THE SUNDERLAND SITE - PAGE 058
SHIPBUILDERS - PAGE 16

May I suggest that you navigate the site via the index on page 001.PRIOR PAGE / NEXT PAGE

On this page ... Ferguson, Forrest & Co., George Frater, Fryer, Gales, Gardner, Gibbon & Nichol, Gibson, P., John Gill, William Gray, Hodgson & Gardner, page bottom (Mount Vesuvius).

Copyright? (1 + 3 + 26 + 41 + 3 + 1 + 4 + 4 + 1 + 3 + 14  = 101) Test.

Miramar, images, mariners-l.co.uk, MNL,

Do you want to make a comment? A site guestbook is here.

To search for specific text on this page, just press 'CTRL + F' & then enter your search term. A general site search facility is here.

Corrections in any of the material which follows, however tiny, would be most welcome. And additions, of course!

HENRY FERGUSON

OF SOUTHWICK

I really know nothing about 'Henry Ferguson' of Southwick, who was apparently a shipbuilder in 1840. All I know is what I have seen, i.e. an eBay item in Apl. 2011 where Henry Sidey, son of James Sidey, a Berwick upon Tweed cabinet maker, was apprenticed, in 1840, to Henry Ferguson of Southwick in the County of Durham, Ship Builder, to learn the art of ship building. With a fine image of the document itself (below).

Can you tell us more about 'Ferguson', perhaps exactly where they were located, & for how long they were in business. The eBay item, which was offered by 'friend of the site' Stephen Murray, i.e. vendor 'atlantic-fox', sold for GBP 31.00.

Ferguson may have been in business for a short time only. I say that because there is no reference to him in the 1848/49 edition of 'North of England Maritime Directory, Shipping Register and Commercial Advertiser' (available via 'Google Books'), which contains an extensive list of Sunderland shipbuilders. The only reference that just may 'fit', is here, but with no words that described his occupation.

I have now seen a list of Sunderland built vessels which includes just 5 vessel built by 'H. Ferguson' during the period from 1840 thru 1848.

1

  John & Ann
209/189, later 198, 182 & 198 tons

2841
1840

A snow or brig. John & Ann is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1840/41 thru 1850/51, & not thereafter. It was owned, thru 1847/48 per LR, by J. Ray of Sunderland for service from Sunderland to London. With 'Dobinson' serving as the vessel's captain.
In 1848/49, per LR, C. Morgan of Sunderland became the vessel's owner for continued service from Sunderland to London, with 'Baxter' as her new captain. Even though John & Ann is not LR listed after 1850/51, the 'Morgan' ownership is well documented. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/49 lists C. & J. Morgan of Sunderland as the vessel's owner in Apl. 1848. As do Turnbull's Shipping Registers of both 1855 & 1856, the 1855 version listing Wm. Cole as her captain. The 1854 edition of the North of England Maritime Directory clarifies the owner name to mean Charlton & John Morgan, of Sunderland, with Wm. Cole her then captain. Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 also lists such owner names.
Certainly from 1856 the vessel is listed at 182 tons. The vessel would seem to have been still registered at Sunderland thru 1861, now at 198 tons. From 1861 it was registered at Whitby, Yorkshire, with, per the Mercantile Navy Lists of 1865 thru 1868, George Wright of York as her new owner. This page (in blue) rather states Geo. Wright & Jn. Leadley.
Signal letters HQTJ.
John & Ann was lost in early 1869, on the beach at Lowestoft, Suffolk, per this page (in blue). This contemporary news report tells us that the vessel, which had arrived from Hartlepool, was driven ashore at the back of the North-pier, at Lowestoft, on Mar. 29, 1869. Further that her crew were all rescued. Is there anything you can add? #2464

FORREST & Co., of Hylton.

Can you help with the history of this shipbuilder. Who, so far as I can see, built 26 vessels during the period of 1847 thru 1856. Possibly at Quarry Hole, North Hylton.

A Sunderland shipping website, which site requests no links or recognition, refers, however, to 'Forrest & Jackson', of South Hylton & to the Low Ford building yard..

1

  Kezia
205 later 184 tons

3407
1847

A snow or brig. Kezia, which was launched in Sep. 1847, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1848/49 thru 1863/64.
The vessel was, per LR, owned thru 1852/53 by J. Hay of Sunderland, for service from Sunderland to London with, it would seem, 'Croft' & 'Simm' her captains. LR is confusing as to when they both served but 'Simm' would seem to have so served from 1850/51 & maybe earlier than that date. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9, records, in Apl. 1848 data, J. Hay of Bishopwearmouth, Sunderland, as the vessel's then owner.
In 1853/54 & 1854/55, per LR, Kezia was both owned & captained by G. Foster of Sunderland. For service from Dublin, Ireland, to Southampton. Such ownership (Geo. Foster) is confirmed, in Mar. 1854 data, by the North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5. With Chas. Campbell, however, her then captain.
From 1855/56, per LR, Kezia was Whitby registered, owned by Steel & Co. of Whitby, with W. Steel noted to have been the vessel's captain. For consistent service thru 1863/64 from Whitby to the Baltic. The vessel's ownership is recorded in Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 as being William Steel & Matthew Storm, both of Robin Hood's Bay, Whitby.
The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') tells us that Kezia was first registered at Whitby on Mar. 31, 1855 & was registered there thru 1866. Owned in 1865 & 1866 by W. Steel of Robin Hood's Bay, Whitby.
In 1908, a fine Whitby shipping history book was published, written by Richard Weatherill (a 'Google' book). Such volume confirms that the vessel was first registered at Whitby in 1855, & was then owned by Will Steel and Matt. Storm.
84.0 ft. long, some crew lists are available via this page.
What finally happened to Kezia? The Whitby history volume referred to above tells us that the vessel was lost at Burntisland in Jan. 1866. A slight error in that date, apparently. I learn that at about 2 p.m. on Dec. 29, 1865, the vessel, then en route from London to Burntisland, Fife, Scotland, was approaching the harbour at Burntisland when it was hit by a squall that threw her against the west breakwater. The vessel ended up on nearby rocks, exposed to the heavy weather, & soon became a total wreck. With her masts gone, the scene a mass of broken timber. The captain (Steel), a pilot & 6 hands were with difficulty all saved - thanks particularly to the efforts of some local fisherman. On Jan. 05, 1866, the hull & stores, still in the water it would seem, were offered for sale at public auction. Kezia was noted to then be owned by the captain's brothers. A contemporary news report.
Can you tell us more? Or correct anything? #2755

2

  Sultan
247 later 225/230 tons

11573
1850

A snow or brig. The available data re this vessel is on occasion both confusing & contradictory.
Sultan, which was launched on Sep. 05, 1850, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1851/52 thru 1880/81. A Lloyd's Survey document re the vessel while in course of construction. Owned thru 1855/56, per LR, by W. Burdes of Sunderland for service from Sunderland to the Mediterranean. With T. (Thomas) McKenzie LR reported as being the vessel's captain. A Sunderland shipping website, which site requests no links or recognition, tells us that the vessel's first owners were rather J. & W. Hay & W. & E. Burdes, both of Sunderland & that the vessel had been built by 'Forrest & Jackson'.
It would seem that Sultan was first registered at Shields on Jul. 06, 1852 (scroll to #11573). The North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5, in 1854 data, records the vessel as Shields registered, owned by Gilbert Ward of Blyth, Northumberland, with Henry Shadforth her captain. Turnbull's Shipping Registers ('TR') of both 1855 & 1856 record the vessel as registered at Shields with G. Ward of Blyth, its owner. TR of 1855 records H. Shadforth as the vessel's then captain. While Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 lists the Shields registered vessel as owned by Gilbert Ward & Henry Shadforth, both of Blyth. LRs of 1856/57 thru 1859/60 record 'Shadforth' as the vessel's captain.
LRs, from 1856/57, however record Sultan, now of 222 tons, not as owned by 'Ward' but rather by Watts & Co. of Blyth. Could 'Ward' & 'Watts' have both been shareholders in the vessel? The webmaster cannot answer that question. But, per LR, Watts & Co. & related entities owned the vessel thru to 1880/81, i.e. Watts & Co. thru 1874/75, Watts, Milburn & Co. of North Shields in 1876/77 & Watts, Milburn & Co. of London from 1877/78 thru 1880/81. LRs from 1877/78 record the vessel as of 225/230 tons.
The vessel's captains, per LR, while 'Watts' owned? 'Shadforth' from 1856/57 thru 1859/60, 'Manners' in 1860/61 & part of 1861/62, T. Watts from 1861/62 thru part way thru 1866/67 & J. Manners (her previous captain?) from 1866/67 thru 1880/81.
The Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') record Sultan as Shields registered from 1857 thru 1871, North Shields registered from 1872 thru 1876 & London registered from 1877. Owned from 1865 to 1881 by E. H. Watts, jun. - of Blyth thru 1875 (1870) & of London from 1876. Such owner name is clarified by MNLs of 1876 to 1881 (1880) to mean Edmd. Hannay Watts.
Under 'Watts' ownership the vessel, per LR, served the Mediterranean ex Blyth thru 1859/60, served ex London in 1860/61, served the Baltic ex Blyth from 1861/62 thru 1866/67, served the Baltic ex Leith, Scotland, in 1867/68 & 1868/69, and served the Baltic ex Blyth again from 1869/70 thru 1872/73. It served as a London coaster in 1873/74.
The vessel, per LR, became of 223 tons in 1875/76 & of 225/230 tons in 1877/78.
There are a great many newspaper references to Sultan with 'Manners' in command. Trading to many Baltic ports - such as Cronstadt, Wyborg (both Russia), & Libau & Windau (both Latvia). Returning to Blyth or to London, on occasion to Dundee & other U.K. ports. Voyages to Archangel, Russia also. In late Nov. 1873, it was reported that Sultan, with a cargo of coal & en route from Blyth to Woolwich (S. bank of River Thames, London), had been run into, in the river Thames, by Primus, a steamship. The report states that Sultan had in fact been cut in half & was sitting in the mud! This Lloyd's Survey document relates to her later repair, at London, thru Feb. 13, 1874. Primus was, I believe, also Sunderland built - by 'Laing' in 1865 - O.N. #45740. From Pauillac (near Bordeaux, France) to Newport, Wales, in 1875. On Aug. 14, 1880, en route from Rotterdam to Blyth in ballast, the vessel was in collision with Rainbow, a General Steam Navigation Company steamship. Rainbow apparently suffered no damage. In 1880, the vessel traded on a few occasions from Lisbon, Portugal, to Vlaardingen (essentially Rotterdam), with cargoes of salt.  
98.0 ft. long, signal letters KTFM, a great many crew lists are available via this page.
What finally happened to Sultan? LR of 1880/81 notes that the vessel had been 'Lost'. I learn that on Nov. 25, 1880, while en route from Lisbon to Vlaardingen with a cargo of salt, the vessel, James Manners in command, was driven ashore & wrecked at Brouwershaven, Zeeland, Netherlands. Her crew were all rescued. A couple of contemporary news reports - 1 & 2. The webmaster has not read the detailed circumstances that resulted in her loss.
Can you tell us anything additional? Or correct the above text in any way? #2775

3

  Emigrant
370/405 tons

2545
1852

A barque. The vessel was first listed upon receiving a guestbook message (thanks!) from Jo Cockwill, of Australia.
Emigrant, which was launched on Aug. 20, 1852, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1853/54 thru 1857/58 only, initially registered in the name of 'Denniston' of Sunderland, intended for use in trade with Australia. With R. Williams LR noted to be her captain thru 1856/57.
Some 'best-efforts' Australian operational data re Emigrant, mainly thanks to 'Trove, Australia'. i) Emigrant left Sunderland on Sep. 11, 1852 for Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, with R. (Richard) Williams in command with a general cargo that included 31,200 bricks, two cabin passengers & 144 passengers in steerage. The vessel arrived at Melbourne on Jan. 03, 1853. The vessel was then advertised for departure to London, then to Mauritius & then to London again. It finally left for London, on Apl. 19 or 21, 1853, with 7 cabin passenger & 68 in steerage, with a cargo that included 265 bales of wool & some gold dust. This article relates to her earlier departure from Sunderland - such article was published in many U.K. newspapers in Sep. 1852. It would seem that a passenger list for such voyage used to WWW exist, but two links to such data no longer work. ii) On Apl. 25, 1854, Emigrant arrived at Geelong (near Melbourne) with a varied cargo & with 'J. Sideall' reported to be in command - 123 days out, the vessel having left London on Dec. 23, 1854. On Jun. 04, 1854 the vessel left Geelong for Callao, Peru, in ballast & with no passengers. iii) On Jun. 20, 1856, the vessel left Gothenburg, Sweden, for Melbourne, where it arrived on Oct. 16, 1856 - J. W. Sedcole noted to be her captain. In late Oct. 1856 it advertised (Sedcole) for a charter to 'a port in the east'. But, after a false start on Nov. 29, 1856, it left Melbourne for Port Robe or Robe Town, South Australia, on Dec. 02, 1856. I have not spotted her later departure from 'Robe' but I presume she soon left for London. 'Emigrant' is a most difficult search term indeed!
The North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5, in Mar. 1854 data, records John Denniston of Sunderland as the vessel's owner, with Jas. W. Sedcole her captain. Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1855 records John Denniston & Hen. Rounthwaite, both of Sunderland, as Emigrant's then owners with J. W. Sedcole her then captain. While LR of 1857/58 records 'Rounthwte' as her new owner, with 'Sidcole' (with an 'i') her captain. For trade ex London. Per TR of 1856, her owners were H. Rounthwaite & S. Mills, also of Sunderland.
The vessel is not recorded in Lloyd's Register of 1858/59, having been lost (at page bottom) under circumstances which have now come to hand. The webmaster has now learned that on Aug. 12, 1857 Emigrant was entered outwards at London for Madras (now Chennai, India) with 'Sedcole' noted to be her captain. In a report from Mauritius on Dec. 07, 1857, Emigrant, Watson in command, was stated to have foundered at sea on Nov. 27, 1857 with her crew all saved. 'Lloyd's List' on Jan. 28, 1828 corrected that data. It tells us that 'Sidcole' was rather the captain of the lost vessel, which had founderd at 33S/57E, which is in the Indian Ocean about 1,700 miles E. of the coast of South Africa & about 1,000 miles SE of the southern tip of Madagascar. The webmaster has not read about the related weather circumstances.
Is there anything you can add or correct? #2714

GEORGE FRATER
GEORGE FRATER AND CO.
KIRKBRIDE, CARRUTHERS

OF AYRES QUAY, SUNDERLAND

Reuben Charlton, in a guestbook message in late Jul. 2011, refers to George Frater & his partners having built ships at Ayres Quay. The firm was in business, apparently, for about a decade, from 1830 to 1841 when the firm went bankrupt. Reuben indicates that George Frater was his great great grandfather & that the James W. Corder Manuscripts contain detail about a number of the ships that the firm built.

'George Frater & Co.' would seem to have built about 7,200 tons of ship construction, which would seem to have comprised 26 ships.

Reuben has now kindly provided, via an e-mail message, some typed extracts of the 'George Frater and Co. - Ayres Quay' pages of the Corder Manuscripts. The extracts list 17 vessels 'from the Custom House Records' & there may well be additional vessels not 'Corder' listed. Reuben has also provided additional biographical data & data about the bankruptcy of 'George Frater & Co', on April 7, 1841. From such data & from other sources, the following would seem to summarize what the webmaster understands to be the history:-

In 1824, George Frater, with I am advised 7 partners, were building ships at Ayres Quay. George was likely a junior partner since the firm would seem to have been known as 'Kirkbride, Carruthers'. His partners would have included Kirkbride, Ralph Todd, John Marrington & presumably also Carruthers. In 1830, that 1824 partnership came to an end, & three of the partners continued to build ships at Ayres Quay, namely George Frater, Ralph Todd, & John Marrington, in business, it would appear, as 'George Frater and Co.' In 1838 Ralph Todd left the partnership. The remaining partners, i.e. George Frater & John Marrington, carried on the business. There was a slump, Reuben advises, in 1840 & on Apl. 7, 1841 'Frater and Company' went bankrupt. As you can read here.

Reuben adds that George Frater married Christiana Todd, a daughter of Ralph Todd. The Ralph Todd in the partnership may accordingly have been Frater's father-in-law or brother-in-law. John Marrington, (search for 'Marrington' - the prior link no longer works!) it would seem, was born in 1792, & was initially a keelman. He married Elizabeth Donnison & in the Sunderland Holy Trinity parish registers in 1844, at the time of the baptism of a son, he is stated to be a river pilot. His new career, it would seem, after the 1841 bankruptcy. In the 1851 census he was stated to be a Trinity House pensioner, at age 59.

The ships built by George Frater & Co.? Note that re many of the ships, I have both amended & expanded the Corder data (sorry Mr. Corder!) from a number of sources, one of which lists 26 vessels built by G. Frater over the period of 1831 thru 1841.

Vessels by year of build:- 1831, Eleanor, 1832 Manico, 1833 Comet, Lord Stormont, Witton Castle, 1834 Ethelbert, George Marsden, Vigilant, 1835 Duchess of Kent, Prince George, Princess Victoria, 1836 Leadbitter, Sarah Nicholson, 1837 Messenger, 1838 England, Rainbow, Robert Henry Allan, 1839 Atkinson, Iodine, Lady Williamson, Thomas Rowell, 1840 Commercial, Eleanor, Minstrel, 1841 Majestic - i.e. 25 vessels.

