945, the vessel was 'raised' & broken up at Skaramanga, presumably at the ship breaking facilities of Hellenic Shipyards Company. Quiloa was also severely damaged in a similar attack & was beached. Can you correct the above and/or add more?

39 Cairnross
5494 tons
Hull 322

145449
1921

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Cairn Line), 2, 3, 4 (all diving/wreck related), 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 (Mackay), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). I have read, the first British cargo ship to be fitted with steam turbines. 425 ft. long. Built for Cairn Line of Steamships Limited, (Cairns, Noble & Co. Ltd., the managers), of Newcastle. Many dive sites (thanks) but little data! Confusion over the name of the shipbuilder. May have been in collision with Olna in 1931. Struck a mine laid by U-30 & sank Jan. 17, 1940, in Liverpool Bay, while en route from Liverpool to St. John's, Newfoundland (I think that is correct, data is again confused), carrying coal & small amount of general cargo. A part of Convoy OB.74, Laurence Halcrow the Master. 2 says 48 lives lost but that reference seems to be in error. 5 says none lost while 7 says 'The master and 47 crewmembers were picked up by HMS Mackay & landed at Liverpool'. A dive site today. Have tried elsewhere on WWW, without success, to identify the first British steam turbine cargo ship. Have accepted 1921 for now. Can you add to or correct this listing? Or provide another image?

40 Zenon
5390 (or 5293 or 5431) tons
Hull 323

171464

Arica
1921

A cargo ship. Per 1 (extensive data, 'u-boat.net', Arica), 2 (U-160), 3 (CGT Line, Arica), 4 (d'Orbigny, in French), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Arica), 6 (Van Kinsbergen), 7 ('pdf', Van Kinsbergen/Arica, 3rd page), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 129.5 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 425 ft., speed of 12 or 13 knots. Built for La Compagnie Anonyme de Navigation d'Orbigny, of La Rochelle, & also of Paris, France. Sister to Alaska. Bare-boat chartered to CGT to 'operate beside Alaska'. In 1934, the vessel was sold to Compagnie Générale Transatlantique, ('CGT'), of Paris, France, & renamed Arica. I am advised that the vessel had 5 N. Atlantic crossings during WW2, & convoy service both U.K. coastal & continental. Was active in the Caribbean. In Jun. 1940, the vessel was taken over by the French Vichy Government. On May 30, 1941, per 1, the vessel left 'a French harbour in the Caribbean', for Dakar, West Africa, escorted by Barfleur, a Vichy armed merchant cruiser. On Jun. 1, 1941, then alone, the vessel was captured by Van Kinsbergen, a Dutch sloop. The French crew tried to scuttle the ship but were not successful in the attempt. This data does not conform with 7 which indicates that when captured, the vessel was en route from Marseilles to the West Indies & was captured 400 miles E. of Antigua. I think that link 7 is essentially correct. The vessel was turned over, on Jun. 4, 1941, to the British authorities at Port of Spain, Trinidad, & later transferred to the Ministry of War Transport (& managed by T. & J. Harrison). WW2 convoy duty hopefully later. Presumably must have crossed the N. Atlantic at least once. At 7:15 p.m. on Nov. 6, 1942, while in convoy TRIN-24 (8 ships) bound from Trinidad to Demerera (British Guyana now Guyana) with a general cargo & mail, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-160, 8 miles N. of Galera Point, Trinidad, & broke in two. At 10.58N, 60.52W. 12 lives were lost (11 crew & a gunner). 55 others, including Captain B. Worthington & 7 gunners were picked up by anti-submarine trawler HMS Lady Elsa (FY-124) one of the convoy escort vessels (the others were HMS Clarika & Artic Explorer) & landed at Port of Spain. Can you add to or correct this listing?

SUNDERLAND SHIPBUILDERS LIMITED

First a few images. Hover your mouse over each thumbnail to read the subject matter.

Can you help with the history of this shipbuilder?

It would seem that the company may have been the result of 'Doxford & Sunderland Ltd.' being taken over by Court Line in 1973 with the company being renamed, (on Mar. 5, 1973), 'Sunderland Shipbuilders Limited'. I underlined 'may have' because I have not yet read anything definitive about exactly what happened to all of the shipbuilding companies 'towards the end' and my knowledge is therefore most limited.

But..... John Bage has kindly advised that Sunderland Shipbuilders Limited, in 1975, were operating three shipyards: a) the Pallion Ship Factory which was a brand new 'covered-in facility' on the former Doxford Shipyard & next to the Doxford Engineworks, b) the Deptford Yard formerly owned by 'Sir James Laing and Sons Limited',  and c) the North Sands Yard formerly of 'Joseph L. Thompson & Sons, Ltd.'. We thank you, John!

It would seem that in 1986, Sunderland Shipbuilders Ltd. & Austin & Pickersgill Ltd. merged to form North East Shipbuilders Ltd.

a) Vessels built by Sunderland Shipbuilders Limited at the Pallion Yard that used to be owned by 'Doxford & Sunderland Ltd.'

Miramar lists (highest hull number on page). It used to be that you could click on the links that follow & get to the relevant Miramar page. But no longer! The new procedure must be to go to Miramar (here) & log in (you must be registered to view any page). And once you are logged in, return to this page & the following links should work for you:- 1017, 1023. (23)

1 Cedarbank
11282 tons
Hull 1001

7356551

Elly
Irene
Nini
1976

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Bank Line, Cedarbank (4)], 2 (7 images of vessel available), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 161.5 metres long overall, 152.5 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 17 knots, signal letters C6OR6. Built for Andrew Weir & Co. - 'Bank Line'. The vessel was launched on May 26, 1976, but was named rather earlier, on Apl. 9, 1976, witness the invitations of Lord & Lady Inverforth of 'The Bank Line Limited', re that naming ceremony & re a black tie dinner at Lumley Castle, later that day. Robert Snowdon, who worked on the ship, tells us what had happened. The ship was not ready to leave the dock. A day or two before the naming ceremony they had a rush to fit the forecastle in position. With no time to complete the welding, it was only tack welded - sticky tape was placed over the butts and seams then it was paint sprayed. The naming was carried out with the launch party none the wiser. On the next day the tape was removed & the welding continued. Thanks, Robert, for that interesting snippet of the vessel's history! The vessel was sold, on Feb. 28, 1983, to Harrier Maritime Inc., of Greece, 'Fafalios Ltd.' likely the managers, & renamed Elly. On Nov. 24, 1991, the vessel was sold again, to 'Sapphire Star Shipping & Trading S.A.', of Greece, & renamed Irene, managed by 'Aegeus Shipping S.A.', (D. G. Pateras), of Piraeus, Greece. On Feb. 09, 1997 the vessel was renamed Nini. Presumably sold at that time - Bahamas flag in would appear but I have not spotted the new owner's name. The vessel was broken up Alang, Gujarat, India, in Feb. 1999. I need your help & your data!

2 Firbank
11282 tons
Hull 1002

7356563

Sibonga
Firbank
Maraki
Agios Spyridon
1976

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Bank Line, Firbank (2)], 2 (1991 charter, Agios Spyridon), 3 (image, Agios Spyridon), 4 (ref. to Mariner Co. 30% down), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 161.53 metres long, speed of 17 knots. Built for Andrew Weir & Co. - 'Bank Line'. The vessel visited Auckland, New Zealand, on Dec. 23, 1976. In 1977, the vessel was renamed Sibonga, a name associated with The Philippines. It would seem that Sibonga rescued Vietnamese boat people & took them into Hongkong. The vessel was renamed Firbank again in 1979 or 1980. And was sold, in 1983, to 'Nemo Nav. Corp.', of Greece, (have also read 'Fafalios Shipping') & renamed Maraki. The vessel was sold again, in 1989, to 'Mariner Co. Ltd.', of Valletta, Malta, & renamed Agios Spyridon. It was chartered for use in the 1991 Persian Gulf war. The vessel arrived at Alang, Gujarat, India, on Apl. 20, 2000, to be broken up. Many gaps in the above data. Can you help with data or with images?

3 Riverbank
11281 (or 11403) tons
Hull 1004

7356587

Indiana
Manhattan
Maritsa Pateras
Saint John
Fratzis M.
1977

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Bank Line, Riverbank (2)], 2 (image Riverbank, but you must be registered to access it), 3 (image Riverbank), 4 (salvage of Fratzis M.), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 161.5 metres long overall, 152.5 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 17 knots. Built for Bank Line Limited, Andrew Weir & Co., i.e. 'Bank Line'. In 1983, the vessel was sold to Dartmoor Shipping Corp., of Liberia, & renamed Indiana. The vessel was renamed Manhattan in 1985. And renamed Maritsa Pateras in 1987. I presume that the vessel was sold on both of those occasions, but I have not been able to spot the purchaser names. It was sold in 1988, for a price in the region of $3.5m, to 'Square Ltd.', of Greece, & renamed Saint John. The vessel was sold for the last time, in 1991, to 'Stratilatis Navigation Ltd.', of Limassol, Cyprus, 'Athinais Compania Maritima SA', the managers, & renamed Fratzis M. The vessel was at Kandla Port, Gulf of Kutch, Gujarat, India, when a tropical cyclone ('Kandla') hit the area on Jun. 9, 1998. I read that the official death toll was 1,000 but locals believed it was closer to 10,000, mostly illegal immigrant workers in the port itself & in shanty towns. 'The entire waterway along the Gulf of Kutch is crammed with shipwrecks 40 of them grounded and five of them sunk vessels that have turned the third largest port on the west coast into a maritime disaster zone.' The port itself was destroyed. At least 2 vessels ended up as total losses - Clipper Kawa, & Fratzis M. which was hit by the 2 or 3 metre storm surge, & collided with Clipper Kawa. Golden Harvest & Icl Jayam Kondan (or Jayama) suffered major damage. Fratzis M. grounded on mud flats opposite the oil jetty & became a constructive total loss. 'Hoosami Metal Industries Pvt. Ltd.' acquired the vessel 'as is' & spent 2 months in a salvage effort.  The re-floated vessel was towed (I presume) the 370 miles to nearby Alang, Gujarat, India, on Apl. 29, 1999, to be broken up. Many gaps in the above data. Can you help with data or with images?

