THE SUNDERLAND SITE - PAGE 175
POTTERIES - PAGE 3
VERSES ON SUNDERLAND POTTERY

May I suggest that you navigate the site via the index on page 001.PRIOR PAGE / NEXT PAGE

Do you want to make a comment? A site guestbook is here. Test

Lower on this page - verses with 2 lines. And those with 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11 & 12 lines.

To search for specific text on this page, just press 'CTRL + F' & then enter your search term.

Here is pottery page 172. And here are pottery pages 173 & 176.

VERSES ON SUNDERLAND LUSTREWARE

The novelty 'Reg Carter' postcard image at left, a partial image only, seems to really relate to the potteries at Stoke-on-Trent. It was mailed, c.1910, from Stoke-on-Trent. A 'J. Salmon' of Sevenoaks, Kent, postcard..

On site page 172, I advised just one of the very many verses that appear on Sunderland Lustreware. One of 8 lines that was, to the webmaster, quite amusing. I have repeated it below (Says Sylvia) from a 'Garrison Pottery' jug (red text at left). Here are more of them - in the interest of completeness and in the hope they will be of interest to you, the reader! Exact punctuation is often most difficult. As is, surprisingly perhaps, determining how many lines of verse there are. It sounds easy. But is often not, as a practical matter!

73 such verses today. More will be added, as we find them. There would seem to be only 216 or so in total (see below). And hopefully we can add some links to images showing the words on an actual piece of pottery. Click on the red square () where such an image (of a reasonably acceptable quality) is presently available.

Amazingly the verses can be as long as 17 lines long. And, who knows, maybe even more than 17 lines (however could they get 17 lines on a piece of pottery?). I now have seen a pottery item on e-Bay which has 16 lines of verse - in two columns of eight lines each - with the title, the 17th line, across the top of the two columns. But while the image was good, it was not good enough to permit me to be able to read all the text. Fair enough. The item was not listed to satisfy my 'needs' for this page. I will list & maybe show such an item as and when I can do so.

Michael Gibson, in his volume, features at least 14 such verses. And there are surely many more (see next paragraph). We have a long way to go! The first verse of two lines below is - per Gibson from a 'Garrison Pottery' chamber pot! While John Bedford, in his volume, has a couple of 'gems' also - the 2nd verse of two lines below, & the 2nd of five lines also.

I see that there is a booklet published on this very subject - entitled 'Rhymes and Mottoes on Sunderland Pottery' by James Crawley. Just 32 pages, published by Sunderland Museum and Art Gallery (or maybe Sunderland Public Libraries) in 1960. With August 1961 amendments and additions in the front of the booklet, perhaps. 192 mottoes and their sources and 4 black & white illustrations, so 'BookFinder' tells me.

James Crawley was, I read, Director of Sunderland Public Libraries, Museum and Art Gallery, in 1946. And probably much later than 1946 also.

A copy of the booklet sold on e-Bay in late March 2007 - for GBP 10.04 or approximately U.S. $19.67. A valuable wee booklet indeed! Now out of date.

But there is more.

A volume entitled 'Sunderland Pottery', in the 5th edition, revised by J. C. Baker in 1984, includes, I believe, the verses previously listed in the 'Crawley' effort above. Editions 1 through 4, published 1951 thru 1973, had the title of 'The Potteries of Sunderland & District'. At pages 106/134 of the 1984 edition, in Appendix IV, are a great many verses and mottoes. How many are there? An easy question to ask but not so easy to answer! It would seem that they list about 216 verses, but the volume numbering goes up to 322 with the inclusion of mottoes, and the titles written under, say, an image of a sailing ship or the iron bridge, etc.

It is probably the nature of the matter, but it would seem to me that quite a few of the verses that are recorded below, do not appear in that 1984 volume. Or do not appear that I can see. It may well be that some of the verses below, largely from items sold on e-Bay, were incorrectly identified by the vendors as being the work of a Sunderland pottery. I do not really know, however. If you have thoughts on the whole matter, your input is invited.

Of a total of 2 lines

From a chamber pot 6 inches high and 9 inches diameter. Had two verses on exterior and another on the inside - with a frog! Vendor says it is called a 'Thunder Mug'.

Keep me clean and use me well
And what I see I will not tell.

Always speak the truth
But not at all times the whole truth.

