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SHIPBUILDERS - PAGE 11

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On this page ... William Doxford Page 2, page bottom (WW1 German torpedo boat).

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WILLIAM DOXFORD (1840/1875?)
WILLIAM DOXFORD AND SONS (1875?/1890)
WILLIAM DOXFORD AND SONS LIMITED (1891/1957)
WILLIAM DOXFORD & SONS (SHIPBUILDERS) LIMITED (1957/ )

(OF COX GREEN, THEN PALLION, SUNDERLAND)

This is the second 'Doxford' page, made necessary by the increasing number of listings re 'Doxford' built vessels. The first page, with the first 100 vessels, is available here. And the 3rd & 4th pages are now here & here.

Build lists? A list of 'Doxford' built vessels is now on site, at page 143. Miramar lists, (highest hull number on page). It used to be that you could click on the links that follow & get to the relevant Miramar page. But no longer! The new procedure must be to go to Miramar (here) & log in (you must be registered to view any page). And once you are logged in, return to this page & all the following links should work for you:- 30, 60, 108, 119, 149, 179, 209, 239, 270, 299, 329, 362, 389, 419, 450, 495, 515, 546, 594, 627, 656, 686, 716, 746, 792, 818, 889, 870. And a list of all of the Doxford built vessels is here (including those built at the Doxford yard in its later years after it was taken over) thanks to Fred Gooch & John Bage.

Names of just a few more of the vessels constructed by William Doxford & Sons of Sunderland - as I happen to spot references to them. In a table in build date sequence. And alphabetic within a year. But just a start!

101 Siward
3753 tons
Hull 304

114440

Queenmoor
Queenmead
Knud
Roma
1903

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (images, Queenmoor), 2 (name ref.), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 109 metres (339.9 or 342.9 ft.) long, speed of 9 1/2 knots. Built for Novocastrian Shipping Co. Ltd., of Newcastle (W. J. Stephens & Co., the manager). The vessel was sold, in 1907, to Moor Line Ltd., W. Runciman & Co. the managers, & renamed Queenmoor. And sold in 1920 to Western Counties Shipping Co. Ltd., of Cardiff, E. Edwards & Sons Ltd. the managers, & renamed Queenmead. In 1922, the vessel was sold to Rederi A/S Triton, of Copenhagen, T. Nielsen of Denmark the manager, & renamed Knud. And sold again, in 1924, to A/S Patria, of Copenhagen, O. Ovesen the manager, & renamed Roma. On Dec. 22, 1924, the vessel was wrecked near Dragor, a fishing village near Copenhagen, Denmark, while en route from Stockholm, Sweden, to Rotterdam. Was re-floated but was broken up at Copenhagen. WWW data about the vessel is most limited. Can you help with additional data? 

102 Andros
3230 tons
Hull 318

118851

Ethelwynne
Shinsei Maru No. 6
 
1904

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 ('uboat.net', 1917 mine, Ethelwynne), 2 (ref. #318), 3 (Harrowing Steamship), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 105 metres long, 332.1 ft., speed of 9 1/2 knots. Laid down as Andros for Dryden Steamship Co., but delivered as Ethelwynne to 'The Harrowing Steamship Co. Ltd.' (J. H. Harrowing the owner?), of Whitby, Yorkshire, (Robert Harrowing & Co., the managers). I am advised that the vessel may have been initially owned by J. H. Harrowing, & that in 1905 'Robert Harrowing & Co.' become the owner. On Jul. 26, 1917, while en route from the White Sea to Cardiff with a cargo of timber, the vessel hit a mine laid by U 71, Kapitänleutnant Walter Gude in command. At 60.36N/00.37W, 6 miles off Fetlar, a north island of Shetland Islands, Scotland. The vessel was damaged & towed to (which?) port. No loss of life. In 1919, the vessel was sold to Joseph Constantine, of London (or Whitby). No change of vessel name, it would appear. In 1920, the vessel was sold to 'The New Steam Navigation & Trading Co. Ltd.', of Bombay, India, again with no change of vessel name. Maybe still registered at Whitby. In 1922 (or maybe in 1923), the vessel was sold to 'Shinsei Kisen Goshi Kaisha', of Japan (exactly where?) & renamed Shinsei Maru No. 6. On Mar. 14, 1931, (have also read Mar. 16) the vessel was wrecked at Hainan Bluff. Possibly at Hainan Island? (S. China Sea). WWW data about the vessel is particularly limited. Can you help with additional data? 

103 Cairntorr
3588 tons
Hull 314

118628
1904

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 [Cairn Line, Cairntorr (1)], 2 (21/3 1915), 3 (ref. about 40% down), 4 (U-34), 5 ('uboat.net', sinking), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 108 metres long, 340.0 ft., speed of 10 knots. Built for Cairn Line of Steamships Ltd., of Newcastle (Cairns, Noble & Co. Ltd., the manager). On Mar. 21, 1915, while en route from the Tyne to Genoa, Italy, with a cargo of coal, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-34, Kapitänleutnant Claus Rücker in command. At 50.14N/00.15E, 7 miles S. of Beachy Head. Attempts were made to tow her into port, but she foundered. No loss of life. U-34, I read, sank 119 ships & damaged 4 others during its WW1 service from Oct. 5, 1914 to (maybe) Nov. 9, 1918. WWW data about Cairntorr is limited. Can you help with additional data?

104 Eaton Hall
3711 tons
Hull 322

119951

Yorkbrook
Primiero
Maria Teresa
1904

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (1907 ref. to Edward Nicholl), 2 (fine image), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 108 metres long, 342.3 ft., speed of 9 1/2 knots. Built for Eaton Hall Steamship Co. Ltd. (Edward Nicholl & Co. ('Nicholl'), the owners & managers), of Cardiff. The principal of Nicholl, i.e. Edward Nicholl (1862/1939) later became Sir Edward Nicholl (lots of references to the vessel in the volume at the link). Bought at the cost of £34,500. The vessel's first voyage was to Port Said, Egypt, with coal, then from Nicholaieff (Nikolayev, Ukraine, today) to Rotterdam with grain. In 1917, Hansen Brothers Ltd. became the managers. The vessel was sold, in 1918, to Hansen Shipping Co. Ltd. ('Hansen'), of Cardiff, with no change of vessel name or manager. Hansen may have later had financial problems because the vessel was sold by National Provincial Bank Ltd., the mortgage holder, in 1924, to Monument Steam Navigation Co. Ltd., ('York Line'), 'Richards, Longstaff & Co. Ltd' the managers, & renamed Yorkbrook. The vessel was sold again, in 1925 or 1926, to 'S.A. di Navigazione Compagnia del Tirreno', (or 'Compagnia del Tirreno S.A. di Navigazione'), of Genoa, Italy, & renamed Primiero. In 1927, the vessel was sold to Augusto Missiroli & Co., also of Genoa, & renamed Maria Teresa. In 1928, the vessel was sold again, to 'United Chartering and Steamship Co. S.A.', of Genoa. 'G. M. Chapira' & 'Depositi Italiani di Carboni Industriali' became the managers, in 1929 & 1931 respectively. On Oct. 5, 1931, the vessel arrived at Genoa, Italy, to be broken up. Maybe actually broken up in 1932. WWW data about the vessel is limited. Can you help with additional data?

105   Nairn
3627 tons
Hull 323

118644
1904

A steel, single screw 'turret' steamer. Used as a collier. Per 1 (data), 2 & 3 (Malwa), 4 ('uboat.net', sinking, Nairn), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 339.6 ft. (about 108 metres) long. Built for Dunrobin Shipping Co. Ltd. (A. M. Sutherland the manager?), of Newcastle. It would seem that from 1906 to 1908, the vessel was owned by J. B. Murray & Co., of Glasgow. In 1908, Park Steam Ship Co. Ltd., (Col. J. Smith Park M.V.O.), also of Glasgow, acquired the vessel. In 1910, at a date not stated, the vessel was in collision with Malwa, a P&O Lines passenger liner, off Colombo, Ceylon, now Sri Lanka. On Aug. 27, (or Aug. 28) 1917, while en route from Malta to Port Said with a cargo of coal, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by Austrian submarine k.u.k. U14, Korvettenkapitän Georg Ritter von Trapp in command, & sank. In the Mediterranean. At 34.05N/19.16E. Off the coast of Libya, N. of Benghazi. No lives were lost. Can you help with additional data?

106   Trowbridge
3712 tons
Hull 320

118451
1904

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (data), 2 (1917 loss), 3 (Trowbridge 1917), 4 (U-63), 5 ('uboat.net', sinking Trowbridge, plus earlier damage), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 104.3 metres (342.3 ft.) long. Built for Temperley Steam Shipping Co. Ltd. But not included in the partial list of 'Temperley' ships here. On Apl. 11, 1907, the vessel ran ashore on Komariya Ridge, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), while en route from Calcutta to Bombay (both India) with a cargo of coal. The holds were reported full of water. I presume that she survived however, since rather later, in 1917, she was damaged while on charter to the Crown. That was on Feb. 14, 1917, when the vessel was attacked by U-38, Korvettenkapitän Max Valentiner in command, while en route from Barry to Alexandria, Egypt. No lives were lost. Max Valentiner was an amazingly successful & much decorated commander, sinking 144 Allied ships in WW1 & damaging many more. At 36.41N/12.54E, in the Mediterranean, S. of Sicily. And on Nov. 14, 1917, the defensively armed vessel was torpedoed & sunk by U-63, Kapitänleutnant Otto Schultze in command, 12 miles SE of Cape de Gata, SE coast of Spain near Almeria, while en route from Blyth to Alexandria, again loaded with coal. No lives were lost. Can you help with additional data? An image, perhaps?

107 Whateley Hall
3712 (or 3757) tons
Hull 321

119946

Yorkriver
Ronchi
San Matteo
1904

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (brief ref., 50% down, 'The Hall Line'), 2 (Jun. 18, 1917), 3 (image, 50% down, San Matteo, carrying timber), 4 (launch image, also -02), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 104.3 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, (or 324 1/4 ft., 342.3 ft, or maybe 349.4 ft.), speed of 9 1/2 knots. Built for The "Whateley Hall" Steamship Company, Ltd., of Cardiff, Wales, Edward Nicholl & Co., ('Hall Line'), the vessel's major owners & manager. The principal of Edward Nicholl & Co., i.e. Edward Nicholl (1862/1939) later became Sir Edward Nicholl (lots of references to the vessel in the volume at the link). The vessel was the 100th turret ship built by Doxford. Named after 'Whateley Hall', (sold & demolished in 1935 or maybe burned down in 1936), at Castle Bromwich, Birmingham, the property of Frederick Knight, Nicholl's first investor. Christened by Miss Knight. Bought at the cost of £34,500. The vessel's first voyage was to Port Said, Egypt, with coal, then from Nicholaieff (Nikolayev, Ukraine, today) to Rotterdam with grain. The vessel assisted Broadgarth, a Middlesbrough vessel, which had run aground in the Black Sea, but have not read exactly when - & I cannot retrace where I read it. In 1917, the managers became Sven Wohlford Hansen & then Hansen Brothers Ltd. On Jun. 18, 1917, the vessel was attacked by U-boat gunfire W. of Gibraltar, & presumably survived the attack. In 1917 or 1918, the vessel, along with 7 other fleet vessels, was sold to Hansen Steamship Company, Ltd. (principals Sven Wohlford Hansen & Vyvyan Robinson), of Cardiff (or London). Hansen may have later had financial problems because the vessel was sold by National Provincial Bank Ltd., the mortgage holder, in 1924, to Monument Steam Navigation Co. Ltd., ('York Line'), 'Richards, Longstaff & Co. Ltd' the managers, & renamed Yorkriver. The vessel may have been renamed 'York River' in 1925. In 1925, the vessel was sold to 'Parodi & Corrado S.A.', of Genoa, Italy, & in 1926 renamed Ronchi. In 1929, the vessel was acquired by 'S.A. E. V. Parodi', also of Genoa, with no change of vessel name. The vessel was sold again, in 1934, to 'M. Scudari', of Catania, Italy, & renamed San Matteo. On Jan. 28, 1937, while en route from Gdynia, Poland, to Italy with a cargo of coal, the vessel was wrecked in a heavy gale near Bornholm, a Danish island in the Baltic, between Sweden & Poland. To be more specific, the vessel was wrecked on the Stolp (or Stolpe) Bank, 17 (or maybe 28) miles north of Stolpmunde, Poland, today's Ustka. All 40 of her crew, were drowned. I read that an image of Whateley Hall exists in France, entering Rouen harbour, France, in Oct. 1914. Can you help with additional data? An image, perhaps?

108 Belle of France
3876 tons
Hull 340

120905
1905

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (ref. #340), 2 ('uboat.net', 1916 loss, Belle of France), 3 (ref to U-33, page 125), 4 (U-21), 5 (ref. Belle Agency Limited), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 111 metres long, 352.0 ft., speed of 10 knots. Built for Belle of France Steamship Co. Ltd., (Crow, Rudolf & Co. ('Crow'), the managers), of Liverpool. But maybe not. 1 indicates that Crow were the original owners. They went bankrupt in early 1914, it would appear. Belle Agency Ltd. became the managers. On Feb. 1, 1916, when maybe owned by Belle Agency Limited (possibly sold therefore?), the vessel was torpedoed & sunk by U-21, Kapitänleutnant Otto Hersing in command, 126 miles NW by W. of Alexandria, Egypt, while en route from Karachi, Pakistan, to Algiers, Algeria, with a cargo of grain. At 32.30N/27.45E. 19 lives were lost. The captain survived. 3 states that vessel was sunk by U-33.  Can you help with additional data? Or correct the above. An image, perhaps?

109 Carthusian
4121 tons
Hull 347

85278

Dumfries
1905

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (data Carthusian), 2 (1915 loss), 3 (19 May 1915, Dumfries), 4 ('uboat.net', sinking, image, Dumfries), 5 ('wrecksite.eu', sinking, Dumfries), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 350.0 ft. (about 111 metres) long. Built for J. Mathias & Sons ('Mathias'), of Aberystwyth, Wales. I read that in 1908, Cambrian Steam Ship Co. Ltd. were the registered owners with Mathias the managers. The vessel was sold, in 1915, to Sutherland Steamship Co. Ltd., A. Munro Sutherland, the manager, both of Newcastle, & renamed Dumfries. At 11.00 a.m. on May 19, 1915, while en route from Cardiff to Leghorn (Livorno), Italy, with a cargo of coal, the vessel was torpedoed & sunk by U-27, Kapitänleutnant Bernd Wegener in command, at 50.46N/05.02W, 13 miles N. of Trevose Head, Cornwall. 2 lives (have also read 1 only) were lost. Can you help with additional data? An image, perhaps?

110 Gellivare
1992 tons
Hull 344

4463
1905

A 'turret' steamer. An ore carrier. Per 1 (fleet list, #5), 2 (launch), 3 (page in Swedish & image), 4 (Norwegian Gellivare page), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 88 metres long (84.2 metres between perpendiculars), speed of 9 knots. Sister to Kiruna. Built for 'Rederi A/B Luleå-Ofoten', (have also read Trafikaktiebolaget-Grangesberg-Oxelosund), (Welin or P. Tham the managers?), of Stockholm, Sweden. P. A. Weiling became the managers in 1906. On May 19, 1916 'Överförd till Trafik Ab Grängesberg-Oxelösund, Stockholm.', which means (thanks to Pontus Skeppstam of the U.K.) 'Transferred to Trafik AB Grängesberg-Oxelösund, of Stockholm'. AB means a limited company, I gather. In 1920, G. Dillner became the managers. In Sep. 1933, the vessel was sold to Lindholmens of Göteborg (Gothenburg) to be broken up. Can you help?

111 Grindon Hall
3721 tons
Hull 346

119978
1905

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (data), 2 (1907/8 Times of London extracts), 3 (crew list), 4 (ref. to 1908 Board of Trade Inquiry into loss), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 342.2 ft. (about 110 metres) long. Built for 'Grindon Hall Steamship Company Ltd.', of Cardiff, (Edward Nicholl & Co., the major owners & managers). The principal of Edward Nicholl & Co., i.e. Edward Nicholl (1862/1939) later became Sir Edward Nicholl. Bought at the cost of £34,500. On Dec. 4, 1907, Grindon Hall left Sulina (Romania, at the mouth of Sulina branch of the Danube River), in the Black Sea, for Glasgow, with a cargo of maize & barley. She was never heard from again, & it is presumed she was lost with all hands in the Black Sea. There was, it would seem, no report of her passing the Bosphorus (or Bosporus), which data is, however, not conclusive on its own. But ... On Jan. 9, 1908, the Times of London reported that a damaged lifeboat from the ship was found in the Black Sea. The Times of London extracts state that 'Edward Nicholl and Co.', of Cardiff, were then the owners. Hall Line. Insured for £30,000. An e-Bay item, now expired, was a 1908 Workman's Compensation Claim re William Roberts, a steward who perished. The vessel was replaced with another Doxford 'turret ship', built in 1908, & also named Grindon Hall. It would be good to access the 1908 Board of Trade Report referred to above. There were some confusing aspects to the record of this vessel, but I think they are now resolved. The volume available above (Nicholl), neither references the loss of Grindon Hall nor mentions the replacement vessel of the same name. Not great issues, perhaps, especially since WW1 losses are not mentioned either. But it does give, at page #99, financial results of the vessel's operations from Sep. 26, 1905 through Nov. 27, 1908. That seemed to be a strange end date indeed, since it was almost a year after the ship was lost. I believe, however, that the solution emerges, thanks to data provided by Barry Quest re the 2nd Grindon Hall. It is clear that Nov. 27, 1908 was the end date of a voyage of that 2nd vessel. Now each Nicholl ship was owned by a separate 'company' or group of investors. I conclude that the company which owned this vessel, received the insurance funds when it was lost, & with those funds bought the replacement vessel of the same name. So the financial results to which reference is made are the results of that company covering 2 vessels of the identical name. Which makes sense, I think. Can you add anything? Or provide an image?

112 Hatumet
4147 tons
Hull 343

120605

Rassay
1905

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (Lima, 75% down), 2 (NY Times article Feb. 14, 1910), 3 & 4 (accounts of the Lima wreck & rescue), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 106.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 350 ft., speed of 10 knots. Built for Hathor Steam Ship Co. Ltd. (H. B. & A. Gourlay), of London. On Feb. 5, 1910, Lima, a passenger liner of 4943 tons built in 1907, en route from the Clyde & Liverpool for Callao, Peru, & commanded by Percy M. Jacobs ('Jacobs'), ran ashore in bad weather including fog on Huamblin Island, about 100 miles S. of Chiloé Island, Chile. At 44.45S/75.12W. References say that the vessel, ran ashore in the Strait of Magellan but it would seem that Huamblin Island is a long way N. of the Strait. Hatumet, commanded by Capt. J. Peters, saw the distress signals & rescued '205 persons, of whom 188 were passengers, including all the women and children'. One by one, they were lowered by rope, in darkness, to two waiting Hatumet lifeboats, boats which were manned, I read, by Lima seamen & commanded respectively by Lima's Chief Officer I. Nicholson & by Lima's boatswain. 6 of the crew of Nicholson's lifeboat (including Nicholson) lost their lives when the boat overturned in high seas & they were swept away, however 3 indicates that in fact 50 more were lost by drowning, including Lima's chief mate. Hatumet, in danger of being herself swept onto the rocks, made for Ancud, at the N. end of Chiloé Island. Many rescue vessels were dispatched. I read that a silver medal of the 'Liverpool Shipwreck and Humane Society' was awarded to J. McClusky, boatswain, presumably of Lima, for his gallant conduct in the rescue, along with the sum of £5. Other medals etc. were also awarded, including silver medals to Jacobs & three able seamen who presumably served as lifeboat crew. The remaining 88 persons aboard Lima were later taken off, by rocket apparatus, by Blanca Encalada or maybe by Chilean cruiser Ministro Centro. Not sure. Nor am I sure of the date on which the 88 were rescued - the data is confusing - however it would seem to have been 15 days after Lima struck (per 85% down on this 'pdf' page). Hatumet was sold, in 1915 (or maybe 1914), to Isles Steam Shipping Co. Ltd., of London, B. J. Sutherland & Co. Ltd., of Newcastle, the managers. And in 1919 was renamed Rassay. In 1923, Rassay was acquired by B. J. Sutherland & Co. Ltd., of Newcastle, with no change of name. The images at left are shown thanks to Sax Jarritt, whose father-in-law served aboard Rassay in the spring of 1920, particularly on a voyage from Hull to Bahia Blanca, Argentina, to pick up a cargo of grain. In Jun. 1932, the vessel was broken up at the Gateshead facilities of J. J. King & Sons. Can you help with additional data? 

113 Kiruna
2004 tons
Hull 342
1905

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (fleet list, #4), 2 (maiden voyage), 3 (page in Swedish), 4 (Kiruna, page with 3 images), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 84.2 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 276.4 ft., named, per Björn Waldenström, after the largest deposit of iron ore in Sweden. Sister to Gellivare. Her maiden voyage was to Stockholm, on Jun. 24, 1905. Built for 'Rederi A/B Luleå-Ofoten', (have also read Trafikaktiebolaget-Grangesberg-Oxelosund), (P. Tham the managers), of Stockholm, Sweden. In 1906, P. A. Weiling became the manager. On Feb. 16, 1913, en route from Oxelösund, Sweden, to Rotterdam, with a cargo of iron ore, the vessel collided with the German steamer Cæsar or Caesar in the North Sea. And sank, with no loss of life. Can you help with additional data? 