4 Crestbank
11237/8 (or 12021 or 12238) tons
Hull 1007

7523922

Tamathai
Northman
Tamamima
Berga
Novanoor
1978

A cargo ship. Per 1 (ref.), 2 [Crestbank (2)], 3 (ref. 70% down & image at page bottom), 4 (fine 'Philip English' May 16, 2005 image as Tamamima & data), 5 (same image as link 5, I believe), 6 (image Novanoor, 2 others also at 'Shipsnostalgia', but you must be registered to access them), 7 (images, Novanoor & Tamamima), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 161.4 metres long, speed of 16 knots. Built for Andrew Weir & Co. - 'Bank Line'. On Apl. 18, 1986, she arrived at River Fal, Falmouth from Rotterdam & was laid up. While laid up, she was sold to Tamahine Shipping Co. ('Tamahine'), of London, was moved on Jul. 16, 1986 to No. 3 dry-dock at Falmouth & renamed Tamathai. In 1987, it would seem, vessel was repurchased by Bank Line from Tamahine & renamed Northman. In 1988, sold again to Tamahine & became Tamamima of Nassau, Bahamas, registry. (That 1987/1988 data is not however confirmed at 2. On Jul. 30, 1988, she again arrived at River Fal, Falmouth from Santander, Spain, where she had been dry-docked. In Oct. 2005, vessel was sold to Berga Investments S.A. (Regency Projects Ltd., of London, the managers) for demolition & in Nov. 2005 was renamed Berga (Panamanian flag). But registry was changed in Dec. 2005 to Kingston, St. Vincent & the Grenadines. On Jan. 19, 2006 she departed Falmouth for Ceuta, an autonomous city owned by Spain but located on the coast of North Africa. Now previously I had advised that she left to be scrapped in India, but that was not so, though stated at the time by her owners to avoid expensive repairs. At Ceuta, she was sold to Hussain Hiudas Khaifa & Salam J. A. Ali, of Dubai, United Arab Emirates, renamed Novanoor & registered at Freetown, Sierra Leone. 'Since then she has been in constant employment mainly loading 17,000 tons of bagged cement in Karachi for either Umm Qasr or Basrah.' In 2008, by July of that year, she had made 13 or 14 round trips from Karachi to Iraq with cement - to rebuild what the Americans blew up! We thank Tony Atkinson for a major part of the above data. And for his update - that on Feb. 20, 2010, Novanoor went to Pakistani ship breakers for a reported price of $2,086,671 ($349 per LDT of 5,979). Can you add anything additional?

5 Laganbank
11213 tons
Hull 1006

7422752

Amphion
1978

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Bank Line, Laganbank (3)], 2 (Bank Line history, 1st of many pages), 3 (image Laganbank, but you must be registered to access it), 4 (image, Amphion, but you must be registered to access it), 5 (image, Amphion), 6 (extensive 'doc' file, 1991 court case), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 161.5 metres long overall, 152.5 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 17 knots. Built for 'Bank Line, Limited', Andrew Weir & Co., i.e. 'Bank Line'. The vessel visited Auckland, New Zealand, 5 times between Mar. 3, 1978 & Feb. 18, 1979. In 1981, the vessel was sold to Burnham Shipping Corporation ('Burnham'), of Greece, (for a price, together with Nessbank, 'rumoured to be something above $18m'), & renamed Amphion. Likely registered at Monrovia, Liberia. On Oct. 19, 1988, the vessel, under charter to General Feeds Inc. ('General'), was at Huangpu, near Shanghai, China, to unload a cargo of fishmeal ex Peru. The smell of burning was reported at hatch #3, which contained 'anti-oxidant treated fishmeal'. A debate resulted as to how safely to remove the fishmeal & the result was an unloading delay (the ship left Huangpu only on Nov. 10, 1988) & considerable extra costs of discharge ($55,000). There was a resulting 1991 court case between General & Burnham, which found, it would seem, in favour of Burnham. On Jan. 27, 1994, a fire broke out aboard the vessel when anchored off Huangpu, resulting in considerable damage. Have read no detail. It must, however, have been extensive since, on Jul. 25, 1994, the vessel left Hong Kong for Haiphong, China, but arrived at Da Nang, Vietnam, prior to Nov. 1, 1994, to be broken up. Can you help with additional data or with images?

6 Dacebank
12214 tons
Hull 1011

7710836

Anna L.
Washington Star
Anna L.
Aris K.
Paradise
Bute
1979

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Bank Line, Dacebank), 2 (data, Dacebank, 10% down), 3 & 4 (extensive data & fine images, 4 images available), 5 (Washington Star, data & images), 6 (data, Dacebank, 80% down, & modest image above), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 161.8 metres long overall, 152.6 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 16 1/2 knots. Built, at the cost of U.S. $13.925 million, for Andrew Weir & Co./Bank Line, of London. But technically owned by RB Leasing Co. & then Royal Bank Leasing Ltd. ('Leasing'). In 1987, the vessel was sold by Leasing, for U.S. $3.8 million, to 'Navigator Maritime Inc.', 'Leond Maritime Inc.' ('Leond') the manager, both of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Anna L. The vessel was chartered to T. & J. Harrison, & later served the U.S. Government, supplying the Gulf forces. In 1991, the vessel was renamed Washington Star, when chartered to 'Blue Star Line', of U.K., though 5 indicates that they owned it, (would seem not), Leond still the manager. It reverted to Anna L. in 1994, & was sold to 'Erling Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Cyprus, Cypriot registered, with no change of name. During her years as Anna L., & probably before & after also, the vessel would seem to have traded quite all over the world. Many countries/continents are referenced. In 1997, the vessel was sold to 'Lorena Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Cyprus, & renamed Aris K. In 1999, the vessel was sold again, to 'Amalfi Shipping Co. Ltd.', also of Cyprus, & renamed Paradise. In 2001, the vessel was sold to 'Beijing Star Enterprises Ltd.', of Hong Kong, 'Univan Ship Management Ltd.' the managers, & renamed Bute. In 2002, the vessel was sold for scrap for U.S. $157.00 per ldt or U.S. $1.02 million. On Oct. 7, 2002, (beached Oct. 12) the vessel arrived at the 'Marine Lines (Ship Breakers) Ltd.' facilities at Alang, Gujarat, India, to be broken up. Can you correct the above or add anything?

7 Pikebank
12214 tons
Hull 1009

7710824

Westman
1979

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Bank Line, Pikebank), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 161.8 metres long overall, 152.6 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 16 1/2 knots. Built for 'Bank Line, Limited', Andrew Weir & Co., i.e. 'Bank Line'. In 1987, the vessel was sold to 'Lefkada Nav. Co.', of Cyprus, & renamed Westman. On Jan. 13, 2001, the vessel arrived at Alang, Gujarat, India, to be broken up. Need more data!

8 Tenchbank
12214 tons
Hull 1012

7710848

Als Strength
Tenchbank
Eastman
Tamathai
Clinton K.
Josemaria Escriva
M. P. Trader
Multi Trader
1979

A cargo ship, that had a great many names. Per 1 (Bank Line, Tenchbank), 2 (image, Eastman), 3 (image, Josemaria Escriva), 4 (German page, has images as Clinton K. & as M. P. Trader), 5 (image, Multi Trader), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 161.8 metres long overall, 152.6 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 16 1/2 knots, call letters P3ZM7. Built for 'Bank Line Limited', Andrew Weir & Company Ltd., i.e. 'Bank Line'. In 1986, the vessel was chartered for a 6 month period to 'Ahrenkiel Liner Services GmbH', of Hamburg, Germany, a joint venture between 'Messina' of South Africa & 'CF Ahrenkiel' of Hamburg, & for the duration of the charter the vessel was renamed Als Strength. The vessel's name reverted to Tenchbank later that same year. In 1987, or maybe in 1988, the vessel was sold to 'Starco Shipping Co.', owned by 'Lendoudis' perhaps, (have seen references to both names), of Athens, Greece, & renamed Eastman. In 1989, the vessel was sold to Tamahine Shipping, of Hong Kong, Seascot Shiptrading of U.K. possibly the managers, & renamed Tamathai. In 1995, the vessel was sold to 'McCrink', of Hong Kong, & renamed Clinton K. In 1997, the vessel was sold to 'Chung Wai Enterprises Ltd.', of Hong Kong, & renamed Josemaria Escriva. In 1998, the vessel was sold to 'Kormos Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Limassol, Cyprus, 'Cyprus Maritime Co. Ltd.' the managers, & renamed M. P. Trader. The vessel was, I read, detained in 1999 at Viana do Castelo, Portugal, & in 2000 at Annapolis, Maryland, U.S.A., but I have not read the reasons why. In 2000, the vessel was sold to Hedland Shipping Co. Ltd., of Cyprus, & renamed Multi Trader.  On Oct. 6, 2008, the vessel arrived at Alang, Gujarat, India, to be broken up. Many images, but very little good data. The above will surely need extensive correction. Much of it came from data 'snippets', so easy of misinterpretation. Need help!

9 Radnik
17832 tons
Hull 1023

8203476

Grant Carrier
Chios Sailor
Elpida
Chios Voyager
Kai Shun
1984

A bulk carrier. Per 1 (image, Radnik, laid up at River Fal, Falmouth, on Aug. 16, 1993), 2 (image Chios Sailor), 3 & 4 (images Elpida), 5 (image Chios Voyager, click on image at right), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 188.2 metres long overall (617 ft.), 161.3 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 15 knots, but have also read 10.8 knots. Built for 'Jugoslavenska Oceanska Plovidba' ('Jugoslavenska'), owners & managers, of Bar, Montenegro. Was laid up, in the River Fal, Falmouth, for an extended period - 1993 thru 1995 perhaps? In 1996, the vessel was sold to 'Grant Carrier Ltd.', of Valletta, Malta, & renamed Grant Carrier. In 2001, the vessel was sold, for $3.1 million, to 'Chios Sailor Shipping and Trading S.A.', of Chios, Greece, 'Starmarine Management Inc.', of Athens, Greece, the managers, & renamed Chios Sailor. Some kind of accident in 2006, in a lock in the Great Lakes Seaway System, perhaps, as a result of which traffic had to be suspended for 22 hours to effect repairs. To the lock, or ship, or both? Have not read the detail. Can you provide? The vessel was sold, for $21 million, in 2007, to 'Elpida Venture S.A.', of Panama, 'Starmarine Management Inc.', of Athens, Greece, the managers, & renamed Elpida. It would appear that the vessel was sold again, in 2009 or 2010, to 'Chios Trader Shipping S.A.', 'Harbor Shipping & Trading S.A.', the managers,  & renamed Chios Voyager. That name is not, as this listing is created, recorded at Miramar. Tony Atkinson advises, however, (thanks Tony!) that Chios Voyager was sold in Feb. 2011 for $4,500,000 to Kaishun Shipping Ltd., (Kaili Shipping HK Ltd. of Hong Kong (China), the managers) & renamed Kai Shun under Panama flag. On Mar. 14, 2013 she arrived at Jingjiang Denfeng Shipbreakers of Jingjiang, Jiangsu, China, to be broken up. Can anybody advise what happened to Jugoslavenska. Need more detail!

b) Vessels built by Sunderland Shipbuilders Limited at the Deptford Yard that used to be owned by 'Sir James Laing and Sons Limited.'

Miramar lists (highest hull number). It used to be that you could click on the links that follow & get to the relevant Miramar page. But no longer! The new procedure must be to go to Miramar (here) & log in (you must be registered to view any page). And once you are logged in, return to this page & the following links should work for you:- 910, 867. (25, 58 all)

10 Craftsman
10220 (or 10200) tons
Hull 900

357405
7111743

Forum Craftsman
Regal Crusader
Christina J
1972

A heavy-lift refrigerated cargo ship. Per 1 (large 'pdf' file - p.28, image), 2 (at bottom), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 162 metres long, speed of 17 knots. Built for T. & J. Harrison Ltd. Equipped with two 250-ton Stulcken derricks. The vessel was sold to Greek interests (Compania Riva S.A.?) in 1981 & renamed Forum Craftsman. On Sep. 2, 1982, the vessel was towing Brighton from Monrovia (Liberia, West Africa) to Yugoslavia to be broken up, when Brighton broke its tow in heavy seas & was wrecked. At 6.30.24N/10.57.18W. Off the W. African coast, near Monrovia. The vessel was sold, in 1988, & renamed Regal Crusader. And sold again, in 1992, & renamed Christina J. The vessel arrived at Cebu, The Phillipines, on Aug. 18, 1994, to be broken up. 3 states 'Doxford contract built at Deptford Yard'. Can you add anything?