A verse on pink lustre plaque. Per vendor 1840-1850. Plaque sold for GBP 232 or approximately U.S. $456.16 on February 1, 2007

MATE SOUND THE PUMP,
MORNING NOON & NIGHT.

A brilliant verse, kindly provided by Gay Jungemann of Owen's Antiques, of Vashon Island, Washington, 98070. Featured on a distinguished frog mug available for sale in Nov. 2011. At www.owensantiques.com - search for frog mug.

If YOU love's I. as I. love's YOU.
No PAIR so happy as WE. TWO

Of a total of 3 lines

A verse on a tiny jug just 2 3/4 inches tall. Per vendor c. 1840

Ladies all I pray make free,
And tell me how
You like your tea.


 

Of a total of 4 lines

Tis a very good world for to live in,
To lend or to spend or to give in;
But to beg or to borrow or to get a mans own,
Tis the very worst world that ever was known.

From a pink lustre mug re John Snowball 1852

Success to the Farmer, and prosper his plough,
Rewarding his ardent toil, all the year through,
Seed time and harvest he ever shall get,
He's trusted all to providence and so may he yet.

The first of two verses on the same piece of pottery, a pink lustre pitcher given as a wedding gift (John & Racheal Adamson) and dated 1852. Stated to be from a c.1850 Sunderland lustre frog mug 4 1/2 inches tall.

The Lord is my Shepherd my guardian and guide
Whatsoever I want he doth kindly provide
Ever since I was born it is he that hath crown'd
The life that he gave me with blessings around.

There are different texts, it would appear.

The second of two verses, and not a very friendly one, on the same piece of pottery, a pink lustre pitcher given as a wedding gift (John & Racheal Adamson) and dated 1852. A verse that is recorded twice on a 7 1/2 inch lustre bowl which also featured 
the High Level Bridge, Newcastle Upon Tyne (also twice). Vendor indicated c.1850.

Be wise then Christian while you may
For swiftly time is flying,
The thoughtless man who laughs today
Tomorrow will be dying.

Also a version without punctuation.

The text of one panel (of two) on a Sunderland pink lustre jug, 6 1/2 inches tall, with a ship decoration. Vendor suggests c 1840.

My heart is fix'd
I cannot range
I love my choice
Too well to change.

The text on a Sunderland Creamware jug, 4 5/8 inches tall, with a ship decoration. Vendor suggests c 1830.

And when the trying time is o’er,
And thou my comforts dost restore,
I’ll to the praise of God declare,
What Grace enables Man to bear.

A verse on a 3 1/2 inch tall bowl, which commemorates the Crimean War (1853-1856). With the crossed flags of Britain and France and the Iron Bridge also.

THE LOSS OF GOLD IS MUCH.
THE LOSS OF TIME IS MORE:
BUT LOSING CHRIST IS SUCH A LOSS
AS NO MAN CAN RESTORE.

Success to the Fleece
To the Plough and the Sail,
May our Taxes Grow Less
And our Commerce ne'er Fail

From a 5 1/4 inch tall pink lustre frog mug, with 'BRIG' a sailing ship decoration. Listed as c. 1840

When far at sea remember me
And bear me in your mind,
Let all the world say what they will
Speek of me as you find. 

Just as it appears. 'Speak' written as 'Speek'.



May Peace & Plenty
On our Nation Smile.
and Trade with Commerce
Bless the British Isle.

There clearly were a number of versions of the verse. 'with Commerce' in line 3 may well identify the plaque as being by Garrison Pottery.

When riding o'er the Mountain wave
The Hardy Sailor ever brave
He laughs at danger smiles at fate
And risks his life to save his mate

From a 3 1/2 inch miniature plate

For age & want
save while you may
no morning sun
lasts all the day

From a pink lustre bowl, 4 1/4 x 8 inches in size. With 'Ancient Order of Foresters', 'Mariner's Arms', and the Iron Bridge on it. Along with this verse, of course!

Teach me to feel another's woe
To hide the fault I see ,
That mercy I to other's show
That mercy, show to me .

A verse on a 4 inch tall pink lustre loving cup (2 handles).

We Sailors are born for all Weathers
Great Guns let them blow high blow low
Our duty keeps us to our Tethers
And where the Gale drives we must go

A verse on a 4 1/2 inch tall pink lustre jug - with the iron bridge and this verse.

The loss of gold is great.
The loss of health is more,
But losing Christ is such a loss
As no man can restore.

Quite similar to the verse 4 above in this column

A verse on a 3 1/2 inch tall tankard - with a large house and a river with swans and two stags.

