THE SUNDERLAND SITE - PAGE 043
SHIPBUILDERS - PAGE 4

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A list of the Sunderland built vessels referenced in these pages is at the top of page 040.

A list of the Sunderland shipbuilders referenced in these pages is a little lower on page 040.

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Corrections in any of the material which follows, however tiny, would be most welcome. And additions, of course! (45 = 45) Test.    Miramar, Plimsoll, images, xplornet, mariners-l.co.uk, Excel DP, MNL, eBay, Delcampe, A. English, Apl. 30, 2021.

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PETER AUSTIN (1) (1826-1846)
PETER AUSTIN (2) (1846-1860?)
S. P. AUSTIN & SON (1860-1874?)
AUSTIN AND HUNTER (1874/1879)
S. P. AUSTIN & SON LTD.
S. P. AUSTIN LTD.

(1826/1954
- originally founded in 1826, in 1954 became a part of 'Austin & Pickersgill Limited.')

This is the second 'Austin' page, made necessary by the increasing number of listings re 'Austin' built vessels. The first page, with the first 100 vessels, is available here.

Miramar lists, 11 pages, (highest hull number on each page). It used to be that you could click on the links that follow & get to the relevant Miramar page. But no longer! The new procedure must be to go to Miramar (here) & log in (you must be registered to view any page). And once you are logged in, return to this page & all the following links should work for you:- 138, 171, 203, 233, 263, 303, 324, 354, 384, 414, 420. And on this site, at page 140 is a list of 'Austin' built vessels, starting in 1831 & ending in 1959. Which list includes unnumbered vessels built as much as 43 years prior to the very first Miramar listing.

Names of a few more of the vessels constructed by 'Austin' of Sunderland - as I happen to spot references to them. In a table in build date sequence. And alphabetic within a year. But just a start!

101 Elizabeth Lysaght
1037 tons
Hull 347

166439
539752

Rino Esposito
Zaffiro
1938

A collier. Per 1 (brief data, image, site is slow to respond), 2 (image, Elizabeth Lysaght), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Elizabeth Lysaght), 4 ('Southampton City Council/Plimsoll'. Lloyd's Register data, 1937/38 thru 1945/46), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 211.3 ft. long (63.7 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 220.5 ft. long (67.2 metres) overall, speed 9 1/2 or 10 knots, signal letters MMSJ, later ISPP. Built for Stephenson Clarke & Associated Companies Ltd. 85 WW2 convoy references, almost entirely U.K. coastal, but including 4 voyages to Seine Bay, France, in Jul., thru Sep. 1944, presumably re the Normandy invasions. It would seem that the vessel must have been extensively modified - see the 3rd image at left, as Rino Esposito. The vessel was sold, in 1958, to 'F. Esposito' & became Rino Esposito. It was sold again, in 1961, to 'C. Giovagnoni' & renamed Zaffiro.  I think that C. Giovagnoni was likely the manager since  in 1968/69 the vessel was owned by 'Michele Scotio di Mase' of Naples, Italy. The vessel was wrecked at Cape Bengut (near Algiers, Algeria, in the Mediterranean), on May 12, 1970. I have not read the circumstances. Can you add more?

102 Monkwood
1591 tons
Hull 345

166343
1938

A collier. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Monkwood), 2 (Lloyd's Register data, Monkwood, 1937/38 thru 1945/46, thanks to Southampton City Council), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 255.2 ft. long perpendicular to perpendicular, 264.0 ft. long (80.47 metres) overall, speed of 10 knots, signal letters GFFP, 176 HP engines (aft) by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., of Sunderland. Built for William France, Fenwick & Co. Ltd., of London, noted for the shipment of coal to the south of England ex the North East. 25 WW2 convoy references, all of which were U.K. coastal. Which is a rather small number of references for a collier that would have likely been up & down the U.K. east coast every few days carrying coal to London (Southend). On Apl. 9, 1959, the vessel arrived at the Dunston, River Tyne, ship breaking facilities of 'Clayton & Davie Ltd.' to be broken up. Howard Snaith advises (thanks!) that his grandfather, Thomas Newby Beaton, MBE, was, during his career, the vessel's Master. Howard seeks vessel plans to be able to complete a model of the ship that his grandfather commenced but did not complete. WWW data available for this vessel is quite modest. Can you add more?

103 Lea Grange
2969 later 2993 tons
Hull 351

165776
5081152

Costicos
1939

A collier. Per 1 (Lloyd's Register data, Lea Grange, 1939/40 thru 1945/46, thanks to Southampton City Council), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). My main data source was info provided by Ron Mapplebeck years ago, at a site that has now vanished or become pay access only. 316.8 ft. long perpendicular to perpendicular, 328.0 ft. long (99.97 metres) overall, speed of 9 1/2 knots, signal letters GDNG, 244 HP engines (aft) by North Eastern Marine Engineering (1938) Ltd., of Sunderland. Built for Tanfield Steamship Co. Ltd., of Newcastle with W. B. Nisbet her manager. The vessel was sold, in 1953, to Stephenson Clarke Ltd. of London. It was sold again, in 1959, to "Costicos" Cia. Nav. S.A. of Beirut, Lebanon, with A. Halcoussis & Co. her managers, & renamed Costicos (Lebanese registry). On Jun. 9, 1973, the vessel arrived in tow at Istanbul. And on Oct. 1, 1973, demolition of the vessel commenced at Halic (i.e. Golden Horn, lstanbul). 2, however, says broken up Jun. 9, 1973 - at 'Mehmet Zeki Verel'. I presume that Mehmet Zeki Verel were shipbreakers. Can anybody possibly tell us more? May the webmaster digress? The fourth image at left, dating from the 1960s, is thanks to Jens Nielsen who has kindly provided also two 'related' images. He wrote 'I think you should see the coal train as well although it does not pertain to your ship register site. There were 8 carriages & the English saddle tank engine used all of its might to push the heavy load up the ramp to the dumping area at the Østre Gasværk (East Gasworks) in Copenhagen. Exciting to stand on the footplate.' Thank you Jens! The images are here & here.

104 Cornwood
2777 tons
Hull 354

168008
5125178

Aris
Gabriele
Firmino
1940

A collier. Per 1 (Lloyd's Register data, Cornwood, 1940/41 thru 1945/46, thanks to Southampton City Council), 2 (1953 image, at North Sydney, Nova Scotia), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Cornwood), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 311.4 ft. long perpendicular to perpendicular, 321.9 ft. long (98.115 metres) overall, speed of 9 1/2 knots, signal letters GMSM, 244 HP engines (aft) by North Eastern Marine Engineering (1938) Ltd., of Sunderland. Built for Wm. France, Fenwick & Co. Ltd., of London. 22 convoy ref. in WW2, all coastal U.K. voyages. The vessel was sold, in 1959, (or maybe in 1960) to  'Ithaca Marine Transportation' (of Greece most probably), renamed Aris & registered at Liberia. It was sold again, in 1961, to  'E. Canale di Pietro' or 'Emilio Canale', probably of Naples, Italy, & renamed Gabriele. And sold again, in 1971, to Euronavi S.p.A., also, I think, of Naples, Italy, & renamed Firmino. The vessel was broken up at La Spezia, N. Italy, in Mar. 1972. WWW data is most limited. Can anybody possibly tell us more?

105 Moorwood
2056 tons
Hull 352

167413
1940

A cargo ship. Per 1 (brief reference), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Moorwood), 3 (Lloyd's Register data, Moorwood, 1940/41 thru 1944/45, thanks to Southampton City Council), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 273.3 ft. long (83.30 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 283.6 ft. long (86.44 metres) overall, signal letters GDWW, 205 HP engines (aft) by North Eastern Marine Engineering (1938) Ltd. of Sunderland. Built for Wm. France, Fenwick & Co. Ltd., of London. 41 WW2 convoy references, all of which were U.K. coastal. On Jun. 11, 1941, while in ballast & en route from London to Blyth, in convoy EC-31, the vessel was hit & badly damaged by an aerial torpedo fired by enemy aircraft off '19C Buoy, N. Whitby', Tees, (have not read the exact position yet). Moorwood opened fire, but sank within 1/2 hour. No loss of life. For his bravery in the attack, Chief Engineer Sydney Bell received 'a King's Commendation for Brave Conduct' & a 'Lloyd's War Medal for Bravery at Sea' - likely a medal like this. The citation used to be WWW available which set out exactly what he did but alas the site where it was available is long gone & I did not retain a scan of the data. It would be in the National Archives doubtless. Sydney's daughter was kindly in touch some years ago to advise us that he passed away in 1946 as a result of war service. Can anybody possibly tell us more? Maybe provide that citation so it can be made available via this page?