11 Birchbank
11452 tons
Hull 903

7329510

California
Santos III
Emma F.
Kota Alam
Libanus
1973

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Bank Line, Birchbank (2)], 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 161.5 metres long, speed of 17 knots. Built for Andrew Weir & Co. - Bank Line Limited. In 1981, sold to Larousse Shipping Corp., of Liberia, & renamed California. Sold in 1985 & renamed Santos III. Sold again in 1986 & renamed Emma F. In 1988, sold to Pacific International Lines, of Singapore, & renamed Kota Alam. And sold in 1993 & renamed Libanus. For three of those sales (1985, 1986 & 1993), I have not found the purchaser names referenced on the WWW. Vessel arrived at Chittagong, Bangladesh, on Apl. 15, 1998, to be broken up. 3 states 'Doxford contract built at Deptford Yard'. Can you add anything?

12 Beaverbank
11452 tons (7199 & 11045 tons in 1990/91)
Hull 904

363349
7341350

Sanjohn Bay
Sotiras
Apocalypsis
Sea Glister
Vigorous Swan
Lucky 25
1974

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Bank Line, Beaverbank (2)], 2 (1976 image as Beaverbank), 3 (Two 1977 visits to Auckland, New Zealand), 4 (image as Beaverbank), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 161.5 metres long, speed of 17 knots, signal letters 3EOH5. Built for Andrew Weir & Co. - 'Bank Line Ltd.' The vessel was sold, in 1981, to 'Comercial Litania', of Greece & renamed Sanjohn Bay. I presume that the vessel was later sold many times, each time the name changed as follows. 1985 renamed Sotiras. 1987 renamed Apocalypsis (or possibly Apo Calypsis). In 1988, the vessel became owned by 'Sea Glister Shipping S.A.', of Panama, 'Parakou Shipping Ltd.' the managers, & was renamed Sea Glister. In 1991, it was renamed Vigorous Swan & in 1998 was renamed Lucky 25. The breaking up of the vessel commenced on May 30, 1998, at Alang, Gujarat, India. WWW data is most limited. I need your help & your data!

13 Thetis
35561 (or 38080) tons
Hull 851

7341336

Theanoula
Palmier
Theano
Oceanways
1974

A 'Panamax' bulk carrier. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 228.1 metres long overall, 218.4 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed? Panamax? A term which relates to the vessel's size & resulting ability to fit within the lock chambers of the Panama Canal. Built for 'Neptune Maritime Co.' ('Neptune'), of Greece perhaps, but registered at Monrovia, Liberia. I saw a snippet reference to Neptune being 'c/o H. Dormond, of Corseaux-Vevey, Switzerland', which seems to indicate that Neptune might have been Swiss owned, but it would seem that 'Economou & Co. Ltd.', of London, were likely the ship's managers. In 1987, the vessel was sold & renamed Theanoula. And sold again in 1991 & renamed Palmier. Can you tell us the names of the purchasers re either of those sales? In 1993, the vessel was sold to 'Charisma Shipping Ltd.', of Malta, & renamed Theano. And in 1996, the vessel was sold for the last time, to 'Shipping and General Consultants S.A.', of Panama, & renamed Oceanways. The vessel arrived at Alang, Gujarat, India, on Aug. 30, 1996, to be broken up. WWW available data about this vessel is essentially non-existent. Even images! Can you add anything? Or correct the above as may be required.

14 Benhope
39087 tons
Hull 858

378117
7356630

China Progress
Atlanticway
Milos
1978

A bulk carrier, 'ore strengthened'. Can such a giant vessel have truly been built at Deptford? Per 1 [Ben Line, Benhope (2)], 2 (data, Milos), 3 (data, Atlanticway), 4 (2004 collision), 5 (fine image, Milos), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 228.12 metres long overall, 218.42 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 16 knots. Built for Ben Line - 'Sheaf Steam Shipping Co. Ltd.', (William Thomson & Co.), of Leith (Edinburgh), Scotland. Hong Kong flag. On Sep. 26, 1984, the vessel, fully loaded & en route from New Orleans to Aqaba, Jordan, grounded on a reef in the Red Sea (at 28.00.18N, but part location only) & was assisted by United Towing salvage tug Yorkshireman. The vessel was sold in 1989 to a Hong Kong buyer whose name eludes me, for approx. $10.6 million & renamed China Progress. Taiwan flag. That buyer might possibly have been 'Chinese Maritime Transport Ltd.', in fact of Taiwan, but my data was fragmentary & I may well have misinterpreted it. The vessel was sold again, in 1991, to 'Goldenmar Corp.' of Panama, with 'Ravenscroft Shipping Inc.' the managers. Renamed Atlanticway, Panama flag. But 'Fastwave Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Kingstown, Saint Vincent & Grenadines, may also relate in some way. And in 1999, the vessel was sold to 'Sea Gust Maritime Co. Ltd.', of Piraeus, Greece, with 'Polembros Shipping Ltd.' the managers, & renamed Milos. Which vessel had a couple of accidents. On Mar. 21, 2004 the vessel, while en route from Boca Grande, Venezuela, to Singapore with iron ore, was in collision with Aksoy Truva. 'Damage to either vessel was not serious and after repairs at Singapore they continued on their voyages.' On Aug. 27, 2006, Milos 'Sustained severe bow damage whilst berthing at Port Said following main engine failure.' The vessel was still operational when this listing was first created in May 2009. It would seem to have later arrived at Chittagong, Bangladesh - on Apl. 2, 2010 - to be broken up & break up commenced on Apl. 15, 2010 when the vessel was beached there. WWW data (other than images) is not very extensive, all said & done. Can you add to (or correct) anything? Note that a fine 2003 image of Milos, by photographer C. Plagué, used to be WWW available. But it is no longer so available. I should not provide such image here without permission (though a thumbnail is at bottom left). Does anybody have an e-mail address for the photographer that I might request his or her permission?

15 Ruddbank
12214 (or, after 1998, 12778 tons)
Hull 906

7710800

Romney
Lairg
Napier Star
Tamapatcharee
Lady Rebecca
Global Mariner
1979

A general purpose cargo ship, container adaptable. Per 1 (lots of data - Romney), 2 (info. Ruddbank), 3 (data & 3 images, from 50% down), 4 (image, Romney, but you must be registered to access it), 5 (Napier Star, images), 6 (data, Global Mariner), 7 ('pdf' accident report with images, including images of Global Mariner partially submerged), 8 (extensive 'doc' file, Global Mariner held responsible by Admiralty Court. Page #2), 9 (more about collision), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for 'Bank Line, Limited', Andrew Weir & Co., i.e. 'Bank Line'. 161.83 metres long overall, 152.6 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 530.94 ft., speed 15 1/2 (have also read 16 1/2 or 20) knots, complement of 25. All accommodation aft? Used on U.S.A./South Africa service. In 1979, the vessel was involved in the rescue of Vietnamese boat people. The vessel was sold, in Oct. 1983, to Lamport & Holts Ltd. & renamed Romney. The ship made several voyages to the Falkland Islands. In 1986, the vessel was 'transferred' to Highvale Ltd. (Lion Shipping Co. the managers?) & renamed Lairg. In 1989, the vessel was renamed Napier Star (Blue Star Ship Management, the new managers?). It was sold, in 1991, to Tamapatcharee Shipping Co., of Hong Kong (Andrew Weir the managers), & renamed Tamapatcharee. And sold again, in 1996 (or 1995), to South Asia Shipping Ltd., of Hong Kong, (John McRick & Co. Ltd., managers) & renamed Lady Rebecca. And sold again in Mar. 1998 to the International Transport Worker's Federation (Acomarit Services Maritime S/A., the managers), at a cost of approx. U.S. $3 million, modified for use as an exhibition ship 'for the Unions struggle against Flags of Convenience ships, and to highlight the well-being and basic rights of seafarers', & renamed Global Mariner. In a 20 month voyage, the ship 'visited 86 ports in 51 countries and attracted three quarters of a million visitors.' It would seem that ITF World Exp Ltd. became the registered owner, likely when in 2000, the vessel was bareboat chartered to Global Mariner Ltd. ('Northern Marine Management') as a 'working' British cadet training ship. On Aug. 2, 2000, the vessel collided with Atlantic Crusader, a Cypriot cargo ship, off the Sidor Terminal, Matanzas, Oronoco River, Venezuela, & sank. At 08.18N/062.50W. No loss of life on either ship (Global Mariner had crew of 32 plus pilots aboard). It would seem that Global Mariner (three pilots on board at the time of the accident and two tugs .. in attendance, one of which had a line on her), with a cargo of steel coils & other products, hit Atlantic Crusader which was a) moored at the time or b) perceived to be underway. Have read that Global Mariner was held responsible by the Admiralty Court. In 2001, the wreck was removed from the shipping lane, beached, & sold to Capt. Waldo Soto for scrap. There are a bushel of WWW references to Global Mariner, but relatively few images. Do I have it all correctly?

16 La Pampa
41934 (or 40796) tons
Hull 861

8010764

Samoa
Leopold LD
Ioannis
Ioannis 2
Brilliant Zhejiang
1982

A bulk carrier. Per 1 (data & image), 2 ('pdf' file, break-up data on p#39), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 230.0 metres long overall, 219.5 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 14 knots, described as a 'gearless panamax bulker'. Built for 'Buries Markes Ltd.' ('Buries'), of London, which company, established in 1930, was, in 1938 acquired by 'Société Anonyme Louis-Dreyfus et Compagnie' ('Dreyfus') of Paris & Dunkirk, France. The third fleet vessel of the name, it would appear. Buries was noted for the worldwide shipment of grain & also, earlier in time perhaps, of coal also. The vessel became Samoa in 1988, likely renamed by Buries, since in 1990 the vessel was transferred to Dreyfus & renamed Leopold LD. And sold again, in 1994, to 'Tekfund Ltd.', of Greece, & renamed Ioannis. In 1996, the vessel was sold to 'Camillo Shipping Ltd.', of Valetta, Malta, & was renamed Ioannis 2. In 2004, the vessel was sold to 'Zhejiang Ocean Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, eastern China, which company is maybe known as 'Zosco', & became Brilliant Zhejiang. Panama registered. The vessel was detained at Hong Kong, in 2004 for violations related to matters of ship safety, i.e. charts, lifejackets, lifeboats, fire fighting issues, etc. etc. The vessel was sold to Indian ship breakers for $500 per ton, & on Jan. 29, 2011, arrived at the Alang, India, ship breaking facilities of 'Leela Ship Recycling'. On Feb. 7, 2011 the vessel was beached there, presumably to start the actual break up. Most of the above data is from Google data 'snippets'. There seems to be very little quality data WWW available about Buries, Dreyfus, or La Pampa. Can you add anything? An image?