114 Komura
2112 tons
Hull 348

120646

Hwa Sung
1905

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (McIlwraith McEacharn, plus data & 3 images, Komura, 45% down), 2 (Scottish Line, data Komura, states vessel was renamed 'Hwa Sing'), 3 (3 fine images, State Library of New South Wales), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 90.1 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 295.5 ft., speed of 10 1/2 knots. 2 masts, single screw. Built for 'McIlwraith, McEacharn & Co. Proprietary Limited', of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, & also of London, (Scottish Line), for the Australian coastal trade. I read that that company was restyled in 1913 & became 'McIlwraith, McEacharn’s Line Proprietary Ltd.' A long expired e-Bay item was a Captain's Abstract or Log, with details, in 500 pages, of the Australian coastal voyages of the vessel from Oct. 15, 1914 to Dec. 6, 1920. In 1931, the vessel was sold to the 'Hwa Sung Steam Ship Co. Ltd.', of Shanghai, China, & renamed Hwa Sung. I read that the vessel was scuttled, as a blockship, in the Upper Yangtse River, China, in 1938. Presumably related to the Second Sino-Japanese War which commenced in Jul. 1937. Can anybody advise us of the circumstances. Or otherwise help with additional data?

115 Nordland
3222 (or 3549, 3779 or 3823) tons
Hull 334

Rigel
1905

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (page in Swedish, modest image), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 107.3 (or 106.6 or 100.52) metres long, 362 ft. 10 in., speed of 9 (or 8) knots. Built for 'Ångfartygs A/B Tirfing (Broström)', of Göteborg (Gothenburg), Sweden. The vessel was sold, in 1930, to 'Red. A/B Iris' (C. H. Abrahamsen managers & maybe the owners also), of Stockholm, Sweden, & renamed Rigel. From 1932 to 1942, the vessel would seem to have become a Finnish vessel. A now expired link stated 'After only two years she was flagged out to Finland under management of Emm. Erikson from Mariehamn. Her actual owner remained C. Abrahamsen.' So Abrahamsen were, in fact, the owners? Returned to Swedish flag in 1942. Can anybody tell us about her service during the years of WW2? At 11:40 p.m. on Mar. 4, 1953, Rigel, carrying iron ore from Oxelösund, Sweden, to Port Talbot, Wales, was in collision with Italian vessel Senegal, in the North Sea off the mouth of the Thames - at 51.41N/2.16E, which was stated, I read, to be SE of the Galloper Light Vessel. I have also read however, in a data 'snippet' that the collision was off the Belgian coast. But if you locate the above coordinates in an atlas, it seems to be neither off the mouth of the Thames nor particularly close to the Belgian coast. Rigel was hit amidships & sank. 29 survivors - the reference seemed to mean there was, in fact, no loss of life. Who rescued the crew, I wonder? The circumstances? Miramar suggest that Senegal was at anchor. If that was so, it was i) a strange place to anchor unless there was dense fog or some other good reason, ii) how could Rigel have been hit amidships if Senegal was at anchor? Very often data about relatively recent times is just not WWW available. Can you correct the above and/or otherwise provide additional data?

116 Österland
4085 (or 4120) tons
Hull 345

4551

Österhav
1905

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 & 2 (images as Österhav, with further links re the 2nd item in 'comments'), 3 (28.3.1936), 4 (1936), 5 (data & image, Swedish page), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 105.6 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 346.3 ft. Built for 'Ångfartygs A/B Tirfing' (Axel Broström & Son), of Gothenburg, Sweden. The vessel became Österhav in 1932 & was sold that year to 'Rederi AB Turret' of Finland, Kristian Hansen the manager. Dan Brostrom became the manager in 1917 & S. G. Janson the manager in 1926. In 1936, the vessel was registered at Helsingfors, it would seem. On Mar. 28, 1936, in thick fog, Österhav struck rocks near the Stacks at Duncansby Head, Scotland (one of the most northerly parts of mainland Scotland near John o' Groats), while carrying a cargo of wood pulp from Rauma (in Finnish Raumo), Finland, to Ellesmere Port, River Mersey. She backed off the rocks, badly holed, & was beached in Sinclair's Bay, 2 miles N. of Wick, where her cargo was discharged by a salvage vessel. The Wick lifeboat rescued the entire crew of 25 men & 4 women, & also the captain's dog (need picture!). All were landed at Ackergill. The vessel was later re-floated & taken S. to Cromarty Firth (Moray Firth). Now Miramar indicates that the vessel was broken up 'Stockton'. It would seem that that reference means that the vessel was sold to Stockton Salvage Company, with the intent of their using Österhav to carry heavy machinery & other material from HMS Natal, which had been lying in Cromarty Firth since 1915. Did Österhav complete that assignment?  Via 2, the vessel may have been broken up at Cromarty Firth. I gather that 'The Doxford Turret Ships' states that the vessel was scrapped at Stockton-on-Tees. The 5th image at left, of Österhav, was referenced 'Marvictor Cia Naviera SA' - can anybody explain that reference. And can you correct the above, and/or add anything?

117 Pearlmoor
4119 (or 4097) tons
Hull 349

120613

Pearlmead
Anneliese
Uru
1905

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (Lloyd Brasileiro, Uru), 2 (1912 rescue), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 110 metres long, 106.7 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 350.0 ft., speed of 10 knots. Built for Moor Line Ltd., of London, (Sir Walter Runciman & Co. the managers). A modest rescue. On Aug. 13, 1912, when in the Red Sea, the vessel rescued a trimmer from Ethiope, who had fallen into the sea when Ethiope was sailing about 8 miles ahead of Pearlmoor. The vessel was sold, in 1920, to Western Counties Shipping, of Cardiff, E. Edwards & Sons Ltd. the managers, & renamed Pearlmead. In 1922, the vessel was sold to F. V. Eberhardt, of London, & later that same year sold to Karck & Knott, also of London. Could both those names, however, be agents' names rather than owners' names? And the references are rather changes of managers? In 1923, the vessel was sold to Emder Reederei, of Hamburg, Germany, & renamed Anneliese. In 1925, the vessel was sold to 'Lloyd Brasileiro', of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, & renamed Uru. The vessel arrived, in Jun. 1957, at the Rio de Janeiro ship breaking facilities of 'Laminacao', to be broken up. Can you add anything? 

118 Queda
7703 tons
Hull 337

121238
1905

A 'turret' steamer. In fact the biggest such steamer constructed. Per 1  [British India, Queda (1)], 2 (a limited ref. in para 4, identical data at other sites also), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 143 metres long, 138.7 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 455.2 ft., speed of 12 knots. Built for British India Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. In 1923, the vessel was sold to T. Campanella, of Genoa, Italy, with no change of vessel name. On Nov. 21, 1923, the vessel arrived at Spezia, northern Italy, to be broken up. Maybe actually scrapped in 1924. WWW data was most limited re this vessel, but thanks to Jochen Kemsa, we are able to present a 5 page 1906 article, in German, re both Queda & Wellington, including plans, ex 'Zeitschrift des Vereins Deutscher Ingenieure' - Magazine of the German Association of Engineers. Here:- A, B, C, D, E. Can you add anything additional! Another image?

119 Querimba
7696 (later 7668) tons
Hull 339

121245

Maria Enrica
1905

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 [British India, Querimba (1)], 2 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyds Register data, Maria Enrica, 1930/31 thru 1933/34), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 143 metres long, 138.8 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 455.2 ft., speed likely of 12 knots, signal letters NXOG. Built for British India Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. In 1923, the vessel was sold to Emanuele Bozzo & Luigi Mortola, of Genoa, Italy, & renamed Maria Enrica. In the 2nd quarter of 1933, the vessel was apparently broken up at Genoa. WWW available data is essentially non-existent re this vessel. Need help! Another image?

120 Wellington
5600 tons
Hull 330

119967
1905

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (page bottom, 16 September 1918), 2 (Seneca's role, p.25 thru 33), 3 (U-118), 4 ('uboat.net', Wellington), 5 (image, Wellington, thanks to Newcastle Libraries. A large & fine set of largely Newcastle images is available here 6), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 119.0 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 390.3 ft., speed of 10 knots. Built for Wellington Steam Ship Company Limited ('Wellington'), (W. J. Tatem & Co. the managers) of Cardiff, Wales. The largest Cardiff owned ship at that time, I read. At an unknown date, the vessel went aground at Gaidaro Rocks, Tenedos, & was assisted by Recovery, a salvage vessel. Tenedos or Bozcaada, is a small Turkish island in the Mediterranean, near to Troy & the Dardanelles. Wellington was wound up voluntarily in late 1909, at which time the vessel was sold to Tatem Steam Navigation Co., Ltd. In 1917, the vessel was sold again, to Atlantic Shipping & Trading Co. Ltd., of London?, W. J. Tatem & Co., of Cardiff, the managers. I read that the vessel was torpedoed by UB-40, Kapitänleutnant Hans Howaldt in command, on Oct. 19, 1917, while 5 miles SSE. of Portland Bill, en route from the Tyne to Genoa with a cargo of coal. The vessel was beached at Portland Roads, later re-floated, repaired & returned to duty. No loss of life. Later, on Sep. 16, 1918, the vessel was en route from Newport, Wales, to Naples, Italy, again with a cargo of coal. A part of 21 ship convoy OM 99 bound for Gibraltar, escorted solely by Seneca,  a U.S. Coast Guard cutter. Wellington was torpedoed without warning by U-118, Kapitänleutnant Herbert Stohwasser in command, 175 miles N. by W. of Cape Villano, NW Spain, (at 45.48N/10.58W). Seneca attempted valiantly to save the Wellington. 20 Seneca volunteers boarded the seriously damaged vessel, which Wellington's crew had abandoned, & attempted to make the port of Brest, France, assisted by 12 of Wellington's crew (including her captain) who had re-boarded her. The ship later sank, however, in a major gale. After valiant attempts to keep the ship moving & afloat, the combined crews took to rafts when she sank, but many were lost, drowned in the cold seas. Seneca lost 11 of its personnel in the attempt, while 5 of the Wellington crew were lost including its Captain (Donovan). Thanks to Jochen Kemsa, we are able to present a 5 page 1906 article, in German, re both Wellington & Queda, including plans, ex 'Zeitschrift des Vereins Deutscher Ingenieure' - Magazine of the German Association of Engineers. Here:- A, B, C, D, E. Still need help! The date of the Gaidaro/Tenedos grounding in particular.

121 Countess Warwick
4108 tons
Hull 366

123168

Kincardine
1906

A 'turret' steamer, a collier. Per 1 (sinking ref. Kincardine), 2 ('u-boat.net', sinking Kincardine), 3 (U-70), 4 (p. 216, A. J. Tennent volume, Kincardine), 5 (ref., # 366), 6 (ref. to builder's model, & data), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 350.0 ft. (about 111 metres) long, 106.7 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 9 1/2 knots. Built for Countess Warwick Steamship Co. Ltd. ('Warwick'), [W. J. Williams & Co. ('Williams'), the managers] of Cardiff, Wales. But maybe not. 5 states Williams was the owner & 'Williams & Mordey', the managers, while 6 states Warwick was the owner & 'Williams & Mordey' were the managers. The vessel was sold, in 1916 (or 1915), to Sutherland Steamship Co. Ltd., of Newcastle, (A. M. Sutherland, the manager), & renamed Kincardine. On Mar. 3, 1917, defensively armed, the vessel was torpedoed without warning by U-70, Kapitänleutnant Otto Wünsche in command, & sunk 20 miles NE of Tearaght Island, off the SW coast of Ireland, (at 52.22N/10.26W), while en route from Cardiff, Wales, to Genoa, Italy, with a cargo of Welsh steam coal. No lives were lost, it would appear, though I cannot tell you how the crew were rescued. Need help! Note: The builder's model sold for $14,700 in a 2005 auction.

122 Drumcondra
4691 tons
Hull 355

120926

Lübeck
S. E. Calvert
Aquitania
Mar Glauco
Mokatam
1906

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (extensive data, Drumcondra), 2 (refs. to Mokatam, 75% down), 3 (data & images as S. E. Calvert & Mar Glauco), 4 (modest image at Tranóy in Jul. 1914), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 380.8 ft. (about 120 metres) long, speed of 8 or 8 1/2 knots. Built for Astral Shipping (or Steamship) Co. Ltd., of Liverpool, & registered there (Joseph Chadwick & Son Ltd., the managers). The vessel was sold, in 1913, to 'L. Possehl & Co.' of Lübeck, Germany, & renamed Lübeck. In Jul. 1914, the vessel was temporarily stranded at Tranóy, which is, I am advised, where the pilots board ships going to Narvik, Norway, to load iron ore. In 1915, the vessel was sold to 'Nordisches Erzkontor G.m.b.H.', of Stettin, Germany. At the end of WW1, in 1919, the vessel became a British vessel, a war reparation, owned by the Shipping Controller, & managed by Turner, Brightman & Co., of London. It was sold, in 1921, to Calvert Steamship Co. Ltd., of Goole, Yorkshire, (J. S. Calvert, probably the owner) & renamed S. E. Calvert. Goole is a 45 miles inland port, on the Ouse River. The vessel was sold again, in 1924 (or 1923), to 'Ditta Luigi Pittaluga Vapori', of Genoa, Italy, & renamed Aquitania. And in 1927, sold once again, to M. Maresca & Co., also of Genoa, & renamed Mar Glauco. In Jun. 1940, the vessel was laid up at Philadelphia & on Sep. 12, 1941 was seized by the U.S. Government & renamed Mokatam. The vessel was operated by the U.S. Maritime Commission under Panamanian flag, & managed by Grace Line. In 1943, the vessel was transferred to the U.S. Army, & was used as a storage facility at Morotai, an island in the Molucca Islands of Indonesia. It was damaged there in a Japanese air attack on or about Feb. 27, 1944. Was later repaired at Sydney, New South Wales ('NSW'), Australia. In 1946 it was laid up at Newcastle, NSW, & in 1949 sold to 'R. Cunningham & H. Sutherland' & cut down to tank top at Stockton, NSW. Was eventually beached in the Platt's Channel, Hunter River, as a 'landfill bulkhead'. It is surely still there today! Quite a history! Can you add anything!

123 Duffield
3838 tons
Hull 372

122865

Fernando
1906

A 'turret' steamer cargo ship. Per 1 ('pdf' file, early Duffield reference I believe, bottom page 5), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Data most limited. 106.8 metres long, 350.3 ft., speed of 9 knots. Built for Northern Petroleum Tank Steamship Co. Ltd. of Newcastle, Hunting & Son the managers. Ex 1 'The steering gear was steam driven. There was no shipboard electricity and therefore no refrigeration; lighting throughout was by kerosene wick lamp. The Duffield sailed with a cargo of steel rails from Middlesbrough to Port Sudan. Before returning to the UK, the Duffield traded for 12 months carrying coal, trading between Calcutta, Colombo and the Red Sea port of Djibouti.' The vessel was sold, in Feb. 1925, to 'Cia. Nav. Pereda', of Colon, Panama, & renamed Fernando. In 1926, then owned by 'Naviera Pereda SA', (the same company?), the vessel was registered at Bilbao, Spain. On Oct. 1, 1932, the vessel arrived at the Santander, Spain, ship breaking facilities of Andres Vega Gorostegui, to be broken up. Can you provide more data?

124   Elgin
3835 tons
Hull 367

122855

Gwynmead
Virgo
1906

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (brief ref. in Swedish to Gwynmead, 90% down page), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Data most limited. 106.8 metres long, 350.5 ft., speed of 9 knots. Built for B. J. Sutherland & Co. Ltd., of Newcastle. In 1908 or 1909, the vessel was transferred to Munro Shipping Co. Ltd., of Newcastle, B. J. Sutherland & Co. Ltd. the managers, with no change of vessel name. And in 1911 or 1912 was transferred again to Sutherland Steamship Co. Ltd. ('Sutherland'), also of Newcastle, A. M. Sutherland the manager, again with no change of vessel name. The vessel was sold, in 1920, to 'Western Counties Shipping Company Limited' ('Western'), of Cardiff, E. Edwards & Sons the managers, & renamed Gwynmead. Western, I read, failed in 1922 & its fleet vessels became owned, I believe, by 'Walter Runciman & Co. Ltd.' ('Runciman'). But Gwynmead would seem to have been earlier sold, to Isles Steam Shipping Co. Ltd., of Newcastle. In 1923 it became owned by Sutherland again. (Have also read that the vessel was indeed sold in 1922 to Runciman). The vessel was sold, in 1929, to Rederi A/B Iris, of Stockholm, Sweden, C. Abrahamsen the manager, & renamed Virgo. 1 seems to indicate, (webmaster's lack of Swedish), that the vessel was sold for £10,350. And renamed Vigo, but I think that may be a typing mistake. In 1932, the vessel was registered at Mariehamn, Finland - same owner it would seem. In Feb. 1936, the vessel was broken up at Grays, Essex. Can you provide more data?

125 Mersario
3847 tons
Hull 363

121350
1906

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 ('u-boat.net', 1917 sinking), 2 (account of sinking), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Data is limited. 106.8 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 350.4 ft., speed of 9 1/2 knots. Built for 'Steamship Mersario Co. Ltd.', 'Maclay & McIntyre' of Glasgow, the managers. The vessel was sold, in 1914, to 'Reid Steamship Co. Ltd.' ('Reid'), of London, W. S. Reid the managers, but the vessel stayed registered at Glasgow. In 1915 & 1916, 'Reid, Rigg & Thoe Ltd.' & then 'T. H. Griffiths & Co. (Depots), Ltd.', of Cardiff, became the managers. Reid, it would seem, was acquired by 'Stathe Steamship Company', of Cardiff, in 1917. On Sep. 16, 1917, Elias Lloyd maybe in command, the vessel left Barry, Wales, with a cargo of coal & coke, bound for Italy. At 11:15 a.m. on Oct. 1, 1917, while in the Atlantic, 86 miles off the coast of Morocco, the vessel was hit by a single torpedo fired by U-39, the much decorated Kapitänleutnant Walther Forstmann in command. At 35.39N/07.53W, 86 miles WxN of Cape Spartel. Now Aled Williams, who lost his great nephew in the attack, (William T. G. Jones ('Jones'), a seaman), indicates at 2, i) that the ship was rather lost at (nearby) 35.40N/7.38W & ii) that the ship was rather en route to Alexandria, Egypt. The vessel sank in 3 minutes, & turned turtle as she sank. One seaman was killed by the explosion & Jones & one other went down with the ship. U-39 surfaced, took R. Chadwick, 3rd engineer, aboard for questioning, & released him on some wreckage, from which he was rescued by the surviving crew who had taken to a lifeboat. Early the next day, the survivors were rescued by La Somme, a French steamer, (built in 1897 by 'Blumer' as City of York) & landed at Gibraltar. One of the Mersario survivors, returning to U.K. aboard Manchuria, had the misfortune, I read, of being torpedoed a second time, when that ship was hit on Oct. 17, 1917, with the loss of 26 lives. He wasn't so lucky the second time around & was one of the 26 lost. Can you provide more data? An image?

126 Newbiggin
3836 tons
Hull 365

122850

Frankier
Tuskar Light
1906

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (image), 2 (Lloyd Royal Belge Frankier), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Data quite limited. 106.8 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 9 1/2 knots. Built for Newcastle Steamship Co. Ltd., of Newcastle, John J. Forster & Charles M. Forster the managers. In 1915, the vessel was sold to 'Brijs & Gylsen Ltd.' (Brys & Gylsen), of London, & renamed Frankier. The vessel was transferred, in 1918 (no name change), to 'Lloyd Royal Belge (Great Britain) Ltd.' of London. In 1923, the vessel was sold to Bristol Channel Steamers Ltd., of Cardiff, Wales, J. German & Co. the managers, & renamed Tuskar Light. Lewis Lougher & Co. Ltd., of Cardiff, became the managers in 1926. On May 12, 1932, the vessel arrived at Bilbao, Spain, to be broken up. Need help!

127   Newbridge
3737 tons
Hull 358

123648
1906

A 'turret' steamer, a collier. Per 1 (data, Newbridge), 2 (scuttling, 80% down) & 3 (scuttling, para #3), 4 (scuttling with map of Rufiji estuary), 5 & 6 (Königsberg), 7 (3 lives lost), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 104.3 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 342.1 ft., speed of 9 knots. Built for Temperley Steam Shipping Co. Ltd., of London, J. Temperley & Co. the managers. But not included in the partial list of 'Temperley' ships here. In Oct. & early Nov. 1914, SMS Königsberg, a German cruiser, was, as a result of a serious engine failure, blockaded in the Rufiji Estuary, German East Africa (S. of modern-day Dar es Salaam, Tanzania). Newbridge was ordered by the Admiralty to be scuttled to block her escape. Newbridge, together with a small fleet of vessels including a ship armed with two torpedoes (in case the scuttling was unsuccessful) moved upstream. Newbridge was successfully scuttled, on Nov. 11, 1914, in Ssuninga (or Simba Uranga) channel. The Newbridge crew was rescued by Duplex but 3 lives were lost. WWW data about the vessel is most limited. Can you add anything?

128 Nonsuch
3826 tons
Hull 359

123642

Clearway
Efstathios
Werner Kunstmann
Hermann Fritzen
1906

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (National Maritime Museum re builder's model), 2 (image, Hermann Fritzen), 3 (ref. p.61), 4 (image Nonsuch), 5 (4 images, Hermann Fritzen, but you must register to be able to see them), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 366 ft. (111.6 metres) long, 106.8 metres perpendicular to perpendicular (350.5 ft.), speed of 9 1/2 (or 8 1/2) knots. Built for Bowles Brothers ('Bowles'), of London. In 1911 or 1912, the vessel was transferred to Bowlines Ltd., with Bowles as the managers. In 1913, or maybe in 1914, the vessel was sold to Anglo-Oriental Navigation Co. Ltd., of London (or maybe of Calcutta, India), A. Yule & Co. the managers, & renamed Clearway. In 1920 or 1921, Edwards Steam Ship Co. Ltd., of London, acquired the vessel, Villiers Ltd., of Calcutta, the managers. In 1924 or 1925, the vessel was sold to S. E. Ambatielos, of Argostoli, Greece, & renamed Efstathios. Later in 1925, the vessel was sold to Wilhelm Kunstmann, of Stettin, Germany, & renamed Werner Kunstmann. In 1938, vessel was sold to 'Johs. Fritzen & Sohn vorm W. Kunstmann', (have also read 'Johs. Fritzen & Sohn vorm. Lexzau, Scharbau & Co.'), of Stettin, & renamed Hermann Fritzen. And in 1949, the vessel was sold to Johs Fritzen & Son., of Emden, with no change of vessel name, The vessel apparently sank in the harbour at Hamburg, Germany, on Nov. 4, 1944, as the result of an air raid by U.S. 8th Air Force bombers. But in 1949, (how interesting!), the vessel was raised, repaired & returned to service. Ten years later, on Apl. 24, 1959, the vessel arrived at the Hamburg ship breaking facilities of Eckhardt & Co. to be broken up.  Can you add anything?