106 Sea Fisher
2950 tons
Hull 353

167736

Malcolm
New Country
1940

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Sea Fisher), 2 (Lloyd's Register ('LR') data, 1939/40 to 1945/46, thanks to 'Southampton City Council'), 3 (data), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 311.5 ft. long (94.945 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 325.5 ft. (99.21 metres) long overall, speed of 9 knots, signal letters MNSS, 244 HP engines (aft) by North Eastern Marine Engineering (1938) Ltd. of Sunderland. Designed specifically to carry 14 inch gun turrets for the largest class of battleships then under construction, the King George V class, - from Barrow & Elswick to the various ship builders' yards. Built for 'Fenwick, Fisher Steamship Co. Ltd.' ('Fenwick'), of Barrow. 19 WW2 convoy references, all of which are U.K. coastal including, I think, one convoy, referenced Gibraltar, MKS.75G, in Jan. 1945, which Sea Fisher seems to have joined late. In 1945, when, it would appear, Fenwick was liquidated, (can you tell us more about that liquidation?), the vessel was transferred to 'James Fisher & Sons Ltd.', also of Barrow, with no change of name. In 1956, the vessel was sold, for £150,000, to 'Shamrock Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Northern Ireland, & renamed Malcolm (Malcom as per Miramar). In 1959, the vessel was sold to 'Great Ocean Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Keelung, Taiwan, 'An Kuo Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Taiwan, the managers, & renamed New Country. In 1966, the vessel was sold to 'China Merchants Steam Navigation Co. Ltd.', of Taipei, Taiwan. In Dec. 1967, the vessel was broken up at Keelung. Can anybody tell us more?

107   Goodwood
2780 tons
Hull 356

168053
1941

A collier. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Goodwood), 2 (Lloyd's Register data, 1940/41 to 1945/46, thanks to 'Southampton City Council'), 3 ('wrecksite.eu', re sinking, but modest data), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 311.4 ft. long (94.91 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 321.9 ft. long overall, speed?, signal letters GPJQ, 244 HP engines (aft) by North Eastern Marine Engineering (1938) Ltd. of Sunderland. Built for William France, Fenwick & Co. Ltd., of London, presumably to replace Goodwood which was lost in Dec. 1939. Just 1 WW2 convoy, i.e. Convoy FS.1734 in Feb. 1945, during the course of which she was sunk. Such number of WW2 convoys (just 1) is strange for a coaster that would have been up & down the U.K. E. coast every few days delivering coal to London. It seems likely that the wrong Goodwood was referenced (i.e. the earlier one) in the data re the other nine convoys. 'Goodwood' listings re 6 of the 8 independent voyages all seem to refer to the earlier vessel of the name, again seemingly incorrectly referenced. I was not able to access pages re the other two. Anyway, on Feb. 22, 1945, while en route from Blyth to London, (FS.1734 was Methil to Southend), with a cargo of coal, the vessel was hit & sunk by a torpedo fired by a German E-boat. Off Lowestoft, per 'The Empire ships .....' or off Southend, per the 'Sunderland Echo'. Miramar advises that the sinking was approx. at 52.53.18N/2.08.15E, which is best described as NE of Great Yarmouth (rather than off Lowestoft). There is virtually no WWW data available about this vessel, however I read that as many as 22 German submarines were operating off the E. coast of the U.K. that night & the vessel would have been sunk by an E-boat of the 2nd or 5th flotillas. Lives lost? I didn't know, but Capt. Howard N. Snaith advises (thanks so much!) that his grandfather, Captain Thomas Newby Beaton MBE, was the Master on that final voyage & that his family tradition says that 'Tommy' Beeton was the last to leave the ship having ensured all hands were safe. Who rescued the survivors? Don't know. The wreck today? Don't know. The WWW record for this vessel is scant indeed. Can anybody tell us more?

108 Cormull
2865 tons
Hull 363

168300

Coldharbour
Cormull
Christakis
1942

A collier. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Cormull), 2 & 3 (Muttitt, awards), 4 (Lloyd's Register data, 1941/42 to 1945/46, thanks to 'Southampton City Council'), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 317.3 ft. long perpendicular to perpendicular, 328.5 ft. long overall, speed probably about 10 knots, fitted with 4 3-ton derricks, signal letters BDZT, 256 HP engines (aft) by North Eastern Marine Engineering (1938) Ltd. of Sunderland. Built for Cory Colliers Ltd., presumably to carry coal from the NE to the S. of England. Was registered in the name of Wm. Cory & Son Ltd., by 1945/46. Registered at Newcastle. There is no recorded WW2 convoy data, but maybe there were independent voyages? I have read that on May 25, 1942, while en route from Blyth to London, the vessel was badly damaged in an explosion. That date is however suspect. The vessel was only launched on May 28, 1942 & was not delivered until July of that year. I think that May 25, 1942 should have read May 15, 1943 as next. On May 15, 1943, when en route from Blyth to London, with a cargo of coal, she struck a mine while 14 miles NE of Yarmouth, was badly damaged but reached port safely. It seemed at first likely that Frederick J. (John) Muttitt, was then its Master & he was later awarded the Order of the British Empire & commended for his brave conduct in the action. But it would seem that is not so. Muttitt was however awarded the MBE (Member) re an action involving Cormead on Sep. 11/12, 1941. In Jun. 1946, the vessel was 'transferred' or maybe sold to Coastwise Colliers Ltd. ('Coastwise'), & renamed Coldharbour. In 1949, Coastwise was wound up & the vessel 'reverted' to Wm. Cory & Son Ltd. & was re-named Cormull. The vessel was on the scene on Feb. 19, 1956, when Corchester was cut in half & sank off Haisboro Light on the coast of Norfolk. Survivors of Corchester were taken to London & later a memorial service took place aboard Cormull at the scene of the disaster. The vessel was involved in collisions on Nov. 13, 1958 (with which vessel?) & was repaired at Austin & Pickersgill's. In 1960, the vessel was sold to 'Dos Hermanos Corp.', of Greece, G. Vlassis, also of Greece, the managers, & renamed Christakis. In Oct. 1965, the vessel was en route from Galatz (Galaţi), Romania, to Alexandria, Egypt, with a cargo of superphosphates. Early in the morning of Oct. 30, 1965, the vessel collided in fog with Mairoula, 984 tons, off Nara Burnu, Turkish Asian coast, Dardanelles. Christakis was beached 5 miles S. of nearby Çannakale, & the cargo was discharged. While I have been unable to read the detail, it would seem that the vessel was badly damaged & was declared a total constructive loss. It would appear, however, that the vessel must have been later re-floated & towed since I read that it was broken up at Piraeus, Greece. However, I have also read that it arrived at 'Ambelaki' on Dec. 1, 1965 & was broken up there - which is a puzzle because Ambelaki seems to be inland in Greece. The above is in part created from snippets of sometimes confusing WWW data. Can you add to and/or correct the above?

109 Bowcombe
2760 tons
Hull 367

168412

Colwyn
Bowcombe
Hanna
1943

A collier. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', where WW2 convoy duty of Bowcombe would usually be found. But there are no records there), 2 (Lloyd's Register data, 1942/43 to 1945/46, thanks to 'Southampton Council'), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 311.4 ft. long perpendicular to perpendicular, 321.9 ft. (98.115 metres) long overall, speed of 10 knots, signal letters GCMW, 256 HP engines (aft) by North Eastern Marine Engineering  Co. (1938) Limited of Sunderland. Built for Stephenson Clarke & Associated Companies Ltd. ('Stephenson'), of London, presumably to carry coal from the NE to the S. of England. No WW2 convoy references - which is a puzzle. In 1946, the vessel was transferred to 'Coastwise Colliers Ltd.' ('Coastwise'), of London, Wm. France Fenwick & Co. Ltd. ('Fenwick') the managers & renamed Colwyn. Coastwise was a company formed by Fenwick and Stephenson for the purpose of carrying out long-term charters with the County of London Electricity Supply Co. Ltd. It had a very short life however, due, it would seem, to the nationalisation of the British coal industry, & in 1949, the company was wound up, the vessel reverted to Stephenson & the vessel's name reverted to Bowcombe. Possibly managed by R. S. Dalgliesh (or R. S. Dalgliesh Ltd. or R. S. Dalgliesh & Company Ltd.), of Newcastle. On Oct. 30, 1964, Bowcombe, ex Hartlepool & bound for London, likely with a full cargo, was in collision with Dvinoles, a 4638 ton Russian cargo ship. The collision was in the River Thames, but I have not read i) exactly where it occurred nor ii) the circumstances & what damage resulted. Do you possibly have that data? In 1966, the vessel was sold to Skrot & Avfallsprodukter ('Skrot'), of Göteborg, i.e. Gothenburg, Sweden, who were, it would seem ship breakers. Now Torsten Johannisson, also of Gothenburg, was the manager of Skrot. So when I read that in 1967 the vessel was converted into a lighter for Torsten Johannisson, I wonder whether it may have been rather for Skrot's account that the conversion was made. There the 'data trail' ends. I can find no later word. Harald Lorentzen has, however, since come to our rescue - thanks! He advises that the vessel was, in 1967, bought from Torsten Johannisson by the 'Christiania Portland Cementfabrik' cement factory, of Oslo, Norway, (now part of Norcem A/S) for 406,000 Norwegian kroner. The vessel was converted into a lighter & renamed Hanna. Further that eventually, in 1979, the vessel was sold & broken up at Inverkeithing, Scotland. Harald advises that the source of such data is a book entitled 'Cementbåtene – en rederihistorie gjennom hundre år'. Its cover. And parts of 2 pages. I read (here) that Hugh Harper Bowman, 'Chief Engineer Officer' of Bowcombe was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire on Jan. 1, 1945. Which sounds like it might well relate to service during WW2. There is really very little WWW data about this vessel. Can you add to or correct any of the above?