17   Hupeh
26239 tons
Hull 865

706814
8200266

Havsul
China Prospect
Huawanghai
SJN Orcas
Nadia
Chios Unity
Capetan Minas
Good Hope
Infinite Hope
Infinite
1984

A bulk carrier, especially strengthened for heavy cargoes. Per 1 & 2 (images & data Hupeh), 3 & 4 (images & data China Prospect), 5 (construction image), 6 (informative Norwegian page, Item 81), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 182.84 metres long, signal letters VRBY. Can anyone correct the following as may be required. Built for 'Taikoo Navigation Co. Ltd.', of Hong Kong. Sold Jun. 1990 to 'KS Havsul' of Oslo, Norway, & became Havsul. Sold in 1995 to 'China Prospect Inc.', of Panama, & became China Prospect. Sold in 2002 to 'Huawang Maritime SA', of Panama & renamed Huawanghai. In Jan. 2004 sold to 'Prosilia Maritime SA', of Panama & became SJN Orcas. Sold later in 2004 (March) to 'Sea Victory SA', of Panama & renamed Nadia. Sold in 2005 & became Chios Unity & in 2006 & renamed Capetan Minas. Data after 2006 is less clear but the vessel had three later names - Good Hope, Infinite Hope & Infinite. Miramar advise that the vessel was broken up at Alang, Gujarat, India, on Jun. 27, 2013. Can you add anything?

18 Colima
29660 tons
Hull 866

8215560

Highgate
Portland Castle
Sv. Matvey
1985

A cargo ship. A bulk carrier. Per 1 (2002 image at Liverpool), 2 (current data Portland Castle), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 196.04 metres long, speed of 17 1/2 knots. A sister ship to Mitla (next below). Now Mitla was built for 'Transportacion Maritima Mexicana' (TMM) of Mexico, (Linea Mexicana), & was Mexican registered. I believe that Colima was the same. Sold in 1996 to Monaco based, 'SAMAMA - Société Anonyme Monégasque d'Administration', with however a separate 'registered owner' stated to be 'Satin Shipping Corp., of Panama, & renamed Highgate. Registered at Panama. Sold in 2007 - to 'Navalmar Uk Ltd.' of London?, & renamed Portland Castle. Tony Atkinson advises (thanks Tony!) that in Aug. 2009 Portland Castle was sold to Porpoise Shipping Ltd., (Fedcominvest Monaco SAM of Monte Carlo, the managers), & renamed Sv. Matvey under Panama flag (Russian owners). On Jul. 25, 2011, the vessel arrived at Alang, Gujarat, India. On Aug. 2, 2011 it was beached & its demolition was commenced by Anupama Steel Private Ltd. of Alang, who had paid $6,349,086 ($522 per LDT of 12,163 tons) for the vessel. WWW data is most limited. Can you add anything?

19 Mitla
29660 tons
Hull 867

8310803

Maria
York Castle
King Edward
1985

The very last 'Laing' yard vessel. A bulk carrier. Per 1 & 2 (images York Castle), 3 (image & data, King Edward), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 196.0 metres long, speed of 17 1/2 knots. 'Changing Tide' advises me (launch image at p. 81) that it was built for 'Transportacion Maritima Mexicana' (TMM) of Mexico (Linea Mexicana) & was a sister ship to Colima (immediately above). A Mexican registered ship, accordingly. In 1999, the vessel was sold & renamed Maria. Have not read, so far, the purchaser's name re that sale. The vessel was sold again, in 2003, to Navalmar (UK) Ltd., of London, (B. Navi Shipmanagement, of Marina di Carrara, Italy, the manager), registered at Cayman Islands, & renamed York Castle. David Cartner advises (thanks David!) that the vessel is, in Nov. 2013, named King Edward - owned by Lebanese interests & registered at Panama. It would seem that the vessel was sold, in 2009, to 'Litat Group' of Beirut, Lebanon. Tony Atrkinson advises (thanks Tony!) that on May 19, 2015. King Edward arrived off Alang, Gujarat, India. And on Jun. 3, 2015, it was beached & demolition of the vessel commenced - by KPG Enterprises of Alang - who had paid $4,926.015 ($405 per LDT of 12,163 tons) for the vessel. Can you help with additional data?

c) Vessels built by Sunderland Shipbuilders Limited at the North Sands Yard that used to be owned by 'Joseph L. Thompson & Sons, Ltd.'

Miramar lists? (highest hull number on page). It used to be that you could click on the links that follow & get to the relevant Miramar page. But no longer! The new procedure must be to go to Miramar (here) & log in (you must be registered to view any page). And once you are logged in, return to this page & the following links should work for you:- 734, 741. (10)

20 Nikitas Roussos
38325 (or 35567) tons
Hull 734

7343023

Klia
1976

A bulk carrier. Per 1 (data & image), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 228.1 metres long overall, 218.4 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 15 knots. Built for Venizelos Group, of Greece. But registered at Liberia. The vessel was sold, in 1995, to Lexicon Shipping Co. Ltd. & renamed Klia. And was sold for scrap (China) in May 1999 for around U.S. $1.3 million. The vessel arrived at Xinhui (Kuixiang), in southern China on Jun. 5, 1999 to be broken up. Can you add anything?

21   Kosmaj
38551 tons
Hull 737

7356599
1977

A bulk carrier. Per 1 (Jugooceanija's financial difficulties), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 228.0 metres long overall, 218.4 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 16 knots. Sister to Sutjeska, Orjen & Kordun, all built at Sunderland by Sunderland Shipbuilders Limited. We thank Stan Taylor, Foreman Shipwright at the time, for telling us of a major event during the ship's construction. One Sunday morning, Stan was driving over Wearmouth Bridge & to his horror saw clouds of smoke rising from what he knew to be Kosmaj's building berth. At the plant gate he was advised that the launch ways had caught fire overnight but that nobody was permitted access until the site was deemed to be safe. 2 days later, Stan was permitted onto the ship, 75% of whose bottom shell was destroyed. The vessel's design included corrugated bulkheads, & the tops of these, tack welded, were fracturing, seriously endangering the basic integrity of the hull. Welds were, after a debate!, effected to avoid a certain catastrophe. There is far more to this story - do read Stan's own words here. The shipyard was praised for its efforts after the fire by 'Bureau Veritas', the vessel inspectors appointed by the owners, as you can read here. Built for 'Jugoslavenska Oceanska Plovidba BB', known as 'Jugooceanija', of Kotor in Montenegro. Montenegro, previously part of Yugoslavia, became independent on Jun. 3, 2006. The company was involved in worldwide tramping & in cargo & passenger services from the Adriatic to Gulf of Mexico ports. It would be good to know in which name the vessel was owned in its early years. In 1995, the vessel would seem to have been owned by 'Kotor Overseas Shipping Ltd.', presumably a Jugooceanija related company, & registered at Malta. WWW data about the history of the ship has proved difficult to find. The ship's history surely relates, however, to the history of Jugooceanija itself, but I haven't found a WWW summary history of that company. It was, however, a giant Yugoslav shipping company that commenced operations in 1956 & had as many as 22 ships in its fleet in 1986. It accumulated mountains of debt related in large part to sanctions placed upon the company relative to the 1991–1995 Bosnian & Croatian Wars. One by one, the fleet vessels had to be sold off until Kosmaj was the last vessel in the fleet. In 2001, the vessel was docked at New Orleans, denied the ability to leave due to debt issues. It must later have left New Orleans because in 2002 the vessel, then at Venice, Italy, was seized respecting debts due to the International Teamsters Federation. As a result of which the vessel, it would appear, was auctioned off. On Feb. 4, 2002, the entire staff of Jugooceanija was laid off. I read that the vessel was deleted from the lists in 2002 so I presume that it was then broken up. Can you add anything? Or correct or expand upon the above text. An image? 

22 Badagry Palm
12279 tons
Hull 741

7726873

Badagry
Cordigliera
1979

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Palm Line/United Africa Company, Badagry Palm (2)], 2 (extensive data, Palm Line, incl, 25% down), 3 (data & image, 75% down), 4 (4 images, Badagry Palm), 5 (an Indian court action related to the sinking), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 154.7 metres long overall, 148.0 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 16 1/2 knots. Built for Palm Line Ltd., of London. The vessel was transferred, in 1985, to 'United Africa Company International', an associated company, also of London, & renamed Badagry. It was sold again in 1986 to 'Navitrade Holding Corporation S.A.', of Panama, & renamed Cordigliera. In 1992, the vessel would appear to have been sold to 'Starlauro S.p.A.', of Naples, Italy, a cruise ship company, with no change of name. It must have been later sold again, because in 1996, when it sank, the vessel was owned by Berner Shipping Inc., a Liberian company, (maybe of Bombay, India), Sinha Shipping Private Ltd. the managers. And registered at Panama. On Nov. 13, 1996, the vessel was en route from Durban, South Africa, to the Mediterranean, with a cargo that included steel & paper reels. The vessel hit heavy weather & took in water in No. 1 hold. It foundered with the loss of all 29 aboard. There were 25 crew I have read & 1 passenger, so presumably there were 3 in other capacities. It sank at 31.21S/30.01E. Which is just 7 miles off Mbashe Rivermouth, about 150 miles S. of Durban, South Africa. I have not read the circumstances or the cause of the disaster. However the text at 7 is interesting in that it was contended, in London, that the vessel sank on account of over loading of the main deck with granite blocks causing the deck to buckle and/or collapse & water to enter No. 1 hold. And possibly that the collapse of the ship's structure was due to corrosion related to structural weakness & massive consequent structural failure. It was averred that Capt. Turner, based on dives carried out on the wreck in Mar. 1998, was of the opinion that the cause of sinking could not have been a freak wave. Can you tell us more, or otherwise add anything?

SUNDERLAND SHIPBUILDING DRY DOCKS & ENGINEERING COMPANY LIMITED

Can you help with the history of this shipbuilder?

It would seem that the company was a holding company which owned, from 1954, Sir James Laing & Sons Ltd., Joseph L. Thompson & Sons Ltd. & 'Sunderland Forge'.

SWAN, HUNTER, & WIGHAM RICHARDSON, LIMITED

OF SOUTHWICK

First a few images. Hover your mouse over each thumbnail to read the subject matter.

Can you help with the history of this shipbuilder?

Most references to 'Swan Hunter' are to the extensive and famous shipyards located at Newcastle. It seems that the next image is likely of the 'Swan Hunter' yard in Newcastle. An image which I like enough to include here even though not Sunderland related - but seems not be be as was advertised - of shipyard cranes at Pallion. I am advised that the ship being built is likely Ottawa.

But for a number of years a shipyard owned by Swan, Hunter, & Wigham Richardson, Ltd. was located in Southwick, Sunderland. There are some brief references to the Sunderland yard in 'Where Ships Are Born'. That in 1912 they were preparing to open the new Wear yard & that it closed in May 1933. (It is quite possible that there are more references to the yard in that volume but finding them is difficult, absent an index). I read that in 1919, it was described in 'Jane's Fighting Ships' as having three building berths. The Miramar Ship Index, a fine site indeed, references 54 vessels as being built there in the years of 1915 through 1931. It would seem from the numbering system that there perhaps were 470 or 480 ships built by the yard over those years, but that conclusion seems to be quite wrong. The hull number sequence, which ranges from 999 to 1473, must include vessels built at Newcastle. 

It is possible that there were other names for the yard. I have seen references to 'Swan, Hunter Ltd.'. And there may well have been other names also.

A now expired eBay item alerted me to the fact that a book was published in 2001 about the history of 'Swan Hunter'.

The volume is 'Swan Hunter: The Pride and the Tears.' By Ian Rae & Ken Smith. Tyne Bridge Publishing, U.K. Illustrated 8vo - 'over 7¾" - 9¾" tall'. Landscape. 60 pages. ISBN 1857951069. Rather earlier in time, was a side-laced 102 page landscape book, 26 x 20 cm. in size, probably published by the company itself. Entitled 'SWAN, HUNTER, & WIGHAM RICHARDSON, LTD. AND ASSOCIATED COMPANIES' 'Ship, Engine, Boiler and Floating Dock Builders & Repairers'. An eBay item in Mar. 2008. No publication date was referenced but I saw from one of the many listing images (31), that it does refer, briefly most probably, to the Wear facility. The item was of interest if only because it provided a more exact spelling of the company name.