I have not included Frances, built in 1832. Possibly another vessel built by 'Frater'. So far at least, the webmaster has not found any references whatsoever to such a vessel actually existing.

1

  Eleanor
215 tons
1831

A snow or brig. The vessel, which was launched in Aug. 1831, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1832 thru 1841/42 only. LRs of 1832 & 1833 record 'Ledbetter' (with an 'e') as being Eleanor's then owner & R. Ledbetter (again with an 'e') as her then captain. For service as a Plymouth, Devon, coaster in 1832 & as a Topsham, Devon, coaster in 1833. LRs of 1834 thru 1840/41 list Ledbitter (now with an 'i') as her owner & 'Ledbitter' as her captain. 'Corder' gratefully comes to our rescue. He notes, in his data re George Frater and Co., that Robert Leadbetter was the vessel's initial owner (& presumably also her captain), per the then Custom House Records. Her service from 1834 thru 1841/42 is LR noted to have been from Sunderland to London, doubtless in service as a collier.
Now LR of 1841/42 lists the vessel but records no owner name or captain's name. That would normally mean that the vessel had been either lost or sold. It would seem, per 'Corder' again, that in 1840 Robert Leadbetter acquired a second vessel of the name, also built (1840) by 'Frater'. The second one was a little larger, at 269/254 tons, & was, I read, launched on Jul. 18, 1840.
What happened to 'our' Eleanor? The webmaster, so far at least, does not know what happened to Eleanor nor when. It seems likely however, that it was lost in some way in 1839 or in early 1840. I say that since the 'new' Eleanor that Leadbetter acquired was launched on Jul. 18, 1840. There is one incident that possibly may relate. I emphasise the word 'possibly'. Wikipedia advises (thanks!) that, on Jul. 30, 1839, a vessel of the name ran aground on Gar Sand (maybe Gare Sand) located near the (north side) mouth of the river Tees. She apparently floated off but was then driven ashore at the nearby Seaton Snook. The vessel was, I read, en route to Seaton Sluice, (located a few miles further up the coast), from Quebec City, Canada, was re-floated on Aug. 3, 1839 & taken into Stockton-on-Tees. All well and good but help is surely needed to establish with certainty what happened to 'our' Eleanor. Perhaps with contemporary newspaper records from Sunderland or Newcastle. Any additional info. you can provide would be most welcome. #2376

2

  Manico
237 tons
1832

A snow. Manico, launched in Aug. 1832 is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1834 thru 1837/38 only. A very short life, indeed. It was owned, per LR of 1834, by H. Punton of Sunderland for service from Sunderland to Newfoundland, with H. Punton serving as her captain. I should note, however, that 'Corder', in his data re George Frater & Co., had difficulty in reading the vessel's name in the local registers but listed the initial owner of what clearly was Manico as being Hugh Paulton.
LR of 1834 in fact lists two owner names. The second, i.e. her new owner, is Chapman of Newcastle. With 'Wright' serving as the vessel's captain - for continued service from Sunderland to Newfoundland. W. Chapman was, I read, a Newcastle banker.
LR of 1837/38 notes that the vessel had been 'Lost'. I learn that on May 20, 1837, Manico left North Shields for London, Richard Wright in command, with a cargo of more than 300 tons of coal. On May 22, 1837, the vessel was spotted adrift in gale conditions off Cley or Clay (north Norfolk coast, east of The Wash), it being believed that she had struck the outer sands very early that morning. Also on May 22, 1837, what clearly was the vessel's longboat came ashore at nearby Blakeney, as did the body of a totally naked woman - I presume the captain's wife. The bodies of 5 crew members were seen in the water at Blakeney but could not, in the conditions, be recovered. Later that same day, the vessel came ashore at Brancaster, nobody aboard of course, with her rudder lost & with 15 inches of water in her cabin. I note that Brancaster is about 15 miles to the west of either Cley/Clay or Blakeney. Manico's crew all had perished - her 'unfortunate crew met a watery grave'. Most of the vessel's rigging & stores were soon recovered but she lay in a dangerous position & it was feared that she would become a wreck. She clearly remained in situ for a number of days & did become a wreck. The owner gave instructions that the wreck & its material be disposed of. But before that could happen, the Vice-Admiral of the County of Norfolk, considering the vessel to be a derelict, took over control to ensure that the local boatmen who had landed her rigging etc. received their due - one third of the amounts recovered from the sale of the wreck & its cargo etc. Greater detail about much of the above can be read here. Is there anything you can add? And/or correct? #2375

3

  Comet
214 tons
1833

A snow. The vessel, which was launched in Oct. 1833, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1834 thru 1851/52 only. Per LR it was owned, thru 1840/41, by Scurfield & Co. of Sunderland for consistent service from Sunderland to Hamburg, Germany. With 'Lambton' always serving as the vessel's captain. I understand that 'Corder' is his vessel data re 'George Frater & Co.' rather records the name 'R. Beenfield' as being her initial owner.
In 1840/41, Comet, per LR, became owned by 'Brereton' of Blakeny (surely means Blakeney, Norfolk). For service thru 1842/43 from Newcastle to Stettin (then Prussia, now Szczecin, Poland), from 1843/44 thru 1845/46 from Stockton-on-Tees to Limerick, Ireland, then ex London for two years & ex Liverpool for three. No routing data is provided in LR of 1851/52 which suggests that the vessel had then either been sold, or maybe had been lost. During the entire period of 'Brereton' ownership, the vessel had, per LR, but a single captain - W. Nurse.
It would seem that the vessel was lost in or about 1851 or 1852. I learn that on Dec. 12, 1852, a vessel named Comet left London for Bristol - 'and has not since been heard from' - per the London Morning Chronicle of Feb. 19, 1853. Was it 'our' Comet that went missing? The reference does not include any data which would determine which vessel named Comet was lost, and there were many at the time. Even the U.K. Government had little data about the vessel that was lost. So, absent identifying data, I cannot today answer my question with any certainty. But from the total LR data of a sequence of years, it seems likely that it was 'our' Comet. Can you tell us more? #2371

4

  Lord Stormont
265 tons
1833

A snow. The vessel was launched on Jan. 21, 1833, as per this contemporary newspaper cutting. The vessel was there stated to be a brigantine for 'Noble of Hebburn Office, & partners'. Lloyd's Register which lists the vessel in 1834 & 1835/36 only, records J. Noble as the Newcastle registered vessel's initial captain but lists 'Greenwel', presumably Greenwell, as her owner. For service ex Liverpool. 'McDougall' replaced 'Noble' as the vessel's captain from 1834.
It would seem that the vessel had a very short life. I did not know what happened to the vessel. But David Watts has now advised (thanks!) that Lord Stormont was wrecked on the NW coast of Langley Island, Newfoundland, on Jul. 4, 1835. All of her crew were saved. She may well have been then under the command of Capt. George McDougall. Can you add anything additional? #2360

5

  Witton Castle
270 tons

2018
1833

A snow or brig. Witton Castle? The most likely is a 15th century castle (1 & 2), ex manor house, located near Bishop Auckland, County Durham. The vessel named Witton Castle is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1834 thru 1880/81 with the exception of 1847/48. In those many years, LR always listed the vessel as being built at South Shields. A consistently repeated error, the webmaster believes. I should note i) that a list of Sunderland built vessels, available to the webmaster, lists Wilton Castle of 270 tons built by G. Frater in 1833 (which should, the webmaster believes, have rather read Witton Castle). ii) There are numerous references to the vessel being built at Ayre's Quay. George Frater's shipyard was located at Ayre's Quay, Sunderland, & iii) there is no Ayre's Quay in South Shields.
Read on & access the provided links. And see if you agree with my conclusions.
The vessel was initially owned, per LR, by Baker & Co. of London, for service from London to Jamaica thru 1840/41 & from Shields to London in 1841/42. With G. H. Baun, per LR, her initial captain, 'Canny' her captain from 1835/36 thru 1841/42 & W. Hewson from 1841/42 thru 1842/43 when the vessel was sold. 'Canny' surely should correctly read 'Canney'. On Aug. 21, 1837, I read (1 & 2), Witton Castle encountered a tremendous gale, a hurricane perhaps, while en route from Jamaica to London, 'Canney' in command. She losts all of her sails (& much more besides) during the event & was on shore, under bare poles, for a couple of hours. Where did all of this happen & where was she on shore? That is at present a puzzle. The reference provided is 40N/70W which is off the coast of Long Island, New York - to a 'landlubber' an unlikely place for a vessel bound from Jamaica to Dover to have been. A study of the volume at the link might clarify the matter. In 1842, with Hewson in command, the vessel made a return voyage from London to Montreal, Canada.
A. Ritchie, also of London, became the vessel's owner in 1842/43 - thru 1846/47 - for continued service from Shields to London thru 1843/44, & ex London therafter. With T. Robson her captain thru 1844/45 & 'Butchart' from 1844/45 thru 1846/47. On May 23, 1843, I read, the vessel left London for Saguenay, N. bank of the St. Lawrence River, Canada, with Butchart in command.
LR records S. Skee, of South Shields as the vessel's owner from 1846/47 thru 1854/55. For service ex Shields to Bremen, Germany, in 1851/52 & 1852/53, & to London in most of the other years. With, per LR, J. Storey the vessel's captain thru 1851/52 & W. Harrison from 1852/53 thru 1854/55. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/49 lists the Newcastle registered vessel as owned by S. Skee & Co. of South Shields in Jul. 1848. The equivalent 1854 directory lists Shepherd Skee & Isabella Scott, both of South Shields, as her then owners & Gideon Henry her then captain.
From 1855/56 to 1861/62, per LR, Witton Castle was owned by J. Wawn of South Shields, for service from Shields to the Mediterranean in 1855/56 & 1856/57 but ex Hull in 1858/59. With W. Scott her captain from 1855/56 thru 1860/61 & J. Curry in a portion of 1861/62. I note, however, that Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1855 lists R. Mole as then her captain. TR of 1856 lists J. T. Wawn of West Boldon & J. H. Wawn of Gravesend, London, as her then owners. While Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 lists John T. Wawn of West Boldon & George H. Wawn, of Gravesend as owners of the vessel, incorrectly listed as Wilton Castle. LR listed the vessel at 265 tons only from 1859/60 thru 1876/77.
In 1861/62, per LR, A. Jamieson of South Shields became her captain & owner, her final captain & owner it would appear. Per Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') of 1865 thru 1869 A. Jamieson, but Andrew Jamieson per MNLs of 1870 thru 1880. TR of 1874 lists the South Shields registered brig at 265 tons. For service from Shields i) to the Baltic thru 1864/65 & ii) to the Mediterranean in 1865 & 1866. Thereafter, thru 1873/74 (when recording such data came to an end), the vessel served ex the Clyde, incl. to the Mediterranean from 1868/69 thru 1873/74.
Wikipedia advises (thanks!) that on Jan. 31, 1866, the brig was driven ashore at Bridlington, Yorkshire, while en route from London to Shields. She was re-floated & resumed her voyage.
91.5 ft. long, signal letters HMKN. Many crew lists are available here.
LR of 1880/81 notes that the vessel had been 'Wrecked'. The webmaster, has not, so far at least, learned what happened to her nor when. Can you tell us what did happen to her? #2390

6

  Ethelbert
264 tons
1834

A snow or brig. The vessel, which is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1834 thru 1846/47, was initially owned, thru 1835/36, per LR, by 'T&RBwn' of Newcastle - T. & R. Brown, perhaps? For service from Sunderland to London with J. Dixon serving as the vessel's captain. LR of 1836/37 records J. Bentley, of London, as Ethelbert's new & it would seem her last owner. Her service under Bentley ownership? LR data is minimal. From Belfast to Quebec, Canada, was briefly LR noted in 1836/37, but mainly just service ex London, with service from Sunderland to London noted in LRs of 1845/46 & 1846/47. With 'Campbell' her captain from 1836/37 thru 1841/42 & then C. Moore from 1841/42 thru 1846/47.
LR of 1846/47 notes that the vessel had been 'Lost'. It would appear that on or about Jan. 14, 1847, per 'Welsh Newspapers Online', the vessel arrived at Llanelly, Wales, from Bridgewater, which means, I think, Bridgwater, Somerset, with Corrish in command. On Jan. 19, 1847, Ethelbert, en route for London, 'got on the sand bank' in the river there & became a wreck. Joseph Cowart may rather have been her master at the time of her loss - he & 2 others filed a report with Lloyd's re her loss. It would seem that Llanelly, now Llanelli, on the Loughor river, is located about 10 1/2 miles NW of Swansea, Wales, & was noted at the time for the manufacture of tin-plate - & also for the shipment of both copper & coal. Can you add anything additional? #2362

7

  George Marsden
277 later 300 tons

4629
1834

A barque, later a brig. The vessel was launched on Aug. 4, 1834 per this newspaper cutting (in red). The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1834 thru 1861/62 & not thereafter. It was initially owned, thru 1841/42, by H. Panton of Sunderland for consistent service from Sunderland to Quebec, Canada, thru 1839/40 & in 1840/41 & 1841/42 for service from London to Quebec. With, per LR, J. Eilley serving as the vessel's captain thru 1840/41 & 'Powdrell' in 1840/41 & 1841/42. This page notes that the vessel arrived at Quebec on Jul. 5, 1841 ex Rye, Sussex, (left May 7), with 227 passengers but maybe rather with 213 passengers, 14 having died on the 59 day passage.
In 1841/42, the vessel, now a brig, became, per LR, owned by P. Dannut of Hull, Yorkshire. Always for service ex Hull, in 1848/49 & 1849/50 to New York & thereafter to the Baltic, thru 1853/54 at least. With, per LR, a number of captains - 'Somrscals' (Somerscales?) thru 1845/46, 'Scott' in 1845/46 & 1846/47, W. Scott from 1847/48 thru 1849/50, T. Smith in 1851/52 & G. Smith from 1852/53 thru 1854/55. 'Picket' would seem to have been the vessel's captain in the spring of 1845. Wikipedia tells us (thanks) that on Jan. 7, 1847, while en route from St. Stephen, New Brunswick, Canada (now), to Hull, the vessel ran aground on the Goodwin Sands off the Kentish coast, but was re-floated & taken into The Downs.
LR of 1854/55 provides limited detail which suggests that the vessel may have been sold. LR of 1855/56 advises that T. Morley, also of Hull, had become the vessel's new owner (thru 1860/61) for continued service ex Hull, later, in 1857/58 & 1858/59, for service from Hull to the Baltic. Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 clarifies such owner name as meaning Thomas William Morley, of Hull.
In 1861/62, LR states that Boutel & Co. of London was the next, but it would seem not the last, owner of the brig, now of 300 tons - for service from Ramsgate to New York. LR of 1861/62 also notes that the vessel had 'Foundered'.
On Jan. 10, 1862, per line 2051 here, the 301 ton square is stated to have been abandoned at sea. No detail is there provided as to exactly where it was lost nor the vessel's routing. Crew of 11 - none lost. Then stated to be owned by E. J. Hayward - a name not LR referenced. This article, however, advises us that the vessel was en route from New York to Queenstown, Ireland, (likely for orders) with a cargo of grain. Lost in a major storm or hurricane in the North Atlantic, it would seem. No crew lists seem to be available. Can you add anything additional? #2366

8

  Vigilant
297 tons
1834

A snow or brig. The vessel, which was launched in Mar. 1834, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1834 thru 1855/56. It was, per LR, initially owned, thru 1837/38, by Hunter & Co. of Sunderland - however I should reference that 'Corder' in his notes re George Frater & Co. refers, I am advised, to Hunter Elliot, & lists the vessel at 273 tons only. For service from Liverpool to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, but LR references the vessel maybe sailing from Sunderland to Quebec, Canada, in 1834. 'Patterson' is LR reported to have been the vessel's captain during such short ownership period.
In 1838/39, per LR, C. Walton, of London, became Vigilant's owner, thru 1852/53, With 'Walton' serving as the vessel's captain thru 1840/41, G. Clark from 1840/41 thru 1845/46, J. Locke from 1845/46 thru 1849/50, 'Conway' in 1850/51 & 1851/52 & 'Purchase' in 1852/53. For, where LR indicated, some quite varied service. From London generally but specifically from London to i) Calcutta (now Kolkata), India, in 1838/39 & 1839/40, ii) St. Vincent (St. Vincent & the Grenadines, Caribbean) in 1846/47 & 1847/48, iii) Valparaiso, Chile, in 1848/49, iv) Halifax, Canada, in 1852/53. Service from Newport, Wales, to the West Indies is also LR noted in 1845/46.
In 1853/54, per LR, the vessel became owned by Jeacock & Co., of London, with 'Wilson' her captain, for service from London to Halifax in 1852/53.
While the vessel is LR listed in both 1854/55 & 1855/56, only minimal data is provided. I note, however that the vessel was not issued an Official Number which means that the vessel did not exist on Jan. 1, 1855, or perhaps was then no longer British owned. It would seem that the vessel may have been lost. Now the webmaster's role is to provide such information as he has found (or not found) & try not to speculate. He advises therefore that an extensive list of vessel wrecks & casualties in calendar 1854 was published by the British Admiralty. Available via here. Such list, a great many pages long, includes 83 vessels lost on British shores just on Jan. 4, 1854. But such list does not include Vigilant either then or later in the list, so far as I can see. I reference Jan. 4, 1854 for a reason. Wikipedia advises (thanks!, scroll down the list), as per a report in the 'Hull Packet and East Riding Times' of Jan. 27, 1854, that a vessel named Vigilant foundered off Cromer, Norfolk, on Jan. 4, 1854 with the loss of all hands. Was it 'our' Vigilant? Further data is needed to clarify the matter. Can you add anything to this discussion? #2374