110 Cormead
2867 tons
Hull 369

169666

Panormitis
1943

A collier. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Cormead), 2 (Lloyd's Register data, 1943/44 to 1945/46, 2nd Cormead on the page, thanks to 'Southampton Council'), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 317.3 ft. long perpendicular to perpendicular, 328.5 ft. (100.13 metres) long overall, speed of 9 1/2 knots, signal letters GDBX, 256 HP engines (aft) by North Eastern Marine Engineering (1938) Ltd. of Sunderland. Built for Cory Colliers Ltd., presumably to carry coal from the NE to the S. of England. 36 WW2 convoy references, all of which are U.K. coastal. The vessel was transferred to Wm. Cory & Son Ltd. in 1946. In 1964, the vessel was sold to 'Nafs Compañía Naviera SA', of Panama, 'K. & M. Shipbrokers Ltd.', of London, the managers, & renamed Panormitis. I presume that the true owners were likely Greek since 'Panormitis' is the name of a Greek Orthodox monastery on the Greek island of Simi (or Symi), 41 km NW of Rhodes. On Feb. 28, 1971, the vessel arrived at the Antwerp, Belgium, facilities of 'J. de Smedt', to be broken up. There appears to be essentially no WWW data about this vessel. Can you add anything?

111 Empire Judy
738 tons
Hull 370

169116

Stream Fisher
Ramaida
1943

A coaster. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Empire Judy), 2 (Southampton City Council, Lloyd's Register data 1942/43 thru 1945/46, Empire Judy), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 185.0 ft. long perpendicular to perpendicular, 192.6 ft. long overall, speed of ? knots, signal letters MCRR, oil engines (aft) by British Auxilliaries Ltd. of Glasgow. Built for the Ministry of War Transport, for use re coastal cargo movements & for the carriage of heavy gun (parts?). With James Fisher & Sons Ltd. ('JamesFisher') the managers. Just 9 WW2 convoy references, all coastal except for 2 voyages to France in Jul. 1944. In 1946, the vessel was sold to JamesFisher  (now James Fisher & Sons PLC), of Barrow-in-Furness & renamed Stream Fisher. The vessel was converted, at Workington in 1965, to carry irradiated atomic fuel from Anzio, Italy, to Barrow-in-Furness. In 1969, the vessel was sold to Grandport Shipping, of Panama, J. H. Ramagge the manager, & renamed Ramaida. In Sep. 1977, the vessel arrived at Lisbon, Portugal, to be broken up. There seems to be limited WWW data about this vessel. Can you add anything?

112 Amberley Castle
1010 (or 1060) tons
Hull 377

Weather Advisor
Admiral Fitzroy
1944

A Castle class corvette (Royal Navy). K386. May have later become F286 (a frigate number) - but am not sure about that. Can anybody possibly tell us? Per 1 (data), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 76.81 metres long, speed of 16 1/2 knots (max.) 10 knots (cruising), complement of 112. Served as a convoy escort. At end of WW2, the vessel was put into reserve at Portsmouth until 1952, & then at Penarth, Glamorgan, Wales, until 1957. The vessel was converted in 1957 at Blyth (NE of Newcastle upon Tyne) into a weather ship - Weather Advisor. Renovated in Jul. 1976 & renamed Admiral Fitzroy. The vessel was scrapped at Troon, Ayrshire, Scotland, in 1982. Can you add anything?

113 Cormount
2871 tons
Hull 375

180027

Chriluck
Marianik
1944

A collier. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Cormount), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 317.3 ft. long, 328.5 ft. overall, speed of 10 knots. Built for Wm. Cory & Son Ltd., presumably to carry coal from the NE to the S. of England. 47 WW2 convoy references, all of which were U.K. coastal. In 1966, the vessel was sold to Chriluck Shipping Co. Ltd. ('Chriluck') of Liberia, G. & A. Vlassis of Piraeus, Greece, the managers, & renamed Chriluck. Chriluck may have been a subsidiary of 'Chriluck Compania Naviera S.A.', of Liberia. In 1972, the vessel was sold to 'Sissini Navigation Co. Ltd.', of Cyprus, 'N. J. Nomikos', of Greece, the managers & renamed Marianik. In Oct. 1974, the vessel arrived at Split, Yugoslavia, to be broken up. There seems to be virtually no WWW data about this vessel. Can you add anything?

114 Rogate
2850 (or 2871) tons
Hull 373

169928
1944

A cargo ship that did not make its first birthday. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Rogate. And beware. Only one of the many voyages you will see is Rogate), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for Stephenson Clarke Limited, of London. Likely a collier? Just a single WW2 convoy reference. On Mar. 19, 1945, while en route from Sunderland to Southend (London), ex Methil it would seem, in Convoy FS.1759, the vessel was torpedoed by a German E-boat near Lowestoft, with 2 lives lost. At 52.31.9N/02.01.4E. The E-boat was a part of the 6th Flotilla, (Lt. Cdr. Matzen) which laid many mines in the area & attacked convoy FS.1759. 'Convoy-web' simply records the vessel as sunk. What was her cargo? And does anybody know the details of the attack & rescue? Miramar refers to No. 4 Buoy, but the significance of that ref. is at present unclear. WWW data is limited. Anything to add?

115 Moorwood
2034 tons
Hull 379

180659
515529

Horsted
1945

A collier. Per 1 (image, Horsted), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). As this listing is created, images of Moorwood are available via eBay. I trust you will forgive my inviting you to find such listings for yourself. The images bear intrusive logos & I prefer not to effectively reward the eBay vendor by linking to his items. 86.4 metres long (283 ft. 7 in.), overall, speed of 9 1/2 or 10 knots, in 1947 was equipped with 'Decca Navigator' radio navigation equipment. Built for William France, Fenwick & Company Ltd. A 3rd fleet vessel of the name (all 3 built in Sunderland), presumably to replace the 1940 Moorwood which was lost in Jun. 1941. The vessel was built too late to see WW2 convoy service. The vessel likely carried coal from the NE to cities in the S. of England, including London. Robin Bobbin, the vessel's 2nd engineer, was awarded the 'Order of the British Empire' (MBE) in the Jun. 1946 Birthday Honours list. In 1960, the vessel was sold to Stephenson Clarke Ltd., also of London, & renamed Horsted. In 1966, the vessel was sold to 'Metaalhandel Sloopwerken HP Heovelman NV', of Ijssel, Holland. I read that in Nov. 1966, the vessel was, in fact, hulked. The WWW record for this vessel is scant indeed. Can anybody tell us more? #1707

116 Pinewood
2853 tons
Hull 376

180528
527859

Coldstream
Pinewood
Sally
1945

A collier which was launched on Jan. 12, 1945 & completed in Mar. 1945. Per 1 (data, France Fenwick, Pinewood 70% down page), 2 (Lloyd's Register data, 1944/45 & 1945/46, Pinewood, thanks to 'Southampton City Council/Plimsoll'), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 317.3 ft. long perpendicular to perpendicular, 328.5 ft. long overall, speed of 9 1/2 knots, signal letters GJQF, 256 HP engines by North Eastern Marine Engineering  Co. (1938) Limited of Sunderland. Built for William France, Fenwick & Company Ltd. of London, for £115,000 I am advised. The vessel was built too late to see WW2 convoy service. The vessel likely carried coal from the NE to cities in the S. of England, including London. In 1946, the vessel was transferred, at the value of £119,375, to 'Coastwise Colliers Ltd.' ('Coastwise'), of London, Wm. France Fenwick & Co. Ltd. ('Fenwick') the managers & renamed Coldstream. Coastwise was a company formed by Fenwick and Stephenson Clarke Ltd. for the purpose of carrying out long-term charters with the County of London Electricity Supply Co. Ltd. It had a very short life however, due, it would seem, to the nationalisation of the British coal industry, & in 1949, the company was wound up, the vessel reverted to Fenwick at a value of £176,800 & the vessel's name reverted to Pinewood. In 1967, the vessel was sold to Torsten Johannisson, of Gothenburg, Sweden, & converted into a lighter. Harald Lorentzen advises us (thanks!) that the vessel was, in 1967, bought from Torsten Johannisson by the 'Christiania Portland Cementfabrik' cement factory, of Oslo, Norway, (now part of Norcem A/S) for 479,000 Norwegian kroner. The converted vessel, i.e. a lighter, was renamed Sally. Harald further advises that eventually, in 1979, Sally was sold & broken up at Inverkeithing, Scotland. Harald advises that the source of such data is a book entitled 'Cementbåtene – en rederihistorie gjennom hundre år'. Its cover. Can anybody tell us more? #1956