A most attractive volume incidentally. It has a very brief reference only to the Sunderland facility- 'In association with Philips of Dartmouth, Swan's also reopened a shipyard at Southwick, Sunderland, for the construction of moderately-sized vessels.'

The 'Hunter' in the name was of course George Burton Hunter later Sir George B. Hunter, who had a long and close association with the city of Sunderland. He was certainly associated through his long career with William Pile & was in partnership with S. P. Austin (Austin & Hunter) from 1874 to 1879. You can read an interesting article about his life history here.

Tony Frost kindly advises that the 'Swan Hunter' Southwick yard was established in 1912. A couple of floating docks were built & shipbuilding commenced in 1917 with Southwick (Hull # 1031). Near the end of WW1, the yard was turned over to 'Wear Concrete Building Co. Ltd.', to produce concrete hulled tugs for the Admiralty. 3 such vessels were completed before the end of WW1, i.e. Cretehawser (1), Creterope (2) & Cretecable (3). Cretehawser later returned to the River Wear, was gutted & the hulk 'beached up river opposite it's building berth and remains there to this day'.

So the vessels constructed by 'Swan Hunter' at Sunderland are as follows, excluding the 20 vessels that are already listed below.

A Caisson for Portsmouth (933), A Caisson for Portsmouth (947), A Dock for Schiedam (971), X176 (999A, an Admiralty landing craft), X177 (999B, an Admiralty landing craft), X178) (999C an Admiralty landing craft), 6 Pontoons (collectively 1017), Southwick (1031), Northwick (1033),  War Maxim (1079), Langfond (1091), War Wear/Sea Glory (1099), War Humber/Polo (1111), Starkad (1151), Vanellus (1155), Coolana (1157), Island Queen (1159), Cito (1161), St. Mary (1165), Glenorvie (1209), Errington Dunford (1213), Stottpool (1219), Forestbeech (1239), Hamildoc (1313). Wellanddoc (1315), St. Therese (1327), Honved (1343), Sac 6 (1353), Phenicia (1367), Prescodoc (1381), Starwell (1387), Saint-Clair (1389), Henri Estier (1429), Fjordheim (1445), Jacques Schiaffino (1447), Sea Venture (1451), San Miguel (1457), Moyra (1467). That is 43 vessels (counting #1017 as 6 vessels) or 63 including the 20 vessels already listed below.

Miramar lists (highest hull number on page). It used to be that you could click on the links that follow & get to the relevant Miramar page. But no longer! The new procedure must be to go to Miramar (here) & log in (you must be registered to view any page). And once you are logged in, return to this page & the following links should work for you:- 1239, 1473. (54). A splendid list of vessels built by 'Swan Hunter' at Southwick is available here, thanks to 'fitter' & the 'northeasternmaritime.co.uk' site. And this partial list, from the same sources, adds additional details.

Names of just a few of the vessels constructed by 'Swan Hunter' of Sunderland in a table in build date sequence. And alphabetic within a year.

1   Zelo
2339 tons
Hull 1039

140701
1917

A collier/coaster. Per 1 (wrecks Merkur & Zelo, 80% down), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 87.0 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 285 ft. 3 in., speed of 11 knots. The word 'zelo' is a musical term meaning 'with zeal'. Built for 'Pelton Steamship Company Ltd.' ('Pelton'), of Newcastle. I am advised that Pelton owned coal mines & also owned a fleet of colliers trading to the Thames, S. coast ports & to the Baltic, sailing mostly from the Tyne, & returning from the Baltic with a deck cargo of sawn timber & pit props. Likely used as above. On May 9, 1920, Merkur, a steamship of 4,046 tons then owned by the Finnish Government, was wrecked in Barry Roads. It had collided with Castro-Alen, of 1,321 tons, while en route from Barry to Las Palmas, Spain, with a cargo of coal. In the following months, Merkur was being salvaged by salvage ship Reliant, owned by Maritime Salvors Ltd.' ('Maritime'), the salvage company concerned - a slow process it would appear. In Sep. 1920, the wreck was still there, submerged, & was 'marked by night by a buoy of the usual wreck marking pattern, placed and maintained by officials of the Trinity House'. It would seem that Merkur was marked as a wreck on charts & its location had been advised to all mariners. In Sep. 1920, Zelo was en route from Bilbao, Spain, to Cardiff, Wales, with a cargo of 3,000 tons of iron ore. H. Cubitt was the captain, & had his wife aboard. A crew of 26 all told, so 27 aboard with the captain's wife. On the evening of Sep. 19, 1920, in thick fog, the vessel struck the sunken forecastle of Merkur, in Barry Roads. At 51.21.5N/03.16W, marked by the 'Merkur Buoy' to this very day. Zelo sank amazingly quickly - one press report said that it sank in 15 seconds! With one exception, everyone aboard was rescued by Fancy, a pilot cutter, & landed at Barry Dock. Much of this data is thanks to Tom Lewis, whose grandfather, Thomas Lewis, a steward, was unfortunately the sole Zelo crew member who lost his life. His body, identified by the clothing, washed up at Penarth, Wales, on Oct. 4, 1920. There are many 'snippet' references to the resulting court cases of succeeding years, but no summation that I can find. So the following may well need correction. Maritime, the salvage company concerned, claimed that before they were able to raise Merkur, the Zelo collision occurred, making further salvage efforts impossible. They sued for their loss of profit on the salvage assignment. It seems that their claim was likely successful (have read such words as 'negligent navigation' & 'Zelo blundered into the wreck').  It would appear that Zelo was insured with 'North of England Protecting and Indemnity Association' ('North'). North refused liability on the basis that Merkur was no longer a 'vessel'. So Pelton sued North. The court held that there was indeed a reasonable expectation that Merkur could be completely recovered & repaired & that the wreck was accordingly a 'vessel'. As a result North paid 1/4 only of the loss (under the 'Running Down Clause') & were freed of liability re the balance.  All said & done, there is very little data WWW available about Zelo. Can you add anything?

2 Hopecrest
2373 tons
Hull 1051

140715

Corcrest
1918

A collier. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Corcrest), 2 (collision, 'The Goodwood', 90% down), 3 (grounding, Haisborough Sand, 'The Corcrest', 10% down), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 87.0 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots. Built for 'Hopemount Shipping Company Ltd.', of Newcastle. In 1919, the vessel was sold to Cory Colliers Ltd. & renamed Corcrest. While I have not been able to read any detail, it would seem that in 1922, Corcrest was in collision with Ulrikka, in the Thames estuary. There would appear to have been many later incidents in the life of this vessel where detail is WWW limited. On Jan. 13, 1928, the vessel was in collision with Lituania, in Newcastle Harbour. Have not read the circumstances. 66 WW2 convoy references, including extensive service in the Mediterranean (mainly Italy, North Africa & Malta, but as far E. as Alexandria) & U.K. coastal. No N. Atlantic crossings - though you would initially think that there were a number of such voyages at 1. During one of those convoys, but I am unable to tell you which one but likely in 1942, the North Sea convoy in which Corcrest was travelling was ordered to anchor. Corcrest was in column following Goodwood & neither heard the order. Goodwood, seeing other vessels anchoring did so also & Corcrest ran into Goodwood. I could, in fact, spot no WW2 convoy with both vessels listed. On Mar. 7, 1946, Corcrest ran aground, in bad weather (snow squalls), on Haisborough Sand, off Yarmouth. The crew was taken off by Minnie Walton, a lifeboat, so Corcrest was abandoned & a derelict. Many vessels attended the scene. Corcrest was re-floated by the next flood tide & drifted towards Scroby Sand. The vessel was towed to Yarmouth, likely by Richard Lee Barber, 4th item here, a tug, with engine-room & after holds flooded, a list to starboard, down by the stern & still making water. George Jewson, also a tug, provided pumping assistance en route to permit that successful tow, & also when moored at Yarmouth. All of this took place over a 4 day period. The court granted awards to many parties for their actions which collectively rescued the ship from certain total loss. Alan Johnston advises (thanks Alan!) that Minnie Walden, the lifeboat, was later renamed Henry Blogg, to honour that revered & famous lifeboatman, perhaps later after he had retired. Henry Blogg may well have been the coxswain of Minnie Walton when she rescued the 22 Corcrest crewmen as set out above. Probably in 1948, Corcrest was in collision with Freetown, an Elder Dempster vessel, & had to be beached off Erith (River Thames, SE London). Corcrest was badly damaged, & it would appear that two Corcrest crewmen lost their lives. Alan Johnston advises that his father was the pilot aboard Freetown at the time of the collision, hence Alan's interest in the matter. I have read that on Feb. 21, 1949, the vessel was wrecked. Now I cannot yet tell you for sure when & where it happened, nor the circumstances, but it may have been off the coast of Suffolk. This is what Miramar advises re the matter - wrecked 2.5nm NWxW Sunk LV 21.2.49 [Rochester-Sunderland, ballast]. However low on this Wikipedia page, the following is stated, re Corcrest, 'On 24 June 1949 she struck a submerged object, ran aground and was wrecked off the mouth of the River Deben in Suffolk'. While this PastScape Historic England page, referring to today's remaining wreckage of Corcrest, states as follows - 'Collapsed remains of an English cargo ship which became impaled on the stern section of the FORT MASSAC (recorded as 1524539) in 1949, and was abandoned when she could not be re-floated. She lies mid way between the East Fort Massac and West Fort Massac cardinal buoys.' Do access the additional available data particularly 'more information & sources'. 3 tugs came to her assistance & the vessel was 'patched up' to permit re-floating. But became more impaled & was abandoned. The Miramar listing re Fort Massac which sank at 51.53.36N/1.32.18E on Feb. 1, 1946 after a collision with Thornaby. Can you help with definitive data about any of the many above incidents and/or add anything. Alan Johnston was in touch & much of the above is thanks to his kind input. Another image?

3   Hopelyn
2348 tons
Hull 1041

140706
1918

A collier. Per 1 (the disaster, a 'pdf' file), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 87.0 or maybe 96.94 metres long, speed of 10 knots. Built for Hopemount Shipping Company Ltd., of Newcastle. On Oct. 18, 1922, while en route from Newcastle to London with 3400 tons of coal, the vessel lost its steering. Temporary repairs attempted (unsuccessful). Anchors dropped. Weather rapidly deteriorated, gale & high seas. On Oct 19, 1922, the vessel was wrecked on North Scroby Sand, Great Yarmouth, Norfolk (52.3N 01.48E). Early on Oct. 21, 1922, after multiple rescue attempts, the entire crew of 24 were rescued, (& the ship's cat), by lifeboat Agnes Cross of Lowestoft lifeboat station. Lifeboat from Gorleston station also involved. An amazing 27 Empire Gallantry Medals were issued re the rescue, 2 of such medals being gold (which medals later became George Cross medals). Do read the story at link 1. Can you help with data about this vessel! An image?

