THE SUNDERLAND SITE - PAGE 196

SOME EARLY LIFE-BOAT IMAGES,
MAINLY POSTCARD IMAGES

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This page was started with a single image, which caught my eye due to both its interesting subject matter & its unusual beauty. An engraving which was published, in France, in the Apl. 8, 1865 edition of 'Le Monde Illustré'.

The engraving relates to the inauguration of a life-boat service at Fleetwood, Lancashire, U.K. Now, while I do not have access to it, I gather that an article about such life-boat service was printed on the rear of the page (#220, shown at left) on which the engraving appeared & which page also included an article about a M. Thuillier.

ALDEBURGH, SUFFOLK

ATLANTIC CITY, NEW JERSEY, U.S.A.

The following image would seem to have been used in many U.S. cities. It may well be of the lifeboat at Rockaway Beach, Long Island, New York.

BRIDLINGTON, YORKSHIRE

FLEETWOOD, LANCASHIRE

Images additional to that which started this page off. At the top of this page - here.

LE HAVRE, FRANCE

PADSTOW, CORNWALL

PLYMOUTH, DEVON

SCARBOROUGH, YORKSHIRE

On Nov. 2, 1861, a massive storm, likely a hurricane, hit the north east of England. One of the casualties of the storm was Coupland, a North Shields schooner manned by a 6 man crew, en route from Aberdeen, Scotland, to London, with a cargo of granite blocks. Coupland tried to enter the port of Scarborough, but was driven onto jagged rocks bear the Spa, & ended up a total wreck. Fortunately its crew were all rescued from the raging seas by rocket apparatus.
Now in 1861 the Royal National Lifeboat Institution ('RNLI') had taken over the Scarborough life-boat station. And five weeks prior to Nov. 2, 1861, the life-boat station had taken delivery of its first RNLI lifeboat, the 32 ft. long, ten-oared, self-righting Amelia. On its maiden voyage no less, Amelia went to the rescue of the Coupland crew, with disastrous results. Amelia, the rescuer, was dashed against the sea wall, ended up destroyed & two of its crew members were killed. That was not all. Bystanders tried to help rescue the remaining lifeboat's crew members & in so doing three of them lost their lives also - Lord Charles Beauclerk, William Tindall & John Iles.
The scene was painted by a number of artists, including the postcard image first below of a painting by prolific artist Elmer Keene (another Elmer Keene lifeboat related postcard). And the second image below of a work, I believe by Alfred M. Willis. Eight Board of Trade Medals for Gallantry in Saving Life at Sea were awarded re these total events, while the RNLI awarded six of its medals & made monetary grants.
So far I have not spotted any references to where Coupland was built, how big it was, who owned it or who captained it.
There are a great many WWW sites which tell the story & show the paintings. I particularly commend this succinct page by Dix Noonan Webb Ltd. ('DNW'), auctioneers, of Mayfair Street, London - re the sale of the silver Sea Gallantry Medal that posthumously was awarded back in 1861 to Mr. William Tindall.

TEIGNMOUTH, DEVON

YARMOUTH, NORFOLK

The first image below is courtesy of the Science Museum. A 1:16 model of the Lowestoft clinker built life-boat designed by William Teasdel (1845-1855). Click the image to go to their webpage.

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