117 Brixton
1635 tons
Hull 385

180913

Brunetto
Iginia Zeta
Piero M.
1946

A self-trimming 'flat-iron' steam collier. Per 1 (image, Brunetto), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 78.5 metres long overall, 74.7 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 247 ft. 3 in., speed of 10 knots, crew of 18. Built for 'South Metropolitan Gas Co.', of London, which company became, upon nationalisation in 1949, part of 'South Eastern Gas Board'. Designed with a funnel that lowered to permit her to pass under River Thames bridges. The vessel carried coal from the NE to gas plants on the S. side of the River Thames at London, most likely including Woolwich Gas Works. While I have been unable to read the detail, it would appear, from Google 'snippets', that Brixton, up-bound in the River Thames with a cargo of coal, was in collision, on Feb. 6, 1954, with Planter headed down river accompanied by two Sun tugs. Planter, possibly travelling too fast, veered off course & hit Brixton, which had to be run aground on the S. side of the river, at Blackwall Point. Planter, with stem damage, was towed to South West India Docks - to effect repairs perhaps. The two tugs may have collided also. A court case resulted. Can anybody provide i) the court's conclusion & ii) better detail as to the circumstances. In 1962, the vessel was sold to 'Emilio Canale S.p.A.', of Genoa, Italy, & renamed Brunetto. In 1976, the vessel was sold to 'Trasporti Mare-"Co. Si. Mar" SpA', (which may mean 'Compagnia Siciliana Trasporti Mare SpA'), of Palermo, Sicily, with no change of vessel name. In 1978, the vessel was sold again, to 'O.M.S.A. SpA', also of Palermo, & renamed Iginia Zeta. And sold again, also in 1978, to 'San Gavino SpA di Navigazione', of Genoa, & renamed Piero M. On Jul. 7, 1981, the vessel arrived at the La Spezia, Italy, ship breaking facilities of 'De.Co.Mar s.r.l.', to be broken up. We thank Paolo Piccardo for three of the images at left. WWW data is most limited. Can anybody add anything? An image? #1733

118 Keynes
1563 tons
Hull 382

180839

Granita IV
1946

A collier. Per 1 (data), 2 (image, Keynes, but you must be registered to see it), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for Stephenson Clarke Limited, of London. 82.3 metres long (270 ft.) overall, 78.5 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 1/2 knots. The vessel carried coal from the NE to the S. of England, most particularly to Newhaven, Sussex. In 1966, the vessel was sold to 'Torsten Johannisson' ('Johannisson'), of Gothenburg, Sweden, & renamed Granita IV. The vessel arrived at Gothenburg on Jul. 3, 1969, to be broken up. I have seen references that seem to link 'Skrot-og Avfallsprodukter' & Johannisson together & references also to Johannisson being a ship breaker. Could the vessel then have been laid up from 1966 to the end? Can anybody elaborate? WWW data is limited. Anything to add?

119 Sir Alexander Kennedy
1714 tons
Hull 384

180862
1946

A 'flat-iron' steam collier. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for London Power Co. Ltd. ('LondonPower'), of London, which company owned power stations at Deptford & Battersea. Sir Alexander Kennedy? A leading British civil, marine & electrical engineer & academic, (1847/1928) - a consultant to LondonPower - you can read about his varied career at many sites incl. here. A matter of interest to the webmaster - he was a keen photographer & was one of the first to document the archaeological site of Petra in Jordan. 82.4 metres (270 ft. 6 in.) overall, speed of 9 knots. The vessel carried coal from the NE to London power stations - I have seen Battersea power station in W. London referenced in that regard. Designed with a funnel that lowered to permit her to pass under River Thames bridges. As a result of the nationalisation of the electricity industry, the vessel was taken over, in 1948, by 'British Electricity Authority'. Which became 'Central Electricity Authority' in 1954 & 'Central Electricity Generating Board' in 1958. On May 3, 1968, the vessel arrived at the Willebroek, S. of Antwerp, Belgium, ship breaking facilities of 'Scrapping SA', to be broken up. WWW data is quite limited. Anything to add? #1697

120 Laverock
1209 tons
Hull 386

181632

Chania II
1947

A cargo ship. Per 1 [General Steam Navigation, Laverock (3)], 2 (4 images, Laverock, re 1963 grounding, but you must now be registered to access), 3 (image, Laverock), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 79.0 metres long overall, 75.2 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, twin screw, speed of 12 (or maybe 13) knots. Sister to Auk & Seamew. Laverock? The Scottish & northern English word for a skylark - General Steam Navigation Company Limited ('General'), of London, were noted for naming their ships after birds. Built for General then. Largely from data 'snippets' it seems likely that the vessel was on the London/Tilbury to Leixões, Oporto, Portugal run, & on to Italy perhaps, bringing back casks of port wine. General made similar runs to Bordeaux, France, & Cadiz, Spain, it would seem. On Apl. 14, 1963, the vessel would appear to have gone aground at Oporto, was re-floated by the Bugsier salvage tug Atlantic on Nov. 20, 1963 & on Nov. 28, 1963 was towed to a Lisbon, Portugal, shipyard by salvage tug Praia da Adraga to effect repairs. Is it possible that that all relates to a 'snippet' I read that states that on Nov. 15 (1964, I believe), the vessel ran aground at Oporto, when caught by a wave created by a dam bursting 56 miles up on the river Douro. No casualties but the vessel was presumably damaged. Can anybody clarify matters? In 1965, the vessel was sold to 'S. Marcantonakis', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Chania II. In 1974, the vessel was sold again, to 'Ormi Shipping Co. Ltd.', also of Piraeus, with no change of vessel name. In May 1980 the vessel was broken up at the 'José Laborda González S.A.' ship breaking facilities at Murcia, Spain. Anything to add?

121 Seaford
1062 tons
Hull 388

181770

Ciciliana
Georgios A
Alexis Athans
Panaghia Kastrou
1947

A collier. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for Stephenson Clarke Limited, of Newcastle. The vessel was sold, in 1971, to 'Efti Sg Co.' of Famagusta, Cyprus, & renamed Ciciliana. It was sold again, in 1972, to 'P. Alogoskoufis' of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Georgios A. And sold again, in 1981, to 'N. Theoharopoulos Maritime Co.', also of Piraeus, & renamed Alexis Athans. Was renamed Panaghia Kastrou in 1984. Laid up in 1988. Broken up at Alexandroupolis (NE Greece near the Turkish border) in 1992. I am grateful for a now expired eBay listing for data & particularly for Miramar. WWW data is most limited. Anything to add?

122 Seamew
1220 or 1209 tons (later 1595 tons)
Hull 387

181696

Marigo
Capetan Chronis
1947

A cargo ship. Per 1 [General Steam Navigation, Seamew (3)], 2 (ref.), 3 (image, Seamew), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 79.0 metres long, 245 ft., speed of 12 or 13 knots. Sister to Auk & Laverock. Built for 'General Steam Navigation Company Limited' ('General'), of London. It would seem that for many years, years 1947/1952 are referenced, the vessel was on the London/Tilbury to Oporto, Portugal run, bringing back casks of port wine. General made similar runs to Bordeaux, France, & Cadiz, Spain, it would seem. On Jun. 30, 1950, while taking on bunker coal at Middlesbrough, a crew member was injured when he was knocked into the vessel's hold. Have read no details as to the circumstances or outcome. On Aug. 19, 1956, Seamew rescued the crew of Traquair, 567 tons, (en route from Leith to Terneuzen, the Netherlands, with coal slurry), which foundered in the North Sea - & landed them at Hamburg. That info thanks to the lead (no longer available) from R396040, who advises 'My part was frying sausages for survivors and lending a survivor a dry shirt & pants.' The vessel was sold, in 1966, to 'Adamantios Bousses & Co.', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Marigo. The vessel may have been modified since Miramar advises the gross tonnage became 1595. It was sold again, in 1972, to 'Kavadas Bros' of Greece, & renamed Capetan Chronis. On Jun. 3, 1974, the vessel, en route from Benghazi, Libya, to Piraeus, Greece, in ballast, was in collision with Hartford Express, at 34.05N/20.45E, about 150 miles due N. of Daryanah, Libya. Capetan Chronis sank in about 2,100 ft. of water. Any loss of life? Alistair Kerr has advised (thanks Alistair!) that he served aboard Seamew for 6 months commencing with her maiden voyage. You can read Alistair's words here. Anything to add?