4 War Tank
2353 (or 2722) tons
Hull 1046

142669

Marzocco
Tripolitania
1918

A cargo ship. Per 1 (ref. War Tank, 60% down), 2 (data, 95% down, Tripolitania), 3 (War Tank), 4 (data, War Tank), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 301 ft. 1 in. long, 86.9 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 1/2 (or 12 1/2 or 10) knots. Built for The Shipping Controller, London, for WW1 service. The vessel was sold, in 1919, to 'Soc. di Nav. Etruria', of Leghorn (Livorno), Tuscany, Italy & renamed Marzocco. And sold in 1925 to 'R. Ginoro Venturi', also of Leghorn. The vessel was sold, in 1926, to 'Cia. Italiana Transatlantica', of Genoa, Italy, & renamed Tripolitania. Sold in 1932 to 'Tirrovia' or maybe to 'Tirrenia', also of Genoa, & sold again in 1937 to 'LLoyd Triestino', of Naples. In 1941, the vessel was scuttled at Massaua? in the Red Sea, but was salvaged the next year & became owned by Ministry of War Transport & managed by British India Steam Navigation Co. In 1949 the vessel was acquired again by LLoyd Triestino. The vessel was scrapped, in Feb. 1962, at Vado, Italy. I cannot locate Vado, Italy, on my map though there is a port of 'Savona Vado', west of Genoa. I need your help with this vessel! And advice re the image.

5 Merganser
1876 (or 1881) tons
Hull 1135

135725

Carlisle
Tweed Breeze
San Jeronimo
1919

A cargo ship. A coaster. Per 1 (Merganser), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 290 ft. (about 93 metres) long overall, 88.4 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 knots, 2 masts. Built for Cork Steamship Company Ltd. of Cork, Ireland. The vessel was sold, in 1922, to 'British & Continental Steamship Co.', of Liverpool. And sold in 1934, to 'James Patrick & Co.', of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, & renamed Carlisle. It was sold again, in 1956, to Cambay Prince Steamship Co., of Hong Kong, ('John Manners & Co.' managers), & renamed Tweed Breeze. And in 1961, the vessel was sold for the last time, to San Jeronimo Steamship Co., of Panama, & renamed San Jeronimo, with no manager change. The vessel was broken up, at Hong Kong, in Q1 of 1962. WWW data is quite limited. Can you add anything?

6 War Shannon
1940 (or 1943) tons
Hull 1113

140639

British Coast
Etrib
1919

A cargo ship. Per 1 (War Shannon), 2 ('uboat.net', sinking Etrib, image), 3 (fine image, data, Etrib, but you must be registered to view it), 4 (Moss Hutchison, Etrib), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Etrib), 6 (convoy HG-84), 7 (Lloyd's Registers, 1930/1931 thru 1943/1944?), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 88.4 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 300 ft. 9 in. (overall?), 290 ft., speed of 10 or 10 1/2 knots, signal letters KBVT & GDTC. Laid down as War Shannon for the Shipping Controller, London, for WW1 service. But delivered as British Coast for 'Coast Lines Limited', of Liverpool, 'Powell, Bacon & Hough', the managers. The vessel was sold, in 1923, to 'Moss Steamship Co. Ltd.' ('Moss'), of Liverpool, James Moss & Co. the managers, & renamed Etrib. In 1934, I read that the vessel was transferred to Moss Hutchison Line Ltd., of Liverpool, when Moss & 'J. & P. Hutchison Ltd.' merged (much WWW confusion as to the exact spelling of the resulting name, i.e. Hutchinson or Hutchison (A, B & C). 36 WW2 convoy references, including extensive service to Gibraltar, & presumably onwards into Mediterranean & to West Africa (Freetown). On Jun. 9, 1942, Etrib, 'Baldie McMillan' in command, with 44 aboard all told, left Gibraltar for Liverpool in convoy HG-84 of 24 merchant ships. Etrib carried a varied cargo ex Cartagena, Spain, mainly of apricot pulp, but also of wine & other commodities. However 6 indicates (re HG-84) that the cargo was rather of pyrites. At about 1 a.m. on Jun. 15, 1942 (many sites state Jun. 14, 1942), the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-552, Fregattenkapitän Erich Topp, in command. At 43.18N/17.38W, about 700 miles W. of Corunna (La Coruña), Spain. 41 survivors, including the captain, were picked up by HMS Marigold, (a convoy escort ship), transferred to Copeland, (the convoy rescue ship) & landed at Gourock, Scotland, on Jun. 20, 1942. 4 lives were lost, two crew members & two gunners. Can you add anything?

7 Western Coast
1928 tons
Hull 1133

140654

Esneh
Tefkros
Shun On
1919

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Coast Lines), 2 (Moss Hutchison, Esneh), 3 (Western Coast, at page bottom), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Esneh), 5 (Lloyd's Registers, Esneh, 1930 thru 1945), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 88.4 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 300 ft. 9 in. (overall?), 290 ft., speed of 10 or 10 1/2 knots, signal letters KOMP (or maybe KCMP) & GDTF. Intended for WW1 service but delivered in Sep. 1919 to 'Coast Lines Limited', of Liverpool, 'Powell, Bacon & Hough', the managers. The vessel was sold, in 1922, to 'Moss Steamship Co. Ltd.' ('Moss'), of Liverpool, James Moss & Co. Ltd. the managers, & renamed Esneh. The vessel may have been sold or transferred, in 1930, to James Moss & Co. Ltd. In 1934, the vessel was transferred to Moss Hutchison Line Ltd., of Liverpool, when Moss & 'J. & P. Hutchison Ltd.' merged (much WWW confusion as to the exact spelling of the resulting name, i.e. Hutchinson or Hutchison (A, B & C). 64 WW2 convoy references, including extensive service in the Mediterranean (Brindisi, Bari, Augusta, Ancona, Bone, Malta, Naples, Trieste) & also to Port Said & Alexandria, a voyage in Aug/Sep 1941 to Archangel, Russia returning with lumber, & U.K. coastal. In 1948, the vessel was sold to 'Olympus Navigation Co.' ('Olympos'), of Limassol, Cyprus, N. P. Lanitis Co. Ltd. ('Lanitis'), also of Limassol, the manager?, (Olympos may well have been owned by Lanitis), & renamed Tefkros. Registered at Famagusta, Cyprus. In 1951, the vessel was sold to Winly Navigation Co., of Hong Kong, with no change of vessel name. In 1954 & 1955, Shun Kee Navigation Co. of Hong Kong & then Choon Kee Navigation Co., both of Hong Kong, acquired the vessel. No changes of the vessel's name re either sale. In 1958, the vessel was renamed Shun On. On Feb. 27, 1959, the vessel arrived at the Hong Kong ship breaking facilities of United Overseas Enterprises, to be broken up. Can you add anything?

8 Krosfond
2193 tons
Hull 1093

Rønnes
Winroth
Borgfred
Tarva
Sandli
Bitten
Immy
1920

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data & image Borgfred), 2 (extensive page with 2 images), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Borgfred), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 87.0 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 295 ft. 3 in., speed of 9 knots. Built for 'Svithun-Linjen A/S' (Sigval Bergesen), of Stavanger, Norway. What a lot of later owners & names! Read on. The vessel was sold, in 1923, to 'Breifonds D/S A/S' (Sigval Bergesen), also of Stavanger. and sold in 1931 to 'Skips-A/S Rønnes' (Chr. Daae), of Grimstad, Norway, & renamed Rønnes. It was sold again, in 1932, to 'D/S A/S Winroth' (Anton Salvesen), of Oslo, & renamed Winroth. And sold the next year, i.e. 1933, to 'Skibs A/S Nor', (C. Henry Smith) also of Oslo. Was sold in 1934 to 'Skips-A/S Borgholm', (G. Gabrielsen), of Farsund, & renamed Borgfred. Lots more later sales! 54 WW2 convoy references, including at least 7 North Atlantic crossings, service in Caribbean, to Australia (Sydney, Brisbane, Townsville), Papua New Guinea (Langemak Bay, Buna, Milne Bay) & U.K. coastal. In May, 1941, 2, she rescued, while on convoy duty as a rescue ship, 22 survivors from Esmond & 16 from Bengore Head - both of which ships had been torpedoed by U-110. And 12 survivors from Gregalia, torpedoed & sunk by U-201. From Jul. 1943 she was chartered by U.S. Army Transport, for service to New Guinea, Indonesia, & other Pacific islands & transported troops. In Nov. 1947 she was sold to 'Skips-AS Tautra' (Br. Torkildsen), of Trondheim, Norway, for use in the North Sea, & renamed Tarva. The vessel was sold again, in Nov. 1955, to 'Skips AS Sandbo' (M. B. Johansen), of Skien, Norway, & renamed Sandli. Vessel taken over by a Norwegian bank ('Skiensfjordens Kreditbank A/S', of Skien) in 1959 when the owner went bankrupt & in Dec. 1959 was sold to 'Skips-IS Bitten' (Knut E. Møinichen), of Oslo, & renamed Bitten. It was sold again, in late 1962, to 'Assuncion Comp. de Nav. y Commercio SA', of Beirut, Lebanon, & renamed Immy. And sold for the very last time, in Mar. 1967, to 'Cantieri Navale del Golfo SpA', of La Spezia, Italy, to be broken up. Can you add anything?

9 Rallus
1871 tons
Hull 1167

147180

Georgios S.
Mike
Gitana
Folk On
1922

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Rallus), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 88.4 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 1/2 knots. Built for British and Continental Steamship Company Limited, of Liverpool. Miramar refers to Cork Steam Ship Company, of Cork, Ireland. Can anybody tell us how the name relates? 39 WW2 convoy references, with service in the western Mediterranean (Bizerta, Algiers, Malta, Augusta, Bari), at least four voyages to Reykjavik, Iceland & U.K. coastal. 'i-law.com' advises that a stevedore, unloading the vessel in 1940, was killed by a derrick chain or by the fall of a derrick. The widow, with 7 children, was awarded £750. The vessel was sold, in 1954, to E. N. Vintiadis, of Lefkas, Greece, (Lefkada, Ionian Islands), converted to an oil burner & renamed Georgios S. It was sold again, in 1961 to T. Engan, of Manila, Philippines, & renamed Mike. And sold in 1962, to Orient Lloyd, of Singapore, & renamed Gitana. The vessel was sold for the last time, in 1964, to Gilbert Yim Fai Hung, of Hong Kong, renamed Folk On, & registered at Panama. The vessel was broken up at Whampoa, (i.e. Huangpu, an outer port of Guangzhou, China), in Jun. 1966. Can you help with additional data about this vessel! WWW data is most limited. Another image?

10 Forestash
1500 (or 7507) tons
Hull 1237

147663

Cramlington
Herbert
Morar
1924

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 73.1 metres long, speed of 11 knots. Built for Forest Shipping Co. Ltd. of London, with Mann, Macneal & Co., of Glasgow possibly the managers. Sold 1926 to Gjemre & Co. Limited, of Newcastle, & renamed Cramlington. Sold in 1932 to K. Hansen, of Helsingfors, Finland, & renamed Herbert. Sold in 1934 to W. S. Scott & Co. & renamed Morar. However, a now dead link stated that she was owned by Western Navigation Co. ('Western') when she hit a mine as next advised. ('Western' may have been a subsidiary of the Murphy Coal Co., Ltd., of Ft. William & may (page bottom) have been a New York company). On Nov. 26, 1943, while en route from London to Belfast with a cargo of cement, Morar hit a mine off Harwich (at 57.50N/1.34E), & sank. 17 lives were lost, 14 crew & 3 gunners. Can you help with additional data about this vessel! WWW data is limited. An image?