129 Oxelösund
2061 (or 1954) tons
Hull 350

4515
1906

A 'turret' steamer. An ore carrier. Per 1 (#350), 2 (image, Oxelösund), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 89 metres long (85.6 metres between perpendiculars), 280.8 ft., speed of 9 1/2 knots. Built for 'Oxelösunds Rederiaktiebolaget A/B' (Percy Tham AB, the manager), of Oxelösund, Sweden. On Jun. 19, 1916, while en route from Holmsund to Norfleet with a cargo of wood pulp, the vessel capsized at Gefle Bay (92 miles NNW of Stockholm), Sweden. I have not read the circumstances, however Björn Waldenström advises that the cause was never determined & the wreck has never been found. WWW data is most limited. A old Christmas card from Oxelösund, on the Baltic Sea, that you will enjoy. Can you add anything?

130 Ryall
4107 (or 4226) tons
Hull 368

122860

Roland
Henrik Lund
1906

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (Norwegian 'pdf' Ref #107), 2 ('uboat.net', sinking, Henrik Lund), 3 (U-151), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 106.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular. The vessel was built for Red "R" Steamship Co. Ltd. of Newcastle, Stephens, Sutton & Stephens, of Newcastle, the owners & managers. In Jul. 1913, it was sold to 'Ångfartygs-AB Tirfing' (Broströmskoncernen or Dan Broström or Axel Brostrom & Sons, the managers), of Göteborg/ Gothenburg, Sweden, & renamed Roland. In Jan. 1916, the vessel was sold to 'A/S D/S Henrik Lund', Willy Gilbert the manager, of Bergen, Norway, & renamed Henrik Lund. On Jun. 10, 1918, while en route from Baltimore to Buenos Aires with a general cargo including coal, the vessel was torpedoed (or maybe hit by an explosive device instead) & captured & sunk by U-151, Korvettenkapitän Heinrich von Nostitz und Jänckendorff in command, off the coast of North Carolina. At 36.30N/71.29W. I needed help with the Norwegian text at 1. But Björn Waldenström has now kindly advised (thanks!) that it states that the vessel was en route from Norfolk, Virginia, to Rio de Janiero, with a cargo of coal & that the lifeboats were tied together with those from Vindeggen (also sunk) until they encountered the Danish Brosund, which took the crew members to New York. Can you help with more data?

131 Ryton
4136 (or 4169 or 4110) tons
Hull 351

122838

Hogland
Dampfem
Erika Fritzen
1906

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (data, in Norwegian, Dampfem), 2 (data & image, builder's style model, Ryton, Lot #114, sold Jul. 2008), 3 (German page, Nov. 29, 1940 ref. to an emergency call from Erika Fritzen, para 2, meaning unclear, even in translation), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 111 metres long overall, 106.7 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 350.2 ft., speed of 8 1/2 or 9 knots, signal letters LDHT. Built for Red "R" Steamship Co. Ltd., of Newcastle, (Stephens, Sutton & Stephens, the managers). In 1913, the vessel was sold to 'Ångfartygs-AB Tirfing' (Axel Brostrom & Son), of Göteborg /Gothenburg, Sweden, & renamed Hogland. In 1917, Dan Broström became the manager. In 1923 or 1924, the vessel was sold to 'Rederi A/S Damp', (Arth. H. Mathiesen), of Oslo, Norway' & renamed Dampfem. And in 1926, it was sold to 'A/G fur Handel & Verkehr' or 'Johs. Fritzen & Sohn', of Emden, Germany, (Lexzau Scharbau & Co., the managers), & renamed Erika Fritzen. In 1938, the owners were restyled as 'Johs. Fritzen & Sohn, vorm. Scharbau & Co.' I am advised that during WW2, the vessel was engaged in shipping coal between Norway & Germany. On Feb. 25 or 26, 1945, the vessel hit a mine & sank N. of Warnemünde on the Baltic coast. At 54.23N/11.59E. Can you help with more data?

132 Admiraal de Ruijter
5545 (or 5544) tons
Hull 389

Afrika
1907

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (Müller as ... 'Admiraal de Ruyter'), 2 (text in Dutch & large image, see thumbnail at left), 3 (data & image, but you now must be registered to access), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 118.9 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 390.0 ft., speed 9 1/2 (or maybe 10 1/2) knots. Built for 'Wm. Müller & Co.', (or 'W. H. Müller & Co's Algemeene Scheepvaart Maatschappij') of Rotterdam. The vessel was in the Black Sea when WW1 commenced. On Mar. 10, 1915, it became Naval Transporter No. 1 of the Russian Black Sea fleet. On Jun. 27, 1918, the vessel was seized by the Germans at Novorossiysk, in Southern Russia, on the Black Sea. It was returned to Wm. Müller & Co. in Nov. 1918. In 1927, the vessel was sold to 'Atlas Reederei AG', of Emden, Germany & renamed Afrika. In Q2 of 1933, the vessel was broken up at Finkenwarder, Germany. WWW data re the vessel is most limited. Can you help with additional data?

133 Billiter Buildings
3829 tons
Hull 379

123802

Claveresk
Renfrew
Ulversmead
Mari
Houstone
Lake Neuchatel
1907

A 'turret steamer'. Per 1 ('Skanfil', of Norway, image, Claveresk), 2 (data & model image etc., Christies, Claveresk), 3 (1918 lawsuit), 4 (B. J. Sutherland, Claveresk), 5 (ref. to Dec. 4, 1908 grounding, lower left), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 106.8 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 350.4 ft., speed of 9 (or 8) knots. Laid down as Billiter Buildings for J. Sunley & Co., of London. But, also in 1907, was acquired by Claverhill Steamship Co. Ltd. (Edmund Haslehurst & Co. managers), of London, & renamed Claveresk. On Dec. 4, 1908, the vessel ran aground near Suakin Harbour (NE Sudan). A Court of Inquiry into the matter was held at Bombay, India, on Jan 14, 15 & 18, 1909. I wonder what it concluded? In 1908 (or maybe in 1909), the vessel was sold to 'Sandhill Steamship Company', B. J. Sutherland & Co. Ltd., of Newcastle, the managers & likely the owners, (Miramar refer however to A. M. Sutherland in 1919) with no change of name. The vessel was sold again, or more likely transferred within 'Sutherland', in 1910, with no change of name. In 1913, the vessel was chartered, by 'Sutherland Steamship Company Ltd.', 'for about 5 years' to 'Earl Line Steamship Co.', of Pennsylvania, U.S.A. On Jan. 25, 1917, the vessel was requisitioned by the Admiralty, for WW1 service. In 1918, a significant court case resulted, which case ruled that the Admiralty requisition had legally terminated the 1913 charter. Sutherland did, in 1919, change her name to Renfrew, when that name became possible. In Feb. 1920, the vessel was sold again, for £130,000, to 'Western Counties Steamship Co.' ('Western'), of Cardiff, Wales, E. Edwards Sons & Co., of Cardiff, the managers, & renamed Ulversmead. Western must soon thereafter have failed, because its fleet of 8 ships was sold at auction in Aug. 1921. It would seem that Ulversmead was undergoing overhaul when sold. It was sold for £6,100 to Spanish buyers, presumably meaning 'C. de Zabala', of Peru, & renamed Mari. The vessel was moved to Spain & the overhaul was completed there. It would seem that the sale value may have related, in part, to her condition. The vessel was transferred to Spanish registry in 1926. In 1937, the vessel was sold to 'Phoenix Shipping Co.', of London, & renamed Houstone. The vessel was sold for the last time, in 1938, to 'Charles Strubin & Co. Ltd.', of London, & renamed Lake Neuchatel. In 1939, the vessel was purchased or maybe requisitioned by the British Government & on Oct. 21, 1939, was sunk/scuttled as a block ship at Kirk Sound, Scapa Flow, Orkney Islands. At 58.53.24N/ 002.53.54W. That was not quite the end of the story. She was salvaged in Jun. 1948, by Metal Industries Ltd., & was towed to Troon, Scotland, to be broken up. Can you add anything?

134 Billiter House
3830 tons
Hull 381

124172

Galavale
Renfrew
1907

A 'turret steamer'. Per 1 ('uboat.net', Renfrew sinking), 2 [B. J. Sutherland, Renfrew (2)], 3 & 4 (images, Galavale), 5 (1910 cyclone), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 106.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 350.0 ft., its speed?, capacity for 12 passengers. Laid down as Billiter House for J. Sunley & Co., of London. But delivered as Galavale for Vale Steamship Co. Ltd., 'A. Crawford Barr & Company' or 'Andrew Crawford & John C. Barr', the owners & managers, both of Glasgow. The vessel was chartered for the carriage of salt to Montevideo, Uruguay. In Apl. 1910, the vessel was damaged in a cyclone off Mauritius, but made it back to Mauritius 'in a terrible state', having lost one man overboard. A 1914 court case involving Cardiff Hall, but no detail is WWW available. In 1917, the vessel was sold to 'Irismere Steam Shipping Company Ltd.', B. J. Sutherland & Co. Ltd., of Glasgow, the manager, & renamed Renfrew. On Feb. 24, 1918, while en route from Bilbao, Spain, to Barrow in Furness, with a cargo of iron ore, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-91, Kapitänleutnant Alfred von Glasenapp in command, 8 miles SW of St. Ann's Head, near Milford Haven, St. George's Channel. The vessel sank. 41 (or maybe 40) lives were lost including the Captain (his name?). Have not read the circumstances. The WWW record for this vessel is limited. Can you help with additional data?

135 Billiter Square
3829 tons
Hull 383

123839

Claverley
1907

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (lots of data & fine image of Claverley & list of those who died. The model is of Nonsuch), 2 ('uboat.net', 1917 sinking), 3 (UB-38), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 106.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 350.1 ft. long, speed of 10 knots. Laid down as Billiter Square for J. Sunley & Co., of London. But, also in 1907, was acquired by Claverley Steam Shipping Co. Ltd. (Edmund Haslehurst & Co. the managers), of London & renamed Claverley. In 1908 (or 1909), the vessel was sold to Sandhill Shipping Co. Ltd. (B. J. Sutherland, the managers), of Newcastle. In 1911, sold to Sutherland Steamship Company Ltd. (A. M. Sutherland managers), also of Newcastle. On Aug. 20, 1917, while defensively armed & en route from the Tyne to Genoa, Italy, with a cargo of coal, the vessel was torpedoed by UB-38, Kapitänleutnant Wilhelm Amberger in command, 4 miles SE of Eddystone Lighthouse, 9 miles SW of Rame Head in Cornwall. 10 lives were lost. The captain survived. A large wreck, I had read at a now long gone WWW site, which lies in 66 metres of water at 50.08N/04.10W - known locally as the 'The Carrier'. But is that so? 1 seems to indicate that the wreck may not yet have been properly identified. WWW data about the vessel is limited. Can you add anything? 

136   Billiter Street
3834 tons
Hull 385

123841

Redbridge
Amerika
1907

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (data Redbridge), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 106.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 350.0 ft., speed of 9 knots. Laid down as Billiter Street for J. Sunley & Co., of London. But, also in 1907, & renamed as Redbridge, became a fleet vessel of Temperley Steam Shipping Co. Ltd., (J. Temperley & Co.) also of London. But not included in the partial list of 'Temperley' ships here. I read with interest that Redbridge assisted in the aftermath of a massive earthquake that demolished 90% of Messina, Sicily, southern Italy, in the early morning of Dec. 28, 1908. 7.5 on the Richter scale, with the epicenter in the Messina Strait between Sicily & mainland Italy. A 40 ft. tsunami followed. As many as 200,000 may have lost their lives throughout the region. In 1923, the vessel was sold to 'Atlas Reederei A.G.', of Emden, Germany, (Schulte & Bruns the managers) & renamed Amerika. Broken up by 'Bremer Vulkan' at Vegesack (or Bremer-Vegesack), Germany, in Q2 of 1934. Glad to have the data I do have. But WWW data about vessel is most limited. Can you add anything? An image?

137 Blötberg
4835 (or 4850) tons
Hull 387

Blommersdijk
1907

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (Batavier Line, Blötberg), 2 [Holland America Line, Blommersdijk (1)], 3 (image Blommersdijk & Dutch text), 4 (image Blötberg),  5, 6, 7 & 8 (all NY Times Archives), 9 ('u-boat.net', sinking, Blommersdijk), 10 (U-53), 11 (ship's model & data), 12 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 125.58 metres long overall, 120.2 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots. Built for 'Wm. Müller & Co.', (or 'W. H. Müller & Co's Algemeene Scheepvaart Maatschappij') (Batavier Line) of Rotterdam. In Mar. 1915, the vessel was painted a bright scarlet at the waterline below a band of yellow conspicuously marked 'Nederlands' in letters 10 ft. tall - said to be 'a brilliant spectacle' - to avoid being attacked by German submarines (Holland being neutral in WW1). On Jan. 27, 1916, the vessel was sold to 'Nederlandsch-Amerikaansche Stoomvaart Maatschappij' (Holland America Line) also of Rotterdam & renamed Blommersdijk. Can anyone explain the matter of the vessel's new name? Most references are to Blommersdijk, but a prominent website used to refer to Blommersdyk (the page is now gone). Are not vessels registered? And the exact name as registered should govern? On Oct. 8, 1916, while en route from New York to Rotterdam (via Kirkwall, Orkney Islands) with a cargo of grain, & 5 miles E. of Nantucket Shoals Lightship, the vessel was torpedoed and/or shelled & sunk by U-53, Kapitänleutnant Hans Rose in command. At 40.40N/ 69.36W. The vessel was a neutral vessel. It would seem that U-53 gave notice & the Blommersdijk crew were able to take to the boats. The crew were rescued by U.S. Destroyer Benham. The vessel sank stern first with the bow awash, was a menace to navigation, & may well have been blown up by Androscoggin. In Nov. 1916, Germany declared willingness to pay damages re the ship & her cargo of grain, with other items to be submitted to a 'prize court'. 11 states 'This error against a neutral ship by a U-boat captain cost Germany dearly in cash compensation, this being paid to her owners and the Dutch Government.' So compensation was indeed I presume, paid. WWW data about vessel is quite limited. Can you add anything? Another image?

138 Clan Buchanan
5212 tons
Hull 335 (number seems out of sequence)

124232
1907

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 [Clan Line, Clan Buchanan (2)], 2 (image & text about 80% down), 3 (ref. about 20% down), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 121.9 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 400.1 ft., speed of 11 knots. Built for 'The Clan Line of Steamers Limited', of Glasgow. On Nov. 12, 1916, the vessel was attacked by gunfire from a submarine off Cape Ortegal (NW Spain on Bay of Biscay) but 'escaped'. In Oct. 1933, three vessels (including Clan Buchanan) were sold for demolition for £15,000 (total price) to Hughes, Bolckow Shipbreaking Co. (or Hughes, Bolckow Co. Ltd.) of Blyth, Northumberland (NE of Newcastle upon Tyne). In Oct. 1933, the vessel was broken up there. WWW data is quite limited. It would seem another Clan Buchanan, a barque, was sunk by gunfire from a German submarine in 1917. Can you help with additional data?

139 Clan Sinclair
5215 tons
Hull 333 (number seems out of sequence)

124222
1907

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 [Clan Line, Clan Sinclair (2)], 2 (ref. about 20% down), 3 (image, Clan Sinclair), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 121.9 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 knots. Built for 'The Clan Line of Steamers Limited', of Glasgow. In 1917, the vessel was requisitioned by the British Government for service during WW1. The vessel was returned to its owners in 1919. In Oct. 1933, three vessels (including Clan Sinclair) were sold for demolition for £15,000 (total price) to Hughes, Bolckow Shipbreaking Co. (or Hughes, Bolckow Co. Ltd.) of Blyth, Northumberland (NE of Newcastle upon Tyne). In Nov. 1933, the vessel was broken up there. But ... I have also read that the vessel was scrapped at Antwerp in 1923, I think in error. WWW data is quite limited. Can you help with additional data?

140 Garfield
3838 tons
Hull 374

125423
1907

A 'turret' steamer, a collier. Per 1 (sinking ref., 15 January 1917), 2 (sinking ref., Garfield), 3 ('u-boat.net', sinking, Garfield), 4 (image), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 106.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 350.2 ft. Built for 'Norwick Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Newcastle, (Hunting & Son, ('Hunting') the manager). In 1908, (or maybe in 1911), the vessel was sold to 'Northern Petroleum Tank Steamship Co., Ltd.', with Hunting as managers. On Jan. 15, 1917, defensibly armed, & en route from Barry, Wales, to Port Said, Egypt, via Malta, with a cargo of coal, the vessel was torpedoed & sunk by U.39, Kapitänleutnant Walter Forstmann in command, 60 miles off Alexandria, Egypt. At 36.05N/19.57E. No lives lost but the master was taken prisoner. Have not spotted his name. WWW data is quite limited. Can you help with additional data?

141 Koromiko
2479 tons
Hull 390

117599

Yu Ping
1907

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (c. 1907 image - Queensland Digital Library), 2 (Allan C. Green pencil drawing of vessel), 3 [Union Steamship, Koromiko (1)], 4 (NZ visits), 5 (a 'pdf' file, data & image, Koromiko, at pages 57/58), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 95.2 metres long. perpendicular to perpendicular, 312 ft. 3 in., speed of 10 knots. Built for 'Union Steamship Company of New Zealand Ltd.', of Dunedin, New Zealand. Used as a collier? The vessel visited Auckland, New Zealand, as Koromiko, 10 times between Jul. 19, 1924 & Sep. 8, 1926. Used on the trans-Tasman trade. The vessel was sold, in 1927, or maybe in 1929, to 'Shun Hong S. S. Co.', of Hong Kong (S. T. Williamson the manager?). Or maybe sold to 'Williamson & Co.' in 1935. Can anybody clarify the matter? The vessel was sold again, in 1936, to 'Yu Chung Steamship Co.', of Shanghai, China, & renamed Yu Ping. In Dec. 1941, the vessel capsized & sank (or half sank), at Hankow on the Yangtze River, China, & at the end of WW2 was determined to be a total loss. Vol. 24 of 'NZ Marine News' (1969 I think) had an article about the vessel & an image. Can you add anything?

142 Westra
3908 tons
Hull 386

124236

Garryvale
1907

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (data & images, Garryvale), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 106.6 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 349.8 ft. Launched as Westra for 'Japp & Kirby', it would appear. But it was delivered as Garryvale for Vale Steamship Co. Ltd., Andrew Crawford & John C. Barr & Co. the managers, of Glasgow. The managers' name was restyled in 1916 as Barr, Crombie & Son. In 1916, the vessel was sold to Dawson Bros. & Rowan, also of Glasgow, with no change of vessel name. In 1920, it was sold again, to British Transoceanic Steamship Co. Ltd., H. W. West the manager, again of Glasgow. In 1922 or 1923, the vessel was sold to Suomen Valtamerentakainen Kauppa Oy ('Suomen'), of Helsinki (Helsingfors), Finland, Kristian Hansen (note). the manager. Timo Sylvänne advises (thanks!) that Suomen later went bankrupt necessitating the sale of the vessel. So in 1929, the vessel was sold for the last time, to Rederi A/B Garryvale, also of Helsinki. The vessel, en route from Narvik, Norway, to the Tees with a cargo of iron ore, was stranded on Jan. 30, 1939, 2 miles SE of South Gare, at the mouth of the River Tees. The vessel was re-floated, but, on Apl. 6, 1939, the vessel arrived at the T. W. Ward ship breaking facilities at Inverkeithing, Moray Firth, to be broken up. It would seem that a later, 1942 built, vessel of the identical name, was owned by 'Andrew Crawford'. No WWW references to the company that I can find but a volume entitled The 'Vales' of Glasgow, privately printed by the company in 1955, covers the 1895/1955 history of the company - 85 pages. A rare volume. Maybe it references Garryvale? A number of earlier links to related data have died. Can you help with additional data?  