9

  Duchess of Kent
342 tons
1835

A barque. The vessel, which was completed in Jan. 1835, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1835/36 thru 1850/51. It was owned, thru 1837/38, per LR, by 'White' of Sunderland for service from Sunderland to London. I earlier, in this spot, referenced Andrew White. In 1838/39, the vessel, per LR, became owned by J. Hoskin of London, which name was later LR recorded, from 1839/40 thru 1842/43, as J. Hosking. In 1838/39, 'Hoskin' (with no letter 'g') is LR stated to be the vessel's captain, & from 1839/40 thru 1843/44 rather R. Newby. For service ex London & especially, in 1838/39 & in the 1841/43 period for service from London to Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Some detail re the Duchess of Kent's voyages to Australia:- i) On Aug. 4, 1837, the vessel left London for Sydney, via Cape of Good Hope ('CGH'), South Africa, under the command of Captain R. H. Newby, with a general cargo & about 31 passengers, many of whom were immigrants. On Apl. 8, 1838 it left for London with wool & oil & arrived at Gravesend, London, on Aug. 23, 1838. ii) In Nov. 1838 the vessel left London for Sydney via Portsmouth (left Nov. 11, 1838) with merchandise & 19 passengers. It arrived at Sydney on  Mar. 12, 1839 & left for London on Jun. 19, 1839. iii) On Jan. 17, 1840 the vessel left Gravesend for Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, via Plymouth, went on to Sydney (arrived Aug. 27, 1840) & on Sep. 27, 1840 left Sydney for Moulmain (now Mawlamyine, Burma (Myanmar), located 300 km SE of Yangon), in ballast. It presumably went onwards to London. iv) On Mar. 22, 1842, the vessel arrived at Sydney ex London, via CGH, with merchandise & about 48 passengers. Newby in command. On May 27, 1842, the vessel left Sydney for Calcutta (now Kolkata), India, in ballast. The vessel left Calcutta on Sep. 24, 1842, under the command of Charles Britton, for Hobart, Tasmania, via Madras (now Chennai), India, went on to Sydney again arriving there on Jan. 3, 1843. It would seem that the vessel was detained for a while at Sydney. Captain Britton was charged & found guilty of smuggling tobacco. He was fined £2,430 & if he did not pay was to be imprisoned at Sydney for a six month period. The vessel went on to Calcutta, with horses, under the command of Captain Simpson. It maybe left Sydney on Apl. 13, 1843.
LRs of 1843/44 & 1844/45 lists no owner name but list her service as Liverpool to Calcutta & 'Atkinson' as her captain. In those two years, LR notes that the vessel 'wants repair'.
From 1845/46 thru 1849/50, Hood & Co. of Newcastle is LR listed as Duchess of Kent's owner for service ex London & with 'Dockerill' or J. Dockerill her captain & briefly (in 1845/46) W. Hall. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/49 is on site. I note in passing that the vessel is not listed in such register, however, 'A. Hood & Co.' of Newcastle is listed as the owner of 7 other Newcastle registered sailing vessels.
In 1850/51, C. Wilson of Newcastle became the vessel's owner with J. Wilson serving as the vessel's captain. For service from Shields to CGH.
On Nov. 23, 1850. the vessel, Wilson in command, left St. Helena bound for Saldanha Bay (located NW of Cape Town, South Africa). On Dec. 12, 1850, per line 462 on this page, the 342 ton barque foundered at sea, while en route from Saldanha Bay to Cork, Ireland. Crew of 15 - none lost. Then stated to be owned by Charles Wilson. The circumstances? Wikipedia advises (thanks!) that the vessel rather foundered before Dec. 12, 1850 & that her crew were rescued by Mary Seaton. It would appear, however, that that the name of the vessel that saved the crew should correctly be Mary Seton, a barque, built in Quebec, Canada, in 1846, then en route from Cardiff to Valparaiso, Chile. Duchess of York, I read, foundered during a heavy gale. Is there anything you can add? #2364

10

  Prince George
322 later 325/379 tons

25480
1835

A barque. The webmaster finds the history of this vessel, as he can best determine it, to be confusing indeed. He has seen that the vessel was Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed in 1836/37 & from 1838/39 thru 1844/45.
This contemporary announcement records, he believes, the launch of the 'remarkedly handsome' barque on Nov. 19, 1835 (maybe on the 18th). Built for Panton and Son of Sunderland. For service, per LR, ex Sunderland, with 'Dryden' her captain. LRs of 1838/39 thru 1844/45 record Prince George as rather now London registered & owned by Gould & Co. of London, with 'Forster' serving as the vessel's captain. For service ex London, to, where LR noted, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, from 1840/41 thru 1842/43 & to Montreal, Canada, in 1843/44 & 1844/45. Certainly the vessel made a number of voyages to Canada. On May 30, 1844, & again on Oct. 25, 1844, it arrived at Montreal ex London, Forster in command. It is reported, from Halifax on Nov. 19, 1844, that the vessel had gone 'on shore in the river' - the St. Lawrence River, I see (Wikipedia).
LR of 1844/45 notes that the vessel had been 'Wrecked'. I learn that on Oct. 2/5, 1844, a major hurricane hit much of the Caribbean & particularly badly hit Havana, Cuba. 'Havannah presented the appearance of a city sacked and bombarded'. 'The principal loss fell upon the shipping: 75 vessels have been lost'. In Dec. 1844, detail was provided. Prince George, Captain Foster, had been lost. 'The Prince George had 3,000 deals on board, as well as 200 hogsheads of provisions and other articles: and before she had been many days on her passage she got on the rocks called Point St. Rock, in the Traverse. Part of the crew were saved, but the mate and two seamen were drowned'. Where is 'Point St. Rock, in the Traverse', I wonder? Hence, I presume the LR advice that the vessel had been wrecked.
But had it truly been wrecked? I say that because I have read that on Dec. 31, 1845, the vessel, Foster still in command, was cleared for departure from the Custom-House (London I think) for Valparaiso, Chile. Upon further research, we now find that the vessel was LR listed again from 1848/49 thru 1856/57 - clearly the same vessel, noted to have been Sunderland built in 1835, now of 325/379 tons. From 1848/49 thru 1851/52 the vessel is stated to be owned by Thomson of Ayr, Scotland, (became of Troon, Scotland), with H. Grange her captain, then 'Ferguson'. And then A. Maxwell. For service from the Clyde to New Brunswick, Canada, & to Quebec, & in 1850/51, to Moulmain (now Mawlamyine, Burma/Myanmar).
'PortlandShBldngCo', also of Troon, is reported in LRs of 1851/52 & 1852/53 as her new owner for service from the Clyde to the Mediterranean.
From 1853/54 thru 1856/57 the vessel is LR noted to be registered at Glasgow, owned by Hamiltons for service from the Clyde i) to Moulmain for 3 years & i) to India in 1856/57. Maxwell is LR noted to have been the vessel's captain from 1850/51 thru 1854/55 & then 'McWhirter'.
What finally happened to the vessel? I read that on Apl. 29, 1856, Prince George, McWhirter in command, en route from the Clyde to Moulmain via Rangoon (now Yangon, Myanmar) came into contact with Anversois (Belgian owned, Meulenaer her captain, soon to return to Antwerp, Belgium) in the river at Rangoon. Neither vessel sustained damage. Wikipedia, from the data source they located, describe it (thanks!) as a collision on May 2, 1856 in the Irrawaddy river. Prince George went on to Moulmain, where it ran aground near the mouth of the Sittang river & became a total wreck. All hands were saved. Wikipedia records that matter also, as having occurred on May 21, 1856. Can you add to and/or correct the above account? It would be good to clarify, from other sources, exactly what happened to the vessel at Havana in Oct. 1844, where she was repaired, & when she was returned to service. No crew lists are available. #2365

11

  Princess Victoria
251, later 256 & 257 tons

22894
1835

A snow or brig. The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1835/36 thru 1858/59 & from 1861/62 thru 1869/70 & not thereafter.
Was initially owned, thru 1841/42 per LR, by H. Panton of Sunderland for service from Sunderland to Quebec, Canada, with 'Harrison' serving as the vessel's captain.
From 1841/42 thru 1847/48, again per LR, Princess Victoria was owned by Wise & Co. of Ayr, Scotland, for service from the Clyde to i) Quebec, & ii) from 1845/46 to North America. LR lists J. Gray as the vessel's captain during the period of 'Wise' ownership.
From 1848/49 thru 1858/59, the vessel was owned by Paul & Co., also of Ayr, for service from Ayr to Quebec thru 1849/50, later from the Clyde incl., in 1850/51 to the Mediterranean. LR of 1858/59 has limited detail which suggest that the vessel may have been sold. A two year LR silence in 1859/60 & 1860/61.
From 1861/62 to 1863/64, the vessel, now a brig, was owned by 'E. S. Robrts' of Ayr soon of London, for service ex the Clyde & ex Liverpool. 
In 1863/64, per LR, P. Hick of Sunderland became owner of Princess Victoria, now a 256 ton brig, for service ex Liverpool but soon (from 1864/65) ex Sunderland. The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') of 1865, however lists Michael Hick of Scarborough as the vessel's owner. MNLs of 1867 & 1870 list Pantland Hick, of Scarborough, Yorkshire, as the then owner of the Scarborough registered vessel. George Barnes, of Sunderland, would seem to have been the vessel's final owner of the Scarborough registered vessel, per MNL of 1871.
88.5 ft. long, signal letters NPJF. Crew lists for most years between 1863 & 1871 are available.
On Dec. 17, 1871, per line 2108 here, the 257 ton brig was stranded at Flamborough Head, Yorkshire, while en route from Harwich, Essex, to Sunderland in ballast. Crew of 10 - none lost. Vessel then stated to have been owned by George Barnes. I learn that two vessels were stranded there on that day, the 2nd being Dawn, an Arbroath schooner. Agreements were signed (presumably with tugs) to get both vessels off, it being hoped that both could be floated if the weather remained moderate. Maybe the weather did not co-operate? Wikipedia confirms the stranding per 2 contemporary London newspapers. Have not read whether bad weather caused the vessel to be stranded. Can you tell us anything additional? #2368

12

  Lady Williamson
262 tons
1836

Likely a snow or brig. The vessel, which was launched on Nov. 10, 1836, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed in 1837/38 & 1838/39 only. Some might consider the word 'listed' to be an exaggeration. The two editions of LR say very little - no owner name, no type of vessel, no build data etc. All they say is that 'Wilburn' was the captain of a 262 ton Sunderland registered vessel.
Now Wikipedia tells us, here (per the 'Times' of London, of Dec. 3, 1838), that on Nov. 9, 1838, a vessel named Lady Williamson was driven ashore & wrecked at Îles des Madelaines, that her crew were rescued & that the vessel was en route from Singapore to London. (Such islands, known in English as the Magdelen Islands, are located in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence, now part of Quebec, Canada). It would seem, however, that the vessel, 'Wilborne' in command, was rather en route from Miramichi, New Brunswick ('NB'), (now Canada) to Sunderland with a cargo of timber. It got on shore & surely was lost, on Oct. 9, 1838, off the Magdalen Islands - her crew & part of her cargo being saved. She had left Bathurst, NB, on Oct. 6, 1838. This U.K. Government report refers to Lady Williamson's loss at pages 26 & 144 in the downloaded volume. Is there anything you can add? Her owner's name, perhaps? #2381

13

  Leadbitter
273 tons

23588
1836

A snow or brig. The vessel, which was first registered in Apl. 1836, is listed in Lloyd's Register ('LR') in a rather strange way. It is LR listed from 1836/37 thru 1848/49, a gap of 4 years, is again listed from 1853/54 thru 1855/56, a gap of two years & finally is listed in 1858/59.
From 1836/37 thru 1845/46, LR reports the vessel as owned by 'Leadbiter' of Sunderland with 'Leadbiter' serving as her captain thru 1841/42 & 'Pickering' thereafter thru 1845/46. It would seem that in both cases 'Leadbiter' is an LR contraction for Leadbitter. Under Leadbitter ownership the vessel, per LR, served ex Sunderland to i) St. Petersburg, Russia, in 1836/37 & 1837/38, ii) to London in 1838/39, iii) to Smyrna (now İzmir, Turkey, from 1841/42 thru 1844/45, and from London to Odessa (Black Sea, Ukraine) in 1839/40 & 1840/41.
In 1845/46, per LR, White & Co., of South Shields became Leadbitter's owner for service from Yarmouth, Norfolk, to Bordeaux, France, from 1845/46 thru 1847/48. With W. Crowell serving as her captain.
Ian Whittaker advises (thanks!) that the 'Edinburgh Courant' reported that the vessel was wrecked on Flotta (Scapa Flow), (Orkney, Scotland) on Apl. 08, 1847, 'Croall' in command, but was expected to get off. Clearly it did so!
The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9, in Jul. 1848 data, lists G. N., and W. White, both of South Shields, as the owners of the Newcastle registered vessel. Now LR of 1848/49 lists 'White' as the owner of the vessel but provides limited other detail. Which suggests that the vessel may well then have been sold.
When LR coverage resumed, in 1853/54, Watson & Co., of Sunderland, are the listed owners for service, in 1853/54, as a Sunderland coaster. Marwood's North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5 clarifies such ownership, in Mar. 1854 data, to mean Wm. H. Watson, Geo. Watson & John Hunter, all of Sunderland, with Geo. Blackett her then captain. Such ownership data is clarified & confirmed by Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1856, which lists the vessel as then registered at Sunderland & owned by W. H. & G. Watson & J. Hunter, all of Sunderland. Further confirmed by Christie's Shipping Register of 1858. LR of 1858/59 lists Watson & Co. as the vessel's owners for service from Sunderland to the Baltic, with Crawford her then captain.
What happened to the vessel & when? The Mercantile Navy List advises (scroll to #23588) that a certificate re her loss was issued on Dec. 22, 1858. Wikipedia tells us (thanks!) that Leadbitter was, in fact, lost off Trelleborg, (located on the S. coast of Sweden), on Nov. 01, 1858, further that her crew were rescued. The vessel was apparently (report from Elsinore on Nov. 01, 1858) carrying a cargo of deals ex Cronstadt (St. Petersburg, Russia) which cargo was, I read, safely landed. No crew lists seem to be available. This contemporary news report (in blue) tells us that the vessel had stranded, had become a wreck & was then condemned. And indicates that only a half of its cargo was saved.
Can you provide more detail as to what caused the loss of Leadbitter? #2369

14

  Sarah Nicholson
286/300 tons
1836

A snow. The vessel, which was launched on Jul. 28, 1836, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1836/37 thru 1846/47 only. It was, per LR, always owned by 'Nicholson' of Sunderland. I noted earlier in this spot that that maybe meant William Nicholson.
Per LR, Sarah Nicholson served Archangel, Russia, ex Sunderland thru 1838/39, served from Sunderland to Odessa (Black Sea, Ukraine) from 1839/40 thru 1841/42, & otherwise ex Sunderland. The vessel, early in its life, would seem to have sailed to Quebec, Canada, and, later in its life, surely made a number of voyages to Cuba, returning with cargoes of sugar and/or copper ore. A frequent visitor to Swansea, Wales, it would appear. LR notes that S. Buck was the vessel's captain thru 1838/39 & then 'Brunton' thru 1842/43. I have seen references to many other captains - 'Thomas', 'Harding', 'Gulley' or 'Galley', 'Blenkey', J. Allsop, 'Charlton' (maybe 'Charleston') & 'McKenzie'.
John Gray notes that Samuel Buck was the vessel's master on a voyage which left Sunderland in Feb. 1837 for Quebec, Canada, later returning to Swansea, Wales. 
Wikipedia notes (thanks) that on Feb. 5, 1840, the vessel ran aground at Barbas Point (stated to be Ottoman Empire) while en route from Newcastle to Constantinople (now Istanbul, Turkey) - was re-floated & resumed her voyage. I have also read that on Mar. 11, 1840, the vessel left Constantinople for Odessa, with 'Thomas' in command. Have not been able to establish where Barbas Point is located.
The webmaster has spotted a reference to the vessel being at Deal, Kent, on Oct. 20, 1845, en route to St. Jago de Cuba with 'McKenzie' in command. Presumably to there load a cargo of copper ore. He has not, so far, seen any references to what finally happened to Sarah Nicholson - in late 1845 or maybe in 1846. Can you help in that regard? #2373