The Ale is good
So pray pour out
As soon as full
Then drink about.

 

A verse on a butter pot, 4 inches tall with a ship decoration. Said to be c. 1840.

Fear not my Soul
Be not dismay'd,
For Jesus Christ
Thy debt has paid.

A verse on a souvenir mug, 10.5 cm tall, with a ship decoration and 'A Present from London' text. Said to be c. 1820.

As I Expect
So let me find
A Faithfull heart
And constant mind.

From a Sunderland lustre jug 10 cm tall.

A soft answer.
Turneth away wrath.
But grievous words.
Stir up anger.

From a c.1830 Sunderland lustre mug 2 1/2 inches tall.

This rustic maid enjoys her ride
Her Donkeys sleekness is her pride
If not the swiftest of his race
No beast can trot with surer pace

From a Sunderland lustre jug 5.3

A Sailors Life is the Life for me
For he does his duty manfully,
He gets belov'd by all the Ship
So toasts his Girl and drinks his Flip.

Stated to be from a c.1850 Sunderland lustre frog mug 4 1/2 inches tall.

God moves in a mysterious way
His wonders to perform
He plants his footsteps in the sea
And rides upon the storm

From a Sunderland Masonic lustre jug 8.5 inches tall.

The Brewer has sent his Clerk
And I must pay my score.
And if I trust my beer.
What shall I do for more

From a Sunderland Masonic lustre jug 8.5 inches tall.

The world's a city with many a crooked street,
And death's a market place were all men meet;
If life was merchandise which men could buy,
The rich would live, the poor alone would die.

Of a total of 5 lines

FORGET & FORGIVE.
To forgive and forget is a maxim of old,
Tho' I've learnt but one half of it yet.
The theft of my heart I can freely forgive,
But the thief I can never forget.

From rocks and sands
And barren lands
Kind fortune keep me free
And from great guns and women's tongues
Good Lord deliver me.

THE SAILORS FAREWELL
Far from home across the sea,
To foriegn climes I go,
While far away O think of me,
And I'll remember you.

SAILORS, FAREWELL
Sweet, oh! Sweet is that Sensation,
Where two hearts in union meet;
But the pain of Separation,
Mingles bitter with the Sweet.

ON TIME
Time was, is past thou canst not it recall,
Time is, thou hast employ the portion small,
Time future, is not and may never be,
Time present is, the only time for thee.

The Gift.
Kindly take this gift of mine,
The gift and giver I hope is thine,
And tho' the value is but small
A loving heart is worth it all.

Of a total of 6 lines

Glide on my bark the summer's tide
Is gently flowing by thy side.
Around thy prow the waters bright
In circling rounds of broken light
Are glitt'ring as if ocean gave,
Her countless gems to deck the wave

There is another version of this verse
with different punctuation at the end of each line. And an 8 line version, i.e. with 2 additional lines, which now appears lower on the page.


Ensigns of state that feed our pride,
Distinctions troublesome and vain,
By Masons true are laid aside,
Arts free-born sons such toys distain,
Ennobled by the name they bear,
Distinguish'd by the badge they wear.




 

 

Thou noble bark of brightest fame,
That bear'st proud England's honourd name,
Right welcome home once more!
Welcome, thou gallant little sail
In England's name I bid the hail!
And welcome to her shore.

From a bowl 16 cm tall and 35 cm diameter by Dixon Phillips & Co. c.1840

When tempests mingle sea and sky
And winds like lion's, rage and rend
Ship’s o’er the mountain water’s fly
Or down unfathom’d depths descend
Though skill avail not, strength decay
Deliver us good Lord we pray



From a bowl 16 cm tall and 35 cm diameter by Dixon Phillips & Co. c.1840.

Now weigh the anchor hoist the sail
Launch out upon the pathless deep
Resolve however veers the gale
The destined port in mind to keep
Through all the dangers of the way
Deliver us good Lord we pray.

 

I may need to remove this verse, which was on a lustre bowl, 4 1/2 inches tall and 10 inches across manufactured by Maw & Co. From a pink lustre bowl made by Dixon and Co., of Sunderland, in 1817 featuring bands and splashes, and transfer-printed designs of the Wearmouth Bridge 
Also a hunting scene & a 2nd verse. Said to be 9 1/2 inches round (what does that mean? Diameter maybe?) by 5 1/2 inches.