123 Branksome
1438 tons
Hull 391

181832
5397551

Zagara
Pinetta
Tjra
1948

A collier. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 77.1 metres metres long overall, 73.2 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots. Built for 'Stephenson, Clarke Ltd.', of London. It may have earlier been intended that the vessel be named Pompey Heat. Presumably used to carry coal from the NE of England to cities in the south & maybe to Portsmouth. The vessel was sold, in 1962, to "Floramar" Cia di Nav. SpA, of Palermo, Sicily, Italy, & renamed Zagara. In 1964, it was sold again, to Silvio Bonaso, of Genoa, Italy, & renamed Pinetta. The vessel was sold, in 1966, to 'African Shipping & Trading Co.', of Monrovia, Liberia, & renamed Tjra. On May 23, 1959, the vessel arrived at the Bilbao, Spain, ship breaking facilities of D. Martin. to be broken up. WWW data is non-existent re this vessel. Is there anything you can add? #1699

124 Coleford
2852 tons
Hull 392

181884
5382659

Bestwood
Vitocha
1948

A collier. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 100.1 metres metres long overall, 95.2 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 317 ft. 6 in., speed of 9 1/2 or 10 knots. Built for 'Coastwise Colliers Ltd.' ('Coastwise'), of London, a company formed by 'Wm. France Fenwick and Co. Ltd.' ('WmFrance') & 'Stephenson Clarke Ltd.' re the chartering of vessels to 'County of London Electric Supply Co. Ltd.', for the purpose of transporting coal to the London power stations of Barking & Littlebrook, respectively on the N. & S. banks of the River Thames. Coastwise was managed by WmFrance. But, with the nationalization of the U.K. electricity industry in 1948, Coastwise went into liquidation. WmFrance acquired the vessel, in 1948, & renamed it Bestwood. The data may not in any way relate, but I see that there was a colliery named Bestwood, at Nottingham, owned by Bestwood Coal and Iron Co. When the generating stations switched from coal to oil, colliers such as Bestwood became redundant. The vessel was sold, in 1961, to 'Navigation Maritime Bulgare', which would seem to have meant the Government of Bulgaria, of Varna, Bulgaria, & renamed Vitocha. A Russian or maybe it is rather a Bulgarian site seems to refer to the vessel as Vitosha. On May 17, 1972, the vessel arrived at the Split, Yugoslavia, ship breaking facilities of Brodospas ('Brodospas Offshore Towage & Salvage Co.'?), to be broken up. The available WWW data re this vessel is modest. Is there anything you can add? #1755

125 Auk
1238 tons
Hull 397

183008
5030725

Ouranoupolis
1949

A cargo ship, a coaster. Per 1 [General Steam Navigation, Auk (3)], 2, 3 & 4 (images, Auk), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 79.1 metres long overall, 74.8 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 245 ft., twin screw, speed of 12 knots (13 knots at her trials). Built for 'General Steam Navigation Company Ltd.', of London. Sister of Laverock & Seamew. The vessel was sold, in 1965, to 'D. Dragonas & others', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Ouranoupolis, (a village in northern Greece, near Mount Athos). There were three later sales of the vessel, with no change of vessel name, & with all the purchasers being of Piraeus. In 1972 to 'Hasba Shipping Co. S.A.', in 1974 to 'Z. D. Kritsas & Alwahabi Suleiman Ebeid',  & in 1976 to 'G. Tsamis & S. Karidakis'. The vessel suffered leaks during a voyage from Chalcis or Chalkis, Greece, to Yenbo, Saudi Arabia, & was laid up, as a result, at Port Said, Egypt, on Mar. 14, 1977. It was later moved, in 1982, to the Great Bitter Lake (Suez Canal), & laid up there pending sale by creditors. The vessel arrived at Port Said ship breakers on Apl. 20, 1982, to be broken up. I am grateful for the ownership data at Miramar since WWW data about the vessel is most limited. Anything to add? #1803

126 Elisabeth Nielsen
2441 tons
Hull 398

Bore V
Evandros
1949

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 98.5 metres long, speed of 12 1/2 knots. Built for 'D/S A/S Progress' (M. Nielsen & Son), of Copenhagen, Denmark. The vessel was sold, in 1961, to 'Ångfartygs A/B Bore' (correct name?), of Åbo, Finland, (Bore Line) & renamed Bore V. There are WWW pages re Bore Line, but I cannot spot this vessel in any of them. The vessel was sold, in 1967, to 'J. P. Hadoulis' & renamed Evandros. Broken up at Inverkeithing, Firth of Forth, Scotland, in Jun. 1968. WWW data is most limited. Anything to add?

127 Pompey Light
1428 tons
Hull 395

182726
5528176
1949

A collier, completed in Feb. 1949. Per 1 (brief ref. Pompey Light, 45% down), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 242.0 ft. (73.76 metres) long perpendicular to perpendicular, 251.9 ft. (76.78 metres) long overall, speed of 10 knots, signal letters MADH, 182 HP engines by North East Marine Engineering Co. (1938) Limited of Sunderland. Sister to Pompey Power. The two vessels were 'the first ships of their type to have AC auxilliaries including provision for taking shore supply'. Ordered by City of Portsmouth. But as a result of the nationalisation of the electricity industry, the vessel was delivered to 'British Electricity Authority'. Which became 'Central Electricity Authority' in 1954 & 'Central Electricity Generating Board' in 1958. The vessel was operated by Stephenson, Clarke Ltd. It carried coal from the North East to coal-fired power plants at Portsmouth. In Oct. 1968, the vessel arrived at the Antwerp, Belgium, ship breaking facilities of 'J. de Smedt', to be broken up. Pompey Light was featured in 'Mining Review 2nd Year No. 3: Shipyard For Colliers', a 1948 'short' 35 mm film, not available for viewing by the public, however. Anything to add?

128 Pompey Power
1428 tons
Hull 394

182724

Tandik
Hamen
1949

A collier, completed in Jan. 1949. Per 1 (image Pompey Power), 2 & 3 (data & images, in Norwegian), 4 (lots of images available), 5 (fine Hamen restoration video), 6 (data), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 242.0 ft. (73.76 metres) long perpendicular to perpendicular, 251.9 ft. (76.78 metres) long overall, signal letters MADJ, 182 HP engines by North East Marine Engineering  Co. (1938) Limited of Sunderland. Sister to Pompey Light. The two vessels were 'the first ships of their type to have AC auxilliaries including provision for taking shore supply'. Built for the City of Portsmouth, U.K., but with the nationalization of the U.K. electricity industry, the vessel was taken over by The British Electricity Authority ('BEA'), & operated by Stephenson, Clarke Ltd. BEA became 'Central Electricity Authority' in 1954 & 'Central Electricity Generating Board' in 1958. Carried coal from the North East to coal-fired power plants at Portsmouth. In 1960, the vessel was sold to 'A/S Orion-Tandberg & Möinichen' of Norway & renamed Tandik. The vessel's deck machinery & masts were modernised. In 1962, the vessel was sold to Hans Utkilen of Bergen, Norway, & (in 1963) renamed Hamen. The steam engine was removed & a 1,200 BHP diesel engine by Wichmann Motorfabrikk A/L, of Rubbestadneset, Norway, was installed in its stead. The vessel operated as tramp ship for many years. In 1985 or 1986 the vessel was laid up, I have read at Kjellstraum, in northern Norway. There seems to be some confusion as to exactly when, however. Maybe in 1986 as per a long dead link , or on Nov. 12, 1985 as per 6. Harald Lorentzen writes (thanks!) to advise me that it was rather on Jun. 6, 1985, on which date, per a machine journal or logbook found in the ship's engine room the vessel was moored - the last log entry since the crew was then discharged. Efforts were made to preserve the vessel in Norway. Later (in 1996?), the vessel was sold to Lupin Shipping Ltd. (owned by Alvar Olsson, of Varberg, Sweden) of St. Vincent. The vessel was towed to near Strömstad, Sweden. And sat there, it would seem. A foundation was established to preserve her, which foundation purchased the vessel in 2005. Not sure of the correct name of that foundation - maybe 'Stiftelsen MS Hamen ex MS Tandik'? The vessel was painted by artist Laurence Bagley (53 x 78 cm. oil), which painting sold for GBP 75.00 via Bonhams, Bath, in Nov. 2005. No image of the artwork seems to be available. Pompey Power was featured in 'Mining Review 2nd Year No. 3: Shipyard For Colliers', a 1948 'short' 35 mm film, not available for viewing by the public, however. But do view the video at 5. Anything to add? I regret my inability in Norwegian - the vessel's current status?

129 Bodmin Moor
1362 (later 1280) tons
Hull 403

183246

Devon Moor
Villamar
1950

A collier. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 71.7 metres long, speed of 10 knots. Likely used to carry coal from the North East to London power stations. A 'flatiron' possibly, i.e. a vessel whose funnels & masts could be lowered to permit passage under low bridges, such as on the River Thames. It was built for 'British Electricity Authority'. Which became 'Central Electricity Authority' in 1954 & 'Central Electricity Generating Board' in 1958. The vessel was sold, in 1960, to Renwick, Wilton & Dobson Limited, coal exporters of Newcastle, (with associations in the SW of England) & renamed Devon Moor. In 1963, the vessel was sold to 'Villamar S.p.A. di Navigazione', or maybe 'S.p.A. Villamar' of Cagliani, Sardinia, Italy, & renamed Villamar. In 1964, the vessel was converted into a chemical tanker, (where I wonder?) & became 1280 tons gross. The vessel had many later changes of Italian owners but not of name. The vessel was sold in 1974 to 'Misano di Navigazione SpA', also of Cagliani, in 1979 to 'Francesco Saverio Salonia', of Rome, in 1980 to 'Pompa M. Pia', of Ravenna, & in 1981 to 'Sa. I. Mar. Srl' ('Sa'), also of Rome. On Aug. 20, 1981 the vessel 'sprang a leak', developed a list, & was beached while in Piraeus Roads at Ambelaki, near Piraeus, Greece. Sa must have had financial problems, because the vessel was sold at auction, by the creditors of Sa, to N. Kontrafouris & G. Velizelos, who, on Dec. 14, 1983, began the scrapping of the vessel at the 'Splilliopoulos Iraklis Shipyards' at Perama, Piraeus, Greece. Much of the above data was found in 'snippets'. And WWW confirming the many names above is most difficult. Can you add to or correct the above?