143 Grindon Hall
3712 tons
Hull 398

128482

Gregorios
1908

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (ref., Grindon Hall), 2 (1924 London Times words), 3 (New York Times, Feb. 8, 1915), 4 ('pdf' re Oct. 21, 1916, 8th para. down), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 109 metres long, speed of 10 knots. Built for 'Grindon Hall Steamship Co. Ltd.' of Cardiff, (Edward Nicholl & Co. the major owners & managers), at the cost of £34,500. The principal of Edward Nicholl & Co., i.e. Edward Nicholl (1862/1939) later became Sir Edward Nicholl (the volume at the link includes an image of the vessel, now visible at left). To replace the vessel of identical name lost in 1907. Its first two voyages were to the Black Sea (see below), under Captain S. H. Mathias. On Feb. 7, 1915, while en route from Havana, Cuba, to London, the vessel put into Norfolk, Virginia, with a fire in her hold. On Oct. 21, 1916, Captain Brewis in command, Grindon Hall was 'wrecked' on Salcombe Beach (near Sidmouth in E. Devon, U.K.), in a terrific gale, the crew surviving due to the efforts of E. Bonner & 'Gent' Yeo. 'W. F. Yeo' was awarded a Sea Gallantry Medal, a most prestigious medal indeed, for his part in that rescue - in addition to the Royal Humane Society Medal referenced at 4. But the vessel was not in fact 'wrecked' that day in 1916. It clearly was later re-floated & repaired. Where I wonder? It was sold, in 1915 (C), to 'Leadenhall Steamship Company Limited', with William McAllum & Co. the managers, with no change of vessel name.  In 1920, the vessel was sold to 'D. Anghelatos', of Argostoli, Greece, & renamed Gregorios. And on Feb. 26, 1921, the vessel was scuttled off Sabinal Point (which seems to be close to Almeria in southern Spain) - in an attempted insurance fraud, no less. Perhaps after hitting a mine while en route from Cephalonia & Philippeville to the Tyne with a cargo of ore. Can anybody tell us about that insurance fraud? The webmaster wishes to thank Barry Quest, of Horrabridge, Devon, for his major assistance re this listing. Barry's grandfather, John D. (David) Carnegie (1871/1917), served as 2nd Engineer aboard Grindon Hall from Aug. 30, 1908 (its maiden voyage) thru Apl. 2, 1909 & made two voyages to the Black Sea, likely carrying grain. He also served, I see, aboard other Sunderland built vessels, i.e. Duchess of York, Eaton Hall, & Intent of Westoll Line. A most interesting (large) image of John Carnegie's Discharge Book, can be seen here, thanks to Barry's kindness. Can you add anything! An image?

144 Walküre
3932 (later 3836) tons
Hull 395

214028 (later)

Republic
Normanna
1908

A 'turret' steamer. Which had a most eventful life. Per 1 (partial vessel history), 2 (partial vessel history, 50% down Normanna), 3 (1908 at Barry Docks), 4 (1908, Barry Docks, search for Walkure, 'WANT MODERN MASTERS'), 5 (Jul. 23 1909 arrival in New Zealand), 6 (French page, 2 images, i) Walküre (L) at Tahiti in 1914, ii) Walküre sunk 45% down), 7 (image La Zélée), 8 & 9 (NY Times archive, Walküre/Republic), 10 (Hooper, 6th para), 11 (image, Normanna), 12 & 13 (Walküre at Tahiti), 14 (Republic), 15 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 106.4 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 349.1 ft., speed of 10 knots. Built, at the cost of U.S. $210,138, for 'Rederi A. G. Oceana', ('Oceana'), H. H. Schmidt the managers, both of Hamburg, Germany. Interestingly, Haldor Virik acquired Oceana in late 1909 & 15 years later, in 1924, he acquired Walküre, then named Republic. On Aug. 13, 1908, while en route from Stettin, (Szczecin), Poland, (inland from Baltic) to Natal, S. Africa, with a cargo of deal, she put into Barry Docks, S. Wales for bunkering. The vessel suddenly lurched to port, spilling her deck cargo. A 40 degree list to port. Read the circumstances at 4. Total capsize was prevented by her masts catching on Trevessa. The cargo had to be unloaded, of course, to right her. On Aug. 12, 1914, while loading phosphates, the vessel was captured by La Zélée, a 337 ton, barque rigged, French gunboat, at Makatea, (or at at Port Lemao), a small phosphate island, near to & N. of Tahiti. The vessel became a French prize & was towed to Papeete, Tahiti. On Sep. 22, 1914, Papeete was shelled by Scharnhorst & Gneisenau, both German cruisers. Walküre was mistaken for a French merchantman & was shelled & modestly damaged by Scharnhorst, (many references say she was sunk but I think not). The French scuttled the vessel in 54 ft. of water, to ensure it was not recaptured by the Germans. The wreck was sold a year later, in Dec. 1915 perhaps, for U.S. $29,000, where she lay, to John A. Hooper ('Hooper'), (a lumberman, as was Christensen his partner), of San Francisco, U.S.A., & in Mar. 1916 was re-floated & towed to Hawaii, where she was reconditioned for her trip to San Francisco, under her own steam & with a full cargo. Became 3836 gross tons, registered at San Francisco. It was renamed Republic in 1916. And on or about May 5, 1916, the vessel was sold by Hooper to Chile Steamship Company, Inc., of New York, for approx. U.S. $1,000,000, at a substantial profit. Owned by 'Chile Exploration' & 'Braden Copper', & acquired to carry copper from Chile to New York. No change of name. Have also read other sales values - U.S. $825,000 & $1,200,000 - but I suspect that U.S. $825,000 is the correct value. In 1924, the vessel was sold to Haldor Virik, of Stavanger, Norway, & renamed Normanna. On Feb. 21, 1925, while en route from Göteborg (Gothenburg), Sweden, to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with a cargo of wood pulp, the vessel caught fire off Tenerife, Canary Islands. Have not read the circumstances. Major damage; the vessel was flooded & beached. On Jun. 19, 1925 the vessel was re-floated, presumably inspected & sold as a result to ship breakers. On Aug. 17, 1925, the vessel arrived, under tow, at Rotterdam, to be broken up. There are a great many WWW data sources re Walküre at Tahiti not referenced above. But ... need an image of Walküre at Barry in 1908. A postcard is WWW available but with too modest an image for inclusion here.

145 Dalemoor
4124 (or 4090) tons
Hull 410

129054

Dalemead
Ruth
Dekade
Jacobus Fritzen
1909

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (extensive Danish page re sinking, 2 images), 2 (1 translated), 3 (Lloyd's 1917), 4 (Fritzen), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 348.8 ft. (about 112 metres) long, speed of 8 knots. Built for Moor Line Ltd., of London (W. Runciman & Co., of Newcastle, the managers). Lloyd's reported that the vessel was torpedoed & sunk on Feb. 20, 1917, & that 11 crew members were missing - but I can find no WWW site that confirms that data. In 1920, the vessel was sold to Western Counties Shipping, of Cardiff, E. Edwards & Sons Ltd. the managers, & renamed Dalemead. In 1923, the vessel was sold to Emder Reederei AG, of Hamburg, Germany, & renamed Ruth. And sold again, in 1926, to 'Riberena del Plata' & renamed Dekade. In 1926, the vessel was sold to 'Johs. Fritzen & Sohn', of Emden, Germany, (Lexzau Scharbau & Co., the managers) & renamed Jacobus Fritzen. On Oct. 14, 1942, while defensively armed & returning from Sweden to Germany with a cargo of iron ore, the vessel was torpedoed (2 torpedoes, the first missed) by Soviet submarine Narodovolets (D-2) (Captain Lindenberg) & sunk, S. of Ystad, Sweden, & N. of Kap Arkona, E. Germany. Any loss of life? The wreck, partially buried in the seabed, lies in 42 metres of water at 55.10.115N/13.38.381E. A wreck site today. D2 (Narodovolets until 1934, name means 'People's Will') was decommissioned on Mar. 5, 1987, & now is in a museum at Leningrad/St. Petersburg, Russia. There are many WWW sites in Danish & Russian re Jacobus Fritzen, which sites refer to 'Decade' rather than Dekade. It is quite possible that the above needs some correction. Anything to add?

146 Inland
2294 tons
Hull 402

5047

Särimner
Ulla
Vindö
1909

A 'turret' steamer. Per 1 (page in Swedish with image), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 88.4 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 290.1 ft., speed of 9 1/2 knots. Built for 'Angfartygs A/B Tirfing' (Axel Brostrom & Son), of Gothenburg, Sweden. In 1917, dan Brostrom became the manager, & in 1926, S. G. Janson. The vessel was sold, in 1934, to 'Rederi AB Suecia', of Stockholm, Sweden, (or maybe instead to 'J. Larsson'?), & renamed Särimner. Transferred in 1939 (or 1940) to 'Lemlands Rederi AB', of Åland (a Swedish speaking Finnish archipelago in the Baltic Sea), Alb. Jansson the manager. The vessel was sold in 1942 to 'Rederi AB Suecia' again, or maybe to Rederi A/B Rex, ('B. Carlsson' or K. M. Kallstrom the managers), & renamed Ulla. Later in 1942, the vessel was sold to 'Rex Rederi AB' of Stockholm, (or maybe to 'R. M. Kallstrom'?), & renamed Vindö. The detail is confusing & may need correction. In May 1954, Vindö, en route from Sunderland to Vasteras, foundered at its moorings at Södertälje, Sweden. It was subsequently raised, & on May 1, 1958, the vessel arrived at Ystad, Sweden, to be broken up. Thanks go to Andrew Collins for his assistance in the translation of the Swedish text. Anything to add?

147 Atland
5029 (or 5068 or 5348) tons
Hull 412

5137
1910

A 'turret' steamer, indeed the last & the biggest of them all. Per 1 (trials, Jun. 15, 1910, ex Marine Engineer ... 1910/1911), 2 (page in Swedish with 2 images), 3 (Norwegian page with images), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Atland, but I cannot check the link. Beware! Ignore the Wheatland entries at the page you come to), 5 (convoy WN.407), 6 (Carso, see Tana), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 118.5 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 388.9 ft., speed of 11 (or 13) knots. The vessel attained a speed of 12 1/4 knots on her trial voyage measured mile. Built for 'Angfartygs A/B Tirfing' (Axel Brostrom & Son), of Gothenburg, Sweden. In 1917, dan Brostrom became the manager, in 1926, S. G. Janson, & in 1933, T. E. J. son Brostromm. 56 WW2 convoy references, so far as I can see, including at least 9 voyages across the N. Atlantic carrying iron ore or phosphates, service to West Africa (Freetown) & many coastal U.K. voyages. On Mar. 5, 1943, the vessel left New York City for the U.K. in convoy SC.122 with a cargo of iron ore. On Mar. 24, 1943, the vessel was in convoy WN.407 from Loch Ewe (NW Scotland) to Methil (Firth of Forth, Scotland). On Mar. 25, 1943, the vessel was in collision with Carso (6149 or 6275 tons, built 1922) off the E. coast of Scotland, at 57.28N (or 57.30N)/1.40W, about 8 miles E. of Peterhead lighthouse. Carso was towed to Leith, while Atland quickly sank with the loss of 19 lives including Captain Wilhelm Löthman. Can anyone tell us the detail circumstances? Which may in fact be stated, in Norwegian, at link 3. Which also states that the final Atland voyage originated at Pepel, i.e. Freetown, Sierra Leone, West Africa. Roger Mathison advises (thanks!) that the wreck lies about 4 miles off Peterhead, is at a depth of 68 metres & is dived but infrequently so. Roger has provided a 'sidescan' image of the wreck, (at left), created, I believe, by a sonar device which emits sonar pulses which reflect back from the ocean floor. Anything to add? Or correct? 

148 Moorlands
3600 (or 3602) tons
Hull 418

131831
1910

A cargo ship. Per 1 (launch ref. at p.108 of a large 'pdf' file, text now available at left), 2 ('uboat.net', sinking, Moorlands), 3 ('wrecksite.eu', data & history), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 108.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 357 ft., 50 ft. beam. Built for 'Eskside Steam Shipping Co.' of Whitby, (N. Yorkshire, E. coast of U.K.). 1 indicates that the vessel was built for 'Charles Smales & Son', of Whitby, that Miss Mabel Smales christened the vessel, & that her trial trip was on Sep. 2, 1910. In 1918, when the vessel was sunk, 'Mitre Shipping Co., Ltd.', of Whitby, 'Houlder, Middleton & Co. Ltd.', the managers, were, I read, the vessel's owners. At 11:50 p.m. on Jun. 24, 1918, the vessel, carrying 5,800 tons of iron ore from La Goulette, the port of Tunis, Tunisia, to Middlesbrough, was hit, below the waterline on the starboard side, by a torpedo fired by German submarine UB-88, Oberleutnant zur See Reinhard von Rabenau in command. While in a 20 vessel convoy (its number?) headed south. Hit S. by E. of Whitby. The ship sank in 6 minutes & 10 of the 48 aboard (all told), lost their lives. Lordship, a convoy escort vessel, picked up the 38 who survived & landed them at Bridlington. In retaliation, convoy escort vessels attacked UB-88 with depth charges, but it survived the attack. A famous submarine, apparently, the UB-88 (A, B, C)! The dive website which previously provided much of the detail is long gone. It informed me, I believe, that the wreck, lying in 52 m. of water, was identified by the name on the wheel boss. The wreck location? It may be at approx. 54.29.29N/0.31.48W. Can you confirm that and/or otherwise advise? Do correct me as required! An image of the ship would be most welcome for inclusion in this listing.

149 Windsor Hall
3693 tons
Hull 414

128516
1910

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('uboat.net' sinking, Windsor Hall), 2 (ref.), 3 ('UB-66'), 4 (modest launch ref. at p.68 of a large 'pdf', text now available at left), 5 (image), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 105.2 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, (345 ft.), speed of 9 1/2 knots. Built for 'Windsor Hall Steamship Co. Ltd.' of Cardiff, Hall Line, (Edward Nicholl & Co. the major owners & managers). The principal of Edward Nicholl & Co., i.e. Edward Nicholl (1862/1939) later became Sir Edward Nicholl (lots of references to the vessel in the volume at the link). Bought at the cost of £31,500. In 1917, the vessel, along with 7 other fleet vessels, was essentially sold to Hansen Steamship Company, Ltd. (principals S. W. Hansen & Vyvyan Robinson), of Cardiff (or London). It would seem that they did not buy the vessel, rather they bought the company which owned it. On Jan. 17, 1918, when owned by 'Hansen Brothers Limited' & defensively armed, en route from Karachi, Pakistan, to Marseilles, France, via the Suez Canal, with a cargo of grain, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by UB-66, Kapitänleutnant Fritz Wernicke in command, 45 miles NW of Alexandria, Egypt. 27 were killed. The Captain was taken prisoner aboard the submarine. Have not spotted the Captain's name. What later happened to him? How big was the crew? Were there other survivors? Can you add anything? An image?

150 Cairngowan
4017 tons
Hull 437

129782
1911

A cargo ship. From 1 [Cairn Line, Cairngowan (2)], 2 ('uboat.net', sinking, Cairngowan), 3 (U 69), 4 (20/4 1916, Cairngowan), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 112.8 metres long, perpendicular, maybe 118 metres long overall, speed of 11 knots. Built for The Cairn Line of Steamships Ltd. (Cairns, Noble & Co., Ltd., the managers), i.e. Cairn Line, which served Canada. On Apl. 20, 1916, while en route from Liverpool to Newport News, Virginia, the unarmed vessel was attacked by U 69, Kapitänleutnant Ernst Wilhelms in command, with no warning given. The vessel was first captured, & then sunk by gunfire. 55 or 60 miles W. by N. of Fastnet Rock (SW tip of Ireland). No exact location is indicated. No lives were lost. WWW data is most limited. Can you add to the above? Your contribution would be most welcome.

151 Monkshaven
3357 tons
Hull 428

131833

Remenham
Mikage Maru No. 11
1911

A cargo ship. From 1 (Watts, Watts & Co.), 2 (Britain Steamship), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 102.0 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed? Built for 'Erkside Steam Shipping Company Limited', managed & likely owned by 'C. Smales & Son', ('Smales') of Whitby. Now Miramar only list 2 vessels named Monkshaven, the 1st built in 1882, but it would seem that Smales had earlier vessels of the name also. I have read that in 1915, the vessel ran ashore in the St. Lawrence River. It was salvaged, repaired & returned to service after 80 days. It may be, however, that that grounding was rather in 1914, since on Aug. 23, 1914, Monkshaven ran aground on Roix Shoal, about 1 mile from Ste. Felicite, Quebec. The inquiry determined that there was lots of blame to go around - the Master (J. E. Millburn), the Chief Officer (P. Gaigne) & the 2nd Mate (R. W. Thoburn) were all censured. A 1918 court case in Pennsylvania deals with commission matters only. There were two changes of ownership, with no change of vessel name, to Austin Friars Steam Shipping Co. Ltd., of Whitby, in 1918, & to Rhondda Merthyr Shipping Co. Ltd., also of Whitby, in 1919. In 1924, the vessel was sold to 'Britain Steamship Company Ltd.' ('Britain'), of London, with Watts, Watts & Co., also of London, the managers but likely owners also since gentlemen named 'Watts' were directors of Britain. And renamed Remenham. In 1926, the vessel was sold again, to 'Muko Kisen K.K.' of Takasago, Japan, & renamed Mikage Maru No. 11. On Aug. 8, 1932, the vessel was wrecked at Sakhalin (a very large Russian Island in the North Pacific, N. of Japan. Have not been able to read anything of the circumstances. In fact, WWW data generally, for this vessel is most limited. Can you add to the above? Your contribution would be most welcome.

152 Orangemoor
4134 tons
Hull 423

132552

Orangemead
Bogen
Brask
1911

A 'turret' steamer cargo ship. Per 1 (Norwegian page, Brask, 2 images), 2 (extensive page, 2 images Brask, crew list), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Brask, but I cannot check the link. But beware the result - not only Brask is on the page), 4 (Dunkirk, 1918, 50% down, Orangemoor), 5 (Dunkirk, 1917, Orangemoor), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 106.7 metres long (350.8 ft.), signal letters LCFJ, LFCQ & WNPV. Built for Moor Line Ltd., of Newcastle. The vessel was damaged at Dunkirk Harbour on Sep. 12, 1917 (or 1918, or both, data differs), by German aircraft and/or Zeppelins. In 1920, the vessel was sold to Western Counties Shipping Co. (Edwards, Sons & Co.), of Cardiff, & renamed Orangemead. A couple of manager changes in 1922. The manager became F. V. Eberhardt & Co., & then Karck & Knott, both of London. The vessel was sold in 1922, to 'Skibs A/S Bogen (H. Waalman)' of Tønsberg, Norway, & renamed Bogen. Lars Jørgensen, of Tønsberg became the manager in 1924. The vessel was sold, in May 1925, to 'A/S Brask' (Nilssen & Sønner), of Oslo, Norway, & renamed Brask. And sold again, in Jan. 1940, to A/S Start (Erling Mortensen), of Oslo, with no change of vessel name. 10 WW2 convoy references including at least 2 North Atlantic crossings. Extensive convoy duty in early WW2, carrying iron ore or coal. On Jan. 10, 1941, the vessel left Oban, Scotland, for Durban, South Africa, in ballast, in convoy OB 272. It later separated from the convoy & on Jan. 15, 1941 was sunk by a torpedo fired by Italian submarine Luigi Torelli, Captain C. F. Longobardo in command. At 52.45N/23.59W in N. Atlantic about 1000 miles W. of Ireland. The vessel sank in just 3 minutes. Survivors clung to debris & then climbed aboard a lifeboat which had floated free. 12 lives were lost, including Gustav Røkenes, the Captain, & 20 were saved. The lifeboat made it to the abandoned Nemea (also in convoy OB 272 & also attacked by Luigi Torelli) which they boarded but returned to the lifeboat on a long line overnight for fear of attack. On Jan. 16, 1941, they & 18 Greek survivors of Nemea, sent out an SOS, started Nemea's engines & tried to reach Ireland (the Azores was attempted but it proved impractical). Overnight again in the boats. Rockets were fired & survivors were rescued by HMS Highlander on Jan. 17, 1941 & landed at Londonderry, Northern Ireland. Need help with Norwegian text. Can you add anything?

153 Tellus
7395 tons
Hull 417

Elizabeth IV
1911

A cargo ship, which, when built, was the largest cargo steamship in the world. Per 1 [Wilhelmsen, Tellus (2)], 2 (Norwegian & English page, Tellus), 3 (Doxford built list, #417, but the page & site seems to be gone now), 4 (iceberg, Apl. 30, 1914), 5 (U-34), 6 (image, Tellus), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 445 ft. long overall, 135.6 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots. Built, at the cost of NOK 1,125,165.39, but for exactly whom is difficult. A Doxford build list, available to the webmaster, indicates that it was built for 'Wilhelmsens D/S' with Wilh. Wilhelmsen the manager, both of Tønsberg, Norway. And 2 refers only to Wilhelmsen. However 3 references 'Wabana S.S. Co. Ltd.' as the owner, which I think means 'Wabana Steamship Co. Ltd.' ('WabanaSteam'), of Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. I had thought that that company was owned by Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Company, re the iron ore deposit named Wabana, at Bell Island, Newfoundland, Canada. Is it possible that Wilhelmsen, in fact, owned WabanaSteam? On Apl. 30, 1914, en route from Rotterdam to St. John's, Newfoundland, the vessel struck an iceberg. The vessel's forepeak & bow were damaged & a new propeller was required. In Nov. 1915, while en route from New York to Vladivostok, Russia, the vessel ran ashore at Nemuro, near Yokohama, Japan. The vessel was re-floated in early Jan. 1916, arrived at Hanasaki, Japan, on Jan. 22, 1916, & on Feb. 4, 1916 arrived at Shanghai, China, for repair. Later in 1916, the vessel was sold to 'A/S Elizabeth IV', of Drammen, Norway, O. Wikberg (or Wikborg) the manager, & renamed Elizabeth IV. On Sep. 8, 1916, while en route from Paseroean (Pasoeroean), Java, Indonesia, to Marseilles, France, with a cargo of sugar, the vessel was captured by submarine U-34, Kapitänleutnant Claus Rücker in command. U-34 was, I read, the 4th most successful German submarine in WW1, sinking 119 ships & damaging 5 more.  Claus Rücker was responsible, in his career, for 88 ships sunk & 3 more damaged. Elizabeth IV was scuttled with explosive charges. At 41.14N/6.24E, in the Mediterranean, W. of Sardinia or NE of Menorca (Minorca). With no loss of life. Anything you can add? An image, perhaps?

154   Bridgeport
6104 tons
Hull 446

135126
1912

A cargo ship. Maybe a collier? Per 1 (data), 2 (data 10% down, Bridgeport), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 135.0 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 knots, signal letters HWMN. Owned by Bridgeport S. S. Co. Ltd., of U.K., (Brown, Jenkinson the manager). Registered at London. In 1912, the vessel was chartered to Dominion Coal Co. of Glace Bay, Nova Scotia, Canada. On Nov. 1, 1913, the vessel sailed from Sydney, Nova Scotia, for Montreal, Quebec (both Canada). It was never seen again. 45 lives were lost. Anything you can add? An image, perhaps?