15

  Messenger
251/265 tons
1837

A snow. The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1836/37 thru 1846/47, not in 1847/48, & again from 1848/49 thru 1851/52. Launched, I read, in Apl. 1837 but LR noted to have been first registered, at Sunderland, in May 1837. Thru 1841/42, 'Thompson' of Sunderland is listed as the vessel's owner for service from Sunderland to the Baltic, with J. Booth serving as her captain. In 1841/42, LR indicates that 'Todd' had become the new owner of the Newcastle registered vessel, but the vessel soon became London registered with J. Todd jun. noted, from 1844/45, to be her owner. And became Sunderland registered again from 1848/49 thru 1851/52, owned by J. Todd. For service ex London, including, from 1843/44 thru 1846/47, service from London to Quebec (now Canada). And from Sunderland to the Mediterranean from 1848/49 thru 1850/51. With Byram (R. Byram from 1844/45 thru 1846/47) per LR serving (1841/42 thru 1851/52), as the vessel's captain.
Some operational detail. i) Wikipedia advises (thanks!) (webmaster modified) that on or prior to Mar. 17, 1842, Messenger was driven ashore at South Foreland (chalk cliffs, near Dover, Kent), while en route from Newcastle to Bordeaux, France. The vessel, refloated, was taken northwards into Ramsgate, Kent, in a sinking condition, arriving there on Mar. 17, 1842. I read that Byram was then in command. I read further that on Apl. 7, 1842, the vessel, presumably repaired, left Ramsgate for nearby London. ii) On Sep. 30, 1843, the vessel arrived at Cardiff, Wales, from Quebec, with a cargo of timber & deals. iii) On Nov. 4, 1843 the vessel (Byram) left Cardiff for London with a cargo of coal. iii) On Jun. 21, 1844 the vessel arrived at Quebec, ex London & on Jan. 4, 1845 arrived at London ex Quebec, both with Byram in command. iv) On Nov. 7, 1845 (I think) the vessel left Neath (near Swansea, Wales) for London presumably again with a cargo of coal.
LR of 1851/52 has limited detail which suggest that the vessel may have been lost. But what finally happened to Messenger? The webmaster can now tell you. A U.K. Government detailed list of 1852 vessel losses, available here ex here, tells us that the vessel had left Sunderland for London with a cargo of coal, 'Wood' in command, with a crew of 9. I note that Lloyd's List, of Oct. 30, 1852, rather references 'Byram' as being the vessel's captain. It became leaky in a truly massive storm, put back to Sunderland, struck violently against the N. pier losing her bowsprit & foretopmast, 'appeared waterlogged', drove up the harbour & sank. This contemporary report tells us that the crew were all saved though one crew member, who had jumped onto the pier, was 'much hurt'. It also tells us that the vessel sank near Polo's yard which likely means the yard of William Pile. A massive storm? This extensive report, while it does not reference Messenger, does show the extent of the NE shipping losses. Messenger is noted in these 'The Lifeboat' pages. It seems likely that the vessel was so damaged as to be beyond repair. 
Now searching thru Lloyd's Registers can be difficult at times - initially the webmaster did not find the vessel's listing in the supplement of LR re 1848/49. At that time he thought that 'our' vessel must have been lost in or about 1846. And found data about lost vessels that were named Messenger that clearly now are not 'our' Messenger. I retain my earlier data - it may prove helpful to others.
A vessel named Messenger, was driven ashore & wrecked at Aberavon, Cardiganshire, Wales, on Oct. 24, 1846, while en route from Liverpool to New Orleans, U.S.A. It likely was a Liverpool owned 590/586 ton barque of the name, built at Merimac (likely Merrimack River, Massachussets, U.S.A.) in 1840. 'Garrick', a name not LR mentioned, was apparently her captain at the time. Another vessel named Messenger, Bannatyne in command, arrived at Miramichi, New Brunswick (now Canada) on May 10, 1846 ex the Clyde. On Jul. 5, 1846 such vessel was wrecked on the coast of Newfoundland in foggy conditions.
Is there anything you can add to the above? Or correct? #2386

16

  Defiance
213/200 later 183 tons
1838

A snow or brig. Defiance, which was launched in Jun. 1838, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1839/40 thru 1856/57 only, ex 1853/54. It was, per LR, owned thru 1847/48 by Ord & Co. of Sunderland for service, in 1839/40, from Sunderland to Shoreham, Sussex, & thereafter thru 1847/48, for service from Hartlepool to London. With 'Hemsley' her captain thru 1840/41 & 'Helmsley' for the rest of the period of 'Ord' ownership.
In 1848/49, per LR, the vessel became Hartlepool registered & owned by 'Sanderson' of Hartlepool for service (where LR noted) from Hartlepool to London thru 1850/51 & from Hartlepool to the Baltic in 1854/55.
The 'Sanderson' ownership is well documented in contemporary shipping registers. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9 records Defiance as Hartlepool registered in May 1848 & owned by Thomas Sanderson & George Moon, both of Hartlepool, & George Hogg of Newcastle. The equivalent directory of 1854/55 reported the same owners in 1854, with Geo. Irvine her captain. Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1856, in 1855 data, records T. Sanderson & Co. of Hartlepool as the vessel's owner with, again, G. Irvine her captain. The LR data in 1852/53 & in 1855/56 & 1856/57 is modest, for reasons unknown.
It seems clear that in 1857 the vessel became Sunderland registered & owned, per Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 by Matthew Atkinson & by William Ord & Co., both of Sunderland, along with George Moon of Hartlepool.
Re the following years, the Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') comes to our rescue in the absence of LR data. MNL lists Defiance as Sunderland registered from 1857 thru 1870, in 1865 owned by Matthew Atkinson of Bishopwearmouth, Sunderland, & from 1866 thru 1870 by Phillip Stubbs of Sunderland.
Signal letters NTFR, a few crew lists are available here.
What happened to Defiance? This MNL page (scroll to #23817) notes that the vessel was 'Lost' (as I read it) per a report dated Jul. 11, 1870. The webmaster has not, so far at least, been able to determine what happened to the vessel & when. It may be significant that that report said 'Lost' - i.e. the vessel was presumably not broken up.
Can you tell us about the vessel's loss or otherwise add anything? #2507

17

  England
258/267 tons
1838

A snow. The vessel, which was launched in Jan. 1838, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1838/39 thru 1842/43 only. It was owned, thru such entire if short period, per LR, by Thompson of Sunderland, for service from Sunderland to Le Havre, France, with T. Bell always serving as her captain. 'Thompson' likely means William Thompson (Corder).
LR of 1842/43 notes that the vessel had 'Foundered'. The webmaster has not so far spotted any references to what happened to 'our' England & when. I note however that 'Wikipedia' (1843 wrecks) references a vessel of the name which foundered off Ostend, Belgium, in mid Jan. 1843. Such vessel, a barque, was built at Chepstow, Monmouthshire, in 1814, & in 1843 was owned by T. Ward (Ward & Son) of Shadwell, of London's East End, with T. Lewis her captain. En route from London to Sierra Leone, West Africa, I read. Details of her loss. If you have any knowledge about what happened to 'our' England, do consider advising the webmaster. #2380

18

  Rainbow
245/259 tons
1838

A snow or brig. The vessel, completed in Apl. 1838, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1838/39 thru 1847/48 only. It was owned, thru that entire period, by 'Speeding' of Sunderland for consistent service from Sunderland to St. Petersburg, Russia, thru 1844/45, & from Sunderland to Marseilles, France, in 1845/46 & 1846/47. Only limited data is provided in LR of 1847/48, which suggests that the vessel might have been sold. But not so it would seem. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/49 lists the 259 ton brig as being registered at Sunderland in Apl. 1848, & owned by T. Speeding & Co. of Monkwearmouth. By Thomas Speeding. Ewens (J. Ewens from 1846/47), per LR, served as the vessel's captain, for its entire lifetime.
On May 23, 1850, per line 194 on this page, the 259 ton brig foundered at sea. Crew of 10 - none lost. Then owned by Thomas Speeding. That date of May 23, 1850 is clearly incorrect. I have read that Marion, a barque, en route from St. Lucia, West Indies, for London, had taken Rainbow's crew aboard & soon thereafter Rainbow had foundered. Only on May 22, 1850, did Marion arrive at Falmouth, Cornwall, with Rainbow's crew. I have not so far read where Rainbow foundered nor her then routing & loss circumstances.
I note in passing that Thomas Speeding must have liked the vessel name Rainbow. In 1851 he acquired a replacement vessel of the same name, also built at Sunderland. Is there anything you can add? Or correct? #2372

19

  Robert Henry Allan
250/269 tons
1838

A snow or brig. The vessel, which was launched in Oct. 1838 & first registered in Nov. 1838, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1839/40 thru 1850/51, with the exception of 1847/48, & not thereafter. It was, per LR, owned thru 1846/47 by 'Hartford & Durham Commercial Shipping Company' ('HDCSC'), of Stockton-on-Tees, for service thru 1842/43 from Sunderland to London, & from 1843/44 thru 1845/46 for service as a Bristol coaster. With, per LR, C. Wake serving as the vessel's captain thru 1843/44 & 'Storey' from 1843/44 thru 1846/47. LR of 1846/47 offers limited detail which suggests that the vessel may well have been sold. When, however the vessel was again LR listed, in 1848/49, HDCSC were again listed as the vessel's owners, now of Hartlepool. With G. Brown now her captain. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/49 lists the 269 ton brig, registered at Hartlepool, as owned by in May 1848 by HDCSC.
'Hartlepool History Then & Now' ('HHTN') have kindly provided details re Robert Henry Allan, noting that the company that owned her was itself owned by William Lisle, Abraham Scotson & Thomas Rowell, all of Hartlepool. They also provide more detail about the vessel's captains, referencing 'Myers' in 1841, George Brown from 1846 to 1850, & James Doyle in Feb. 1850 (they do not reference, however, either C. Wake or Storey). And provide, thanks to both the Customs & Library services of Hartlepool, two registration documents re the vessel. Alas, with my tired eyes, I cannot properly read their text. 
HHTN also tells us that in Feb. 1841, while en route from Hartlepool to London, the vessel went ashore on rocks at Flamborough (Yorkshire) but with the assistance of nine local men was got off on the same tide.
On Oct. 7, 1850, per line 356 here, the 269 ton brig (incorrectly named Robert Henry Allen, i.e. with an 'e') stranded at Hogland (Hogland or Gogland, an island in the Gulf of Finland, eastern Baltic, about 180 km west of St. Petersburg, Russia), while en route from Hartlepool to Cronstadt (St. Petersburg) with a cargo of coal. Crew of 9 - none lost. The vessel was stated to be then owned by William Lisle, presumably then her manager. Can you add anything? I have to wonder where the vessel name came from - I presume that there was, likely in Hartlepool or Stockton, a gentleman named Robert Henry Allan. #2361

20

  Atkinson
282/307, later 274 tons

3410
1839

A ship, later a snow or brig. The ship, which was launched in Dec. 1839, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1839/40 thru 1868/69.
Atkinson was initially owned, thru 1846/47 per LR, by Gateshead & Tyne Shipping Co., of Newcastle, with D. McDonald her captain thru 1844/45 & W. Murch from 1844/45 thru 1846/47. For service from Sunderland to Odessa (Black Sea, Ukraine) in 1839/40 & 1840/41 & from Shields to Montevideo, Uruquay, from 1841/42 thru 1846/47.
In 1846/47, the vessel, per LR, became owned by 'Nicholson' of Newcastle (of North Shields from 1848/49), with G. Jackson her captain thru 1853/54 & J. Andrews from 1854/55 thru 1857/58. Such ownership is confirmed by many NE shipping registers. By the North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/49 which lists J. Nicholson, of Tynemouth, Northumberland as the vessel's owner in Jul. 1848. By the equivalent directory of 1854/55 (Apl. 1854 data), which references John Nicholson & also records J. Andrews as her then captain. By Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1856 & by Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 (Jno. Nicholson). A number of those registers incorrectly list Atkinson as being Tyne built. The vessel was noted, I see, to have been re-rigged as a snow from 1847/48. Her service (where LR indicated) while 'Nicholson' owned? From Newcastle to Carthagena (likely Cartagena, SE Spain), in 1846/47 & 1847/48, from Shields to the Mediterranean in 1848/49 & 1849/50 & also, in 1850/51, from Cork, Ireland, to Havana, Cuba. To New York from Galway, Ireland, (I think) in 1852/53 & 1853/54 & from Blyth to the West Indies in 1854/55 & 1855/56.
In 1858/59, per LR, the vessel became owned by E. Wright of Shields for service ex Shields to the Mediterranean thru 1859/60, to Hamburg, Germany, in 1860/61 & to London in 1861/62. With, as her captains, J. Dale (in 1859/60 & 1860/61), W. Badsey (in 1860/61 & 1861/62), & then W. Graham from 1861/62 to the sale of the vessel in 1862/63.
In 1862/63, per LR, 'Forrest', of North Shields would appear to have become the final owner of the vessel, now of 274 tons. W. Forrest per the Mercantile Navy Lists of 1865 thru 1869. With W. Simpson, per LR, briefly her captain, G. Atkins from 1863/64 thru 1866/67, & D. Russell from 1866/67 thru 1868/69 when the vessel, per LR, was 'Wrecked'.
93.0 ft. long. Some crew lists are available.
I read (London Daily News of Nov. 13, 1868 - in red) that Atkinson, en route from Hamburg to Newcastle, stranded at Neufield (now Newfeld), Holstein, Germany, on the E. bank of the River Elbe, on Oct. 25, 1868. Further that the crew landed in a ship's boat. In a report from Hamburg dated Nov. 2, 1868. Can you add to and/or correct the above vessel history? #2370

21

  Iodine
246/246, later 247 tons

3464

1839

A snow or brig. The vessel, which would seem to have survived thru 1871, is only modestly listed in Lloyd's Register ('LR'). So far as I can see, the vessel is LR listed from 1839/40 thru 1847/48, then after an LR silence of 5 years, again from 1853/54 thru 1855/56. And appears not to be listed in later editions (I checked thru 1873/74).
During the first such period, the vessel is LR reported as being owned by Speeding of Sunderland for service from Sunderland to London thru 1846/47 & with G. Mills always her captain. Per Wikipedia, at an unknown date before Nov. 13, 1843 a vessel named Iodine, surely this vessel, was driven ashore near Krossederessi, Ottoman Empire (where exactly is it?). She was re-floated with assistance from HMS Devastation.
The LR of 1847/48 offers minimal detail which suggests that the vessel might have been sold or in process of being sold. But possibly it was so listed because of uncertainty as to the status of the vessel.
I say that because on the night of Feb. 2, 1847, at Hull, having arrived, Mills in command, from Prince Edward Island (now Canada) on Jan. 30, 1847, Iodine caught fire in the Old Dock, causing considerable damage to the cabin and the after part of the vessel. (Referred to here, Wikipedia). The webmaster has not seen any references to where it was repaired & when it was returned to service. But it surely was repaired. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/49 records, in Apl. 1848, T. Speeding & Co., of Monkwearmouth, as still the brig's owner. I have seen references to a Thos. Speeding,  Sunderland ship-owner, at about the above time period.
This page (scroll to #3464), indicates that on Apl. 18, 1853 Iodine was first registered at Shields. Just possible it was Sunderland registered until that time? From 1853/54 thru 1855/56. LR records J. Parkin of Shields as the vessel's owner for service as a Sunderland coaster in 1852/53 & 1853/54 but for service from Shields to Hamburg, Germany, in 1855/56. With J. Dryden (J. G. Dryden, per Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1855) her captain in 1855/56. The 1854/55 edition of the North of England Maritime Directory, clarifies her then ownership. It lists her as registered at Shields with Jas. Parkin of South Shields, John Ewens of Monkwearmouth, John Wilson of Whitby & John Robinson of Drewsbury as her owners. (Dewsbury of W. Yorkshire looks to be correct). With Robert Mills then her captain. Such ownership is essentially confirmed by the 1856 edition of TR. I note that the vessel is not listed in Christie's Shipping Register of 1858.
Absent references to the vessel in later editions of LR, I was glad to find that the Mercantile Navy Lists of 1865 thru 1871 at least (1870 is here), but not in 1872, record the vessel, with Parkin (James Parkin), as owner of the Shields registered vessel.
What finally happened to the vessel, in or about 1871? The webmaster is not able, at this time, to answer that question. Perhaps you can help provide an answer? No crew lists are available. #2367