130 Brent Knoll
1362 (later 1313) tons
Hull 404

183301
5389308

Brentford
Wightstone
1950

A steam collier, which became a diesel sand suction dredger. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 71.7 metres long overall, 68.4 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 9 1/2 (or maybe 11) knots. Built for 'British Electricity Authority' ('Authority'). Which became 'Central Electricity Authority' in 1954 & 'Central Electricity Generating Board' in 1958. When the generating stations switched from coal to oil, colliers such as Brent Knoll became redundant. So in 1961, the vessel was sold, at about £20,000, to 'Douglas Arnold', of London, & renamed Brentford. And later that year (1961), the vessel was converted (where I wonder?) into a diesel powered sand suction dredger, of 1313 gross tons, for 'Foremost Dredging Co. Ltd.', of London, & renamed Wightstone. In 1965, the vessel was sold to James Contracting & Shipping Co. Ltd. & in 1967 to Westminster Gravels Ltd., both of London, with no change of name in either sale. The vessel was, in 1976, sold at a price of £36,000 to 'T. W. Ward Ltd.', & on Oct. 8, 1976, the vessel arrived at their Gray's, Essex, ship breaking facilities to be broken up. Break up commenced in Feb. 1977. There are very few WWW references to the vessel. Am grateful for the data at Miramar. Can you add to and/or correct the above?

131 Wychwood
2506 tons
Hull 405

184309
1950

A cargo ship. Per 1 (underwater wreck images), 2 & 3 (accounts of the disaster), 4 ex 5 (Court of Inquiry), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 95.9 metres (302.5 ft.) long, speed of 9 1/2 knots. Built for William France Fenwick & Co. Ltd. of London. On Aug. 11, 1955, while en route from Walton, Nova Scotia, Canada (left Aug. 7, 1955), to Port of Spain, Trinidad, with a cargo of barites or barytes (used in drilling), the vessel ran aground on a coral reef 8 3/4 miles S. of Bermuda (off Gibbs Hill Light). She was pulled off by U.S. Navy tug Papago & U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Rockaway. Her rudder being damaged & under most difficult conditions (high winds from hurricane Diane) she was towed by the stern towards St. George's Harbour, Bermuda. Crew from Rockaway joined the ship's crew in trying to save the vessel. But in difficult weather conditions & with the pumps failing, the vessel could not enter the harbour & was abandoned by its crew on Aug. 13, 1955. The crew was rescued by Rockaway, whose own crew aboard Wychwood were then saved in most difficult conditions. On Aug. 14, 1955, at 11:50 a.m., the vessel sank at Five Fathom's Hole. At left is a fine image of Wychwood's builder's brass plate, Hull No. 405, thanks to diver Russell Whayman. Russell advises that the wreck is not a protected wreck having sunk with its bow in only 50 ft. of water & becoming a shipping hazard accordingly. The forward section of the ship had to be blown up, while the aft section, from the bridge back, was left intact & lies in 75 ft. of water. A dive site today, but visited infrequently. The Marine Court of Inquiry concluded that the primary cause of the stranding was the negligence of her master, Captain Aeron Thompson (3 rather states Thomas) - navigational & communication errors, also the ship was not equipped with a chart of Bermuda. Can you add anything?

132 Ardingly
707/1473 (N/G) tons
Hull 406

184351
5022778

Ballyrobert
Lucky Trader
1951

A coaster or collier. Per 1 & 2 (both Stephenson Clarke), 3 (data & images, Ardingly), 4 (image, Ardingly), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 243.2 ft. (74.13 metres) long perpendicular to perpendicular, 253.0 ft. (77.11 metres) long overall, speed of 10 1/2 knots (11 knots at trials), signal letters MDJP later C4XR, 925 BHP Sulzer oil engines by George Clark (1938) Ltd. of Sunderland. Launched on Oct. 25, 1950 by Mrs. G. Sulzer, as you can see in the wonderful launch image at left, kindly provided by Tom Millar. Tom advises that his father, also named Thomas (Tom) Millar (1903/1987), was General Manager of 'Austins' from about 1950 through 1957/58. Mrs. Sulzer presumably relates to the diesel engine builder of that name & to the ship's engines.
Peter Wheatley has kindly been in touch to state that he believes that Ardingly was in collision with the dock wall at Seaham on Sep. 11, 1957. Thanks for that data, Peter! He also tells me that he was present at the launch of the vessel, as also were his parents & his grandmother (Mrs. J. Jones). Indeed, if you look at the launch party image at left, Peter is the small schoolboy standing to attention in the very front & his parents & grandmother are to his left.
Built for 'Stephenson Clarke Ltd.', of Newcastle, which company in 1968 became 'Stephenson Clarke Shipping Ltd.'. Then said to be the oldest U.K. shipping company in existence, (dates from 1730), they were also, I read, one of the largest coal factoring companies in the U.K. But .... the company went into liquidation on Jul. 26, 2012. Two books about Stephenson Clarke. Ardingly? A village in West Sussex located about 33 miles S. of London, home of Ardingly College. The vessel carried coal from the NE to the S. of England & particularly to the power station at Poole, Dorset, & later carried bulk cargoes including limestone & grain. The vessel was sold, in 1971, to 'John Kelly Ltd.', (John Kelly Wilson the manager), of Belfast, Northern Ireland, (which company was partly owned by 'Stephenson Clarke'), & renamed Ballyrobert. It was sold again, in 1977, to 'Oreosa Navigation Co. Ltd.', of Limassol, Cyprus, & renamed Lucky Trader. I have read that on Apl. 28, 1980 the vessel was laid up at Piraeus, Greece, & in 1982, the vessel was broken up there. Anything you could add would be most welcome.

133 Battersea
1777 (or 1776) tons
Hull 407

184403

Grainville
1951

A collier. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 82.4 metres long overall (270 ft. 6 in.), 78.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 knots. Sister ship to Blackwall Point. Carried coal from the North East to London power stations. A 'flatiron' i.e. a vessel whose funnels & masts could be lowered to permit passage under low bridges, such as on the River Thames. The vessel was presumably named after the W. London power station of the identical name. The ship was built for 'British Electricity Authority'. Which became 'Central Electricity Authority' in 1954 & 'Central Electricity Generating Board' in 1958. It would seem that later, in 1981 I think, the vessel was owned by 'Le Blond Shipping Co.' ('LeBlond'), who renamed it Grainville & sold it, also in 1981, to Alba Shipping Co. Ltd., of London, with LeBlond the managers, possibly of South Shields - no further change of vessel name. On Dec. 14, 1981, while en route from Belfast, Northern Ireland, to Bilbao, Spain, with a cargo of scrap iron, the vessel capsized & sank. At 52.02.04N/6.12.13W, about 10 miles SW of Tuskar Rock Light, off the SE coast of Ireland near Rosslare. 4 (or maybe 3 only) lives were lost of the crew of nine. I have not read the circumstances. Due to reasons of copyright, I presume, relatively recent data seems to be simply unavailable. A WWW data 'snippet' advises, however, that the cargo shifted, & that she failed to seek 'shelter or broadcast a distress message and obtain assistance in sufficient time.' Can you add to or correct the above?

134 Blackwall Point
1776 tons
Hull 408

184423
5046023

Blackwell Point
1951

A collier. Per A (e-Bay image, Blackwall Point), 1 (image, Blackwall Point), 2 (image, Blackwell Point, 70% down), 3 (Chipchase, ref. 50% down), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 82.4 metres long (270 ft. 6 in.) overall, 78.3 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 knots. Sister ship to Battersea. The ship was built for 'British Electricity Authority' (BEA'), & managed by Stephenson, Clarke Ltd. A 'flatiron', i.e. a vessel whose funnels & masts could be lowered to permit passage under low bridges, such as on the River Thames - since the vessel was presumably named after the power station of the identical name, at Blackwall, in E. London. Carried coal from the North East or from Barry, Wales, to London power stations. In 1957, the vessel ran aground in the Thames near Rotherhithe Tunnel, but was re-floated in 2 hours. From 1958 to 1960, vessel was mainly on the Dunston (Gateshead) to Battersea power station run. BEA became 'Central Electricity Authority' in 1954 & 'Central Electricity Generating Board' in 1958. On Jul. 8, 1964, Chipchase, a 106 ton tug, turned over sideways & sank while assisting Blackwall Point at Blyth Dry Docks. The vessel was sold, in 1976, to 'Erika Shipping Co. S.A.', of Colon, Panama, & renamed Blackwell Point. The vessel would appear to have been laid up for a couple of years commencing in 1986. Also in 1986, the vessel was sold to 'Lotus Shipping Ltd.', also of Colon, Panama, with no change of name. On Nov. 27, 1994, the vessel arrived at the Bruges (Brugge), Belgium, ship breaking facilities of 'Scheepsloperij Bakker N.V.', to be broken up. Can you add to or correct the above?