155 Cardiff Hall
3994 tons
Hull 444

135131
1912

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('irishwrecksonline' wreck data, Cardiff Hall), 2 ('wrecksite.eu', sinking, image, Cardiff Hall), 3 ('Sea Breezes', re vessel loss), 4 (painting, Cardiff Hall), 5 (image, Cardiff Hall), 6 (images, ship's anchor), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 106.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 350 ft., speed of 9 or 10 knots. The WWW available data re this vessel is, to the webmaster at least most confusing. I have first read that it was rather built by 'W. A. Young & Co.' It was? So far as ownership was concerned, I have read many things. I believe, however, that the vessel was built for 'Standish Hall Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Cardiff, a single ship company the major owner & manager of which was 'Edward Nicholl & Co.', also of Cardiff. The principal of Edward Nicholl & Co. was Edward Nicholl later Sir Edward Nicholl ('Nicholl'). I understand that there were many such single ship companies so owned, & collectively they were known as the Cardiff "Hall" Line. In 1917, Nicholl sold his shipping interests & Cardiff Hall, along with many other vessels also, was acquired by Hansen Steamship Company Ltd. ('Hansen'), also of Cardiff. There was no change of the vessel's name. Miramar indicate that that ownership change, to 'Hansen Shipping Co. Ltd.', was in 1919. I do not think that the ownership later changed. But ... I have read that in 1925, when the ship was lost, the vessel  was owned by either i) W. A. Young & Co., ('Young'), ii) R. & A. Hall ('Hall') of Cork, or iii) Hansen. It is likely that Young were the managers of the ship while Hall may relate to R. H. Hall, of Cork, the consignee of the cargo of maize. For its lifetime, the vessel was, I believe registered at London. On Dec. 7, 1924, the vessel left Buenos Aires, Argentina, for Cork, Ireland, via St. Vincent, with a cargo of 6,000 tons of maize ex Rosario, Argentina, valued at £60,000. David T. (or maybe J.) Bowen was in command, with 29 aboard, all told. On Jan. 13, 1925, approaching Cork, Ireland, she encountered a major gale. I suspect those words no not reflect the magnitude & intensity of that storm. Cardiff Hall was not able to make way in the fierce conditions, & was driven by the winds onto the shore. She struck Shoota or Shoonta Rock, W. end of Trevara Bay, Seven Head Rocks, Clonakilty Bay, County Cork, at a site that sounds grim - rocks, backed by cliffs 150 ft. high. The vessel broke her back & disappeared in about 15 minutes. I am not sure where that 15 minute reference originated. Why do I say that? All of this happened late on Jan. 13, 1925 in darkness & likely with no witnesses. Also because all 29 aboard were lost so there was no survivor to relate what happened. Only two bodies were ever found, I read, one of those bodies being the captain's. A 2 ton portion of the vessel's keel ended up on a ledge 40 ft. above the sea & is still there today. The cargo was strewn everywhere including the top of the cliffs. Recently, the ship's anchor was recovered & is now a memorial to the wreck at Butlerstown. There are some interesting events in the vessel's life but the detail eludes me. One such event relates to the vessel, at an unknown date, operating under sealed Admiralty orders, travelling without lights, in collision with another vessel similarly 'dark', maybe in the Mediterranean. I think other lawsuits. A dive site today, though little remains, I gather, located in 15 metres of water. Anything you can add? Or correct? Her WW1 service? Another image, perhaps?

156 Clan Macrae
5058 (or 6479) tons
Hull 429

133005

Banffshire
1912

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per 1 [Cayzer, Irvine, Clan Macrae (2)], 2 [Turnbull, Martin, Banffshire (2)], 3 (data, Clan Macrae, 80% down), 4 (data, Clan Macrae, 55% down, image as Banffshire), 5 ('u-boat.net', Banffshire sinking, image), 6 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Banffshire, but I cannot check the link.), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 131.1 metres long, 430 ft., speed of 14 knots. Built for Cayzer, Irvine & Company Limited (Clan Line), of Glasgow. In Sep. 1914, the vessel aided the crew of HMS Pegasus, sunk at Zanzibar by the German cruiser Königsberg. In Oct. 1914, the vessel towed HMS Chatham off Leven Rocks near Kilindini, Mombasa. In Mar. 1915, Clan Macrae was chased by a submarine when off Liverpool Bar Light Vessel but escaped. In 1920, the vessel was sold to  Turnbull Martin & Co. (Scottish Shire Line) & renamed Banffshire. I have read that in 1921 the vessel was 'transferred' to 'British and South American Steam Navigation Co. Ltd.' ('British') (Houston Line managers?) & then renamed Banffshire. But have also read that that 'transfer' was in 1932. And the vessel does not appear in the Houston/British fleet list here. May have served on the U.K. to Australia route. 28 WW2 convoy references, including 3 eastbound voyages across the N. Atlantic. There must, clearly, have been W. bound voyages but I cannot spot them. Also service to West Africa (Freetown, Sierra Leone), & to South Africa (Cape Town, Durban, etc.). I presume there were independent voyages also, including voyages into the Indian Ocean, but I am not permitted to access such data. On Sep. 29, 1943, while en route from Colombo, Ceylon, to the U.K. via Aden with a cargo of coconut oil, copra, plumbago (i.e. graphite, I believe), rubber & tea, Herbert Evans in command, the vessel was sunk by a torpedo fired by U-532, Fregattenkapitän Ottoheinrich Junker in command. At 9.26N/71.20E, 380 miles SW of Mangalore (i.e. N. of the Maldives). A complement of 100, one life lost. All of the 99 survivors were picked up by Indian minesweeper HMIS Rajputana & landed at Colombo. I suspect that at some point in its life the vessel was extensively modified - to become 6479 gross tons. Can you add anything?

157 Herman Sauber
2913 (or 2948 or 2966) tons
Hull 439

143281 (later)
1912

A self-trimming collier. Per 1 ('Marine Engineer', 'pdf' available, launch data & image at p.355 - article now at left), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 95.7 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 315 ft., speed of 10 knots. Designed with discharging gear that permitted 3,750 tons of coal to be discharged in 6 hours using only 6 men (800 tons per hour). Built for 'Sauber Gebr.' ('Sauber'), coal merchants & shipowners, of Hamburg, Germany, (T. H. Catcheside & Co., of Newcastle, their U.K. agents) for their Hamburg trade. 'Gebr.' is a contraction of 'Gebrüder', German for 'brother' or 'brothers'. The vessel was christened by Mrs. Howard Catcheside. Sauber (or Sauber & Co.) owned, over time, at least 5 vessels of the name. It would seem that the vessel was later modified & stiffened to permit the transport of ore during WW1. And the rate of discharge was increased to 1200 tons per hour. On Oct. 30, 1922, the vessel left the Tyne for Hamburg with a cargo of coal. It was never seen again. I wonder how many lives were lost? That experience was similar to an earlier Sauber vessel of the identical name which sailed for Hamburg in 1878 & also was never seen again. It is possible that more data might be provided in 'Sauber Gebr. 1839-1939', published in German in 1939 (an English version of 24 pages was published also). Anything you can add? An image, perhaps?

158   Gifford
5119 (or 4988 or 5060 or 5213) tons
Hull 456

133145

Gifhorn
Sperrbrecher 9
Gifford
Sheaf Mount
Eftychia
Guidonia
Plaudit
1913

A cargo ship. I think this vessel had the most names in its lifetime of the vessels so far listed on site. A few differences in the data. Per 1 ('uboat.net', sinking, Plaudit), 2 [Bank Line, Gifford (3)], 3 (data near page bottom), 4 (New Zealand data), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 420 ft. (approx. 133 metres) long overall, 128.0 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 knots. The vessel was built, it would seem, for Gifford Ltd., of Glasgow, (Andrew Weir & Co. the manager) or maybe for Andrew Weir & Co./Bank Line. The vessel was interned, at Hamburg, Germany, on the outbreak of WW1 in 1914. In 1917, the vessel, then owned by the German Navy, was renamed Gifhorn. In 1917 it was renamed Sperrbrecher 9, again for the German Navy. In 1918, the vessel was returned to her owner, (not sure whom then), & renamed Gifford. It was sold, in 1919, to W. A. Souter & Co. Ltd. & renamed Sheaf Mount. And in 1930 was sold again, to G. Vergottis, of Greece, & renamed Eftychia. In 1932, the vessel stranded & lay idle for the next 5 years. In 1938, the vessel was sold to Achille Lauro, of Naples, Italy, & renamed Guidonia. In Jun. 1940, the vessel arrived at Norfolk, Virginia, U.S.A., & was detained. On Aug. 23, 1941, the vessel was taken over by the U.S. Government & on Sep. 25, 1941 it was assigned by the U.S. War Shipping Administration, to South Atlantic Steamship Co., of Savannah, Georgia. On Oct. 8, 1941, the vessel was renamed Plaudit, registered at Panama. On Nov. 8, 1942, proceeding unescorted, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-181, Kapitän zur See Wolfgang Lüth in command, off Port Elizabeth, South Africa. The vessel was en route from Colombo, then Ceylon, to U.S.A. via Cape Town, with a cargo of rubber, manganese ore, jute, tea, etc. At 36.00S/26.32E. U-181 fired until the ship sank. Most of the 49 aboard abandoned the ship, but 3 lives were lost. The survivors were picked up by South African trawler HMSAS Africana & via RAF crash boat Navigator they were landed at Port Elizabeth. Can you add anything? An image, perhaps?

159 Harlow
6550 (or 8384 or 8459) tons
Hull 453

135222

Gernis
Noorderdijk
Provvidenza
1913

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Holland America Line, Noorderdijk (2)], 2 (Roland Line, Gernis), 3 (Dutch page, image Noorderdyk II & data, at page bottom, 4 (Harrison history), 5 (Thos. & Jas. Harrison, but Harlow not referenced), 6 & 7 (Truant), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 148.13 metres (485 ft.) long, 143.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 12 knots. Built for J. & C. Harrison Ltd., of London, i.e. 'Harrison Line'. That may, in fact, mean that 'Charente Steamship Co. Ltd.' was the owner & 'Thos. and Jas. Harrison' were the managers. Can anybody clarify the facts? On Jan. 20, 1914, the vessel was sold to 'Roland Linie Aktien Gesellschaft', of Bremen, Germany (Roland Line), & renamed Gernis. The vessel was interned in 1914 at Sabang, Aceh, Indonesia & laid up there until 1918. On Oct. 28, 1918, the vessel became owned by the Netherlands as a war reparation. On Nov. 22, 1918, the vessel became owned by 'Nederlandsch-Amerikaansche Stoomvaart Maatschappij' (Holland America Line) of Rotterdam & renamed Noorderdijk. Some problems it would appear that I am unable to translate. The vessel's first voyage for Holland America Line commenced only on May 18, 1920. Can anyone explain the matter of the vessel's new name? Most references are to Noorderdijk, but 3 refers to Noorderdyk. Are not vessels registered? And the exact name as registered, whatever it was, should govern? Used on the Rotterdam to New York service. On Dec. 16, 1931, the vessel was sold to Fratelli Rizzuto (Rizzuto Bros.), of Naples, Italy, & renamed Provvidenza, (have also read Providenza). On Sep. 22, 1940, while en route from Naples to Cagliari, Sardinia, the vessel was torpedoed & sunk by Truant, a T or Triton Class  British submarine (N68), 3 1/2 miles from Punta Imperatore, Ischia (Istrië), near Naples, Italy. Can you translate the '18 May 1920' refs. at 3, or otherwise add to or correct the above? An image?

160 Südmark
5113 later 6579 (or 5154 or 5182) tons
Hull 455

136793 (later)

Huntscraft
Clan Mackay
1913

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Clan Mackay 65% down), 2 (NY Times re Sudmark cargo fire), 3 & 4 (Clan Line, Huntscraft), 5 (wreck ref., Clan Mackay), 6 & 7 (Hamburg-American, Sudmark), 8 ('uboat.net', 1918 torpedo), 9 (image, Clan Mackay, & -01 & -03), 10 (Lloyd's Register data, 1930/31 thru 1934/35 per 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 11 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 420.0 ft. long overall, 128.0 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 knots, signal letters JKGF & GQMX. Built for 'Hamburg Amerikanische Packetfahrt Actien Gesellschaft', i.e. 'Hamburg-Amerika Linie' or HAPAG, of Hamburg, Germany. On Aug. 17, 1914, while en route from Yokohama, Japan, to Hamburg, the vessel was captured by HMS Black Prince in the Red Sea, & taken to Suez. Südmark had not been aware that war had broken out. Its cargo of tea, jute & coconuts was placed in an Alexandria warehouse, where it was unfortunately destroyed by fire in mid Oct. 1914. The cargo was valued at that time at U.S. $1 million - what an amazing sum in 1914! In Sep. 1914, the vessel was requisitioned by The Shipping Controller (British Government) & in 1915 renamed Huntscraft, with Harris & Dixon Limited, the managers. As a result probably of 'Prize Court' proceedings in London. It seems that the vessel evacuated troops from Gallipoli in 1915. In 1917, Union Castle Steamship Co. became the managers. Described as a 'large cattle boat' re a voyage carrying troops to Le Havre, France, in Jun. 1918 - so not a luxury trip across the channel! On Jul. 6, 1918, while in ballast & en route from Le Havre to Southampton, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by UB-57, Oberleutnant zur See Johannes Lohs in command, & disabled. 10 miles E. of St. Catherine's Point, Isle of Wight. The vessel was towed to Netley (nr. Southampton) for repairs. 6 lives were lost. Maybe involved in the rescue of allied forces from Russia? The vessel was sold, in 1919, to 'Cayzer, Irvine & Company, Limited' ('Cayzer) but more likely The Clan Line of Steamers Ltd. with Cayzer the managers, & in 1921 renamed Clan Mackay, the 4th vessel of that name. On Oct. 19, 1934, while en route from Cairns, Australia, to Montreal, Canada, via Cape Town, with a cargo of sugar, the vessel was beached/wrecked on Carpenters Rock, Sierra Leone, 'in the morning mist'. At 8.30N/13.18.45W. Have not read the circumstances. Can you add to or correct the above? An image?

161 Tuscan Prince
5275 tons
Hull 464

133543
1913

A cargo ship. Per 1 (50% down), 2 [Prince Line, Tuscan Prince (2)], 3 (left col. 25% down), 4 (image of wreck), 5 (data & 2 images available at the site but difficult to tell you how to find them absent an index. Go to 'The Wrecks'. 'Slide' to 1923, & search on the map for Tuscan Prince. But the slider is amazingly sensitive & getting to 1923 is difficult. I gave up trying), 6 (Sea Gallantry Medals), 7 (archive data available per giant 'pdf' about 50% down, 13-9), 8 (wreck data 90% down), 9 (crew rescued by Snohomish), 10 (image), 11 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 420 ft. (approx. 133 metres) long, speed of 12 knots. Built for Prince Line Ltd., of Newcastle (J. Knott the manager). On Aug. 5, 1918, defensively armed, the vessel was torpedoed by UC49 & holed in the English Channel, 8 miles from Dungeness, but made it to port. 2 died in the attack. On Feb. 15, 1923, while en route from the Tyne to Vancouver, British Columbia ('BC'), via Antwerp, & carrying a general cargo, the vessel was wrecked during the great winter storm of Feb. 14/15, 1923, off the BC coast. The ship ran aground in a snow storm on the S. cliffs of Effingham Island (prev. Village Island), Barkley Sound, BC, at 48.51.267N/125.19.147W. A rugged coast - location is close to the West Coast Trail. WWW data about what exactly happened is confusing. I suspect that the most reliable data is that of Bernard de Neumann, who advises that 3 prestigious Sea Gallantry Medals in bronze were issued re the shipwreck, & quotes from the official Board of Trade award citation. Two men tried to make it ashore in a boat which was destroyed on the rocks. George E. Lobb, the boatswain, succeeded in getting ashore, made a line fast & so permitted the entire crew of 42 to make their way ashore. A line was fired ashore by a 45 calibre line gun. 5, the WWW site of the Maritime Museum of BC, states that the 2nd Engineer made it to shore with a rope & returned to rescue the ship's cat & her kitten. And that the crew was saved by the Bamfield lifeboat. 9 says Snohomish, a U.S. Coast Guard cutter, rescued the crew - from the shore perhaps? Most of the cargo was recovered. Wreck a dive site today. All said & done, WWW data re the story is truly most confusing. Can you help clarify the facts?

162 Roman Prince
5284 tons
Hull 466

133549

Berwick Law
Benlomond
Chrysopolis
1914

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Roman Prince, 60% down), 2 (a 1920 painting of Roman Prince, by French artist Adam Eduard or Edouard, exists), 3 [Ben Line, Benlomond (3)], 4 ('wrecksite.eu', Chrysopolis), 5 (image Benlomond, the correct one?), 6 [Prince Line, Roman Prince (2)], 7 (image of Roman Prince, I think, ex an expired web site), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 129.0 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 420 ft., speed of 12 knots. Built for Prince Line Ltd., J. Knott the manager, of Newcastle. The vessel was sold, in 1926 (or 1927), to Thomas Law & Co's 'Law Shipping Co.', of Glasgow, & became Berwick Law. And sold in 1933 to 'Ben Line Steamers Ltd.', owned by William Thomson & Co., & became Benlomond. And sold yet again, in 1935, to 'Pneumaticos et Alexander Shipping Co. Ltd.', Kassos Steam Navigation Co. the managers?, of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Chrysopolis. On Jun. 18, 1936, while en route from Emden, Germany, to Cape Town, South Africa, the vessel was wrecked off Cape Barbas, Senegal. At 22.20N/16.44W. I have read no detail as to the circumstances. Were any lives lost? Do you have anything to add?

163 San Jeronimo
10067 (after conversion 12028 or 12398) tons
Hull 457

135314

Southern Empress
1914

A tanker which became a whale factory ship. Per 1 (data & image), 2 ('uboat.net', sinking & image), 3 (2 images Southern Empress), 4 (image Southern Empress), 5 (convoy SC-104), 6 (image Southern Empress), 7 (U-221), 8 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Southern Empress, but I cannot check the link), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 160.2 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 525 ft. 6 in., speed of 11 knots. Built for The Eagle Oil Transport Co. Ltd., ('Eagle') of London, (or maybe 'The Eagle Tanker Company Limited'). Carried crude oil & white oil products. Identified as being a 'Shell' tanker - maybe chartered to Shell? Or maybe Shell had an ownership interest in Eagle? In 1917, the vessel's gross tonnage became 12028 as a result of modifications. In 1928, the vessel was sold to 'Southern Whaling & Sealing Co. Ltd.' ('Southern'), of London, converted (where, I wonder) into a whale oil factory ship & renamed Southern Empress. Have read also that Southern was based at Stanley in the Falkland Islands. Active in Antarctic waters. 20 WW2 convoy references including at least 6 N. Atlantic crossings, & service to Port Said. In 1941, the vessel was sold to 'Christian Salvesen & Co.', of Edinburgh, Scotland. On Oct. 13/14, 1942, while serving as a Royal Fleet Auxiliary Tanker, part of convoy SC-104 & en route from New York to Glasgow with a cargo of fuel oil & 21 (but maybe 10 only per 8) landing craft - 11 small & ten big it used to say at 2 - the vessel was torpedoed (3 torpedoes in 2 attacks) & sunk by U-221, Kapitänleutnant Hans-Hartwig Trojer in command, about 400 miles S. of Cape Farewell (N.E. of St. John's, Newfoundland, at 53.40N/40.40W). 125 were aboard when sunk. 48 lives were lost including Captain Olaf Hansen (Charles Hocking stated, however, that he survived). The 77 survivors were picked up by Norwegian corvette Potentilla, transferred to the Norwegian whale factory ship Suderøy & landed at Liverpool. Can you add anything?

164 San Nazario
10064 (or 12029 or 12667) tons
Hull 459

136702

Thorshammer
1914

A tanker which became a whale factory ship. And had a very long life indeed (58 years). Per 1 (data & image), 2 & 3 (data Thorshammer), 4 (detail in Norwegian, with many images), 5 (16 images & data in Norwegian, but the images are no longer there), 6 (data in Norwegian, again the images are no longer there), 7 (1941 German raid on whaling fleet), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 160.2 metres (525 ft. 6 in.) long, speed of 11 (or maybe 10) knots. It is a pleasure to find a vessel so well documented though I regret my inability in Norwegian. Built for 'The Eagle Oil Transport Co. Ltd.', ('Eagle') of London, (or maybe 'The Eagle Tanker Company Limited'). Carried crude oil & white oil products. Identified as being a 'Shell' tanker - maybe chartered to Shell? Or maybe Shell had an ownership interest in Eagle? On Oct. 15, 1917, the vessel was torpedoed by U-53 & damaged, but survived & was repaired. The vessel was sold, on Jul. 23, 1928, to 'Bryde & Dahls Hvalfangerselskap A/S' of Sandefjord, Norway, converted (at 'Ankomst Framnæs mek. Værksted'?) into a whale oil factory ship & renamed Thorshammer. Managed by 'A/S Thor Dahl', of Sandefjord. The vessel was further rebuilt, (at 'Wilton-Fijenoord', of Rotterdam?), in 1931/32. A major event that Thorshammer was able to avoid. In Jan. 1941, the Norwegian whaling fleet was on the 'whale herding grounds' in Antarctic waters. In the largest single capture German raiders ever accomplished, 3 whale factory ships & 11 whale catchers were captured without bloodshed on Jan. 14, 1941 by German raider Pinguin. Prize crews were placed on board the many vessels, & the Norwegian crews were taken prisoner. Thorshammer was fortunate to avoid capture - she was approaching the area but was warned in time of the danger as you can read at 7. The ship was repaired or refitted twice in the late 1940s, it would seem - by 'Framnæs Mekaniske Verksted' in 1948, & by Harland & Wolff at Liverpool in 1949 (I think, but am not sure, that is what the data says). On Sep. 6, 1972, the vessel was sold to 'SPA Cantieri, Navali' ('C.N. Santa Maria'?), of Genoa, (La Spezia), Italy, to be broken up. I am quite sure that the above text contains errors, in view of my lack of ability in Norwegian, a language most difficult of WWW translation. Corrections & additional data are accordingly invited.