22

  Thomas Rowell
267/290, later 251 tons

14181
1839

A snow or brig. The vessel, which was launched in Mar. 1839, is Lloyd's Register ('LR' listed from 1839/40 thru 1866/67. It was, per LR of 1839/40, owned by 'Hpl&DurComShCo' of Stockton-on-Tees, which I learn means 'Hartford & Durham Commercial Shipping Company' ('HDCSC'). From 1840/41 thru 1850/51, LR rather lists 'ComShCo', i.e. Commercial Shipping Company, of Stockton, later of Hartlepool - not a different owner rather a different name by which HDCSC was known. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/49 confirms that in May 1848, HDCSC was the vessel's owner. Per LR, 'Musgrave' was the vessel's initial captain, thru 1839/40 only, then 'Henderson' from 1839/40 thru 1845/46, 'Robertson' from 1845/46 thru 1847/48 & 'Nellis' from 1848/49 thru 1850/51.
Now 'Hartlepool History Then & Now' ('HHTN') have kindly provided details re Thomas Rowell, noting that the company that owned her was itself owned by Thomas Rowell, Abraham Scotson & William Lisle, all of Hartlepool. LR is frequently poor in its listings of vessel captains, so the webmaster was glad to see HHTN's detail about the vessel's captains, which reference, while HDCSC owned, Samuel Musgrove (not Musgrave) in 1839, Alexander Robertson in 1845, Thomas Nellis from Mar. 1848 to 1850, & John Minto in Apl. 1850. They also provide, thanks to both the Customs & Library services of Hartlepool, a registration document re the vessel.
The vessel's voyages when HDCSC owned? In 1839/40 from Sunderland to 'Merimc' (likely the Merrimac river, Massachusetts, U.S.A.), becoming London to Hartlepool. LR is not very informative about the vessel's proposed voyages, but principally ex London or Hartlepool for about 7 years & from Hartlepool to St. Petersburg, Russia, in the period from 1848/49 thru 1850/51. However, on Dec. 7, 1840, the vessel was the first vessel to enter the new docks at Hartlepool. On May 10, 1847 the vessel left London for Quebec, Canada, with a single passenger, arriving there on Jun. 29, 1847 (at page bottom). And it arrived there again on Jun. 21, 1848, Nellis in command, ex Hartlepool (Apl. 29, 1848) with a cargo of coal.
In 1850/51, per LR, Thomas Rowell became owned by the 'Wawn' family of Shields - C. Wawn thru 1857/58 & then J. Wawn. HHTN indicate that HDCSC had been dissolved on Apl. 15, 1851 & all of its then 12 vessels, including Thomas Rowell, were auctioned off at Hartlepool. I presume that Wawn specifically, per HHTN, Charles Newby Wawn & Jonathan Ayton, acquired the vessel at such auction. Per LR, J. Ayton served as the vessel's captain from 1851/52 thru 1854/55 & then 'T. Hemsly'. Again HHTN corrects the record, indicating that Jonathan Ayton was the vessel's captain in 1851 & 1853, Frederick Sloone in 1852 & George Storey Helmsley from 1853 right thru to 1865. Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1856 records J. T. Wawn of West Boldon & E. Wawn of South Shields as the vessel's then owners. While Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 lists John T. Wawn & Elizabeth Wawn, both of South Shields. Under 'Wawn' ownership, the 251 ton vessel served mainly ex Shields, to the Mediterranean or to America, though service from Swansea, Wales, to the Mediterranean is LR noted in 1855/56. And service from Shields to Algiers, Algeria, in 1858/59.
LR of 1861/62 advises that J. Gibbon, of Shields, had become the vessel's owner, thru 1865/66 per LR, with 'T. Hemsly' (i.e. Helmsley), still her captain. John Gibbon, I read. HHTN reference that in 1861 the vessel left Shields for Spain. The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') of 1865 confirms her registration at South Shields & the Gibbon ownership.
In the 1865/66 edition of LR, A. Grant of North Shields is stated to be her new (& last it would seem) owner - Alexander Reed Grant per HHTN. And essentially also per MNL of 1866. With 'Robinson' her captain. For service as a Shields coaster.
89.0 ft. long, signal letters LMCJ. Crew lists of 1863 & 1864 are available.
What happened to Thomas Rowell? LR of 1866/67 notes that the vessel had been 'Wrecked'. Wikipedia advises (thanks!) that on Nov. 19, 1866 the vessel ran aground off the mouth of the Eider river (North Sea coast of Germany, near Tönning). As per the 'Newcastle Courant' of Nov. 30, 1866. HHTN rather note that the vessel stranded on Nov. 10, 1866 - on the Outer Grounds of the River Eider. I do not know which date is correct. No lives were lost. Can you add to and/or correct the above vessel history? #2363

23

  Commercial
301/335 tons
1840

A barque. The vessel, which was launched on Apl. 13, 1840, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1839/40 thru 1855/56 - but would seem not to have been issued an Official Number which should mean that the vessel was not, if still British owned, in existence at Jan. 1, 1855.
I should note, at the outset, that per LR the vessel became Hartlepool registered in 1842/43. 'Hartlepool History Then & Now' ('HHTN') kindly provides extensive detail re Commercial, starting from 1843, which includes mention that the 3-masted vessel had a male bust figurehead. Commercial was, per LR, initially registered at Stockton-on-Tees & owned by 'Hartlepool Commercial Shipping Company' ('HCSC') - with, again per LR, 'Scott' her captain thru 1842/43 & 'Henderson' from 1842/43 thru 1851/52. LR is often inaccurate in its listings of vessels' captains. HHTN tells us that 'Henderson' meant Walter Henderson, that he was followed in 1849/50 by Robert Cummings & from 1851 thru 1854 by George Yule. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/49 lists 'Hartford & Durham Commercial Shipping Company' as her owner in May 1848 (owned in 1843 per HHTN by William Lisle, Abraham Scotson & Thomas Rowell, all of Hartlepool). I read that such company was dissolved on Apl. 15, 1851 & all of its then vessels were auctioned off.
Commercial's service, per LR, when HCSC owned? From Sunderland to Quebec, Canada, from 1839/40 thru 1841/42, from Hartlepool to Bordeaux, France, in 1842/43, from London to Lima, Peru, in 1843/44 & 1844/45, from Hartlepool to London from 1845/46 thru 1847/48, & from Hartlepool to Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) in 1848/49 & 1849/50.
HHTN tells us (thanks!) that 'Whealer' of Sunderland, owned the vessel in May 1851. Presumably he bought the vessel at the fleet auction on Apl. 15, 1851. Further, that in May 1854, John Punshon Denton (of Hartlepool & from 1854 of Glasgow), owned the vessel. Neither name is LR referenced.
LR reports her ownership differently. From 1851/52 thru 1855/56, per LR, the vessel was owned by Jackson & Co., of Hartlepool, with G. Yule serving as the vessel's captain. Which is essentially confirmed by the 1854/55 edition of the North of England Maritime Directory, which tells us that in 1854 the vessel was owned by William Lisle, William George Jackson, & Wm. Kilvington, all of Hartlepool, & by Robert Henry Jackson of Yarm (near Stockton-on-Tees) - with Geo. Yule her then captain. HHTN tells us that 'Leonard' was the vessel's captain in 1854/55. LR reports service from Hartlepool to Odessa (Ukraine, Black Sea), from 1851/52 thru 1853/54 & from Hartlepool to the Mediterranean in 1854/55. HHTN also references that, on Nov. 26, 1854, the vessel sailed from Crookhaven, Ireland, & in May 1855 sailed from St. Thomas.
Such reference to a May 1855 voyage is at present a puzzle to the webmaster. If the vessel existed in May 1855, it should, if still British owned, have been issued an Official Number. Which would seem not to have been so. It looks as though the vessel must have been sold to non-British interests. And hence no Official Number. Hopefully new data will emerge that clarifies the matter & tells us what finally happened to the vessel. Can you tell us anything additional? #2358

24

  Eleanor
269/254 tons
1840

A snow or brig. The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1840/41 thru 1847/48 only, always owned & captained, per LR, by Leadbitter (with an 'i') of Sunderland, & always for service from Sunderland to St. Petersburg, Russia. Now 'Corder', in his data re George Frater & Co., lists Robert Leadbetter (with an 'e') as the initial owner of Eleanor 1840, noted to be of 281 tons. Robert Leadbetter would seem to have, per Corder, owned three vessels built by 'Frater' including an earlier (1831) vessel named Eleanor, detail listed on site here.
I have spotted references to one Eleanor voyage to St. Petersburg that arrived back in London on Oct. 13, 1840. With Leadbitter (with an 'i' & not an 'e') consistently noted to be her then captain. I have not, in the limited time I presently have available, found any later references to the vessel - which is a bit of a puzzle. I suspect that there was a new captain after that date but that does not account for my difficulty in spotting references to vessels named Eleanor that seemed likely to be 'ours'. Perhaps others will be more successful.
It would seem that the vessel was not always Leadbetter (whatever) owned. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/49 lists the vessel as still Sunderland registered in Apl. 1848 but then owned by J. Barkes of Monkwearmouth & G. Robinson of Sunderland.
What happened to the vessel? At this moment I cannot tell you what happened to her nor when. Wikipedia refers to many groundings etc. of vessels named Eleanor during the course of her lifetime but I have not, so far, been able to identify any of them that with certainty relate to 'our' Eleanor. There were many vessels named Eleanor at the time! Can you add anything additional? #2378

25

Minstrel
321 tons
1840

A wooden 'snow'. Referred to by 'Corder' as owned by or maybe built for J. B. Ord. Vessel not listed at Miramar. The webmaster has a few editions of Lloyd's Register available to him from 'Google' books, see left. The vessel seems not to be recorded in the 1848/49 or 1852/53 editions of Lloyd's, at least as Minstrel. Perhaps the vessel had met its end by then, though it is possible that the vessel was sold & is recorded under a new name. Was built for Ord & Co., maybe J. B. Ord, of Sunderland, for the Indian trade. Ord? There was i) a Robert Ord, a shipowner, in 1831, who owned two 'Gale' vessels recorded here, built in 1819 & 1831 respectively, ii) a William Ord, a Member of Parliament, perhaps of Newcastle. And iii) I refer re Madeline, built 1860, to 'W. Ord & Co.', of Sunderland, possibly of Bishopwearmouth, re trade with South America. The available data is fragmentary indeed but may help others searching for the vessel. Need help to progress further! #1721

26

  Majestic
357/421 tons
1841

A barque, but possibly later a ship. The vessel, which was launched in May 1841, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1841/42 thru 1850/51 only. Throughout such period, Majestic was always, per LR, owned by J. & J. Wait, & registered at Newcastle thru 1845/46 & thereafter at North Shields. With O. Brodie, per LR, her initial captain thru 1842/43, & 'Isbester' her captain thereafter. Her service per LR? - i) from Sunderland to Calcutta (now Kolkata), India, in 1841/42, ii) from Liverpool to Savannah (likely Georgia, U.S.A.) in 1842/43, iii) to Calcutta - from Liverpool in 1843/44 & 1844/45 & from Shields during the period from 1845/46 thru 1847/48, iv) from Shields to the Mediterranean from 1848/49 thru 1850/51. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/49 records the vessel as a ship, still registered at Newcastle, & clarifies such owners' names as meaning, in Jul. 1848, James & John Wait of North Shields.
What happened to the vessel & when? Wikipedia advises (thanks!) that on Apl. 26, 1850, while en route from Liverpool to Constantinople (now Istanbul, Turkey), a vessel named Majestic ran aground near Gallipoli & was re-floated. Likely 'our' Majestic. I learn that three vessels had run aground that day & all were got off without apparent damage. Later that year, while en route from Odessa, (Black Sea, Ukraine) to either Queenstown, Ireland, or Falmouth, Cornwall, presumably for orders, with a cargo of grain, Majestic had to put into Lisbon, Portugal, on Dec. 20, 1850, in a damaged condition. Her cargo had shifted, her pumps were choked & part of her bulwarks had been carried away. She discharged a part of her cargo & had repairs effected, later leaving Lisbon to resume her journey on Jan. 9, 1851. Soon after leaving Lisbon, she encountered a heavy gale, & having been struck by several seas sprang a leak. She ended up with, I read, 7 ft. of water in her holds, & had to be abandoned. While her crew were saved I have not read how they were saved. Wikipedia states that her abandonment occurred on Jan. 14, 1851, in the Atlantic Ocean. As is confirmed by this page (line 757) which tells us the vessel had a crew of 14 & was then owned by Jas. Wail (means Jas. Wait). I learn that 'Cuthbertson' was the vessel's captain at the time of her loss (referenced at Lisbon). Now it would be good to get independent confirmation that Cuthbertson was the captain of 'our' Majestic re such voyage. But ... it likely was the correct Majestic. Can you add to and/or correct in any way the above text? #2359

FRYER

OF SUNDERLAND

So far I know nothing about 'Fryer' of Sunderland, not even their proper name, & refer to them here only because I have spotted references to vessels being broken up by 'Fryer'. Royal Navy Destroyer HMS Basilisk was one such vessel, said to have been sold on Nov. 1, 1921 to 'Fryer', of Sunderland, to be broken up. HMS Blanche, a light cruiser built 1909, was another such vessel, stated to have been sold to 'Fryer' in Jul. 1921. Can you tell us more about 'Fryer', perhaps where they were located, & how long they were in business. Presumably as ship breakers.

WILLIAM (1782/1838) & JOHN M. GALES (1784/1858)
W. & J. GALES
L. and T. C. GALES
JOHN MOWBRAY GALES (1784/1858)
L. GALES, i.e. LAWSON GALES (1821/1856)
THOMAS CHARLES GALES (1833/1883)

OF HYLTON

Shipbuilding yards, building wooden ships, existed at Hylton in the late 18th century. Thanks to data kindly provided by Peter Kirsopp & now also by Simon Gales (thank you both!) we are able to summarise the 'Gales' shipbuilding history hopefully more accurately than before.

But first an image, a partial image only, adjusted somewhat for better presentation on this page, of the 'Gales' ship yard in or about 1825/1835. It is but a portion of a larger print, surely partial also, (visible here), perhaps from a contemporary directory or advertisement. Should you have available to you the complete print, do let the webmaster know. The site visitor who kindly provided what I offer today would love to have a print more complete.

Simon Gales advises, that William Gales (1782/1838) & John M. (Mowbray) Gales (1784/1858), his younger brother, started the first 'Gales' yard in 1810/12 - to build a ship for John White (launched in 1813). William Gales had earlier worked for Edward Potts & John M. Gales had worked at another yard. Interestingly, as noted elsewhere in these pages, Mr. George Bartram, the founder of Bartrams, was, at the age of 11 & an orphan, apprenticed at the Hylton yard of 'W. & J. Gales'. That would have been in 1811. Interestingly also, both of the Gales brothers married daughters of Thomas Lawson. Thomas Robson, was an apprentice at a yard there in about 1770, which yard later became owned by William Potts (the Elder), & later was inherited from William by Edward & William Potts & then became the 'Gales' yard. But .. Simon Gales is not sure that was so. The 'Gales' yard may have been that previously owned by Edward & William Potts, or instead may have been a new facility. (It would seem that Edward Potts was a drinker & as a result could not deliver his ships on time). In passing, I note that Thomas Robson's son, (Mr. Robson of Claxheugh), was a ship builder also it would seem. I presume, from that wording, that his yard was at Claxheugh which is on the River Wear, near Ford, South Hylton.

'Mr. Gales, sen.', which per Simon Gales means William Gales (1782/1838), 'built no less than 212 ships during the period from 1812 to his retirement in 1845' (Per 'The Nautical Magazine', 1852, a 'Google' book, here, at page 583 in the downloaded book - here is what it says.) However, that data is in some doubt, particularly since William Gales would seem to have died in 1838. The retirement date of 1845 likely relates to John M. (Mowbray) Gales. Simon Gales believes that the 200 plus ships were rather built by all of the 'Gales'. In its time, the 'Gales' yard was the biggest employer at Hylton, along with Dawson's Pottery.

John M. (Mowbray) Gales eventually started up another yard on the opposite side of the river Wear, but in addition to rather than in competition with the first 'Gales' yard. In fact, the families lived together, in the same mansion, i.e. Ford Lodge, as well as Ford Cottage nearby.

Peter Kirsopp advises that John & William Gales were in 1828 listed in Whites Directory as shipbuilders at Hilton Ferry. And presumably mainly from later census data:- In 1841, John M. (Mowbray) Gales was living at Ford Lodge, a short step from the Leopard shipbuilding yard and graving dock at South Hylton. By 1851 he is described as ship owner, still at Ford Lodge. At that date, his elder son Lawson Gales (1822/1856), 30 years old, was carrying on the shipbuilding tradition, employing 66 men and 13 boys. While Thomas Charles Gales (1833/1883), his 18 year old son, was a shipwright. By 1861, only two widows & another William (1826/1868), an unmarried middle son of John M., & a ship owner, are still at Ford Lodge.

In 1852, the yard was owned, by Lawson Gales. The only other snippet of data that has come to my attention is that there was an 'L. Gales' listed in 1857 as a shipbuilder at Hylton (presumably that was Lawson Gales, who actually died in 1856). And at the same date an 'L. and T. C. Gales' also, in Sunderland, but with no yard location stated. Most probably. T. C. Gales is the Thomas Charles Gales referred to above. In business with Lawson Gales, his brother.

Lawson Gales would seem to have died very young - at age 35, while Thomas Charles Gales retired from shipbuilding in 1861, at age 28.

The shipbuilding business would seem to have come to an end a few years later, perhaps because of the greater capital requirements of building in iron.

Peter Kirsopp additionally advises that Lawson Gales certainly died at Stockton in 1856 (his wife came from Stockton & his elder daughter was born there). And Thomas Charles Gales, who may have continued to build ships for a while after his brother died, had by 1861 moved to the small rural village of Bishop Monckton, North Yorkshire, being described then as a retired shipbuilder (at age 28). And perhaps then a ship owner.

'L. and T. C. Gales', (note that the 'L' in the name, i.e. Lawson Gales, had died in 1856 so presumably Thomas Charles Gales must have kept the old business name after his brother died), apparently built 2 ships in 1857, Chillian Packet of 331 tons registered at London, & Lizzie Scott a barque of 453 tons, registered at Sunderland. Both referenced here. (Per 'Christie's Shipping Register....' of 1858, a 'Google' book that is available here, and on site here).

Frances, the widow of Lawson Gales, was, I am advised, running a lodging house in Sunderland, in 1861.

Such data is quite 'fragmentary'. And quite confusing, alas. We thank Peter Kirsopp & Simon Gales, who between them have kindly provided most of it. But it is all that I now have. Can you help by adding more about the history of Hylton shipbuilders named 'Gales'?

To help in understanding how all the various 'Gales' fit into the picture, Simon Gales has provided the following chart - of the children of both William and John Mowbray Gales.

Bill Greenwell has kindly been in touch in Aug. 2021 about the above chart. He advises that his current research states that 'Isabella Thompson, widow of George Thompson, who died in 1889 at South Hill, The Cedars, was ‘the last surviving and eldest daughter’ of William Gales of Hylton – so I think the helpful chart provided by your contacts is erroneous in that respect'.

A build list of ships built by the many shipbuilders named 'Gales' is now on site, transcribed from a list provided by Simon Gales. Here, at page 144. However, the data is partial today, since only a part of the data has yet been transcribed. Hopefully it can be made complete very soon.