Mild Charity's glow,
To us mortals below,
Shows the soul from barbarity clear,
Compassion will melt,
Where the virtue is felt,
And its dew is diffus'd in a tear.

The second image has different punctuation.

From a 5 inch tall pitcher with a sailing ship and this verse.

Remember me ,
When this you see,
And keep me in your mind,
For let the World:
Say what they will,
Speak of me as you find.

From a pink lustre bowl, 3 3/4 inches tall and 10 inches wide featuring a sailing ship, 'SHIP SALLY', and two verses.

The man doomed to sail
With the blast of the gale,
Through billows Atlantic to steer
As he bends o'er the wave
Which may soon be his grave
Remembers his home with a tear.

From a pink lustre bowl, 3 3/4 inches tall and 10 inches wide featuring a sailing ship, 'SHIP SALLY', and two verses.

When round the bowl the jovial crew
The early scenes of youth renew,
Tho' each his fav'rite fair will boast,
This is the universal toast,
May we, when toil and danger's o'er,
Cast anchor on our native shore.

From a pink lustre earthenware child's mug, c.1820 per e-Bay vendor. 6.3 cm tall.

GRACE BEFORE MEAT
Be present at our Table LORD
Be here and every where adord
These Creatures bless
And grant that we
May live to dwell in Paradise with thee

From a pink lustre mug, 3 1/2 inches tall with two verses.

REST IN HEAVEN.
There is an hour of peaceful rest
To mourning wand'rers given:
There is a tear for souls distrest
A balm for every wounded breast
Tis found above in heaven!

The vendor who listed this item said the first word of the last line is 'if'.

When first I was a foremast man I often did pretend,
If e're I got promoted I'd be a seamans friend
But in a little time I was promoted to be mate,
I then like many others forgot my former state.
When I became a Captain I thought myself a king,
I then entirely did forget the foremast man I'd been.

I had difficulty reading the source of this text, which may therefore be imperfect.

From a 3 1/3 inch tall lustre mug with an image of the iron bridge. Per e-Bay vendor c.1840. From a 7 inch tall Masonic lustre mug. Per e-Bay vendor c.1820/c.1840.

FRIENDS ARE LIKE LEAVES
WHICH ON THE TREE DO GROW,
IN SUMMERS PROSPEROUS STATE
MUCH LOVE DOTH SHOW,
BUT WHEN IN ADVERSITY, THEN THEY
LIKE LEAVES IN AUTUMN FALL AWAY.

From a 5 3/4 inch tall lustre pitcher with an image of a sailing ship.

Here's to the wind that blows,
And the ship that goes,
And the boy that fears no danger
A ship in full sail,
And a fine pleasant gale,
And a girl that loves a sailor.

From a 7 inch tall Masonic mug. Vendor indicated c.1820/c.1840. With two other verses.

The world is in pain
Our secrets to gain
But still let them wonder & gaze on
They ne’er can divine
The word nor the sign
Of a free & an Accepted MASON.

From an 5.5 in. pitcher. An e-Bay item in Jul. 2014.

May Orangemen true,
Their rights pursue,
Whilst honor crowns their Cause
Their Church and King,
And every Thing,
That constitute their Laws.

From a 7 inch tall Masonic mug. Vendor indicated c.1820/c.1840. With two other verses.

This is a good world to live in,
To lend or to spend or to give in.
But to beg or to borrow,
Or get a man's own;
It is such a world,
As never was known.


 

Of a total of 7 lines


The Sailor's tear
The man doomed to sail
With the blast of the gale;
Through billows atlantic to steer
As he bend o'er the wave
Which may soon be his grave
He remembers his home with a tear.

Lines 2 thru 7 of this verse essentially also appear, i.e. without the 'title' line. And therefore of 6 lines only as above. But not quite identical in the text.

From a chamber pot 6 inches high and 9 inches diameter. Had two verses on exterior and another on the inside - with a frog! Vendor says it is called a 'Thunder Mug'. From a chamber pot. Had two verses on exterior and 2 lines on the inside.

PRESENT.
Dear lovely Wife pray rise & P:'ss,
Take you that handle & I'll take this,
Let's use the Present which was sent,
To make some mirth is only meant,
So let it be as they have said,
We'll laugh and P:'ss and then to Bed.

The webmaster is just the scribe! The verse, which was on a chamber pot, has unusual punctuation that I cannot duplicate properly here.