165 Lord Strathcona
7335 (or 7320) tons
Hull 473

137447
1915

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('uboat.net', 1942 sinking, image), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Strathcona, but I cannot check the link), 3 (events, Sep. 5, 1942, modest image), 4 (7+ minute video of the wreck), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 137.1 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 455.0 ft., speed of 11 1/2 knots. Lord Strathcona? A famous name indeed in Canadian history (A), but too big a story to cover here. The vessel was built for Lord Curzon Shipping Co. Ltd., of Liverpool, J. Herron & Co. the managers & just possibly the owners also. During the period of 1918 to 1923, the vessel linked Cardiff & New York, perhaps via Gibraltar. Can anybody advise of the later ownership changes - it would seem to have spent much of its life in Canadian waters. At the time of WW2, the vessel was owned by Dominion Shipping Co. Ltd., of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. 32 WW2 convoy references, all of which were Canada coastal (Saint John, St. John's, Halifax, Sydney, Corner Brook, Quebec) likely mainly carrying iron ore ex the Wabana mines at Bell Island, Newfoundland. But that number of convoys is suspect, since three 1944 & 1945 convoys are listed, something which is just not possible. Maybe 29 therefore? On Sep. 5, 1942, Lord Strathcona, Charles Stewart in command with a crew of 43, was one of 5 vessels anchored at Wabana Roads, Bell Island, Conception Bay, Newfoundland, loaded with a cargo of iron ore bound for Sydney, Nova Scotia. At 4:46 p.m. that day, the vessel was struck amidships by 2 torpedoes fired by U-513, Fregattenkapitän Rolf Rüggeberg in command. At 47.35N/52.59W. There was a giant explosion & Lord Strathcona sank within 90 seconds. All of the crew were rescued by a Customs launch & landed at Lana Bay, Bell Island. U-513 had, half an hour earlier, also sunk Saganaga. I read that in manoeuvring in the shallow waters to make good its attack, U-513 hit the stern of Lord Strathcona & damaged its conning tower. But, while it was then attacked, it was able to make its escape. The wreck is still there today, lying in about 28 metres (have also read 120 ft.) of water, relatively well preserved by the cold waters. Preservation which is surely helped by the Canadian laws which state that no wreck artifact may be removed from a wreck site. Can you add anything?

166 HMS Norseman
1025 (or 1242) tons
Hull 506
1916

A 'Repeat' Admiralty M Class destroyer. Per 1 (data re M Class), 2 (more M Class data), 3 (image), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 269 ft long, 3 funnel, speed of 34 knots. F13. Armed with three 4-inch guns; one 2-pounder pompom anti-aircraft gun; two 21-inch torpedo tubes. Sold to be broken up at Grays, Essex, on May 9, 1921. WWW data is most limited. Anything that you can add?

167 HMS Orestes
1025 (or 1042) tons
Hull 487
1916

An Admiralty M Class destroyer. Per 1, 2, 3 & 4 (all data, but the last link now no loner works, temporarily, I hope), 5 (image), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 269 ft long, 3 funnel, speed of 34 knots. G61. Armed with three 4-inch guns; one 2-pounder pompom anti-aircraft gun; two 21-inch torpedo tubes. Sold to be broken up at either Jan. 30, 1921 or Oct. 31, 1921 (data differs). Sold to W. & T. Burden, it would appear, though I am unable to track where they were located. WWW data is most limited.

168 HMS Orpheus
1025 tons
Hull 489
1916

A 'Repeat' (data conflicts about that) Admiralty M Class destroyer. Per 1 (data), 2 (data), 3 (at Doxford's in 1916, a 'Facebook Tugs ...' image, view best in 'Photo Viewer'), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 273 ft 8 in. long, 3 funnel, speed of 34 knots, complement of 80. H28. Armed with three 4-inch guns; two 1-pounder pompom anti-aircraft guns; four 21-inch torpedo tubes. Sold to be broken up on Nov. 1, 1921 & broken up at Sunderland. WWW data is most limited.

169 HMS Oryx
1025 tons
Hull 490

HMS Octavia
1916

An Admiralty M Class destroyer. Per 1 (data), 2 (data), 3 (image), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The vessel was originally ordered as HMS Oryx, but her name was changed while in course of construction & she was delivered as HMS Octavia. 83.31 metres long, 3 funnel, speed of 34 knots, complement of 79. Armed with three 4-inch guns; one 1-pounder pompom anti-aircraft gun; four 21-inch torpedo tubes. G71? The vessel was sold, to be broken up, on Nov. 5, 1921 & was broken up by Granton Shipbreaking Co. Ltd., of Edinburgh, Scotland. Available WWW data is most limited. Can you correct the above modest text or add to it?

170 Smolensk
2487 tons
Hull 474

137507

Warszawa
1916

A passenger/cargo vessel. Per 1 (data in Polish), 2 & 3 (Wilson Line), 4 ('uboat.net', Warszawa sinking, image, Smolensk), 5 (U-559), 6 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Warszawa, but I cannot check the link), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 92 metres long, speed of 12 knots. Completed for Russian North-West Steamship Co. Ltd. in late Jul. 1915, but laid up until May 1916. In May 1916, the vessel was delivered to Thos. Wilson Sons & Co., 'Wilson Line', of Liverpool.  In 1917, the vessel became an Ellerman's Wilson Line vessel upon Ellerman's acquiring Wilson Line. 'Ellerman's Wilson Line Ltd.' became the new owner's name in 1917. In 1930 (or maybe in 1929) the vessel became Warszawa, owned by 'Polish-British Steamship Co.', of Gdynia, Poland, or, in Polish, Polsko-Brytyjskie Towarzystwo Okrêtowe SA (Polbrit). From Nov. 1939 to Jun. 1940, the vessel transported Polish soldiers & refugees from Greece & Yugoslavia to Marseilles & Syria. She was then interned by Vichy-French authorities at Beirut, but escaped to Haifa & was used to transport British troops to Greece, Crete & also to Tobruk, Libya. Just 6 WW2 convoy references, mainly in the Mediterranean. In late Dec. 1941, the vessel, T. Meissner in command, was heading a small convoy (AT.6) en route from Alexandria, Egypt, to Tobruk, when it was torpedoed, at 2:29 p.m. on Dec. 26, 1941 off Tobruk, by U-559, Kapitänleutnant Hans Heidtmann in command. A crew of 47, 5 gunners & 416 passengers (military personnel) were on board. The vessel was hit at 32.10N24.32E. 4 crew & 19 passengers were lost. The ship settled by the bow & was taken in tow by convoy escort vessel, HMS Peony,  K40, a corvette, which took off all of the military personnel & a portion of the crew. At 7:30 p.m., Warszawa was hit by another torpedo & sank. The remaining crew were rescued by HMS Peony & landed at Tobruk. I am grateful for the data at 4. WWW translation of Polish is most difficult. But ... the above may well contain mistakes. I would welcome corrections.

171 General Church
6600 tons
Hull 515

140423

Ekaterini Nicolaou
Victoria
Cantabro
Castillo Oropesa
1917

A cargo ship. Per 1 (1918, torpedo), 2 (UB-49), 3 (Italian page, 1941 sinking, 45% down, Castillo Oropesa), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 128.0 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, (420 ft.) speed of 11 1/2 knots. Built for Byron Steamship Co. Ltd., of London, 'M. Embiricos', the manager. On Feb. 4, 1918, while en route, in ballast, from Genoa, Italy, to St. John's, New Brunswick, Canada, the vessel was attacked by UB-49, Kapitänleutnant Hans von Mellenthin in command, (by torpedo, I presume) off Genoa. 2 lives were lost but the ship survived the encounter, in a damaged condition. In 1932, the vessel was sold to  'N. G. Nicolaou', & became Ekaterini Nicolaou. A number of ownership changes in 1938/9. Became Victoria in 1938, owned by 'A. G. Pappadakis & Co. Ltd.' of Piraeus, Greece, (or maybe London). Later that year the vessel became Cantabro, owned by the Spanish Nationalist Government. In 1939, the vessel became Castillo Oropesa, owned by the Spanish Government (Gerencia de Buques Mercantes para Servicios Oficiales?) In late 1941, the vessel travelled in ballast from Barcelona to Melilla, Spanish Morocco, (Mediterranean coast, eastern Morocco). On Nov. 8, 1941, while anchored in Spanish territorial waters at the mouth of the port of Melilla, the vessel was torpedoed & sunk by Italian submarine Dandalo. 3 indicates (I think) that the vessel was sunk by mistake. I have read snippets of data that suggests that may well not be so. No loss of life. I would welcome additions or corrections.

172 HMS Redoubt
1065 tons
Hull 508
1917

An R Class destroyer. H68. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Speed 36 knots, complement of 90. WWW data about the vessel seems to be non-existent. But the vessel was involved in a quite amazing aviation story, which merits being detailed at length. You should first know that the Germans used Zeppelins in WW1 to bomb London & for aerial reconnaissance with great effect & impunity. On Aug. 11, 1918, Redoubt took part in a raid on German shipping in the Heligoland Bight, off the Dutch coast. Redoubt towed a 'lighter' at a speed of 35 knots, a tiny flat topped barge if you will, which was carrying Flight Sub Lieutenant Stuart Douglas Culley, an American pilot, aboard a Sopwith Camel 2F.1 fighter. A patrolling Zeppelin (L-53) was sighted. The Camel took a run of just 5 feet, got airborne, climbed for an hour to 18,000 feet & using incendiary ammunition shot down the Zeppelin flying above him. Only one of the Zeppelin's crew survived after baling out. Culley, virtually out of fuel, with just one pint left, landed his aircraft in the sea alongside Redoubt & he and his aircraft were taken aboard using a derrick. He was the first, & probably the only, pilot to shoot down an enemy 'aircraft' having taken off from a towed vessel. Culley's Camel hung in the Imperial War Museum in London for many years (2 and 3). And may indeed still do so? Culley won the DSO - see link above. Commodore Reginald Y. (Yorke) Tyrwhitt, fleet commander I believe, was so impressed with Culley's heroic performance that he ordered the young flyer to stand on top of Redoubt's main gun turret while the rest of the fleet passed in review with all hands on deck to salute him. Vessel broken up Jul. 13, 1926. Loads of WWW references to the story. This is the best account I have read. Can anybody possibly provide more detail about the vessel?

173 HMS Umpire
1085 (or 1090) tons
Hull 512
1917

A Modified (slightly bigger than the standard) R Class destroyer. Per 1 (data), 2 (Wikipedia ref. Umpire), 3 (Valetta, Malta, 1924 rescue of passengers), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 84.1 metres long, speed of 36 knots, complement of 82. I have previously indicated that the vessel was F 26. I wonder now if that was true & if so the incorrect vessel is pictured at top thumbnail left. Instead H 10. Armament 3 4 in. guns & a single 2 pounder 'pom-pom', 4 21 in. torpedo tubes. An improvement (fuel economy) on the earlier M class destroyers. On Nov. 2, 1924, when at Valetta, Malta, the vessel rescued passengers of a small motorboat, in collision with HMS Calypso. Then H 10. WWW data about the vessel's service is non-existent. Can anybody possibly provide more detail about the vessel? On Jan. 7, 1930, the vessel was sold to be broken up at Charlestown (Firth of Forth, Rosyth, Scotland).

174 HMS Vega
1300 (or 1200) tons
Hull 514
1917

An Admiralty V Class destroyer. Per 1 (V & W Class Destroyers), 2 ('uboat.net', Vega), 3 (HMS Vega, history), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 309 ft. (95.1 metres) long, speed of 34 knots, armed with four 4 inch guns & four 20 mm anti-aircraft guns, complement of 125. Commissioned Dec. 14, 1917. The vessel was damaged in 1918. Was selected for conversion to an Anti-Aircraft Escort. Reconstruction to 'Fast Escort' completed on Nov. 28, 1939. Pennant number D52 changed to L41 upon completion. Or ... reconstructed in 1940 (completed Apl. 23, 1940), & became a Fast Escort (D52 changed to L41). Used during WW2 on North Sea convoy duties. Took part in the successful blocking of the Bruges Canal at Zeebrugge in May 1940, assisted at the withdrawal of the British Expeditionary Force from Dunkirk & Le Havre in May 1940, & blockaded the harbour at Dieppe in Jun. 1940. On Nov. 11, 1940, the vessel hit a mine off Sunk Head (Harwich). Repairs were only completed on Nov. 14, 1942. The vessel was sold to 'BISCO' for breaking up ('Clayton and Davies') at Dunston (River Tyne) on Mar. 4, 1947. And arrived at Dunston, on Mar. 26, 1947 (or maybe the same date in 1948) for scrapping. Can you help improve this listing?

175 HMS Shamrock
1075 (or 905) tons
Hull 524
1918

An S Class destroyer. HO6. Per 1 (S Class - armament at right), 2 (data & related images), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 84.1 metres long overall, 276 ft., 80.8 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 36 knots, complement of 82 (or maybe 90). Built for the Royal Navy. The vessel perhaps should be included at 1? But is not. I thought she had seen service in WW1, but perhaps not. I now read that she was commissioned at Chatham on Oct. 11, 1919 for 'service in the 4th Flotilla, Atlantic Fleet' & 'was detached to the Mediterranean for a time in 1920. Was re-commissioned at Nore on Jun. 30, 1921, as an 'emergency destroyer, a tender to' Hecla (later Malcolm), 'with only engineering officers permanently attached'. On Nov. 17, 1927 'she paid off into Maintenance Reserve at Rosyth and in November 1930 she recommissioned at Portsmouth for service at Gibraltar.' The vessel remained in the Mediterranean until late 1936. On Nov. 23, 1936, the vessel was sold, for breaking up at Milford Haven. Have read such sale was 'as part exchange for RMS Majestic'. Can anyone explain that?

176 HMS Walpole
1300 (or 1100) tons
Hull 518
1918

A V & W Class destroyer. Per 1 ('uboat.net', data, Walpole), 2 (data, Walpole), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 95.1 metres (312 ft.) long. Armed with four 4-inch guns; two 2-pounder pompom anti-aircraft guns; one machine gun; four Lewis guns & six 21-inch torpedo tubes. Speed of 34/35 knots, complement of 134. Commissioned Aug. 1918. D41. On Oct. 30, 1939, HMS Walpole & HMS Whirlwind scuttled with gunfire British merchantman Bronte (torpedoed at 49.30N/12.15W, by U-34 on Oct. 27, 1939, 180 miles W. of Lands End). Walpole took aboard 42 Bronte crew members. On Mar. 8, 1940, the vessel picked up 78 survivors from the British merchant vessel Counsellor which hit a mine laid by U-30 close to Liverpool Bar Lightship, at 53.38N/03.23W. On May 13, 1940, the vessel evacuated personnel from IJmuiden, Holland. On Jul. 27, 1940, the ship was damaged by bombs from German aircraft while escorting a convoy off Dover. On Jan. 6, 1945, the vessel was mined off Vlissingen (Flushing), Holland. 2 crew were killed, & 5 seriously injured. While the vessel was towed back to Kent by HMS Rutherford, she was declared to be a constructive total loss, & was not repaired. Was sold to be broken up on Feb. 8, 1945 & broken up at Grays, Essex. Anything you can add?

177 War Aconite
5329 (or 5299) tons
Hull 529

142634

Trefusis
1918

A 'A' dry cargo ship. Per 1 (data, War Aconite), 2 & 3 (images, War Aconite), 4 (sinking, data & image), 5 (U-130, type in 130 at top left), 6 (U-410 & Trefusis about 75% down, p#51), 7 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Trefusis, but I cannot check the link), 8 & 9 (Hain), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 122.0 metres (perpendicular to perpendicular) & 412 ft. long, speed of 11 knots. Aconite? A poisonous plant, used in wartime to poison enemy water supplies. Built for the British Government (The Shipping Controller) as War Aconite, managed by W. Runciman & Co., of London. The vessel was sold, in 1919, to The Hain Steamship Company Limited ('Hain') of Cardiff & later London (but originally of St. Ives, Cornwall), renamed Trefusis & registered at St. Ives. Hain was then part of the 'Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company' group of companies. 59 WW2 convoy references, including 7 N. Atlantic crossings, service to W. Africa (Freetown), & U.K. coastal. On Feb. 28, 1943, the vessel left Gibraltar under the command of Captain Robert T. (Tyrer) Browne with a cargo of iron ore (ex Pepel, nr. Freetown, Sierra Leone) bound for Liverpool (& then to London it would seem). In convoy XK-2. A total complement of 47. The convoy was attacked by U-130 (6 refers to U-410, however. I wonder why.) & 4 convoy ships were sunk on Mar. 5, 1943, including Trefusis. At 43.50N/14.46W, NW of Lisbon, Portugal. 3 lives were lost. The survivors (including the Captain) were picked up by HMS Coreopsis, (a corvette), transferred to HMS Loch Oskaig (an armed trawler), & landed at Londonderry, Northern Ireland. Anything you can add?

178 War Aspen
5277 (later 5286) tons
Hull 528

142711

Sutherland
Southmead
Koolonga
Caithness
David Dawson
Avon River
1918

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Koolonga), 1 (War Aspen), 2 (data & the wreck in 2007/2010?), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 400.3 ft. (about 127 metres) long, 2 masts, speed of 11 knots. Launched for the British Government as War Aspen. But delivered to Sutherland Steamship Co. Ltd., of Newcastle (A. M. Sutherland the manager) as Sutherland, at a cost of £167,500. The vessel was sold, in 1920, for £280,000, to Western Counties Shipping Co. ('Counties'), of London (E. Edwards Sons & Co. managers?) & renamed Southmead. In 1921, Counties went out of business & the vessel was sold at auction, for £60,000, to McIlwraith McEacharn Limited, (or McIlwraith, McEacharn Line Pty. Ltd.), of Melbourne, Australia, & renamed Koolonga. The vessel was sold again, for £36,000 in 1929, to B. J. Sutherland & Co., of Newcastle & renamed Caithness. In 1935, the vessel was sold to Jubilee Shipping Navigation Co., of Newcastle, (Frank S. Dawson ('Dawson') the manager?) & renamed David Dawson. It was sold again, in 1936, to Avon Steamship Co. Ltd., of Bristol (M. Whitwill & Son the manager? - Whitwill was a director of Dawson) & renamed Avon River. Gross tonnage became 5286. Later in 1936, while en route from Montreal, Quebec, to Churchill, Manitoba, (both Canada), in ballast, the vessel ran into a severe gale with mountainous seas on Sep. 15, 1936. The engines failed, & on Sep. 16, 1936, the vessel was driven onto the W. coast of Mansel Island in Hudson Bay. At 62.06N/80.18W. No lives were lost, which is amazing considering how remote the site. The inquiry at Montreal determined loss was due to the weather conditions & attributed no blame to the vessel's officers & crew. Wreck still seems to be there in 2007/2010? Can you correct or add to the above?

179 War Stag
5249 (or 5175) tons
Hull 525

142431

Tregonnell
Iris
1918

A 'B' type cargo ship. Per 1 (War Stag), 2 (image, Tregonell), 3 (Could this be an image of Iris? Also -12, -13), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 121.9 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, (400 or 413.5 ft.), speed of 11 (or 10 1/2) knots. Built for the British Government (Shipping Controller) as War Stag, with Watts, Watts & Co. Ltd., of London, the managers. The vessel was sold, in 1919, to Hain Steamship Company Ltd., of London (company previously was of St. Ives, Cornwall, until purchased by P&O in 1917) & renamed Tregonnell. Vessel often referred to as 'Tregonell', possibly incorrectly? The vessel served the Hull & Cardiff to New York route in the 1920-1923 period. It was sold, on Aug. 2, 1935, to 'Achille Lauro', (Flotta Lauro or Lauro Lines), of Naples, Italy, & renamed Iris. On Jun. 25, 1943, the vessel was bombed & sunk at Naples but later was salvaged (when I wonder?) & returned to service. Am grateful for 1 re that data. Have not been able to WWW read the circumstances. On Apl. 10, 1958, the vessel arrived at Spezia, Italy, to be broken up. Can you correct and/or add to the above?

180 HMS Whitley
1300 (or 1100) tons
Hull 520
1918

A W Class destroyer. Per 1 (4 images, 20% down), 2 (re sinking), 3 ('uboat.net', data, Whitley), 4 (Wikipedia, V & W Class destroyers), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Was initially intended to be named Whitby. 95.1 metres long, speed of 35 knots. Commissioned Oct. 1918. During 1919-20, the vessel served in the Baltic for operations against the Bolsheviks. The ship was placed in the Reserve Fleet by 1921 as part of the 9th Destroyer Flotilla at Rosyth & did not serve with the Fleet in the inter-war years. L23. Reconstructed by HM Dockyard Chatham, to 'Fast Escort' in Oct. 1938. D97. On May 19, 1940, the vessel was badly damaged by German aircraft & was beached between Nieuport & Ostend on the Belgian coast. It was pulled off the beach but due to its poor condition was intentionally sunk nearby by HMS Keith - in only 5 m. of water. Can you add to or correct the above?