1   Salus
162 or 164, later 150 & 148 tons

12448
1817

A snow or brig, built by W. & J. M. Gales & launched in Oct. 1817. Which had a long life, indeed. Salus is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1817/18 thru 1842/43, a gap of 13 years, from 1856/57 thru 1863/64 (if cryptically), another gap, this time of 10 years, & finally from 1874/75 thru 1879/80.
For many years I have noted here that Salus's initial owner was Judah Cowen of London. LR however records J. Gales as the vessel's initial owner, presumably her builder, with 'Stafford' her captain, for service as a Sunderland coaster. Becoming, later in 1817/18, 'Capt. & Co.' as the owner with 'Thompson' such captain.
'Thompson', per LR, owned the vessel for many years, thru 1831/32, with many captains over that period - 'Thompson', 'Hamlin' briefly in 1820/21, J. Thompson from 1820/21 thru 1825, 'Nisbitt' & then R. Fulton in 1826, 'Gullen' in 1826/27 & 1827/28, J. Thompson from later in 1827/28 thru 1831/32, H. Everitt from 1831/32 thru 1836/37. Her service while Thompson owned? From i) London to Hamburg, Germany (1817/18 thru 1821, 1823 thru 1825 & in 1826/27 & 1827/28) ii) Plymouth to Sunderland in 1822, iii) London to Cadiz, Spain, in 1826, London to Bilboa (likely Bilbao, Spain), from 1828/29 thru 1831/32.
In 1832/33, per LR, Salus became Lynn, Norfolk, registered & owned by Fison & Son (later Fison & Co.) of Lynn, with H. Everitt her captain thru 1836/37, & J. Rutland from 1836/37 thru 1842/43. Her service when 'Fison' owned (where LR indicated)? As a Plymouth coaster in 1832/33 & for service from Lynn to Newcastle from 1836/37 thru 1842/43.
From 1856/57 thru 1863/64, LR tells us that W. Shipp, of Lynn, was Salus's owner, with W. Allen noted to be her captain throughout such period, for service from Lynn to Antwerp, Belgium, in 1856/57 & 1857/58. The data is cryptic, however, & likely of no great reliability. I say that because the Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') records the vessel as registered at Lynn in 1857 & 1858 only, & registered at Whitby, Yorkshire, from 1859 thru 1880. MNLs of 1865 thru 1868 record Alfred Walker, of Whitby, as the then owner of the 148 ton vessel. This page, (in green), advises that the vessel became Whitby registered in Aug. 1858, owned not by 'Walker' but rather by Jn. Wake, Robt. Oliphant, Hannah Stephenson and Will. Oliphant. I note that LRs of 1874/75 thru 1879/80 all record J. Wake, of Whitby, as the vessel's then owner. MNLs of 1869 thru 1880, all record Jno. Wake, of Whitby, as the vessel's owner.
It was reported, on Feb. 24, 1877, that Salus had arrived at Rouen, France, ex Shields, having, en route, been in collision, on Feb. 13, 1877,  with Castle Baynard (a 59 ton schooner built in 1836 at Bideford, Devon).
70.0 ft. long, later 72.1 ft., some crew lists are available here.
What finally happened to Salus? LR of 1879/80 notes that the vessel had been 'Wrecked'. I read that on Dec. 18, 1879, the vessel sank & became a total loss, when in the River Seine, France, in Dec. 1879. Wikipedia advises that Salus (noted to be a French vessel) was lost downstream of Caudebec-en-Caux (located roughly midway between Le Havre & Rouen), due to ice, further than her crew were all rescued. 'Wiki' references two news reports, both dated Dec. 22, 1879, in the 'Times' of London & in the 'Daily Gazette for Middlesbrough". If any site visitor has access to such reports, do consider providing them to the webmaster for reference here. The ice in the River Seine must, at that time, have been most extensive. 'The Daily News' of London, reported on Dec. 22, 1879 that Aberdeenshire, a steamer (built at Renfrew in 1855), was chartered by the Chamber of Commerce at Rouen to force a passage through the ice from Rouen to Quillebeuf but itself became fast in the ice near Rouen. It also reported that Salus, previously reported to be in a dangerous position near Caudebec, had been lost.
Is there anything you can add? And/or correct? #2541

2   Rhoda
145 later 128 later 118 tons

6218
1819

A snow or brig, built by W. & J. M. Gales & launched in May 1819. Rhoda is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1818/19 thru 1832/33 & not thereafter. It was initially owned & captained, thru 1824/25 per LR, by 'Thompson'. Which means, per a 'Gales' built list on site, Turner Thompson, of Sunderland. For service thru 1821/22 per LR from London to Rotterdam & thereafter for service as an Exmouth, Devon, coaster.
In 1825/26, per LR, the vessel became owned by W. Dennett, of port unknown, for service as a coaster ex Topsham, Devon, (thru 1826/27), Yarmouth, Norfolk, (thru 1829/30), Exmouth again in 1830/31, & Hull, Yorkshire, (in 1831/32 & 1832/33). With J. Smith (briefly), J. Laws (from 1826/27 thru 1829/30), & W. but more likely J. Coxon (1829/30 thru 1832/33) her captains.
As per this (in red) Whitby shipping history book page, Rhoda became Whitby, Yorkshire, registered in 1832, owned by 'Will Clark, Isaac Calvert and Jn. Clark, Runswick'.
The North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5 tells us, in 1853 data, that Rhoda, now of 128 tons, was then registered at Whitby & owned by William Stead & John Green, with Charles Seaton her then captain. Turnbull's Shipping Registers of both 1855 & 1856 record the vessel, in 1855 data, as still owned by Stead & Green but with W. Stead now her captain. While Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 records the vessel, now of 118 tons, as owned by Francis Ayre and Henry Raw, Alfred Walker & Robert Consitt, all of Whitby. In 1859, the vessel is noted to have been owned by Alfred Walker, master mariner, and Jn. Wake, both of Whitby.
What finally happened to Rhoda? It is clear that the vessel was lost in Dec. 1862, but it is most difficult to tell you exactly what happened. Wikipedia reports the vessel became a wreck - twice in fact on Dec. 22, 1862 - firstly that the vessel struck on Newcombe Sand & became a wreck & secondly that she had struck a sunken wreck and was beached at Dungeness, Kent, where she was wrecked. In both cases while en route from Amble, Northumberland, to Rouen, France. Now Lowestoft, Suffolk, (near which Newcombe Sand is located) & Dungeness are quite a distance apart - 113 miles as the crow flies. Contemporary newspaper reports, quite confusing also, are available. On Dec. 24, 1862, 'The Evening Star', of London, in a report that I believe originated at New Romney (a little to the N. of Dungeness, Kent) reported that Rhoda, en route from Amble to Rouen with a cargo of coal, had, on Dec. 21, 1862, stranded on Newcombe Sand. Further, that while the crew were saved, the vessel would likely become a total wreck. 'The Standard', of London, on Dec. 25, 1862 reported as follows:- 'DUNGENESS, Dec. 23. - The Rhoda, Amble to Rouen, while at anchor off Dungeness struck on something, supposed to have been a wreck, early yesterday morning, and making water very rapidly, she slipped, and was run on the beach at No. 1 Battery, where she now lies a total wreck.'
'Tis confusing. Did the vessel free itself from Newcombe Sand & then sail S. to Dungeness? Can you tell us anything more? #2632

3   Lady Frances
222 or 223 tons
1821

A snow or brig, built by W. & J. M. Gales & launched in Apl. 1821. The data available to the webmaster re this vessel is modest. Lady Frances is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1828 thru 1833, of 8 thru 13 years old & of 228 tons, owned by 'Sursfield'. With R. Berry listed as her captain thru 1831 then J. Smith. For service ex Belfast, Ireland, in 1828 & 1829, from Waterford, Ireland, to Sunderland in 1831. Simon Gales earlier advised (thanks!) that her initial owner was R. Scurfield rather than 'Sursfield'. Which data is confirmed in an available 1826 list of vessels registered at Sunderland, which notes that the vessel was then owned by R. Scurfield & Co. & that her then captain was R. Barry (rather than R. Berry).
In 1832, per LR, the vessel became owned by T. Douglas, for service from Hull to Elsinore (Helsingør, Denmark), with J. Smith still her captain.
Lady Frances is also listed, cryptically, in LRs of 1834 thru 1838/39. Cryptically? Yes indeed. It lists the vessel at 223 tons, registered at Sunderland, with J. Smith her captain - and nothing more. No owner name, no date & place of build, no proposed voyages, no rigging.
So far as the webmaster can see, the vessel is not later LR referenced. Fortunately, however, the North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/49 includes the vessel, & notes that in Apl. 1848 the vessel was registered at Sunderland, & owned by T. Douglas of Bishopwearmouth & J. Coleman of Gateshead.
The webmaster first detail listed this vessel having seen, in a U.K. Government report, that Lady Frances, en route from Swansea, Wales, to London with a crew of 6, was wrecked off the Isle of Wight on Oct. 21, 1852. At line 2082 here, the vessel there noted to be owned by Thos. Douglas. A more detailed list of 1852 vessel losses was also Government published - you can read the page that relates to Lady Frances here ex here. It states that the vessel, with a cargo of patent fuel, sprang a leak & sank, bow first, when about 20 miles SW of St. Catherine's Light (S. tip of the Isle of Wight). From the wording it would seem that the vessel sank very soon indeed after the leak was discovered. The crew (of 8 per such report) took to the ship's boats so no loss of life. Lennox Chalcroft is there noted to have been the vessel's captain at the time of her loss. However, Lloyd's List of Oct. 25, 1852 noted that a deposition re the loss of 'Lady Francis' had been filed by Lenox Chalcraft, her captain. This contemporary report also refers to the loss of 'Lady Francis'. There would seem to have been some confusion as to the spelling of the vessel's name. But Lady Frances looks, to the webmaster at least, to be correct.
Is there anything you can add? And/or correct? #2457

4   Kingston
296 later 295 tons
1822

A fully rigged ship, built by W. & J. M. Gales & launched in Jan. 1822. The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1822 thru 1836/37. It was, per LR, initially owned, thru 1826, by Pirie & Co., likely of London, with D. Luckie serving as the vessel's captain. For service from London to Demerera (South America, now Guyana), except for 1823 when service from London to 'CdeV' (where is it?) is indicated.
From 1827 thru 1829, Kingston, per LR, was owned by Binney, soon Binney & Co., with B. or J. Binney serving as the vessel's captain. For service from London, to Halifax, Canada, in 1827, from Liverpool to St. Thomas in 1828, & ex London in 1829.
This advertisement tells us that on Aug. 13, 1829, the 294 ton Kingston, than at West India Dock in London, was offered for sale at a public auction held in London. B. Baynton is therein stated to be her then commander.
In 1830, per LR, the vessel became owned by Thompson, (in 1834 Thomson of London) for service from London to Jamaica, with J. Baynton (B. Baynton in 1834) serving as the vessel's captain. 'Thompson/Thomson', per LR, owned the vessel thru 1835/36. The vessel is LR recorded at 295 tons from 1834.
In 1836/37, per LR, the vessel became owned by B. R. Brown (maybe R. R. Brown), for service from London to Honduras (Caribbean, N. of both Panama & Nicaragua). LR of 1836/37 also indicates that R. Winter was then the vessel's captain & that the vessel had been 'Abandoned'.
I have read that on Sep. 3, 1836, a vessel named Kingston, likely 'our' vessel, Winter in command, left London for Barbadoes (Barbados). It would seem that there was a further change in the vessel's captain. This contemporary news report advises that on Mar. 5, 1837, Orion, an American vessel under the command of 'Card', encountered a heavy gale at 28.80N/59.30W - about 900 miles SE of Bermuda - while en route from New Orleans to Norfolk, Virginia, both U.S.A. The next morning Orion fell in with Kingston of London, which vessel had presumably experienced the same gale - & had been en route from Honduras to Cork, Ireland. Kingston was full of water, with stern stove in, & mainmast & bulwarks gone. At noon on Mar. 6, 1837, Orion took off 13 Kingston crew members, being her entire crew other than her captain (Peck) who had been washed overboard - ten hours earlier I have read. Orion landed the 13 survivors at Norfolk, Virginia.
Is there anything you can add? #2456

5   Echo
114 later 114/97, 131 & 118 tons

16741
1823

A brig or snow built by William & John M. Gales. A 'Gales' build list in these pages states that Echo was built for the builder's own account - presumably until it was sold. The vessel, which was launched in May 1823, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1826/27 thru 1848/49, a 6 year LR silence, & again from 1855/56 thru 1869/70.
From 1826/27 thru 1837/38, Echo was owned by C. Balfour (noted to be of Montrose, Scotland, from 1834) for service from Leith, Scotland, to i) Pillau (now Baltiysk, Russia) in 1826/27, & ii) to the Baltic in 1827/28 & 1828/29. From Liverpool to Cadiz, Spain, in 1829/30 & 1830/31, to Riga, Latvia, ex Liverpool, in 1831/32, from London to Riga, in 1832/33, ex Belfast in 1834, & ex London to the Grand Canary Islands (in 1835/36 thru 1837/38). Per LR, T. Peter served as the vessel's captain thru 1828/29, & G. Balfour from 1829/30 thru 1837/38. LR had some unusual comments re the vessel for the 3 years from 1835/36 - 'wants repairs'.
From 1838/39, Pegg & Co., of London, is LR listed as the vessel's owner for service from Shields to London. With R. Duncan serving as the captain of the vessel, now of 114/97 tons.
From 1845/46 to 1848/49, S. Stokoe of South Shields is LR listed as Echo's owner for service from Newcastle to London. With J. Coltman, per LR, her captain thru such period. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9 records the 131 ton vessel as then registered at Newcastle & owned, in Jul. 1848, by Appleton & Stokoe, of South Shields. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/55 records the vessel, twice in fact, in 1854, registered at Shields in both cases. Firstly owned by Samuel Appleton of South Shields with Thomas Appleton her captain. And secondly as owned by John Lawrence Hall & Thomas Coltman, both of South Shields, with John Coltman her captain.
In Nov. 1854, the vessel was registered at Dover (scroll to #16741). That is a puzzle!
I note that Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1855 records Echo as a Shields registered schooner, owned by T. Coltman of Shields with W. J. Robison her captain. Probably briefly because when LR coverage resumed in 1855/56, 'Coltman' of Shields is listed, in 1855/56 only, as the vessel's owner for service as a Shields coaster. With 'W. Rbinsn' her captain. Vessel now LR listed at 131 tons.
From 1856/57 thru to 1869/70, Howard & Co. of Lynn, Norfolk, is listed as owner of the Lynn registered vessel for service as a Lynn coaster. With J. Howard was her captain for that entire period.
The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL'), however, records Echo's ownership very differently. It reports the vessel to have been registered at Lynn only thru 1860 & registered at Maldon, Essex, thereafter thru 1871. With Barnard Miles, of Maldon, her owner from 1865 thru 1867 & Samuel Hawkes, also of Maldon, from 1868 thru 1871 (1870). MNL listed at 118 tons from 1865.
63.6 ft. long. A couple of crew lists are available.
On Feb. 10, 1871, per line 1868 here, the 118 ton brig was stranded at Bridlington, East Yorkshire, while en route from Sunderland to Rochester, Kent, with a cargo of coal. Crew of 6 - none lost. Then stated to be owned by Samuel Hawker. Wikipedia tells us that Echo's crew were rescued by the Bridlington lifeboat. And refers to the vessel as a schooner. On that day, i.e. Feb. 10, 1871, a great many ships were lost or damaged by a terrific gale which affected vast areas of the NE coast of England. An extensive account of the loss at the Tyne of Jabez, another Sunderland built ship, can be read here.
Can you add anything additional? #2510