135 Brunswick Wharf
1782 tons
Hull 409

184499

Allan C.
Fjordcem
1951

A collier. Per 1 (image, Brunswick Wharf), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 82.4 metres (270 ft. 6 in.) long, speed of 10 1/2 (or 10) knots. Carried coal from the North East & from Swansea, Wales, to London power stations. A 'flatiron', i.e. a vessel whose funnels & masts could be lowered to permit passage under low bridges, such as on the River Thames - since the vessel was presumably named after the power station of the identical name, now long gone, however, at Blackwall, in E. London. It (the ship & the power station) was built for 'British Electricity Authority'. Which became 'Central Electricity Authority' in 1954 & 'Central Electricity Generating Board' in 1958. The vessel was laid up for a while before being sold, in Sep. 1972, to Poul Christensen, of Aalborg, Denmark, for 'upp-huggning' (whatever that means!), & renamed Allan C. The ship was taken to Nakskov, S. Denmark, the machinery removed (in Dec 1972, it would seem) & she became a barge. In 1974 the vessel was towed to Norway, renamed Fjordcem, & used, after installation (by A/S Hymo?) of the necessary pumps & pipelines, for the storage of bulk cement. The vessel, stationed perhaps at Åndalsnes, Norway, supplied cement for North Sea drilling platforms & for the construction of Canary Wharf Tower, in London. Towed there by tug Bjørn Eskil for the purpose. In 1992, Fjordcem was stationed in Western Norway, & sold to Norwegian contractors, who 'put her up in Gannsfjorden as cement stocks of derricks in the North Sea'. In 1996 she was mothballed at Hinnøya, Stavanger, awaiting new assignments. Miramar advises us that the vessel was still a hulk at Oslo, in 1998. Maybe owned by 'Norcem A/S', of Norway, with K. G. Jebsen, of Bergen, Norway, the managers. The above will surely need correction, since the webmaster has no ability in Swedish, the WWW translation at 4 is difficult, & much data was found in 'snippets'. Can you add to or correct the above?

136 Deptford
1782 tons
Hull 410

184540
5088825
1951

A 'flatiron' collier. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 270 ft. 6 in. long (82.45 metres) overall, 78.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 1/2 (or 10) knots, signal letters GMDD. Carried coal from the North East to London power stations. A 'flatiron' i.e. a vessel whose funnels & masts could be lowered to permit passage under low bridges, such as on the River Thames - since the vessel was presumably named after Deptford in E. London. The ship was built for 'British Electricity Authority'. Which became 'Central Electricity Authority' in 1954 & 'Central Electricity Generating Board' in 1958. Hackney was converted in 1968 - from coal to oil burning perhaps? I wonder whether Deptford was also? On Feb. 6, 1973, the vessel arrived at the T. W. Ward Ltd. ship breaking facilities at Briton Ferry to be broken up. The WWW record for this ship is modest - but the search terms i.e. Deptford, Austin, etc. are difficult. Can you add to or correct the above?

137 Gosport
1824 (or 1820) tons
Hull 413

184707

Sanastasia
Massys
1952

A coaster or collier. Per 1 (Stephenson Clarke), 2 (image, Gosport), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). As I update this page an image of Sanastasia is eBay available. But forgive me if I invite you to find it for yourself. I do not like to 'reward' eBay vendors by linking to images that bear excessive intrusive logos. 79.86 or 79.9 metres long overall, 76.0 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 249 ft., speed of 11 knots. Built for 'Stephenson Clarke Ltd.', of Newcastle, which company in 1968 became 'Stephenson Clarke Shipping Ltd.'. Said to be the oldest U.K. shipping company in existence, (dates from 1730), they were also, I read, one of the largest coal factoring companies in the U.K. Two books about Stephenson Clarke. The vessel was sold, in 1972, to Sanastasia Ltd., of Famagusta, Cyprus, & renamed Sanastasia. It was sold again, in 1973, to 'Blue Pilots Navigation Co. Ltd.', also of Famagusta, & renamed Massys. In 1975, the vessel was sold to Overtania Shipping Co. Ltd., of Limassol, Cyprus, with no change of name. On Dec. 7, 1977, while en route from Bulgaria to Apapa Quay at Lagos, Nigeria, via Conarkry, Guinea, with a general cargo, the vessel suffered an explosion in her engine room. A fire resulted & the vessel sank. At 9.14N/14.58W. Off the coast of Sierra Leone or Guinea, W. Africa. All of the crew of 10 were rescued by the Russian 'roll-on, roll-off' motor vessel Inzhener Machulskiy & landed at Las Palmas. I read that the chief engineer & the second engineer both had to be hospitalised with burns. Anything you could add would be most welcome.

138 Hackney
1782 tons
Hull 411

184576

Bulk I
Greta
1952

A collier. Per 1 & 2 (image, Bulk I, text), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 82.4 metres (270 ft. 6 in.) long overall, 78.3 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 1/2 (or 10) knots. Launched on Nov. 14, 1951 by Miss Josephine Clarke, as you can see in the wonderful launch image at left, kindly provided by Tom Millar. Tom advises that his father, also named Thomas (Tom) Millar (1903/1987), was General Manager of 'Austins' from about 1950 through 1957/58. Hackney carried coal from the North East to London power stations. A 'flatiron' i.e. a vessel whose funnels & masts could be lowered to permit passage under low bridges, such as on the River Thames - the vessel was presumably named after Hackney and/or the power station located there, in E. London. The ship was built for 'British Electricity Authority', which became 'Central Electricity Authority' in 1954 & 'Central Electricity Generating Board' in 1958. It would seem that the vessel was converted in 1968 - from coal to oil burning I presume. The vessel was sold, in 1972, to 'Estrella Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Famagusta, Cyprus, & renamed Bulk I. It was sold again, however, also in 1972, to 'Firma Woekatz' (who were they I wonder?). And arrived at Gothenburg, Sweden, on Aug. 4, 1973 to be converted into a barge. At Lindholmen? I read that the ship yard at Lindholmen, a long established shipyard indeed, was integrated into 'Mek. Verkstads Eriksbergs AB' in 1970, & in 1973 was in process of being closed down. But the 'demolition' of Bulk I was in progress at Lindholmen in Sep. 1973, I read. Andy Larsson, via 3, has provided two images of the vessel at Varberg, Sweden, in Jun. 1973 (a date possibly in error?). He indicates that after unloading, the ship was towed to Gothenburg & broken down & rebuilt there as a barge named Greta. Thank you Andy! I wonder i) why she had to be towed, ii) who then owned Greta & iii) what later happened to Greta. Part of the above was assembled from WWW data 'snippets', easily misinterpreted. Can you add to or correct the above?

139 Lady Charrington
2154 tons
Hull 414

184730
1952

A coaster or collier. Per 1 (ref. to the Charrington company), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 87.0 metres long (285 ft.) overall, 82.4 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots (or 10 1/2 knots, 11 knots at trials), raised quarter-deck. Carried approx. 2,900 tons of coal. Built for 'Charrington, Gardner, Locket (London) Ltd.' ('Charrington'), of London. Are the two commas in the name correct? But maybe owned then or later by 'Charrington Steamship Co. Ltd.'. Used in the shipment of coal from the North East to London & other cities in southern England. Charrington were long-established coal & coke merchants, dating from 1731, apparently headed by five generations of men named John Charrington. The company expanded into transporting coal as well as selling it. In Oct. 1969, the vessel arrived at the Inverkeithing facilities of 'T. W. Ward Ltd.', to be broken up. Anything you could add would be most welcome.

140 Wallarah
1448 tons
Hull 412

191350

Sorana-Del-Mar
1952

A collier. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 73.3 metres long overall, 69.8 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 228 ft. 6 in., speed of 10 knots, specially designed for service on the Australian E. coast i.e. service from the jetty at Catherine Hill Bay (see below) to Sydney. Launched on Feb. 12, 1952 by Mrs. F. C. S. Parbury, as you can see in the wonderful launch image at left, kindly provided by Tom Millar. Tom advises that his father, also named Thomad (Tom) Millar (1903/1987), was General Manager of 'Austins' from about 1950 through 1957/58. Built for 'The Wallarah Coal Company Ltd.' ('CoalCo'), of London & Sydney, Australia. The 3rd company vessel of the name. The crew of 21, who sailed her to Australia, did not return to the U.K. - all chose to settle in Australia. CoalCo, established back in 1888, operated a giant coal mine, (origins as early as 1865), located at Catherine Hill Bay, near Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. A mine that closed in 1963. The vessel was transferred, in 1956, with no change of vessel name, to 'J. & A. Brown Abermain Seaham Collieries Limited' (who acquired CoalCo in 1955), of Sydney. That maybe should be 'John and Alexander' instead of J. & A.'? In 1971, the vessel was sold to Captain Emile Savoie, of  Nouméa (New Caledonia, French, South Pacific Ocean) & renamed Sorana-Del-Mar. Engaged primarily on the Nouméa to Sydney run. On Jul. 5, 1974, while en route from Nouméa to Auckland, New Zealand, with a cargo of scrap iron, the vessel capsized while in tow, 12 miles off Cape Brett, N. Island, New Zealand. Have not been able to read the circumstances. Can you tell us? Meaningful WWW data about this vessel is essentially non-existent. Anything you could add would be most welcome. An image?