181 HMS Velox
1300 tons
Hull 516
1918

Admiralty V Class destroyer. Per 1 (with image), 2 (Wikipedia), 3 (data & image), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 300 ft. long, speed of 34 or 35 knots, armed with (you can read it at 3. I have difficulty in summarising it). Complement of 110. D 34. Launched Nov. 17, 1917 & commissioned Apl. 1, 1918. Built with the ability to be converted into a minelayer within 24 hours. Was engaged in the Second Ostend Raid. Travelled to the Baltic Sea N. of Russia (does that make sense) during the Bolshevik revolution. Placed in Reserve due to economic conditions during the 1930s. The vessel was re-commissioned in 1939 & allocated for duty at Gibraltar. Saw service with the Atlantic Fleet, 1st Destroyer Flotilla. Took part in operations at Ostend & Zeebrugge. In 1940, Velox organised the embarkation/evacuation at Port Vendres & Sète, France, of Czechoslovak troops to Gibraltar. From Aug. 19/25, 1941, carried to Gibraltar a) the survivors (transferred from Campanula) of Alva, sunk by German submarine U-559, & b) 8 survivors (transferred from Campanula) of Empire Oak, a tug, sunk by U-564. On Aug. 22, 1942 the vessel picked up 66 survivors from City of Wellington, torpedoed & sunk by U-506 SW of Freetown, Sierra Leone. In May 1944, the vessel was reconstructed & became a Long Range Escort. I-34. Reduced to 'Reserve' after VJ Day, placed on the 'Disposal List' in 1946 & sold to 'BISCO' on Feb. 18, 1947 for breaking-up by Metal Industries. In Nov. 1947, the vessel arrived, in tow, at Charlestown (Firth of Forth, Rosyth, Scotland) for breaking up. Corrections?

182 HMS/HMAS Success
1075 tons
Hull 522
1919

An S Class destroyer. Per 1 (includes modest image), 2 (S Class - armament data at right), 3 (a c.1920 & a 1927 image of Success are available. But you must search for them since I am not permitted to give you links. I wonder why), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for the Royal Navy. 276 ft. long, twin screw, 2 funnels, a long forecastle, a tall bridge, which, unusually, was located behind the break in the main deck, speed 30 (or 36) knots, steam turbine, twin screw, complement of 90. But in Jun. (or maybe in Jul.) 1919, the vessel was transferred to the Royal Australian Navy. Was intended to be renamed Raboul, but it was not renamed. On Jan. 27, 1920, the vessel was commissioned as HMAS Success (H02). But held in reserve. On May 21, 1931, the vessel was de-commissioned. And on Jun. 4, 1937, was sold to 'Penguin P/L' to be scrapped. 'remains scuttled by bombing by aircraft off Sydney Dec. 20, 1941'. Can you explain what 'Penguin P/L' means & also explain those last words. Means that vessel was not therefore actually scrapped in 1937? And can you provide more data?

183 War Jasper
6701 tons
Hull 537

141917

Comeric
Hampton Hill
Mount Kyllene
1919

A cargo ship. Per 1 (War Jasper), 2 [Bank Line, Comeric, (2)], 3 ('wrecksite.eu', sinking data), 4 (two Apl. 1938 Australian newspaper articles, ex 5 & 6), 7 (Board of Trade Report re Anglo Australian, 'pdf' available), 8 (image, Comeric, also -02), 9 (Lloyd's Register data, 1930/31 thru 1937/38, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org', see left), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The history of this vessel has been particularly difficult to WWW research - which is unfortunate because the story is a dramatic one. 125.8 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 412.6 ft., speed of 11 knots, signal letters (late in life) KOHN, GBTD & SVUQ. Laid down as War Jasper for the British Government (Shipping Controller). But delivered as Comeric to Bank Line Limited, Andrew Weir & Co. the managers, i.e. 'Bank Line', of Glasgow. In 1936, the vessel was sold to Middlesex Steamship Co. Ltd., of London, with Counties Ship Management Co. Ltd., the managers, also of London. And renamed Hampton Hill. In 1937, the vessel was sold to 'Kulukundis Bros. & C. N. Pateras', which would seem to have become 'Kulukundis Shipping Co. & others' or something most similar, Kulukundis & Pateras, the managers, all of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Mount Kyllene. Mount Kyllene, or Mount Kyllini or Mount Cyllene is the 2nd highest mountain in the Peloponnese peninsula, Greece, the legendary birthplace of messenger of the Gods 'Hermes'. On Apl. 9, 1938, while en route, in ballast, from Amsterdam to Panama City, Panama, Mount Kyllene encountered heavy weather. I have read that the ship suffered an explosion 'in the neighbourhood of her bunkers', an explosion that blew the ship into two pieces. At 43.30N/28.00W, in the N. Atlantic, said to be about 200 miles N. of the Azores, about 1,200 miles W. of the N. Spanish coast. It would seem, however, that there is much more to the story than is written above. Apparently the weight of the ship, i.e. its engines & its water & solid ballast, was predominantly amidships. During the storm, the ship became 'suspended' with bow & stern on the crests of separate waves. The ship buckled in the middle, initially, apparently, with some 'creaking'. However, within 15 minutes, the ship had physically broken into two pieces amidships. Both parts stayed afloat, & per Charles Hocking, 17 crew were on the bow section while 14 were on the aft. Papa Theodorou ('Theodorou'), the ship's radio officer, rigged a temporary aerial in the fore part of the ship after the explosion, & was able to send out distress signals. It would seem that three tankers came to the rescue. Inverlee & Athelfoam, respectively Irish & British tankers, were two of the three. I have read that Kitia Knudsen, a Norwegian tanker, was the third, but Miramar do not reference a vessel of such a name. I think that the third vessel may have correctly been Kaia Knudsen. Inverlee certainly rescued 5 crew members (J. H. Onions, then 3rd officer of Inverlee, was honoured by the Greek Admiralty with a medal for his part in the rescue). But Inverlee may well have saved more crew members on the second day. Athelfoam must have had a significant rescue role. Arthur Wilkinson advises, (thanks!) that his father, Arthur Wilkinson, an able seaman aboard Athelfoam, was awarded the Naval Medal 2nd class (silver) by the Kingdom of Greece for his part in the rescue. An image of the citation is at left, approx. translated here. In total, by one or other of those three ships, 29 crew members were rescued. Unfortunately, four crew members, including Theodorou, lost their lives trying to board the lifeboats that came to save them in the mountainous seas. Remarkably both parts of the ship stayed afloat after the break-up - the stern stayed afloat for 36 hours while the bow section stayed afloat for at least 11 days. I read that it was last seen on Apl. 20, 1938 - at 43.09N/31.22W, about 210 miles W. of where she broke apart, but also have read that it floated for 14 days. Was there an official enquiry, I wonder, into the disaster? Mount Kyllene's experience was referenced in the Board of Trade Inquiry Report re Anglo Australian which was lost in somewhat similar circumstances a month prior, on or about Mar. 14, 1938. Photographs apparently exist of the ship in two pieces. Can you add anything? Another image?

184 Anten
5135 or 6498 or 6590 or 5234) tons
Hull 547

6406
1920

A cargo ship. Per 1 (U-123 data), 2 ('uboat.net' sinking data), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Anten, but I cannot check the link. Choose Anten only from the list.), 4 & 5 (images, Anten), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 128.0 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 433.9 ft., speed of 10 (or 11) knots. Many different tonnages are referred to re this vessel! Built for 'Rederi Aktiebolaget Transatlantic', (in English, 'Swedish Transatlantic Steamship Co.'), of Gothenburg, Sweden. G. Carlsson, likely of Gothenburg, were the initial managers, however General Steamship Corporation, seem to have later been the managers. In 1925, the vessel was chartered to 'La Compagnie Française des Phosphates de L'Oceanie' to carry phosphates from Makatea, Tuamotu Archipelago, South Pacific. Some modest legal dispute resulted. Carried sugar to San Francisco. In 1935/37 at least, was on service from Canadian & U.S. ports on the W. coast of North America to ports in Australia. Just 3 WW2 convoy references, including one eastbound crossing of the N. Atlantic. The vessel saw independent service, thru Aug. 1940, mainly in South African & Australian waters. In Nov. 1940, the vessel was en route, in ballast, from Liverpool to Cape Town, South Africa, in convoy OB-244. At 9.14 a.m. on Nov. 23, 1940, after the convoy had dispersed, the vessel was hit amidships by a torpedo fired by U-123. At 56.57N/18.18W. About 550 miles NW of Ireland, SW of Rockall. Does that not seem to be a strange place for a convoy to have dispersed? She drifted helplessly eastwards for a while but sank. One life lost of the 33 man crew. The survivors abandoned ship & were picked up by HMS Sandwich (L12). I read that U-123 hit a submerged object & suffering damage to its conning tower & both periscopes, was unable to finish Anten off & returned to base in France for repairs which took 50 days to complete. Anten sank, however, 2 days later, at 57.15N/17.40W. Can you add anything? An image?

185 Kincardine
6503 (or 6507) tons
Hull 519

144904

Antar
Artemisia
1920

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Artemisia), 1 [B. J. Sutherland, Kincardine (2)], 2 (modest data), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Artemisia, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 128.0 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 433.9 ft., speed of 10 1/2 knots. Built for Grindon Steamship Company Ltd. ('Grindon'), of Glasgow, B. J. Sutherland & Co. Ltd. ('Sutherland'), of Newcastle, the managers. I have not read about the relationship between Grindon & Sutherland. In 1923, the vessel was sold to 'New Egypt & Levant Shipping Co. Ltd.' ('Egypt'), of London, (T. Bowen Rees & Co. ('Rees'), the managers), & renamed Antar. I have seen a reference to Egypt being of both Izmir, Turkey, & Alexandria, Egypt, & Rees being also of Alexandria. The vessel was in Carrick Roads, near Falmouth, Cornwall, for 2 1/2 years, I presume laid up during the Depression. In 1932, the vessel was sold to 'Henry M. Thomson', of London, & renamed Artemisia. Just 9 WW2 convoy references. The vessel was independent in the Far East in late 1939 (Singapore, Rangoon), & was independent for much of 1940, (Aden, Bombay, Colombo, to Fremantle, Western Australia, back to Durban & Cape Town, South Africa then Takoradi, & Freetown, West Africa). On Mar. 14, 1941, the vessel left Southend in convoy FN.432 bound for Newcastle. On that day, the vessel was bombed & set on fire by German aircraft & sank in shallow water 2 miles off Haisboro'. At 52.53N/1.39E, off the NE coast of Norfolk. Near Aldeburgh. 2 lives were lost. HMS Sheldrake took off her captain & 46 crew members. The captain's name? WWW data is most limited. Need help! Another image?

186 Koranton
6695 tons
Hull 543

142863
1920

An F type Standard cargo ship. Per 1 (Chapman and Willan, Ltd., flags & data), 2 ('uboat.net', sinking data & image), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Koranton, but I cannot check the link), 4 (images), 5 (contains names of 5 lives lost), 6 (Hawaiian Isles, later Abraham Rydberg, ref. 1936), 7 (Gysae), 8 (in French, Abraham Rydberg III), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 412 ft. (about 130 metres) long, speed of 12 knots. Built for R. Chapman & Son, ('Chapman'), of Newcastle. On May 10, 1936 the vessel was in collision with Abraham Rydberg, a 4 masted barque built in 1892, 45 miles S. of Eddystone (Cornwall or Devon). Just 5 WW2 convoy references, including two N. Atlantic crossings, including SC.25 in which she was lost. No data available, t would seem as to any independent voyages. On Mar. 10, 1941, the vessel left Halifax, Nova Scotia, for Liverpool, under the command of Master Charles E. (Edward) Howard, as part of convoy SC.25, carrying pig iron from Philadelphia for Loch Ewe & Hull. The vessel lagged behind the convoy & on Mar. 27, 1941 was hit by a torpedo fired by U-98, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Robert Gysae, a top U-boat ace. The vessel immediately sank - at 59.00N/27.00W, SSW of Reykjavik, Iceland. The entire crew of 36 were lost (34 crew & 2 gunners). Many WWW references to names of those lost. Anything you can add? Or correct.

187 Mabriton
6694 tons
Hull 541

142857
1920

An F type Standard cargo ship. Per 1 (Chapman and Willan, Ltd., flags & data), 2 ('uboat.net', sinking data & image), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Mabriton, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Jenisch), 5 (names of the 12 lost), 6 (modest data, Mabriton), 7 (U-32), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 412 ft. (about 130 metres) long, speed of 12 knots. Built for R. Chapman & Son, ('Chapman'), of Newcastle. Or maybe for 'The Carlton Steamship Company Ltd.', which was related to the owners of Chapman. 13 WW2 convoy references including 2 completed N. Atlantic crossings. Independent to Cape Town in late 1939. On Sep. 18, 1940, under the command of Master Reginald Patrick, the vessel left Methil (Firth of Forth) for Liverpool in convoy OA.216, there to join convoy OB.216 which left Liverpool on Sep. 19, 1940 bound (Mabriton), in ballast, for Father Point, St. Lawrence River & on to Montreal, Quebec, Canada. On Sep. 23, 1940 the vessel dispersed from the convoy & early on Sep. 25, 1940 was hit in the stern by a torpedo fired by U-32, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans Jenisch, a top U-boat ace. Vessel broke in two & sank, at 56.12N/23.00W, WSW of Rockall or about 900 miles W. of the Hebrides. 12 lives were lost, 25 survived. The Master & 17 survivors were rescued by HMS Jason & 7 by HMS Rochester. All were landed at Londonderry, Northern Ireland. Anything you can add?

188 Sydland
6508 (or 6563, later 5134) tons
Hull 544

6371
7019
196437

Högmarsö
Caymont
1920

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Norwegian page, images, Sydland), 2 (Swedish page, data & images, Sydland), 3 & 4 (images, Sydland), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Sydland, but I cannot check the link), 6 (Lloyd's Register data, Sydland, 1930/31 thru 1945/46, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 128.0 metres long (431.1 ft.) perpendicular to perpendicular, 434.9 ft. overall, speed of 10 or 10 1/2 knots, signal letters KPGV later SIPA. Built for 'Angfartygs A/B Tirfing' of Göteborg (Gothenburg), Sweden, (Dan Broström or 'Axel Broström & Son Aktiebolag', the owners & managers), who owned the vessel for the next 28 years. 'S. G. Jansen', later 'S. G. J : son Broström' is Lloyd's listed as the later manager. They did not own it without incident! In early Dec. 1920, the vessel, Karl J. (Johan) Larsson, in command, left Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A., for Gothenburg, with 10,027 tons of coal & bunker coal. The ship had a rough crossing of the N. Atlantic. On Dec. 20, 1920, proceeding at reduced speed in dense fog, the vessel ran aground on submerged rocks approaching harbour - at 4:10 p.m., near Hönö head (location). A part of the cargo was jettisoned. I presume that tugs would have arrived to help her. 3 days later, on Dec. 23, 1920, in deteriorating weather conditions, the ship broke into two pieces - the stern of the ship was saved while the bow later slipped under the surface. It is still there, a 'spread out' dive site today, in 25 metres of water, located at 57.41.377N/11.35.838E. A new bow section was built by 'Eriksbergs Mekaniska Verkstad A.B.', of Eriksberg, Gothenburg, Sweden. It took a while to accomplish, the rebuilt ship, joined together in the Eriksberg's floating dock, returning to service on Aug. 14, 1923. In 1928, the vessel was the first to leave Galveston, Texas, with a full cargo (401,250 bushels) of barley, bound for Bremen, Germany. 68 WW2 convoy references, including 11 crossings of the N. Atlantic. A few of the E. bound voyages were independent as were many of the W. bound (often to S. America). The vessel carried varied cargoes, including steel & scrap steel, iron ore, lumber, pig iron & sugar. The vessel also saw service on the coast of W. Africa, & into the Indian Ocean. In 1948, the vessel was sold to 'Rederi AB Rex', of Stockholm, Sweden, K. M. Kallstrom the managers, & renamed Högmarsö. And sold again, in 1957, to Belmont Shipping Co., of Bermuda, & renamed Caymont. Or, per a couple of the above links, Vaymont? On Jun. 9, 1958, the vessel arrived at ship breakers at Rotterdam, to be broken up. Anything you can add? Or correct.

189 Hallgyn
6672 (or 6630 or 6669) tons
Hull 550

Lina L-D
Michael J. Goulandris
1921

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('pdf', p.2, re wreck), 2 (data, Michael J. Goulandris), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Michael J Goulandris, but I cannot check the link), 4 (image, Hallgyn), 5 (image, Michael J. Goulandris), 6 & 7 (images, Lina whatever), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 128 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 (have also read 9) knots. Built for 'D/S A/S P. Kleppes Rederi', of Bergen, Norway, (Adolf Andersen, the manager). Can anybody advise me what happened in 1922 & 1923 i.e., from an expired website '1922: Des.: Overtatt av Bergens Kreditbank, Bergen, 1923: Overtatt av D/S A/S Phønix (A/S Rederiet Odfjell), Bergen.' 'Overtatt' etc. cannot be WWW translated. Perhaps taken over by a bank & then sold? In 1926, the vessel was sold to 'Louis Dreyfus & Cie.', of Dunkerque (Dunkirk), France, & renamed 'Lina L-D'. Now what exactly was its name? i.e. Lina L.D. or Lina L.D or Lina LD. All variations are used. I have gone with yet another variation, i.e. Lina L-D, the name as painted on the stern! The vessel was sold again in 1937 (or maybe in 1934, but I suspect that is wrong), to Goulandris Bros., of Andros, Greece, & renamed Michael J. Goulandris. But soon owned perhaps by 'The Heirs of the late Michael J. Goulandris', of Athens, Greece. 25 WW2 convoy references, including 3 N. Atlantic crossings, service to W. Africa (Freetown) but extensive service in the Australian theatre. On Dec. 21, 1944, while en route from Newcastle, New South Wales, to Fremantle Gas Works, Fremantle, Western Australia, with a general cargo & with coal (or the other way around), the vessel struck the 'South West Reefs' & was wrecked 3 miles S. of Point D'Entrecasteaux, Western Australia, (on the SW corner of the continent). At 34.53S/116.00E. The crew was saved, in difficult conditions, by St. John, an Australian naval vessel. Have not read the circumstances. Anything you can add? Or correct? Another image?

190 Yngaren
5247 (or 5246 or 5293) tons
Hull 549

6653
1921

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('wrecksite-eu' data, image), 2 (Wikipedia, U-43), 3 ('uboat.net' sinking data, Yngaren), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Yngaren, but I cannot check the link), 5 (Lüth), 6 (image, Yngaren, 40% down), 7 (splendid copyrighted Yngaren image by Walter E. Frost, thanks to the Vancouver, Canada, City archives), 8 (the 1921 oil engine), 9 (New Zealand, 1930 article), 10 (giraffes), 11 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 128.82 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 433 ft. 10 in., speed of 11 1/2 or 12 knots, single screw. Doxford's first motor ship with a 4 cylinder opposed piston (Junkers-Doxford) oil engine. Which engine would seem to have performed splendidly. Built for 'Rederi AB Transatlantic', (Transatlantic Steamship Company), of Gothenburg, Sweden, G. Carlsson, the manager? Per a Doxford 1922 booklet, on site in its entirety (the page, the booklet), the vessel was built for built for the 'Transatlantic S.S. Co.' In Dec. 1923, the vessel was in collision with the Norwegian Hermod, at the Scheldt (the river upon which Antwerp sits). Both vessels were badly damaged & Yngaren was repaired at Gothenburg. In 1925, the vessel was anchored on the Scheldt & was rammed by the Spanish Villa Franca. Have read no detail re either accident. In late Oct. 1927, the vessel arrived at Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, with 2 giraffes (apparently named 'High' & 'Mighty'!) & several hundred birds, ex Rhodesia, destined for the Sydney Zoological Gardens. Just 9 WW2 convoy references, including 3 crossings of the N. Atlantic & service to Freetown, W. Africa. In Jan. 1942, the vessel was in Convoy HX-168, from Halifax, Canada, to U.K. Note that Yngaren's voyage would appear to have originated in Bombay, India, bound for Hull - I presume that the vessel would have gone round the S. tip of Africa & then NW to North America to join that convoy - the independent voyage data at 4 does not help to confirm that. With a varied cargo (3,000 tons of manganese ore, almost 5,000 tons of copra, 80 tons of trucks & 8 aircraft, per H-168 (1 & 2) manganese), a crew of 34 all told & 6 passengers. At 8.02 a.m. on Jan. 12, 1942, a convoy straggler in very heavy weather, the vessel was struck by two torpedoes fired by U-43, Kapitänleutnant Wolfgang Lüth in command, at 57.00N/26.00W, (or maybe at 58.17N/12.38W, or 57.03/25.00W), about 600 miles W. of Ireland. The vessel sank within a minute. 38 lives, including the Master, (his name?), were lost. Almost a month later, a raft, really a chunk of floating wreckage, was spotted by a Hudson Coastal Command aircraft, & on Feb. 10, 1942, 2 survivors (a Swede & a Dane) were picked up by a fishing trawler. The much decorated Wolfgang Lüth was the 2nd most successful WW2 U-boat commander sinking 47 vessels & damaging two more. He died under unusual circumstances a few days after WW2 ended. On May 13, 1945, Lüth did not apparently identify himself or provide a password. Have not read where or the circumstances. But a German sentry took a shot literally in the dark at a target he couldn't see, struck Lüth in the head, & killed him instantly. Anything you can add? Or correct? Another image?