6   Hylton
232, later 231 tons

25440
1823

A brig or snow built in Mar. 1823 by William & John M. Gales.
Hylton is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1825/26 thru to 1863/64. The 260 ton (per LR, likely in error) brig was initially owned, thru 1831, by Gales & Co., presumably the vessel's builder, for service from Cork, Ireland, - with service to Quebec, Canada, referenced in 1826. With, per LR, T. Hudson always her captain. An 1826 list of Sunderland registered vessels records the 231 ton snow as owned by W. Gales with L. Hudson her then captain.
A Sunderland shipping website, which website requests no links or recognition, tells us that the vessel was registered on Feb. 27, 1830 in the name of John George Reay, of South Shields. We thank such site for that data.
In Dec. 1831, the vessel was repaired at the Newcastle shipyard of C. Young & Sons. Thanks to the 'Lloyd's Register Foundation', a 2-page 1835 Survey for Hylton is available here. I note that other documents re the vessel are also available at such website.
Hylton, per LR, became of 232 tons in 1834. From 1831/32 to 1852/53, the vessel, per LR, was owned by J. & G. Reay, initially of Newcastle but from 1836/37 of South Shields. With Brodie (O. Brodie from 1830/31) her captain thru 1835/36, J. Thirkwell from 1835/36 thru 1839/40, J. Booth from 1839/40 thru 1845/46, 'Davison' or R. Davidson from 1846/47 thru 1850/51, & B. Holland in 1851/52 & 1852/53. For service from Liverpool to Wyborg (Vyborg, NW of St. Petersburg, Russia), in 1831/32 & 1832/33, & in later years from Newcastle or Shields to the Baltic, from Hull to St. Petersburg (in 1839/40), from Shields to London, from Newcastle to the Mediterranean, & from Shields to Sweden (in 1851/52 & 1852/53). The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9, in Jul. 1848 data, lists J. C. Reay of South Shields, as her then owner.
The Sunderland shipping website that I referred to above tells us also that on Jun. 03, 1850, Hylton was registered in the name of Ralph Hart, of South Shields.
In LR of 1853/54 only, S. Stokoe, of Shields, is listed as Hylton's owner for service from Shields to London. With T. Sprott her captain. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5, in 1854 data, records the vessel as Shields registered & owned by Samuel Stoke of South Shields with Ben. Holland, her then captain. The Sunderland shipping website, however, refers to Samuel Stokoe.
From the next year, i.e. 1854/55 to 1863/64, Scott & Co., of Shields, is LR listed as the vessel's owner. Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1855 lists T. & J. Scott, of South Shields as the vessel's then owner with G. Bambrough her captain. Thomas & James Scott it would appear. While TR of 1856 lists J. Scott of South Shields as her owner. During the period of 'Scott' ownership, G. Stephenson, per LR, was the vessel's captain in 1854/55 & H. Riddle thereafter thru 1863/64. 
The available LR data from 1858/59 is limited - suggesting that Hylton may well have been sold. Indeed Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 lists Robert Morrison of South Shields as her then owner.
The Mercantile Navy List records the vessel from 1857 thru 1864, always registered at Shields.
86.0 ft. long, no crew lists seem to be available.
What finally happened to Hylton? On Oct. 20, 1862, per line 2830 here, the 231 ton snow was abandoned at sea while trading 'coastwise'. Crew of 8 - 2 lost. The location where the vessel was lost & its routing is not referenced in such listing - Robert Morrison is stated to have been her then owner.
The webmaster has now learned more about the loss of Hylton, but has not read in any report the name of her then captain. It would seem that in mid/late Oct. 1862, a series of massive gales hit vast areas of the U.K. & the North Sea. So massive that the reports reference no less than 182 wrecks in a single week. For most of those wrecks the reporting is modest indeed. However the Hylton story was so heart wrenching & compelling that its awful experience was set out in some detail.
It would appear likely that Hylton had just delivered a cargo of coal to London. And was returning northwards from London in ballast. Somewhere in the North Sea, it was hit by the gales & the crew struggled to keep the vessel afloat. After two or three days battling the seas, a smack came near but, in the conditions, could not come alongside the Hylton. The smack did however shout that if the Hylton crew were able to get to the smack in a ship's boat they would take them on board. So the Hylton crew abandoned their vessel & took to a ship's open long boat. To then find that the smack did not stand by as promised, rather it sailed off to leave the Hylton crew in their tiny boat to face their fate - likely to end up in watery graves. The Hylton crew were in that open boat for about 54 hours, during which time the ship's mate, an old man who apparently was the father of the captain, was washed overboard & drowned. As also was a young cabin boy. Eventually Hylton's captain & 5 crew members were picked up, in an exhausted condition, by Tiger, a steamship which was en route from Hamburg, Germany, to Kingston upon Hull - & were landed at Hull on Oct. 25, 1862. The name of the smack involved was, I read, known, but its name appears not to have been published. Some contemporary news reports - 1, 2 & 3.
Can you tell us anything additional? Maybe provide the name of Hylton's captain at the time of her loss? #2857

7   Return
180 later 194 tons
1824

A brig or snow built by William & John M. Gales. Return, which was launched in Jun. 1824, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed, often in a fragmentary fashion, from 1829 thru 1846/47 & not thereafter. The webmaster has not seen any documentary evidence of her initial owner, however a 'Gales' build list on site states 'H. Magra' with a question mark. From 1829 thru 1833, LR lists 'McGhie' as the 180 ton vessel's owner but advises no port of registration. From 1834 thru 1838/39 the modest LR data includes no year of build, no owner name, no rig or routing data but does indicate Sunderland registry. From 1839/40 thru 1846/47, LR records H. Magee, of Sunderland, as Return's owner.
Which of the two names was correct i.e. McGhie or Magee? Fortunately we can tell you. On site is a list of vessels registered at Sunderland in 1826 (ex Google), two years after the vessel was launched. It reports (here) that H. Magee, of Sunderland, was then Return's owner with J. Bolton the vessel's captain. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9, records the vessel as Sunderland registered & still owned, in Apl. 1848, by H. Magee, of Monkwearmouth, Sunderland. So 'Magee' seems to be correct, at least thru 1846/47 where the LR data is again modest - which suggests that the vessel was then either out of commission or in process of sale. David Berry advises, however, (thanks!), that Henry Magee died in late 1851.
While 'Magee' owned, LR lists H. Potter as the vessel's captain from 1829 thru 1833 (for service ex London), M. Craggs from 1834 thru 1838/39 & W. Redman from 1839/40 thru 1846/47 (for service from Sunderland to London thru 1841/42, & from Cardiff, Wales, to Rotterdam from 1843/44 thru 1845/46 - but I note that there are very few references to the vessel at 'Welsh Newspapers Online').  It seems likely that 'Redman' served thru late 1844 - there are many Lloyd's List references to the vessel, with 'Redman' in command, serving St. Petersburg (Russia), Le Havre (France), & Rotterdam - frequently returning to Lynn, Norfolk. David Berry kindly advises that 'Blake' was the vessel's captain for a voyage from Seaham to London & back, from Nov. 1845 thru Jan. 10, 1846 (David Berry's ggrandfather Samuel Berry was an apprentice on such voyage). In 1846 'Goodridge' or 'Goodbridge' would seem to have served as the vessel's captain on a voyage ex Sunderland to Hamburg, Germany.
What finally happened to Return? Wikipedia tells us, here, that on Feb. 11, 1853, the brig struck a sunken wreck in the Swin (I believe part of the Gunfleet Sands, located off the Essex coast near Clacton), & foundered. Further that her crew were rescued by Eliner, a Barking (East London) smack. This Lloyd's List report rather indicates that Return was lost on the night of Feb. 10, 1853, sank within 20 minutes of the impact, & that 'Goddard' was then her captain.
Is there anything you can add to the above? The name of the vessel's owner at the time of her loss? #2511

8   Anns
95/75 tons
1826

A schooner (later, per LR, a brigantine), built by William & John M. Gales. The vessel, which was launched in Jun. 1826, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1825/26 thru 1841/42, then an LR silence of three years, & again from 1845/46 thru 1847/48. For many of those years, i.e. from 1829/30 thru 1841/42, LR listed the vessel as Ann's rather than Anns.
The vessel's initial owner, per LR, was J. Cook - of Sunderland. We know that not because LR said so but because the vessel is included here, in a list of vessels registered at Sunderland in 1826. A 'Gales' build list, on site, tells us that J. Cook meant John Cook & that he was of Hylton.
While LRs record J. Cook (J. Cooke from 1834) as Anns' owner thru 1841/42 (I read that the vessel became Whitby, Yorkshire, registered in 1841). 'Cook' was likely of Sunderland thru 1834, then of Inverness (in 1834 perhaps), then of Burghead (Moray Firth, NE of Inverness, from 1834), both in Scotland. Per LR, A. Cook served as the vessel's captain from 1826 thru 1829/30 & from 1834 thru 1841/42. McDonald, maybe A. McDonald, was the vessel's captain from 1829/30 thru 1831/32, & J. Cook from 1831/32 thru 1832/33. The vessel served as a coaster - i) London (1825/26 & 1826/27), ii) Bristol (from 1827/28 thru 1829/30) & iii) Liverpool (1830/31 thru 1832/33). LR notes that the vessel served from Aberdeen to London in 1834 & 1835/36, & from Dundee to London from 1836/37 thru 1841/42.
LRs of 1845/46 thru 1847/48 record Anns as now a brigantine with E. Clark of Whitby as the vessel's owner (likely from 1841) & J. Clark her captain - for service as a Whitby coaster. This 1908 Whitby shipping history page records that her then owners were Geo. Hopper and Ed. Clark. And notes that the vessel was lost at Yarmouth in 1847.
Wikipedia advises (thanks!), that on Nov. 18, 1847 a schooner of the name, en route from Newcastle to London, was abandoned off Great Yarmouth, Norfolk. Further, that her crew were rescued by a brig. This contemporary 'Lloyd's List' report tells us i) that the vessel's captain at the time was 'Hogarth' ii) refers to the depth of water then in her hull, but iii) makes no reference to a brig rescuing her crew. It would be good to be able to read the full text at the 'Wiki' source. But, without an independent reference to 'Hogarth' being the captain of our 'Anns', it is not possible to conclude that it was truly 'our' vessel. But it most likely was.
Can you add anything additional? #2587

9   Adahbella or Ada Bella
180 later 194 tons
1827

A snow built by John M. Gales. The available data re this vessel is modest - even the vessel's name is unclear. The webmaster has two Sunderland build lists available to him. One of them lists Adahbella, launched in Nov. 1827 & built by J. M. Gales. The other lists Ada Bella, 1827, also built by J. M. Gales.
The vessel is listed, as Adahbella, in LLoyd's Registers of 1829/30 thru 1832/33, always owned by Trattles & Co., for service from Leith, Scotland, to the Baltic, with 'Nesfield' noted to have always been the vessel's captain.
Now the vessel was first listed having seen this brief entry in a 1908 Whitby, Yorkshire, shipping history book. It tells us that Ada Bella was first registered, at Whitby, in 1829, owned by Seaton Trattles. Further that the vessel was lost in 1831, with no date mentioned.
The webmaster has seen just two credible references to the vessel, both in Lloyd's List. On May 21, 1830, Ada Bella, Nesfield in command, arrived at Danzig (now Gdańsk, Poland) ex Norkiobing (Norrköping, E. Sweden). On Jul. 31, 1830, Adebella, Nesfield in command, arrived at Copenhagen, Denmark, ex Leith.
The webmaster needs help to establish what happened to the vessel & exactly when. #2564

10   Aquila
100 tons
1827

A schooner built by William & John M. Gales. Aquila, which was launched in Jul. 1827, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1826/27 thru 1841/42 only. For a couple of years, i.e. in 1834 & 1835/36, the LR data is fragmentary - of 100 tons, registered at Whitby, Yorkshire, with M. Ord her captain. With no owner name, rig, intended voyage, etc. referenced.
LRs of 1826/27 thru 1832/33 all list Craig & Co., as Aquila's owner with M. Ord consistently serving as the vessel's captain. For service as a London coaster in 1826/27 & 1827/28 & as a Yarmouth, Norfolk, coaster from 1828/29 thru 1852/53. An on site 'Gales' build list states that John Craig, of Sunderland, was the vessel's initial owner.
LRs of 1836/37 thru 1841/42 all record Ord & Co., of Whitby, as the vessel's owner for service as a Whitby coaster. With M. Ord always her captain.
The above ownership data looks to be inaccurate. This Whitby shipping history book page states that Aquila became Whitby owned in 1829, owned by Jn. Barry, a shipwright, & Matt. Ord, both presumably of Whitby. It further states that in 1840 the vessel's owner was Will Todd, also of Whitby. And that in 1844 the vessel became Scarboro', Yorkshire, registered.
It seems likely that 'Stephenson' became the vessel's captain & served as such from Mar. thru Oct. 1844 at least. I say that because on Apl. 5, 1844, a vessel named Aquila arrived at Scarboro', Yorkshire, Stephenson in command, ex Calais, France, where it had arrived from Shields on Mar. 28, 1844. On Apl. 24, 1844 such vessel arrived again at Calais ex Warkworth (near Amble, Northumberland). On May 24, 1844, Aquila arrived at Lowestoffe (Lowestoft) Roads ex Calais, with loss of anchor & cable. It was back at Scarboro' again on both Jun. 5, & Jul. 29, 1844 ex Calais, & back at Shields on Oct. 12, 1844 ex Boulogne, France.
What finally happened to Aquila? The webmaster does not know for sure. But it may well relate to a report from Shields on Oct. 16, 1844 that stated that a few days prior to that date, Sophie, from Hamburg, Germany, in entering the harbour at Shields, had struck Aquila, from France, which had suffered damage. The webmaster spotted no later references to Aquila.
Is there anything you can add to the above modest history? #2667

11   Content
187, later 188, 166 & 165 tons
1827

A snow or brig built by William & John M. Gales. A partial 'Gales' build list, on site here, indicates that Content was built for the builder's own account. So far as I can see, the vessel was listed in Lloyd's Register ('LR') only from 1834 thru 1838/39 & that identification is tentative. LR states that Content, a vessel of 188 tons, was registered at Sunderland with J. Jackson her captain i.e. no year or place of build, no rig, no owner name, no proposed voyage data, etc. was indicated. It was not later recorded in LR, thru to 1861/62.
I list it here because the vessel was listed in U.K. Parliamentary Papers re the Plimsoll Inquiry, stranded in late 1861.
Content, now 27 years old, is recorded in the North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9, in Apl. 1848 data, as an 188 ton brig then owned by T. Longstaff of Sunderland.
I now learn that 6 vessels, all previously owned by the late Thomas Longstaff, were sold at an auction, held at Sunderland on Oct. 14, 1851. At that sale (in green) Mr. Sharp bought Content for the sum of £510.
When listed in Marwood's North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5, in Mar. 1854 data, Content, now of 166 tons, was owned by Richd. Sharp, Wm. Farrow & Geo. Hutchinson, all of Sunderland, with Jas. Barrett serving as the vessel's captain. It was still so owned & captained per Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1855 & also in the 1856 edition of such register & in 1858 in Christie's Shipping Register, with the latter listing the owner names as Richard Sharp, William Farrow & George Hutchinson.
The Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') of 1857 thru 1862 all list the vessel as registered at Sunderland. Signal letters HPRV. It must have been sold after 1858 & before Dec. 1861.
What finally happened to Content? On Dec. 13, 1861, stated to be then owned by Thos. Minikin, the 155 ton snow stranded at Dunwich, Suffolk, while en route from Sunderland to London with a cargo of coal. Crew of 6 - none lost. As per line 1899 on this page. The 'Newcastle Journal' of Dec. 16, 1861 reported that at 6:30 a.m. on Dec. 12, 1861, Content, 'Miniken' in command, struck what was supposed to be a wreck, when near Sizewell, Suffolk. During a heavy gale. With difficulty the vessel was kept afloat. And soon was beached opposite the Sluice at Sizewell. The Thorpe lifeboat safely rescued & landed what was reported to be the five man crew of Content. This news report relates.
Can you add anything additional? #2680

12   Vesta
209 later 187 & 177 tons

3412
1827

A snow or brig built by W. & John M. Gales. Vesta, which was launched in Feb. 1827, is Lloyd's Register listed from 1828/29 thru 1854/55 & not thereafter. A 'Gales' build list, on site here, records George Thompson of Bishopwearmouth, Sunderland, as the vessel's initial owner. LR of 1828/29, however, lists 'Seekamp' as the vessel's then owner for service ex London, with 'Whitehnd' (Whitehand?) her then captain.
LRs of 1828/29 thru 1842/43 all record 'Seekamp' (or 'Secamp') as the vessel's owner with the sole exception of 1831/32 which lists 'Whiteh'd' as her owner. LRs from & after 1834 (thru 1854/55 in fact) tell us that the vessel was registered at Ipswich, Suffolk, so I presume that Seekamp was likely an Ipswich resident. While 'Seekamp' owned the vessel, 'Whitehnd' served as her captain thru 1831/32, J. Barton from 1831/32 thru 1832/33 & W. Garrod from 1834 thru 1842/43 (indeed thru 1845/46).
Vesta's service while 'Seekamp/Whitehnd' owned? i) Ex London thru 1830/31, ii) from Lynn, Norfolk, to Riga, Latvia, in 1831/32, iii) from Yarmouth to 'North Fr' (northern France, perhaps) in 1832/33, iv) ex Ipswich from 1834 thru 1840/41 & v) from Ipswich to the Baltic in 1841/42, lastly vi) from Liverpool to Rotterdam in 1842/43.
From 1843/44 thru 1845/46, LRs record 'Cobbald', of Ipswich, as the vessel's owner for service as an Ipswich coaster (in 1843/44) & from Ipswich to the Baltic ( next 2 years). With W. Garrod her captain thru 1845/46 & then 'Draper'.
LRs from 1846/47 thru 1854/55 all record Read & Co., of Ipswich, as the vessel's owner, for consistent service from Limerick, Ireland, to Quebec, Canada, with 'Draper' always her captain.
It is quite clear that the LR record from 1853 is in error. This page (scroll to #3412) tells us that Vesta became Newcastle registered on Oct. 13, 1853. In Apl. 1854, per the North of England Maritime Directory, Vesta was owned by Edward Hutcheson & George Brown, both of Newcastle, with G. Allan her captain. Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1856 records E. Hutchinson & G. Brown as the vessel's owner, while TR of 1855 also lists G. Allan as the vessel's captain.
I read, in this page from a 1908 Whitby, Yorkshire, shipping history book, that in 1856 Vesta became Whitby registered, owned by T. and Robt. Mills. Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 confirms that Thomas and Robert Mills, of Whitby, were then the vessel's owners. Thomas Mills likely later died - in 1866 Robt. Mills owned all 64 shares in the vessel.
What finally happened to Vesta? Wikipedia advises (thanks!) that on Mar. 23, 1866, the vessel was lost in Swansea Bay, her 11 man crew being rescued by Swansea lifeboat Martha and Anne (search for Vesta). I am glad to know the name of the lifeboat. Neither of these two newspaper reports (1 & 2) refer to the lifeboat's name. The vessel, loaded with coal for Fécamp, France, (Normandy, NE of Le Havre, France) was at anchor when a strong gale arose. Vesta broke her moorings & drifted to the inner Green grounds. The lifeboat found Vesta's crew of 7 (not 11) clinging to her rigging. Just in time because Vesta sank soon thereafter. The webmaster has not yet learned the name of Vesta's captain at the time of her loss.
Can you add to or correct the above? #2604