Hail! MASONRY Divine!
Glory of ages shine,
Long may'st thou reign!
Where'er thy LODGES stand,
May they have great command,
And always grace the land,
Thou ART divine!

From a two handled butter pot with lid, 10.7 cm tall & 11.4 cm in diamter. Featuring the cast iron bridge. Vendor suggested c 1820.

THE GOOD WIFE.
Show me the wife that's on the watch
For every little rent, or scratch,
And cures it with a timely patch,
Before you know it ;
She is a women fit to match,
A Lord or Poet.

Of a total of 8 lines


Says Sylvia to a reverend priest
What reason can be given
Since marriage is a holy thing
That there is none in heaven?
There are no women he replied
She quite returned the jest
Women there are, but I'm afraid
They can not find a priest.

I envy no one's birth or fame,
Their title, train or dress,
Nor has my pride e're stretch'd its aim,
Beyond what I possess;
I ask not, wish not, to appear
more beauteous, rich or gay,
Lord make we wiser every year,
And better every day.

SWIFTLY SEE EACH MOMENT FLIES,
SEE AND LEARN BE TIMELY WISE,
EVERY MOMENT SHORTENS DAY,
EVERY PULSE BEATS LIFE AWAY,
THUS THY EVERY HEAVING BREATH,
WAFT THEE ON TO CERTAIN DEATH,
SEIZE THE MOMENTS AS THY FLY
KNOW TO LIVE AND LEARN TO DIE.

 

My lad is far upon the sea
 His absence makes me mourn
The bark that bears him far from me
I hope will safe Return
And from his earnings I'll save up
 If lucky he should be
And then when ld with me shall stop
And go no more to SEA

LET MASONRY FROM POLE TO POLE
HER SACRED LAWS EXPAND,
FAR AS THE MIGHTY WATERS ROLL,
TO WASH REMOTEST LAND:
THAT VIRTUE HAS NOT LEFT MANKIND
HER SOCIAL MAXIMS PROVE,
FOR STAMP'D UPON THE MASONS MIND
ARE UNITY AND LOVE.

Michael Gibson lists this verse entirely in
lower case and with different punctuation. I presume there is more than one version.


Distress me with those tears no more,
One Kiss my Girl and then adieu!
The last boat, destined for the shore,
Waits, dearest Girl alone for you.
Soon, soon before the light winds borne
Shall I be sever'd from your sight;
You left the lonely hours to mourn
And weep thro' many a storm'y night.


 

 

How dear to the heart of the long absent tar
Is the home of his childhood, to gaze on from far,
When the cliffs of old Tynemouth, appear to his view
And the thoughts of past joy, fill his bosom anew,
The wind it may whistle, across the wild sea,
Yet the sailor with joy, is still looking at thee,
And the billows may foam across thy wide bar
Tis the mouth of the home of the coaly Tyne, TAR.

The sun is up we'll brush the dew
To hear the huntsman's gay halloo
And hark the dog's enlivening cry
Now see the horsemen gallop by.
And now we hear the distant horn.
Upon the dying echoes borne.
From copse to copse the hunters hie
On hearing Driver's well known cry





From a chamber pot 6 inches high and 9 inches diameter. Had two verses on exterior and another on the inside - with a frog! Vendor says it is called a 'Thunder Mug'. From a chamber pot. Has two verses on exterior and two lines on the inside. The final short line is hard to understand. Means 'This' it would seem.

MARRIAGE.
This Pot it is A Present Sent,
Some mirth to make is only Meant,
We hope the same you'll not Refuse,
But keep it safe and oft it Use,
When in it you want to P:'ss,
Remember them who sent you,
THIS 

As I have said elsewhere on this page, the webmaster is just the scribe! The verse, which was on a chamber pot, has unusual punctuation that I have tried to best duplicate above. The second image is slightly different.

THERE'S A FRIGATE ON THE WATERS,
FIT FOR BATTLE, STORM, OR FUN,
SHE DANCES LIKE A LIFE BOAT,
THOUGH SHE CARRIES FLAG AND GUN,
WHAT'ER MAY TRY, SHE'LL STAND THE TEST,
THE BRAVE, THE STAUNCH THE FREE,
SHE BEARS A NAME OF STAINLESS FAME,
THE FAIRY OF THE SEA.

I have seen an e-Bay listing which states that this verse is attributed to William Ball of Ball's Pottery (or Deptford Pottery) in the 1850s.