11 Islington
1495 (or 1494) tons
Hull 1223

147583

Lilburn
Polmela
Transeas
1924

A cargo ship. Per 1 (plans available), 2 (Smith Hogg), 3 (Stornoway incident), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 73.1 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed ? Built for H. Harrison Ltd., of London. Sold in 1927 to Smith Hogg & Co. ('Hogg') & renamed Lilburn. The vessel 'achieved a place in the annals of Maritime Law when she rolled on her beam ends in Stornoway harbour (Webmaster: Isle of Lewis) during bunkering on a trip from Archangel to Garston.' She was carrying a cargo of timber from Soroka(?) to Garston, (Liverpool, River Mersey), & was dangerously unstable due to the quantity of timber loaded on her deck. Cargo was lost & damaged. Hogg, the ship owners, were held to be responsible. The vessel was sold, in 1937, to 'J. J. Thomas & Co.', of West Hartlepool, & renamed Polmela. And sold in 1938 to 'Continental Transit' & renamed Transeas. During WW2, in order to block the harbour entrance, Transeas, then a 'special service vessel', was scuttled on May 25, 1940 in Zeebrugge Roads, Belgium. Can you help with data about this vessel! WWW data is limited. An image?

12 James Dunford
1196 (or 1226) tons
Hull 1243

148083

Whitley
Belvina
1924

A cargo ship. A coaster. Per 1 (London & Edinburgh), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Whitley), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 75 metres long, 71.6 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots. Built for 'Dunford Steamship Company Limited', (J. W. Elliott, the manager), of Newcastle. The vessel was sold, in 1935, to 'Aln Steamship Co.' (probably also of Newcastle), & renamed Whitley. 109 convoy references in WW2, all being U.K. coastal voyages. The vessel was sold, in 1946, to 'London & Edinburgh Shipping Co. Limited', & renamed Belvina. On Feb. 10, 1958, the vessel arrived at Rosyth, Firth of Forth, to be broken up. WWW data about this vessel is most limited. Can you help with additional data! Another image?

13 Lachinedoc
1926 (later 1976) tons
Hull 1311

149430

Queenston
Boblodock
1927

A canaller. Per 1 (extensive data, Lachinedoc plus 4 other similar ships), 2 ('Plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data from 1930/31), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Lachinedoc), 4 (1932 collision), 5 (image Lachinedoc & 4 images, Queenston), 6 (image Queenston, also at link 5), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 77.0 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 252.8 ft., speed of 9 knots, seven hatches, tall & thin funnel, designed to fit the narrow locks on the St. Lawrence River & of the Welland Canal (links Lakes Ontario & Erie), signal letters KVWF & later GFSP. Sister to Hamildoc & Wellandoc (also built at Southwick), & also Kingdoc, Torondoc. The vessel was built for 'Paterson Steamships Ltd.' ('Paterson'), of Fort William, Ontario, Canada, & launched by Mrs. Norman M. Paterson. Paterson, it would seem, later became 'N. M. Paterson & Sons Ltd.' The 'doc' at name end signified 'Dominion of Canada'. The ship was used to transport grain down river from the Great Lakes & bring pulpwood back, but it would have carried coal also. On Oct. 29, 1932, the vessel was in collision with John Irwin, a tanker, at the western entrance to the Lachine Canal. Both vessels were held to be at fault. The ship was little used & probably was laid up during some of the Depression years. The vessel was requisitioned by the Canadian Government in 1941 (no change of owner) & in 1942 was sold to the U.S. Maritime Commission for $587,322 - owned, per Lloyd's Registers, by 'United States War Shipping Administration' & registered at Panama. The vessel primarily was used, during WW2, to transport bauxite (aluminium ore) from Guyana to smelters (in Canada & U.S.A.?). The vessel must have been sold to the Ministry of War Transport, likely prior to Jun. 1944, Witherington & Everett the managers, & registered at London. In Jun. 1944, the vessel left Charleston, South Carolina, U.S.A., for the U.K., its sole WW2 N. Atlantic crossing reference, cargo not stated. Just 4 other convoy references in WW2, including 3 voyages to & from the continent (Le Havre, Antwerp) in 1944 & in 1945. At the end of WW2, the vessel was laid up in the James River reserve fleet, near Newport News, Virginia, after, it would appear, the vessel was sold back to the 'United States War Shipping Administration'. The vessel was sold, in 1946, for $113,800, to Colonial Steamships Ltd. (a Misener company). The vessel was then rebuilt & refurbished by Port Weller Dry Docks Ltd., of St. Catharines, Ontario, became a little larger (1976 gross tons) & was renamed Queenston. And carried grain. In 1959 the vessel was transferred to 'Scott Misener Steamships Co. Limited' but did not see active service. May have been retired at Cardinal in 1959. In early 1961, the vessel was given immortality, perhaps - sold to Bob-Lo Ferry Company, Ltd., of Windsor, Ontario, & (I think) dubbed Boblodock, but, I read, there is evidence of an official name change to Boblodock. On Feb. 10, 1961, the vessel arrived at Bois Blanc Island, (known as Boblo Island) in the Detroit River, where she became a dock on the Canadian side of the island, then the location of an amusement park. I have read that the ship was 'scuttled'. Now I may well be quite wrong in saying that I associate that word with water being permitted to enter a vessel & it sinking as a result. The word seems not to fit well with what happened to her - stripped down, presumably filled with cement etc., and, largely above water, becoming the foundation facing of a passenger dock. She is there to this very day. But ... the amusement park has been gone for decades & the dock is, I read, in ruins. One would travel downriver from Detroit for an hour or more on a three story riverboat with a paddlewheel on its stern, to the amusement park which included a roller skating rink, 38 rides including a flume ride & picnic grounds. And at some time featured a roller coaster, the 'Screamer'. A million people a year went there in the 1950s. The amusement park later went into bankruptcy, the site is developed or being developed into a residential community & the two river boats are in storage. Is it truly still there in 2012? Can you help with additional data? Another image? #1849

14 Toftwood
4302 (or 4329) tons
Hull 1323

147795

Star of Alexandria
Montardizio
Kettara II
1928

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Star of Alexandria, page in Norwegian with image), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 388 ft. 8 in. (about 120 metres) long, speed of 10 or 10 1/2 knots. Built for Joseph Constantine Steamship Line Ltd., of Middlesbrough (have also read London), which company both owned & managed ships. I think that they owned Toftwood, however. Can anyone confirm that? There was also a related company 'Constantine Shipping Co.', of Middlesbrough, & maybe others also. Sold in 1936 to Alexandria Navigation Company Ltd., of Alexandria, Egypt, (Red Rose Line), & renamed Star of Alexandria. Sold in 1950 to B. & A. Montanari, (who may be the manager only), of Italy perhaps? (an expired eBay item showed the ship at Rimini), & renamed Montardizio. Sold in 1959 to 'Compagnie Minière et Métallurgique', of Casablanca, Morocco (have also read France) & renamed Kettara II. On Nov. 30, 1959, the vessel arrived at Kure, Hiroshima, Japan, to be broken up. Can you help with data about this vessel! WWW data is limited. An image?

15 Hopecrag
4007 (or 4029 or 4054) tons
Hull 1401

161539

Wyvern
Zeta Trader
1929

A cargo ship. Per 1 & 2 (data), 3 (mainly extensive WW2 service data Wyvern, with 4 links to WW2 voyage details), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Wyvern), 5 (Hopemount), 6 (archive data available), 7 (Moller, Zeta Trader), 8 (1958 stranding, Zeta Trader), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 111.1 metres long, 376 ft. 0 in., speed of 9 1/2 knots. Built for 'Hopemount Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Newcastle, A. Stott & Co., also of Newcastle, the managers. In Feb. 1936, (have no detail), the vessel broadcast a distress call, but it would seem was able to effect the necessary repairs herself. The vessel was sold, in 1938, to 'Borges Rederi A/S', of Tønsberg, Norway, Hans Borge the manager, & renamed Wyvern. Some confusion as to the name. Have also read Wyveren. The vessel was at Tampico, Mexico, when Germany invaded Norway on Apr. 9, 1940. Just 10 WW2 convoy (1942/1944) references, all in the Indian Ocean, mainly from Aden to Durban or Cape Town, South Africa & service to India & Ceylon (Calcutta, Colombo), & to Kilindini (Mombasa, Kenya). Now there presumably is independent voyage data at 4, which I am not permitted to access. Do, however, read the data available via 3 & particularly the paragraph at the bottom of the page. The vessel was sold again, in 1953, to Zeta Shipping Co. Ltd. ('Zeta'), of Hong Kong, Mollers Ltd., of Hong Kong, the managers (& likely the owners of Zeta), & renamed Zeta Trader. Something changed in 1957 (2) - not sure what. On Oct. 23, 1958, the vessel, en route to Jakarta, went aground at Pulau Mantaras, about 35 miles S. of Singapore. Barfoam, a Royal Navy tug, was sent to her assistance, to tow her off at the next high tide. Maybe the vessel was significantly damaged, because on Jan. 17, 1959, the vessel was laid up at Hong Kong, 'after stranding'. And in Mar. 1959, the vessel was broken up there. Can you help with data about this vessel! Another image?

16 Hopedene
4010 tons
Hull 1403

161545

Photinia
Atlas
1929

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Hopemount), 2 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Hopedene, 1931/32 thru 1938/39), 3 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Photinia, 1938/39 thru 1945/46), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Photinia), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 374.0  ft. long (114.0 metres) overall, 364.5  ft. long (111.1 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots, signal letters LFGT later GKVW & OFQI. The vessel may later have been slightly modified - in the 1966/67 edition of Lloyd's Register, when named Atlas, the vessel is stated to be 376 ft. 1 in. & 360 ft. 0 in. long, overall & between perpendiculars. Built for Hopemount Shipping Co. Ltd., of Newcastle, A. Stott & Co. the managers. The vessel was sold in 1938 to Stag Line, Ltd., of North Shields, Joseph Robinson & Sons, also of North Shields, the managers, & renamed Photinia. 103 convoy references in WW2, including, it would seem 8 N. Atlantic crossings. The vessel spent much of the war in the Caribbean area & on the E. Coast of U.S.A. - Trinidad, Guantanamo, Key West, Galveston & also New York, Boston & Halifax. Not included in that list is a convoy from the Tyne to Methil, (date & convoy number unknown to the webmaster), during which Photinia was in collision with Llanover in the Firth of Forth. A malfunction of the steering gear of Llanover, (it jammed), would seem to have been the cause of the collision. I had thought that the convoy was in 1945 but that date is suspect. Llanover, built by Bartram in 1928, would seem to have been sunk by a torpedo from U-124 on May 12, 1942. Can you advise the dates of the convoy & its number? The vessel was later sold, in 1950, to 'Rederi A/B Asta' of Mariehamn, Finland, Leonard Karlsson the manager, & renamed Atlas. In 1968, the vessel was sold for the last time, to 'Compañia de Navegacion Pinares S.A.', of Mogadishu, Somalia, without change of the vessel's name. In Jan. 1974, the vessel was broken up at Split, Yugoslavia at the ship breaking facilities of Brodospas. Can you help with additional data about this vessel? Perhaps another image?