191 Blythmoor
6582 tons
Hull 551

146540
1922

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image, Blythmoor), 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Blythmoor, but I cannot check the link), 2 (a commendation of Blythmoor Captain), 3 & 4 (Narvik battles), 5 (painting of ship), 6 & 7 (images, Blythmoor), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 128.0 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 433 ft. 9 in., speed of 10 knots. Built for Moor Line Ltd., 'W. Runciman Shipping Co. Ltd.', the managers, owned by Walter Runciman & Co., all of Newcastle. Have seen brief references to the vessel frequently trading to S. Africa & traversing the Panama Canal many times. Just 10 WW2 convoy references. The vessel was independent in the Indian Ocean thru to late 1939 (Colombo, Mombasa, Laurenço Marques, Vizag). U.K. coastal voyages also. One completed voyage to Narvik, Norway, to load iron ore - the vessel was sunk at Narvik on her 2nd such voyage.  On Mar. 27, 1940, the vessel left Methil, Firth of Forth, in Convoy ON23/1 bound for Narvik (Arctic Circle, 700 miles N. of Bergen) there to load iron ore. On Apl. 9, 1940, as part of the wider German invasion of Norway, a large German fleet arrived at Ofotfjord, leading to Narvik, in part at least, to secure German control over iron ore mined in the region, (iron ore from mines at Kiruna, Sweden, were exported via Narvik). On Apl. 10, 1940, German destroyer Roeder (Diether von Roeder perhaps) opened fire. Hotspur & Hostile returned her fire. There were an amazing number of ore ships at Narvik at the time, 25 apparently. 5 of the anchored ships were British (including Blythmoor) but there were also Norwegian ships (4), neutral Dutch & Swedish ships (4) even 11 German ships. I read that the German Bockenheim, assuming that the intruding warships were British, beached & scuttled his vessel, indeed set it on fire! 11 merchant ships (6 German, 1 British, 2 Swedish & 2 Norwegian) were sunk during a later British sortie into the harbour. On Apl. 10, 1940, Blythmoor sank at her moorings with the loss of six lives, believed to have been hit either i) by an errant British torpedo, or ii) by gunfire possibly from British destroyers. 30 of the crew of Blythmoor would appear to have been held in a local school, in freezing conditions & with limited food, & after the 2nd battle of Narvik, were force-marched over the border into Sweden, enduring en route blizzards, deep snows, & some very rough country indeed. (Is that all correct? I have seen a reference to 30 being rather 'simply' interned in Sweden). 7 of the crew would seem to have been returned to the U.K., rescued by British vessels. Blythmoor was salvaged in 1953 & broken up at Stavanger, Norway, in 1954. The subject of the German invasion of Norway & the battle at Narvik is vast & separating out the data re Blythmoor is difficult. The above will surely therefore need correction, which is invited. Anything you can add?

192 Dominion Miller
5089 (or 5108) tons
Hull 521

146516

Pacific Commerce
Norbryn
1922

A cargo ship. Per A & B (e-Bay images, Dominion Miller), 1 (WW2 data, Norbryn, image), 2 (Furness Withy, Pacific Commerce), 3 (Norfolk & North American), 4 (Norwegian page, Norbryn), 5 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Norbryn, but I cannot check the link), 6 (image, Dominion Miller), 7 ('Life Magazine', Jun. 13, 1955), 8 (Lloyd's Register data, Pacific Commerce, 1930/31 thru 1935/36 ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 9 (Lloyd's Register data, Norbryn, 1937/38 thru 1945/46 ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 10 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 128.0 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 419.8 ft., speed of 12 knots, signal letters KLRD, GFTV & LJJV. Equipped, apparently, with the 2nd built, 4 cylinder, opposed-piston, Doxford diesel engine. Which engine would seem to have had some problems, however. And it would seem that the ship was later too slow for some WW2 N. Atlantic convoys. Most references are to the ship being a 'Furness Withy' vessel. A Doxford 1922 booklet, which booklet is on site in its entirety, states that the vessel was built for the 'Norfolk & North American S.S. Co.', which I think means 'Norfolk & North American Steam Shipping Co. Ltd.', (collectively 'Norfolk'), Norfolk being owned by Furness, Withy and Company Limited ('Furness'). However the vessel does not appear in the list of Norfolk vessels at 3. In 1924, the vessel was transferred to Furness. One interesting cargo in Jul. 1924, from Portland, Oregon - of 26,423 cases of canned goods, principally loganberries. An e-Bay vendor advised, as I understood the words, that forward side deckhouses were removed in 1925. The vessel was renamed Pacific Commerce, in 1925 (but 4 says in 1928). The transfer to Furness stated above may prove to be in error. From 1930/31 to 1934/35, the vessel was certainly registered in the name of Norfolk. In 1936, the vessel was sold to 'Brynmore Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Swansea, Wales, with 'Ambrose, Davies & Newman', of London, the managers. No change of vessel name. The vessel was sold again, in 1937, to 'Skibs A/S Viking', 'Lundegaard & Sønner' the managers, both of Farsund, Norway, & renamed Norbryn. 39 WW2 convoy references, including at least 6 (& maybe more, difficult to tell) N. Atlantic crossings, service to W. Africa (Freetown, Takoradi) & Mediterranean (Port Said), Caribbean, & limited service in Indian Ocean (Colombo, Bombay). Also to Seine Bay, France, re Normandy landings in Sep. 1944. Too slow for some N. Atlantic convoys. WW2 cargoes would seem to have been nitrates, coal & war stores. In Apl. 1950, the vessel was sold to 'Skibs A/S Lundegaard' with no change of manager. At a date in early Jun. 1955, Norbryn approached a dock head-on at Quebec, Canada, with a pilot aboard. But fighting strong winds & a running tide it did not stop! It crashed into the dock, became suspended in mid air when the tide turned & was towed off by 4 tugs at the next high tide, with a 6 in. hole in her bow. The dock suffered significant damage also. A writer, unaware I think of the detail above commented:- probably the Doxford refused running 'astern'! Much later, the vessel was laid up for about a year, then sold for scrap in 1958. And on Jan. 14, 1959, the vessel arrived at the Grimstad, Norway, facilities of 'Norsk Skipsopphugnings Co. A/S' to be broken up. Anything you can add? Or correct? Another image?

193 HMS Shikari
1075 (or 905) tons
Hull 526
1924

An S Class destroyer. Per 1 ('uboat.net', data), 2 (''uboat.net', sinking, William Pierce Frye), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Shikari, but I cannot check the link), 4 (WW2 service summary), 5 (data), 6 (Invergordon Mutiny), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The vessel was built by Doxford but the order was apparently cancelled during construction. It was launched by Doxford on Jul. 14, 1919. The vessel was towed to Chatham for completion by the Royal Dockyard there. Completed in Apl. 1924. 84.1 metres long, speed of 31 or 36 knots. Commissioned Apr. 1924. D85. Armed with 3 4-inch guns, 5 smaller guns & 4 21-inch torpedo tubes arranged in pairs. Complement of 98. Was one of the vessels involved in the Invergordon Mutiny in Sep. 1931. An expired e-Bay listing referred to the vessel being, in 1939, converted to a Controlling Vessel for the wireless-controlled target ships HMS Centurion & Agamemnon. 65 WW2 convoy references, all as a convoy escort vessel on E. & W. bound N. Atlantic convoys, to Iceland, etc. Clearly more voyages, because the list at 3 does not include any cross-channel voyages to Dunkirk, France, re the evacuation - on Jun. 1, 1940, the vessel saved French soldiers from Prague, sinking off Gravelines. On Jun. 4, 1940, HMS Shikari was the last ship to leave Dunkirk (departed 03:40) with 380 troops aboard. On Apl. 3, 1943, the ship rescued 7 survivors from U.S. freighter William Pierce Frye sunk on Mar. 29, 1943 by U-610, Kapitänleutnant Freiherr Walter von Freyberg-Eisenberg-Allmendingen, in command. A total of 57 died. The 7 survivors were taken to Londonderry. The matter is not referenced at 4. The vessel was sold to 'BISCO' on Sep. 13, 1945 & arrived at the ship breaking facilities of J. Cashmore, at Newport, Wales, on Nov. 4, 1945, to be broken up. Anything to add?

194 Pacific Shipper
6304 (or 6290) tons
Hull 577

147593
1924

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per 1 ('Furness Withy', Pacific Shipper), 2 (1933 engine room fire), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Pacific Shipper, but I cannot check the link), 4 & 5 (images, Pacific Shipper), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 128.0 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 436 ft. 8 in., speed of 11 1/2 knots, some passenger capacity, crew of 47 (in 1933). The vessel's deck plan was published in 'The Motor Ship' in its Feb. 1924 issue. Built for Furness, Withy & Company Limited, of London & Liverpool, for their service from the U.K. to ports on the W. coast of North America (incl. Los Angeles & Vancouver), via the Panama Canal. On Feb. 6, 1933, while en route from London to Portland, Oregon, U.S.A., & 15 miles off Cape Flattery, Olympic Peninsula, State of Washington, U.S.A., the vessel suffered a fire in its engine room, which fire was reported as spreading. Charles L. Wheeler, Jr. stood by. Pacific Shipper was able to bring the fire under control. In 1937, damage caused by heavy weather was repaired by Blythswood Shipping Co. Ltd. of Port Glasgow. 66 WW2 convoy references including at least 24 crossings of the N. Atlantic, (apparently a lucky ship!), with cargoes generally described as being 'general'. But there are a few references to cargoes of fruit, meat, explosives, grain & occasionally a few passengers. Some service into the Mediterranean (Bône & Bougie, Algeria). Also U.K. coastal. The vessel was sold to BISCO, (British Iron & Steel Company, then an arm of the British Government, but now owned by Tata, of India) & on Jul. 20, 1950, the vessel arrived at their ship breaking facilities at Briton Ferry, S. Wales, to be broken up. Nancy Magnusson has kindly provided (thanks so much Nancy!) an undated image of the ship. Her image & a modified version of it are both available at left. It may be that ... Anything to add?

195 Pacific Trader
6327 (or 6304 or 6317) tons
Hull 578

147652

Braganza
1924

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per 1 ('Furness Withy', Pacific Trader), 2 (Norwegian 'doc' file, data, Braganza), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Pacific Trader, but I cannot check the link), 4 (extensive WW2 data, Braganza), 5 (ref. to the Bombay 1944 explosion, 90% down), 6 (a long account of the Bombay 1944 explosion), 7 (image, Pacific Trader, also -03), 8 (image, Braganza), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 128.0 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 436 ft. 8 in. (or 420.0 ft.), speed of 11 1/2 knots, capacity for about 30 passengers, a crew of 46 (in 1944), signal letters LJTS. Built for Furness, Withy & Company Limited, of London & Liverpool, for their service from the U.K. to ports on the W. coast of North America (incl. Los Angeles & Vancouver), via the Panama Canal. It would seem that the ship was involved in a series of marine oil engine trials in 1926. R. B. Scoble, earlier a captain of Pacific Trader, died in the ship's stateroom in 1931, when the ship was at Seattle. The vessel carried timber from the Canadian west coast to the Orient. In Oct. 1937, the vessel was sold to 'A/S Braganza', Ludvig G. Braathen the manager, of Oslo, Norway, & renamed Braganza. In Apl. 1940 the vessel was taken over by 'Nortraship' for WW2 service. 18 WW2 convoy references including at least 3 crossings of the N. Atlantic, with cargoes of steel or scrap iron. The vessel saw service into the Indian Ocean (Bandar Abbas, Bombay, Aden), to Africa (Cape Town, Durban), in the Caribbean (Trinidad, Guantanamo), & U.K. coastal. An extensive WW2 voyage list can be seen via the link at page bottom at 3. On Feb. 28, 1941, the vessel, dispersed from convoy OB.281 ex Liverpool, broke down with oil in the fuel & was towed all the way to Galveston, Texas, to effect repairs. The ship was damaged in a giant explosion at Bombay, India, on Apl. 14, 1944, when Fort Stikine, carrying ammunition, blew up, killing 731 people & injuring 2,884 more. 13 ships were destroyed as a result of the explosion & it took 7 months to get the port back into full operation. Mahatma Ghandi came to view the devastation. Braganza would seem to have been only modestly damaged. On Oct. 10, 1944, the unaccompanied Braganza, Ingolf Gaulen in command, left Montevideo, Uruguay, for U.K., via Freetown, Sierra Leone, with a general cargo that included linseed & canned meats. 53 were aboard including 5 passengers. Two days out, at about 2:00 p.m. on Oct. 12, 1944, when about 150 miles off the coast of Uruguay, the vessel suffered an explosion in its engine room. The fire spread furiously, & while it was fought hard it could not be brought under control. At 3:00 p.m., 'the ammunition for the Oerlikons on the boat deck started to explode, and when the fire had spread to the holds all hopes of winning the battle with the flames were abandoned'. Everyone left the burning ship in 3 lifeboats & a motorboat (later abandoned), all launched with very great difficulty. Where did all of this happen? There are many references - incl. to 34.00S/52.00W, where the fire may have erupted, to 32.50N/48.51W or maybe 32.40S/48.30W, where the ship may have sunk. I cannot figure out exactly where, but no matter! Braganza would seem to have 'blown up in a fire ball around midnight', on Oct. 12, 1944. Lifeboat #4, containing nine men, landed 40 miles S. of Rio Grande, Brazil, on Oct. 17. Lifeboat #3, landed a few kilometres to the north, on Oct. 19, with, by deduction, 26 aboard. Lifeboat #2, containing 15 survivors, was picked up by Argentinian Rio Salado on Oct. 18, 1944 & landed at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Oct. 22, 1944. 18 had been aboard lifeboat #2 but 3, including a passenger, had died & were buried at sea. Anything to add? Or to correct? Another image?

196 Vinemoor
4359 tons
Hull 582

147728
1924

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Vinemoor, but I cannot check the link), 2 (image), 3 ('uboat.net', sinking data), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 114.3 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 390 ft. 10 in., speed of 10 or 10 1/2 knots. Built for Moor Line Ltd., 'W. Runciman Shipping Co. Ltd.', the managers, owned by Walter Runciman & Co., all of Newcastle. 5 WW2 convoy references, including at least 1 N. Atlantic crossing & service to W. Africa (Freetown). At 2:47 p.m. on Jul. 26, 1940, David J. (John) Jones in command, en route from Manchester to Naura (Micronesia, South Pacific, re phosphates) in ballast, & in convoy OB-188 ex Liverpool, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-34. The vessel settled by the stern, & slowly sank (it sank on Jul. 27). At 55.43N/16.25W, about 320 miles W. of Bloody Foreland (NW Donegal, NW Ireland). The entire ship's complement of 32 were picked up by HMS Clarkia, transferred to Hollinside (built by Short Bros. in 1930) & landed at Liverpool. Anything you can add?

197 Carica Milica
6371 tons
Hull 586

5606731
1928

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyd's Register listings, but many links seem not to work), 2 ('uboat.net', sinking data & image), 3 ('Time Magazine', Nov. 27, 1939 article, bottom paragraph), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 440.2 ft. long overall, 129.5 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 425.0 ft., signal letters JCRA later YTAL, speed? Built for 'Jugoslavenski Lloyd Akcionarsko Drustvo', of Zagreb, Yugoslavia.  Miramar refers to 'I. Racic' however, the manager, perhaps? In 1928, ten crew members deserted the ship at Montreal, Quebec, Canada. No WW2 convoy references. At 11.55 a.m. on Nov. 18, 1939, en route from Newcastle to Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia, with a cargo of coal, the vessel hit a mine laid that same day by U-19, Korvettenkapitän Wilhelm Müller-Arnecke in command. At 52.05N/01.41E, 3 1/2 miles off the then Shipwash light vessel, near Orford Ness, Suffolk or Harwich, Essex. Yugoslavia was at the time a neutral country. I read that the entire crew of Carica Milica was rescued & that the wreck was later 'dispersed' (whatever that means). Many other vessels were sunk by mines at about the same time in that vicinity - Kaunas, Blackhill, Torchbearer built by J. Crown & Sons of Sunderland, Wigmore, a trawler, B. O. Borjesson, Grazia. And also Simon Bolivar, a Dutch passenger/cargo ship en route for Paramaribo, Surinam, with the loss of 138 lives, mostly German-Jewish refugees, scores of them being children. Anything you can add?

198 East Lynn
4665 (or 4685) tons
Hull 589

148836

Santa Clara Valley
1928

A cargo ship. Per 1 (William Reardon Smith, East Lynn), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Santa Clara Valley, but I cannot check the link), 3 (image, East Lynn, temperamental of access), 4 (image East Lynn, also -02 & -03), 5 (image, Santa Clara Valley), 6 ('pdf', 'Veterinary Corps' in Greece re mules), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 122.2 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 12 1/2 knots. Sister to West Lynn. Built for Oakwin Steamship Co. Ltd., of Cardiff, Wales, (or perhaps of Bideford), managed & owned by Sir William Reardon Smith & Sons Ltd. In 1931, the vessel was renamed Santa Clara Valley. The vessel served the Pacific coast of North America from ports in western Europe. 15 WW2 convoy references, including, in Oct. 1939, service to Narvik, Norway, &, in Dec. 1939, an involvement in the evacuation of Norway. Also at least 1 N. Atlantic crossing, carrying phosphates, & service to Aden carrying coal. In Apl. 1941, the vessel was at Alexandria, Egypt, & made its way to Piraeus, Greece, with a cargo that included mules. On Apl. 24, 1941, the Germans were about to overrun Athens & the Allied evacuation of the British Expeditionary Force in Greece commenced (Operation Demon) - a mini 'Dunkirk' in which approx. 51,000 troops were evacuated from mainland Greece to the island of Crete & Alexandria. Before dawn that day, Santa Clara Valley arrived at Nauplia Bay, (Nafplion or Nafplio), Peloponnese, Greece, ex Piraeus, with a cargo of ammunition & explosives & also 338 mules ex Alexandria, (have read, in data 'snippets', other 'mule' numbers) & maybe some horses. The animals being needed for transport in the rugged & mountainous Greek terrain. Santa Clara Valley had 97 persons on board including 47 muleteers, 2 gunners, 14 military men & a crew of 34. At 11:00 a.m. on Apl. 24, 1941, (have also read the sinking was on Apl. 23, 1941), the Allied forces were attacked by a force of 41 German Ju 87 (or maybe Stuka) aircraft. Santa Clara Valley fought back with her available guns but suffered 4 direct hits, caught fire, & sank. 7 lives were lost, including 5 muleteers, a crew member & one of the military men. I read that rescue work was undertaken to save the mules that were located in the un-submerged stern of the ship, & some mules were thrown overboard to swim to shore. But ... 'practically all the mules were drowned', & 'those that were injured or not easily accessible were destroyed'. 11 years later, on Oct. 1, 1952, the vessel was raised, & on Nov. 14, 1952 it arrived, presumably under tow, at Trieste, Italy, ship breakers, to be broken up. Anything you can add?

199 Innesmoor
4392 (or 4477) tons
Hull 592

160474

Weissesee
1928

A cargo ship. Per 1 (image, Innesmoor, 90% down), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Innesmoor, but I cannot check the link), 3 (image, Innesmoor), 4 (image, Weissesee), 5 ('pdf', Court's decision re Samkey), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 114.3 metres (391 ft.) long, speed of 9 (or 10 or 10 1/2) knots, crew of 30. Built for Moor Line Ltd. (more than one), of Newcastle, 'Walter Runciman & Co. Ltd.', of Glasgow, the managers. 72 WW2 convoy references including 8 N. Atlantic crossings, service to W. Africa (Freetown) & S. Africa (Durban, Cape Town), eastern seaboard of the U.S. & Caribbean, France, & U.K. local. On Jan. 29, 1948, Innesmoor was the last vessel to sight Samkey, 7219 tons, a Liberty ship owned by the Ministry of Transport, which had left London for Cuba, in ballast, on Jan. 24, 1948, with a crew of 43 (number not stated in the Court decision). Samkey's last radio message was from 41.48N/24W on Jan. 31, 1948, via 'Horta' radio in the Azores. Samkey then ran into heavy weather, was never heard from again & was presumed lost on or about Feb. 1, 1948. Samkey was apparently carrying 1500 tons of 'Thames' ballast, a solid ballast comprising stones of varying size with sand. The later Court of Inquiry was of the opinion that the loss was due to the sudden shift of the ballast during heavy weather, that the loss was due to errors of judgement of the Marine Superintendent & her Captain, but that the Ministry of Transport was partly if indirectly responsible also, for the non-dissemination of information relative to the shifting of ballast. In 1950, the vessel was sold to 'W. Schuchmann Reederei', of Bremerhaven, Germany, & renamed Weissesee. It was sold to 'Eisen und Metall Akt.' of Hamburg, Germany for breaking up at Bremerhaven (where it arrived in Jan. 1960). Much of the above relates to Samkey. Little data seems to be WWW available about the listed vessel. Can you tell us more?

200 Northmoor
4392 tons
Hull 590

160612
1928

A cargo ship. Per A (e-Bay image), 1 ('u-boat.net', sinking), 2 (cannot link you directly, enter 198 in top left box, & then Northmoor), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Northmoor, but I cannot check the link), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 114.3 metres (391 ft.) long, speed of 10 1/2 knots. Built for Moor Line Ltd. (more than one), of Newcastle, ('Walter Runciman & Co. Ltd.', of Glasgow, the managers). On May 17, 1943, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by U-198, north of Durban, South Africa, at 28.27S/32.43E, while en route from Lourenço Marques, now Maputo, Mozambique, via Durban to Buenos Aires, Argentina, as a part of convoy LMD-17, with a cargo of coal. 12 lost (11 crew & a gunner). The survivors (27), including the master (Arthur Peters) were picked up by trawler HMS St. Loman, (FY-276) & landed at Durban. Can you tell us more?

This page is the second of 4 Doxford pages, the first being here. The 3rd & 4th pages are here & here.

TO END THE PAGE

For your pleasure and interest.

So many of the vessels listed in these pages ended their lives in wartime. WW1 & WW2 mainly. Hit by a torpedo perhaps or bombed by enemy aircraft. The following image does not relate to any vessel listed in these pages. But I like the WW1 image, of a German torpedo boat in action, the work of German artist Prof. Willy Stöwer (1864/1931). I hope that you like it also. It was 'sharpened' for presentation on this page.

The item was listed by e-Bay vendor 'moonrabbitpostcards', a U.S. vendor, from Silver Springs, Maryland. That vendor consistently provides large & clear images of the items he offers for sale. Indeed, I have him in my e-Bay 'favourites' list & check his store out from time to time.

May I suggest that you navigate the site via the index on page 001.PRIOR PAGE / NEXT PAGE

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