 

Glide on, my bark; the summer’s tide
 Is gently flowing to thy side;
 Around thy prow the waters bright,
 In circling round of broken light
 Are glitt’ring, as if ocean gave
 Her countless gems to deck the wave;
 Whilst moonlight shines like mimic day ---
 Glide on, my bark, thy moonlit way.

The above verse is recorded on a Sunderland pitcher commemorating the Crimea War. And appears here thanks to Ruth Lilian, of Florida, who wrote in to the guestbook. The pitcher had two 8 line verses - the other is at right.

 

Glide on, my bark! how sweet to rove,
With such a beaming sky above,
O’er the dark sea, whose murmurs seem
Like fairy music in a dream;
No sound is heard to break the spell,
Except the water’s gentle swell;
Whilst midnight, like a mimic day,
Shines on, to guide our moonlit way.

See immediately left





Of a total of 9 lines

I have seen this long verse on the side of a chamber pot just 5 1/4 inches in diameter! But the text was clearer on the image that I show. From a porcelain bowl, 7 1/2 in. in diameter, MARKINGS ON BOTTOM INCLUDE ADAMS SUTHERLAND AND A STICKER WITH WILLOW HALL LONDON.

THE SAILORS TEAR
He leap'd into the boat;
As it lay upon the strand,
But, oh! his heart was far away,
With friends upon the land,
He thought of those he lov'd the best
A wife and infant dear,
And feeling fill'd the sailor's breast
The sailor's eye - a tear.

From an 'Ancient Order of Foresters.' bowl, with a ship. 6.6 inches wide and 3.2 inches tall. May be c.1820. Damaged. sold for GBP 9.99 or approximately U.S. $19.64 in January 2007. Item 120074545347.

FORGET ME NOT.
The sailor tossed on stormy seas
Though far his bark may roam,
Still hears a voice in every breeze
That wakens thoughts at home;
He thinks upon his distant friends
His wife, his humble cot,
And from his inmost heart ascends
The prayer forget me not.

From a pink lustre jug 4 inches tall Note

England England glorious name
Home of freedom star of fame.
Light o’er Oceon widely sent,
Empress of the element.
Gorgeous sea encircled gem.
Of the worlds bright diadem.
Nations Nations to command
Who but points admiring hand.
To thee our own our native land.

From a pink lustre jug 4 inches tall From a pink lustre mug re James Snowball 1852

REMEMBRANCE.
The sun shall lose its splendour,
The tides shall cease to flow
And tyrants' hearts grow tender,
And melt at others' woe,
Thy frosty breath December,
Shall blight the flow'r of May
Ere I cease to remember
The friends now far away.

Of a total of 11 lines

From a 7 inches tall Masonic Mug. Per vendor c.1820/c.1840.

FRIENDSHIP, LOVE AND TRUTH.
WHEN FRIENDSHIP LOVE AND TRUTH ABOUND
AMONG A BAND OF BROTHERS,
THE CUP OF JOY GOES GAILY ROUND,
EACH SHARES THE BLISS OF OTHERS
SWEET ROSES GRACE THE THORNY WAY
ALONG THIS VALE OF SORROW;
THE FLOWERS THAT SHED THEIR LEAVES TODAY
SHALL BLOOM AGAIN TOMORROW!
HOW GRAND IN AGE HOW FAIR IN YOUTH
ARE HOLY FRIENDSHIP LOVE & TRUTH.


 

Of a total of 12 lines

From a 'The Farmers Arms' purple lustre jug, 5 1/2 to 6 inches tall, which was e-Bay listed and then withdrawn.

Let the Wealthy & Great,
Roll in Splendour and State,
I envy them not I declare it ;
I eat my own Lamb,
My Chickens and Ham,
I shear my own fleece & I wear it
I have lawns I have Bow'rs
I have fruit, I have flow'rs
The lark is my morning Alarmer 
So Jolly boys now 
Heres God Speed the Plough
Long Life & Success to the farmer. 

Michael Gibson lists this verse with a different line sequence, with different punctuation and even with different spelling of certain words. I presume therefore there is more than one version.




 

May I suggest that you navigate the site via the index on page 001.PRIOR PAGE / NEXT PAGE

To Sunderland Pottery pages 172, 173 & 176.

To Thomas M. M. Hemy Data Page 41. All of the other Thomas Hemy pages, including image pages, are accessible though the index on page 05.

To the Special Pages Index.

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