17 Imari
1940 tons
Hull 1365

149497

Delaware
Empire Rother
Manicouagan
Washington Times-Herald
Manitoulin
1929

A cargo ship. A 'canaller', I believe, of a size to be able to transit the then St. Lawrence & Welland canals. Per 1 [70% down, Manicouagan (1)], 2 (data & 8 images), 3 (plans available, Imari), 4 (Rother), 5 (data, Imari), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 77.0 metres. (252 ft 8 in.) long. The data for this vessel is to me quite confusing. I do try to be 100% accurate. May I suggest that you access all of the pages linked above & read the source data for yourself. What follows is the closest I can get to 'accuracy'. Vessel was built 'on spec' & bought by Inland  Steam Ship Co.' of Newcastle, related maybe to Inland Lines Ltd., of Cleveland, Ohio. I wonder why a vessel to be used in the U.S. & in Canada would be given a Japanese name, most often associated with porcelain? Sold 1930 or 1931 to St. Lawrence Steamships Ltd. & renamed Delaware. Sold to British Ministry of War Transport in 1943 & became Empire Rother. In 1949 the vessel was acquired, I think, by 'Quebec & Ontario Transportation Co. Ltd.', of Montreal, Quebec, who renamed it Manicouagan. They would seem to have changed the vessel's name twice more before selling it in 1962 (became Washington Times-Herald in 1951 & Manitoulin in 1954). The vessel was sold, in 1962, to A. Newman & Co., of St. Catharines, Ontario. Broken up at Port Dalhousie, St. Catharines, in 1961 or maybe in 1963. Can you add anything and/or correct the above data.

18 England
2299 (later 2319) tons
Hull 1415
1930

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('uboat.net', sinking, image), 2 (Danish 1934 'pdf' data, WWW page #61, 30% down, England), 3 (Wikipedia, Danish, England), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 86.5 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 283.8 ft., speed of ? knots, signal letters OXUE. Built for, I believe, 'A/S Dampskibet England' with 'H. A. Christensen' the managers, both of Copenhagen, Denmark. But ... can anybody tell us about 'Christensen'. I have seen a number of WWW references to the name, it would seem as managers. And also perhaps, earlier as 'Svendsen & Christensen'. There was also, however, a 'H. A. Christensen' of Sandefjord, Norway. No WW2 convoy references, of course, at 'convoyweb.org'. In late Jan. 1940, the 'neutral' vessel, then, per 1, owned by 'Det Forenede Kulimportører', of Copenhagen, was en route from Copenhagen to Blyth, in ballast, with a crew of 21 all told. The ship was then neutral, Denmark not being invaded by German forces until a few months later, on Apl. 9, 1940. Anyway, on Jan. 27, 1940, England was hit by a torpedo fired by U-20, Kapitänleutnant Harro von Klot-Heydenfeldt in command. At 58.25N/1.53W, about 15 miles SE of Copinsay, an island off the E. coast of the Orkney Mainland, Orkney Islands. 20 lives were lost, & one only survived (though I have not read how he was saved). The vessel broke in two & sank within 2 minutes of the strike which hit underneath the bridge. England was sailing in the company of the 2094 ton Fredensborg, also Danish. The two Danish vessels attempted, in heavy weather, to assist Faro, of 844 tons, Swedish & neutral also, which had been hit by a U-20 torpedo. Faro eventually drifted ashore & was wrecked at Taracliff Bay, Deerness, Orkney Islands, while Fredensborg was sunk by U-20 - & all of its crew of 20 died. Note also, that an earlier 1923 England, ex Thorhild, managed by H. A. Christensen, was owned by 'D/S A/S Europa'. Can you help with data about our vessel! WWW data is limited.

19 Sea Rambler
2327 tons
Hull 1449

149165
1930

A cargo ship. Per 1 (1935 image, Sea Rambler, but you must be registered to view it), 2 (yellow fever in 1936), 3 (1936 newspaper article re yellow fever voyage), 4 (top-middle, re 1936 voyage), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Sea Rambler), 6 (1940 rescue of crew of Sea Rambler, 75% down - 'Rescue at Sea'), 7 (Feb. 09, 1940 SOS, ex 8 Col.#2), 9 (most pleasing pages, thank you, Sea Rambler case ref. p#39), 10 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register data, Sea Rambler, 1930/31 thru 1938/39), 11 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 294.1 ft. long (89.64 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 9 knots, crew of 24/25 (in 1936 & 1940), signal letters LGJT later GTNS. Sister to Sea Venture. Built for Dover Navigation Company Ltd., owned & managed by Leach & Co. both of London, which company it would seem traded between U.K. & Canada. On Jun. 5, 1936, the vessel left South Shields for West Africa. In Aug. 1936, while returning from Dakar, French West Africa, to Dunkirk, France, the vessel put into Funchal, Madiera, to seek medical assistance for the vessel's crew. William C. Munday was in command. Two crew members died on the ship, five more later died in hospital at Funchal (or maybe at Dunkirk) & many more, maybe as many as 14, had severe illness. The cause was initially thought to be food poisoning & botulism. But after arrival in the River Tyne on Sep. 12, 1936, the blood of surviving crew members was examined & it was determined that they had suffered from yellow fever. The crew members were believed to have been bitten by West African mosquitoes that carried the disease. I have tried to make the above text fully accurate, but it is difficult since the many Google data 'snippets' seem to be contradictory. The 5 may have been rather hospitalized at Dunkirk & just maybe did not die. After arrival at the River Tyne, the vessel soon left for Murmansk, Russia. Can anybody clarify the matter? Just a single WW2 convoy reference, in Sep. 1939, ex Southend, in convoy OA-27. The convoy dispersed & the vessel continued on to New York with a cargo of chalk. On Feb. 9, 1940, while proceeding independently from Halifax, Canada, to Swansea & Bristol with a general cargo, the vessel sent an SOS stating that a hatch had stove in during a raging snow-storm & she was taking on water. At 47.16N/41.18W, 540 miles E. of St. John's, Newfoundland, in the North Atlantic. The vessel was under charter to 'Bristol City Line of Steamships, Limited' ('BristolCity'), at the time. The vessel was found, drifting helplessly, by Mosdale which rescued 12 survivors by lifeboat. The Mosdale lifeboat was about to return for the remaining 13 crew members, but Kaia Knudsen, which had arrived on the scene in the meantime, had rescued them all. The vessel foundered on Feb. 10, 1940. All of the crew were landed at New York. I read that BristolCity, who lost a cargo of alcohol & gin, claimed that the ship had not been seaworthy, but the statement was not legally substantiated & their case failed 9 years later. The Life Saving Benevolent Association of New York awarded Captain J. Stave, of Mosdale, a gold medal re the rescue (was he in command of the lifeboat, I wonder?) & awarded other medals also. We thank Chris Herring for his data re this listing. Can you help with additional data about this vessel?

20 Flathouse
1546 tons
Hull 1473

162665
1931

A cargo ship, a collier perhaps. Per 1 & 2 (images), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Flathouse), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 74.4 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 1/2 knots. The very last 'Swan Hunter' ship to be built at Southwick. Built for Stephenson Clarke & Associated Companies Ltd., of Newcastle, noted as coal shippers. An expired eBay listing indicated that the vessel carried coal from the north-east to Battersea Power Station (River Thames, London) though presumably from 1939 when the building of that station was completed. 53 WW2 convoy references, mainly U.K. coastal but including 6 voyages, from the Solent or the Thames, to Seine Bay, France, in Jun/Aug 1944 re the Normandy landings & a 1945 voyage to Antwerp, Belgium. On Feb. 16, 1961, the vessel arrived at Grays, Essex, to be broken up. Can you help with data about this vessel! WWW data is limited.

THOMAS YOUNG & SONS (SHIPBREAKERS) LTD.

OF SOUTH DOCK

In the course of compiling this site, I have seen references to ships, particularly warships, being broken up at Sunderland. But with no words ever as to exactly where in Sunderland & by whom. I now learn that Thomas Young & Sons (Shipbreakers) Ltd. ('Young') was most active in the business & that they were based at South Docks. More specifically, they were located 'in the north-east corner of the main or North Hudson Dock just south of and round the corner from Gladstone Bridge.' or, I am advised, 'they had their yard in the river itself on the old south pier opposite the pilot house, just to the seaward of the lifeboat station and before the river opens out into the basin. That is opposite where the Sunderland yacht club has its clubhouse now'. In advertisements dating from 1956, they described themselves as being shipbreakers, machinery merchants, iron & steel scrap merchants & dismantlers.

I am advised that by the mid 1960s they weren't doing much business other than collecting scrap & drilling swarf (the waste from metalworking operations) from the yards & engineering companies.

An eBay item, in Jun. 2010, advised that one of the ships that was broken up at Young's was R4, a Royal Navy submarine, of 'R' Class, a class nicknamed the slug. Launched at Chatham Dockyard on Jun. 8, 1918 & commissioned Aug. 23, 1919, too late for WW1 service. Used as a fast underwater target at the Portland anti-submarine school until 1934. Sold to be broken up on May 26, 1934.

And per another eBay item in Feb. 2011, they apparently in early 1932 broke up Liberty, a cargo steamer built in 1890 at Hull by Earle's Shipbuilding. On Jan. 22, 1946, HMS Impulsive, a Royal Navy I class destroyer built in 1939, arrived to be broken up. Web pages re that vessel suggest that Young was then owned by 'W. H. Arnott, Young and Company, Limited', ship breakers, mainly based at Dalmuir in Scotland, it would appear.

Other vessels broken up were:- a) Sentinel, a Royal Navy 2900 ton cruiser, which arrived on Jun. 23, 1923, after having been stranded at Seaburn Beach, b) Arctic Trapper, previously HMS Moy, a trawler, arrived on Oct. 10, 1952, c) HMS Wolsey in the spring of 1947 - 'The ship was sold to BISCO on 4th March 1947 and later was towed to Sunderland for demolition by T Young & Co.'.

It seems that D86 Agincourt, a Battle Class Royal Navy destroyer launched in 1945 & commissioned in 1947, was later scrapped at Sunderland. In 1974. It may well have been at Thomas Young & Sons (Shipbreakers) Ltd. facilities. Thanks to Mike Davies, we have an image of both D86 Agincourt & also D97 Corunna moored at staithes in North Hudson Dock, Sunderland in 1974. D97 Corunna was broken up by Hughes Bolckow, at Blyth, I understand.

In this guestbook message, Jack Thompson advises (thanks, Jack!) that the last Royal Navy vessel to be dismantled by Thomas Young 'was the Flower class corvette HMS Coreopsis, the ship featured in the film 'The Cruel Sea'. She was finally broken up on the Polka Hole, as the beach was called, i.e. the beach opposite the North Dock. I looked at the ship being towed in and moored up in the South Dock yard of Tommy Youngs. After she was stripped down, the bottom half was towed to the Polka Hole and finished off'. Jack was an apprentice fitter for the River Wear Commissioners at the time. - Coreopsis, which became Compass Rose in 'The Cruel Sea', was scrapped on Jul. 22, 1952. You can read some brief details about her here. While more comprehensive data, and many images of her, can be accessed here.

That is however all that I know. Can you help with the history of this ship breaker.

May I suggest that you navigate the site via the index on page 001. PRIOR PAGE / NEXT PAGE

To Thomas M. M. Hemy Data Page 41. All of the other Thomas Hemy pages, including image pages, are accessible though the index on Thomas Hemy page 05.  [ ] £ ñ õ ô Ô

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