141 Borde
3401 tons
Hull 416

185921

Balmoral
Eileen
Aryl
1953

A cargo ship, a collier. Per 1 (Stephenson Clarke), 2 (1950's image incl. Borde), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 104.8 metres (344 ft.) long, speed of 10 1/2 knots. Launched on Apl. 28, 1953 by Lady Merrett, as you can see in the wonderful launch image at left, kindly provided by Tom Millar. Tom advises that his father, also named Thomas (Tom) Millar (1903/1987), was General Manager of 'Austins' from about 1950 through 1957/58. Built for 'Stephenson Clarke Ltd.', of Newcastle, which company, in 1968, became 'Stephenson Clarke Shipping Ltd.'. Said to be the oldest U.K. shipping company in existence, (dates from 1730), they were also, I read, one of the largest coal factoring companies in the U.K. Stephenson Clarke? A book, written by Peter Cox, about the company was published in 1980, entitled 'A Link with Tradition - The story of Stephenson Clarke Shipping Limited 1730-1980'. And another, in 1981, by Craig J. M. Carter entitled 'Stephenson Clarke Shipping'. Both would presumably have data about Borde. The vessel was sold, in 1968, to Balmoral Shipping Corporation, of Liberia (S. M. Bull, the managers), & renamed Balmoral. The vessel was sold, in 1971, to 'International Activity Shipping & Investment Co., S.A.', of Panama, (Duodo & Co. the managers), & renamed Eileen. And sold again, in 1977, to 'Aryl Inc.', also of Panama, (N. Patella, the managers), & renamed Aryl. In May 1978, the vessel arrived at the ship breaking facilities of Sidermar S.p.A., at Trieste, Italy, to be broken up. Anything you could add would be most welcome.

142 Thomas Livesey
1779 tons
Hull 417

185965
5359418

Harting
Cosmic
1953

A cargo ship, indeed a collier. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 82.4 metres long overall, 78.5 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots. A 'flatiron' i.e. a vessel whose funnels & masts could be lowered to permit passage under low bridges, such as on the River Thames since it was built for North Thames Gas Board, & maybe elsewhere too. The vessel was sold, in 1966, to 'Stephenson Clarke Shipping Ltd.', of Newcastle, & renamed Harting. It was sold again, in 1975, to 'Knight Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Limasoll, Cyprus, & renamed Cosmic. The vessel arrived at the Eleusina, nr. Piraeus, Greece, ship breaking facilities of 'E. Pederaki OE', in Dec. 1978, to be broken up. Anything you could add would be most welcome.

143 Adjutant
1366 tons
Hull 420

186052
5002742

Galiola
1954

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per 1 [Adjutant (3)], 2 (image, Adjutant, but you must be registered to see it), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 79.2 metres long, speed of 13 knots, signal letters MSFL. Built for General Steam Navigation Company Ltd. ('General'), of London. 2 references the vessel with the colours of Moss Hutchinson Line Ltd. That company, like General, was owned by Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Company (i.e. P&O Line). The vessel was sold, in 1966, to Cove Shipping Co. Ltd., of Nassau, the Bahamas, (maybe Yugoslavian owners) & renamed Galiola. In 1970, the vessel was sold to 'Lopedra Shipping Corp of the Bahamas Ltd.', with no change of name. And in 1974, again with no change of name, the vessel became owned by 'Losinjska Plovidba', of Rijeka, Yugoslavia. The vessel was broken up at Split, Yugoslavia, in 1982. Anything you could add would be most welcome.

144 Frederick John Evans
3375 tons
Hull 418

186016

Braemar
Brick Decimo
1954

A collier. Per 1 (Frederick John Evans, 1818/1880, biographical data), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 104.8 metres long overall, 99.1 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 1/2 knots. Built for North Thames Gas Board & managed by 'Stephenson Clarke'. Named after a noted civil engineer of the name who, for over 40 years, was with 'The Gas, Light & Coke Company'. He designed & constructed 'Beckton Gas Works' & retired as its Chief Engineer. The vessel delivered coal to the Beckton Gas Works. The vessel was sold, in 1966, for £100,000, to 'Braemar Shipping Corp.' of Monrovia, Liberia, & renamed Braemar. The vessel was sold again, in 1971, to Gino Gardella, of Genoa, Italy, & renamed Brick Decimo. In Sep. 1982, the vessel arrived at the La Spezia, Italy, ship breaking facilities of Terrestre Marittima S.p.A., to be broken up. Break up commenced on Oct. 27, 1983. Anything you could add would be most welcome.

145 Greenbatt
1968 tons
Hull 422

169259
5050232

Bramber
Maldive Sailor
1954

A collier. Per 1 (stunning image, Bramber, at Dover, in the 1970s), 2 (image, Bramber), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 80.8 metres long overall, 77.0 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, 264 ft. 1", speed of 10 knots, signal letters MSGG. Built for 'Newbigin Steam Shipping Co. Ltd.' ('Newbigin'), of Newcastle. 'E. R. Newbigin Limited', the owner & manager? Newbigin, founded in 1896, ceased operations in 1960. Duncan Lumsden, Chief Engineer, apparently died aboard the ship in 1956. In 1960, the vessel was sold to 'Stephenson, Clarke Ltd.', of London, & renamed Bramber, after the Sussex village of the name. Presumably carried coal from the North East to the S. of England & likely to the Shoreham Power Station & the Thames. In 1968, the vessel was sold to 'Maldives Shipping Limited', of Male, Republic of Maldives, & renamed Maldive Sailor. In Jan. 1975, the vessel arrived at Gadani Beach, Pakistan, to be broken up. Do you have more data?

Tony Frost advises (thanks!) that further vessels were constructed at the Wear Dockyard, after S. P. Austin & Son Ltd. became part of Austin & Pickersgill Limited in 1954. Specifically hull numbers 419 through 436. See here. The last hull number for S. P. Austin & Son Ltd. was, I am advised, #418.

TO END THE PAGE

eBay vendors who provide quality listing images with no logos

First the good news. A start on a list of eBay vendors whose maritime & Sunderland related listed items include quality images without intrusive logos. Just a few vendors with items regularly in my watch list. In alphabetic order. I will add to it as other sites come to mind. But ... suggestions for vendors to be added to the list would be most welcome. It would be my hope that the vendors listed below will be rewarded by eBayers, for the integrity of their listing practices.

1

cobwebpostcards

2

natterjack57

3

prints-4-all

4

rji2002

5

searching01

6

shipsearchphotos

7

travtaff

I do hope that you will not find the following to be presumptuous.

In building these pages, the webmaster has found lots of data relevant to the particular subject at hand via eBay 'university'. Often not by specifically searching for it, rather by finding it by accident. A reference to a book perhaps, maybe an early print or an interesting postcard. And last but not least images, most often of ships that were built at Sunderland.

I should tell you clearly that I DO use such eBay images on site, lots of them in fact. But in doing so, I try, very hard indeed, to treat the eBay vendors with honour. I provide links to hundreds of such eBay images throughout the site - and I often even provide links to the eBay store of the vendor in question. Both in some small way to thank the vendor i) by effectively advertising the availability of his item & ii) for the use of his listing images. Only when a listing is long expired do I use, on site, the full size listing images that were provided.

Now only a few of the eBay listing images I see are usable. They are so often too small, out of focus or otherwise unusable. Often they have 'logos' prominently written across them - to dissuade somebody like yours truly from using the image &, I presume, to protect the purchaser of the item. My own belief is that when a purchaser buys an item, a postcard perhaps, he or she buys that postcard, but does not buy the related listing image of that postcard. I have to think that an image displayed on eBay & available to the entire world is effectively in the public domain. I say that not as a lawyer. Rather as someone trying to develop an interesting website that informs & educates anybody interested enough to search the site - which site is non-profit, free of membership, free of access, has no fees, intrusive advertising, pop-ups etc. A rarity, these days!

The use of such 'logos' seems to be steadily increasing. And so often the logos are placed across an image in a place that makes it quite impossible to remove by someone with my limited photo editing skills. One vendor in particular, a vendor who has provided modest listing images for many years with no logos, & to whose images there are still many links, has recently added a most intrusive logo across all of his listing images. I wrote to the vendor, but from his perspective he feels he is fully justified & does not propose to re-consider the matter. Gradually, as I find them again, I am removing all links to his sale items & will reference such items no more.

May I suggest that you navigate the site via the index on page 001    PRIOR PAGE / NEXT PAGE

To Thomas M. M. Hemy Data Page 41. All of the other Thomas Hemy pages, including image pages, are accessible though the index on Thomas Hemy page 05. [ ] £ ö

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