13   Earl Bathurst
237 later 219 tons

23113
1828

A snow or brig, built by John M. Gales. Earl Bathurst, which was launched in Apl. 1828, is Lloyds's Register ('LR') listed from 1829/30 thru 1838/39, not in 1839/40, from 1840/41 thru 1844/45, & not thereafter. In 1829/30, the vessel, noted to be 2 years old, was, per LR, still owned by its builder ('J. M. Gale') for service ex Dublin, Ireland. With T. Brown & then 'Smith' serving as the vessel's captain.
LRs of 1830/31 thru 1832/33 list 'Smith' or 'Smith & Co.' as the vessel's owner for some varied service - from Gloucester (River Severn, Gloucestershire) to Naples (Italy), in 1830/31, from Newport, Wales, to London in 1831/32, & from London to Cape of Good Hope, South Africa, in 1832/33.
Now the vessel is LR listed from 1834 thru 1838/39, but cryptically so - of 237 tons, registered at Scarboro', Yorkshire, with 'Dickinson' her captain - but with no rig, no date & place of build, no owner name, no intended voyage data. LRs of 1840/41 thru 1844/45 all list Earl Bathurst as Scarboro' registered, owned by 'Smith' with 'Downey' serving as her captain. It seems likely that the vessel was Scarboro' owned & registered from back in 1830/31.
The LR silence after 1844/45 is partially covered off by some North of England shipping directories.
The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/49 does not cover the port of Scarboro'. But the 1854/55 edition of such register does & records the vessel, in 1853 data, as registered at Scarbro' & owned by Samuel Smith, Eliz. Hick, Thos. Newham & Wm. Smith, all of Scarbro', and Robert Smith of London. With Dav. Thomas, her master.
It would seem that the vessel was sold soon thereafter. Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 lists Earl Bathurst at 219 tons only & now registered at Hartlepool. Owned by George Smith, Edmund Stephenson & Joseph W. Tinley, all of Hartlepool.
The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') tells us that the vessel was Hartlepool registered on Jun. 10, 1853 (scroll to #23113). And tells us also that the vessel was i) Hartlepool registered from 1857 thru 1867 & ii) owned, from 1865 thru 1867, by Edmund Stevenson of Hartlepool. The vessel is not MNL listed in 1868.
The vessel is site listed having seen a reference to what surely must be this vessel here (in red) in a Lloyd's List report of events of Jan. 26, 1860. With 'Jones' noted to be her captain. On that day, 10 vessels including Earl Bathurst, were on shore at Robin Hood's Bay ('RHB') (SE of Whitby) & many more were lost or damaged elsewhere on the east coast. As a result of a violent gale & snowstorm that hit on the evening of Jan. 26, 1860. The vessel, it would seem, was not lost that day. It was got off & on Feb. 6, 1860 was at Whitby, Yorkshire, in a most damaged condition. To effect repairs.
'The Standard' newspaper, of London, in an extensive article you can read here, tells us of the extent of the storm & of the vast damage that was incurred by vessels large & small. Earl Bathurst is mentioned in the article but oh so briefly.
A little operational detail. On Apl. 27, 1859, Earl Bathurst (Hall in command) arrived at Hartlepool ex Hamburg, Germany. On Jun. 11, 1859, the vessel (Jones) arrived at Cronstadt (St. Petersburg, Russia) ex Hartlepool. It went on to Wyborg (Vyborg, NW of St. Petersburg), & arrived back at Grimsby on Aug. 17, 1859. On Jun. 5, 1860 (Watson) the vessel arrived again at Cronstadt ex Hartlepool, went onto Wyborg & on Jul. 22, 1860 arrived back at Hartlepool. Essentially the same voyage again (Watson) - arrived on Sep. 5, 1860 at Cronstadt - at Gravesend, London, on Nov. 8, 1860 ex Wyborg.
The webmaster is not really aware of what finally happened to the vessel. However, a certificate dated Jan. 4, 1867 advised MNL that the vessel had been lost. But Wikipedia advise (thanks!) that on May 7, 1866, a vessel of the name ran aground at Hartlepool. I presume that it was 'our' vessel.
Signal letters NQGT, A few crew lists, (1867 the latest) are available.
Is there anything you can add? More detail re the circumstances of the vessel's loss, perhaps? #2601

14   Ann
231, later 231/223 tons
1830

A brig or snow built by J. M. Gales. Ann, which was launched in Mar. 1830, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1834 thru 1852/53 with the exception of the years of 1844/45 thru 1847/48. We may, accordingly, need to locate a published launch announcement to know the name of her initial owner. LR of 1834 records R. Surtees of Sunderland replacing G. Wood, also of Sunderland. Her captain under 'Wood' ownership had been J. Moffatt. Her service under 'Surtees' ownership, i.e. from 1834 thru 1839/40? Per LR, from Sunderland to St. Petersburg, Russia, in 1834 & 1835/36 & from Sunderland to London thereafter, with 'Kilvington' the vessel's captain thru 1836/37 & E. Pounder thereafter thru 1839/40. In 1839/40, per LR, 'Thompson' of Sunderland became her owner, for more service from Sunderland to St. Petersburg, with 'Atkinson' serving as her captain.
After a 4 year LR 'silence', Ann was again LR listed from 1848/49 thru 1852/53, with J. Young of South Shields now her owner. And with 'Brown' her captain in 1848/49 & 1849/50 then E. Grieves. For service from Shields to the Baltic thru 1850/51 & from Shields to Odessa (Ukraine, Black Sea), in 1851/52 & 1852/53. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848-9, however, lists the vessel as rather registered at Newcastle in Jul. 1848 then owned by James Young & Co., of South Shields. LR of 1849/50 first listed the vessel at 231/233 tons.
On Dec. 29, 1852, Ann, en route from the Mediterranean to Shields with a cargo of grain & a crew of 9, was driven ashore at Tramore Bay, S. coast of Ireland (located in County Waterford, 13 km. S. of Waterford). This page, which lists the vessel as 'Anne' (search for 'Anne'), says she was rather en route to Limerick, Ireland. The crew were all saved though I cannot tell you how. The vessel's loss was U.K. Government reported here (ex here). Her owner at the time probably was James Young & Co. of South Shields, as above. I read, here, that the vessel was specifically en route from Odessa & was driven ashore in a heavy gale. The vessel was said to be in 'a very exposed situation' - it seems likely that the vessel soon broke up. Grieves, presumably the E. Grieves referred to above, was her captain at the time of the loss. I read (thanks!) that, on Jan. 18 & 19, 1853, Ann's hull & cargo of Ghirka wheat in barrels, was offered for sale at a public auction.
Can you add anything additional? #2471

15   Dorothea
178 later 161 tons

22474
1830

A snow, later a brig, built by John M. Gales. I often, in these listings, advise what Lloyd's Register ('LR') has to say about the particular vessel. In this case, however, the LR coverage is to be polite about it 'underwhelming'. I suspect that I may truly not understand what LR in the 1800s was trying to achieve.
The vessel is LR listed from 1830/31 thru 1833/34, initially owned by Vint & Co., likely of Sunderland, for service from Hull to Hamburg, Germany, & then as a Topsham, Devon, coaster.
LR in 1834/35 took a giant step in its listings, alas a step backwards! The vessel may be LR recorded from 1834/35 thru 1838/39, first listed as Sunderland registered & then as Whitby registered. May be registered? There is a vessel of the name of 178 tons listed with virtually no data whatsoever, not even where the vessel was built, a giant step backwards from the data of say LR of 1833/34.
Such limited coverage is however better than that after 1838/39 where LR is totally silent about the vessel - for the next 34 years! It was an average sized vessel, it would seem, but it apparently merited, for whatever reason, zero LR coverage.
What do we know? The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9 does not list Dorothea (Whitby list not included). The equivalent list of 1854/5 does list the vessel, in 1853 data, as Whitby registered & owned by Wm. Waller of Runswick & Robt. Porritt, of Hinderwell, both Yorkshire, with Wm. Waller then her captain. Turnbull's Shipping Registers of both 1855 & 1856 record Dorothea, a brig, as registered at Whitby & owned by W. Walker of Runswick & R. Porritt, of Hinderwell, with W. Walker her captain. Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 records William Waller & Robert Porritt as her then owners.
The Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') of 1865 thru 1871 (1870) all record William Waller, of Runswick, as her owner. MNL of 1872 rather lists Francis Waller, of Middlesbro', Yorkshire, as her then owner. MNL also tells us that the vessel was first registered at Whitby in 1827.
A Whitby shipping history book provides extensive data about Dorothea. It tells us that in late Oct. 1862, Dorothea, near the Danish coast in the North Sea, under the command of John Elliott Lund, came across a vessel in distress - Margaret, also of Whitby, with 4 ft. of water in her holds. Margaret's crew left their vessel in a ship's boat & came aboard Dorothea, but some of then returned to Margaret on the next day to man her again when Dorothea took Margaret in tow. In due course Dorothea arrived safely back at Hartlepool with Margaret astern. It would seem that a court case resulted. A total of £210 was awarded - £140 for the ship, £25 for 'Lund', £18 for Dorothea's crew & £12 for Dorothea's boys. All as per this page.
Signal letters NLQF. Many crew lists are available via here.
On Dec. 11, 1872, per line 3166 here, the 161 ton square foundered ESE of the Humber, while en route from Middlesboro' to London with a cargo of coal tar pitch. Crew of 5 - none lost. Dorothea was there stated to have been owned by Francis Waller. The loss more likely was on Dec. 10th rather than the 11th. It would appear that Jn. Waller was also then a part owner. Wikipedia notes the loss here.
Anything you can add? Or correct? #2657

16   Earl Grey
229, later 212 tons

23837
1831

A brig or snow built by W. Gales. Earl Grey? The vessel Earl Grey, which was launched in Jan. 1848, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1832 thru 1838/39 only, & for most of those years, i.e. from 1834 thru 1838/39, the data is fragmentary - of 229 tons, registered at Sunderland, with J. Bartram her captain but with no owner name, no rig, no year & place of build, nor routing indicated. Per LR, the vesssel was initially owned by White & Sons for service from Hull to Sunderland in 1832 & 1833, with J. Bartram (J. Bertram - with an 'e' - in 1832 & 1833) serving as the vessel's captain thru 1838/39. A 'Gales' build list on site here records Andrew White as the vessel's initial owner.
For most of the vessel's life, LR is therefore silent about the vessel. Fortunately Earl Grey is recorded in a number of NE shipping registers. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/49 records the vessel, in May 1848, as registered at Hartlepool & owned by Christopher Davison of Hartlepool, Isabella Davison of Homerton (London East End), Edmund Shaw of London, & John Whitbread of Edmonton (N. London). The equivalent directory of 1854/55 lists the vessel, in 1854, as registered at Hartlepool & owned by the representatives of the late Christopher Davison of Hartlepool, Isabella Davison of Homerton, Middlesex, Edmund Shaw of London & John Whitbread of Edmonton, Middlesex. With Jno. (Jonathan) Thompson her then captain. Turnbull's Shipping Registers of both 1855 & 1856 (in 1855 data), lists C. Davison & Co., of Hartlepool, as the vessel's owner with J. Thompson her captain. While Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 lists Robert and Isabella Davison, Edward, and W. M. Shaw, all of Middlesex (I think that is what it means) as the vessel's then owners.
On Dec. 13, 1850, a vessel of the name, ex Newry, ran aground on Brigg Rocks (near Belfast, Ireland). With assistance it was refloated & put into Belfast in a leaky condition. I read that 'Sumner' was such vessel's then captain. Was it 'our' Earl Grey? Likely not but I am not sure. On Nov. 8, 1855, a vessel of the name, under tow leaving Gt. Yarmouth for Newcastle, Green in command, lost her tow & grounded on the Knoll (sands E. of Yarmouth). Was expected to get off. Again I do not know if that was 'our' Earl Grey.
This is a good place to note that 'Hartlepool History Then and Now' provides, here, extensive data about the vessel. With a detailed account of the circumstances re her later loss. They also provide detailed data about John Coverdale & his family & shipping fleet. Do drop by their fine website!
Such 'HHTandN' site tells us that in Apl. 1859, John Coverdale, of West Hartlepool, became the vessel's owner. In May 1859, that became John Coverdale & William Henry Sayers. The vessel's ownership reverted in Apl. 1864 back to John Coverdale. W. H. Sayers was, I read, the vessel's captain from 1860 thru 1864 & B. S. Grainger from 1864.
What finally happened to Earl Grey? It would seem that on Dec. 5, 1864, the vessel, then owned by John Coverdale of Hartlepool, passed Elsinore, Denmark, presumably returning to the U.K. from an unknown (to the webmaster) Baltic port. With B. S. Granger (likely Grainger) in command & a crew of 8, all told. At 3:30 a.m. on Dec. 6, 1864, during a gale, the vessel ran aground on Anholt-reef, presumably close to the island of Anholt (a Danish island, in the Kattegat, located about midway between Denmark & Sweden). Earl Grey was stuck on the reef for 6 days during which time the ship became full of water & pounded by immense seas which took away both of her masts, destroyed her rudder & stern post & essentially made her a total wreck. For all of those six long days, the crew suffered great hardship - huddled with limited shelter, no water & just a few peas to eat - 'one lad actually died from starvation before help arrived'. Eventually the ship was freed from the reef & her crew were rescued, on Dec. 12, 1864, by a small boat from the nearby island of Læsø. Alas, soon after they reached land, another crew member, a boy named John Matthewson, also died. So two lives were lost. These events were widely published in the U.K. press at the time. You can read one such report in its entirety here. It is sad reading, indeed. Wikipedia advises her loss here.
The now abandoned vessel must have drifted & gone aground somewhere else. I read that she was got off in Jan. 1865, towed to Frederikshavn (NE Jutland coast, Denmark) where she was condemned & sold as a wreck. A portion of her cargo likely was saved.
Signal letters NTHC, a few crew lists are available here. Hartlepool registration documents (alas, my old eyes cannot read them) are available (1 & 2).
Is there anything additional you can add to the above account? Or correct? #2513

17   Jane Dunn
208 later 198 tons
1831

A brig or snow built by J. M. Gales. Jane Dunn, which was launched in Jan. 1831, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1831/32 thru 1838/39 only. Its initial owner was W. Dunn, for service from Liverpool to Narva (Gulf of Finland, Estonia) in 1831/32 & from Exmouth, Devon, to 'SAnd' (which I now know means St. Andrews, see below), in 1832/33. With T. Purday the vessel's initial captain & J. Loney her captain thereafter thru 1838/39 (though J. Lowney, likely in error, in LR of 1831/32).
The data provide by LRs from 1834 is modest indeed - of 208 tons, registered at Sunderland, with J. Loney her captain. And that is all! No owner name or port of registry, no rig, no date of build, no intended voyages etc.
It seems likely that Jane Dunn's initial captain was 'Purdy'. 'Smith' would seem to have been her captain in 1837. For a great many years, from roughly 1837 thru 1849 at least, 'Williams' was her captain - for a vast number of voyages to Amsterdam with coal.
The webmaster has not researched the operational history of Jane Dunn - there are an enormous number of references to her over the years. A few events which however I happened to spot in passing. i) On May 7, 1831, the vessel (Purdy) was at Elsinore, Denmark, en route to St. Petersburg, Russia. ii) On Aug. 11, 1832, the vessel (Loney) arrived at Topsham, Devon, with a cargo of timber ex St. Andrews, New Brunswick, Canada. iii) On Jan. 16, 1839, during a major storm or hurricane, the vessel (Williams) was driven from her anchors & chains at sea but arrived safely at Burlington, Yorkshire, & there landed the crew of Spring-flower, a pilot boat. iv) On Feb. 27, 1840, the vessel was in contact with Pilgrim (Ranton) when off Sizewell Bank (off Thorpness, Suffolk). Pilgrim made it to Harwich, Essex, with her bow stove in. v) On Nov. 30, 1843 the vessel had to put back to Rotterdam having lost 2 anchors & their chains. vi) On Nov. 13, 1845 the vessel put into Southampton in a leaky condition. vii) On Sep. 17, 1847, the vessel rescued the 7 man crew of Navigator (Francis) found in a sinking state at 53.41N/5.51E. And landed them at Sunderland. viii) On Sep. 13, 1849, the vessel was assisted into Niewdiep (effectively Amsterdam) leaky.
The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9 tells us, in Apl. 1848 data, that Jane Dunn, still Sunderland registered, was then owned by T. Longstaff, of Sunderland. The equivalent directory of 1854/5, in Mar. 1854 data, records John Phillips of Sunderland as the vessel's then owner, with John C. Phillips, her then captain. Such data is confirmed by Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1855 while TR of 1856 records J. Phillips as still her owner.
I now learn that 6 vessels, all previously owned by the late Thomas Longstaff, were sold at an auction, held at Sunderland on Oct. 14, 1851. At that sale (in red) Mr. Phillips bought Jane Dunn for the sum of £630.
The webmaster did not expect to find the vessel listed in TR of 1856. I say that because at 2:30 a.m. on Feb. 6, 1855, Jane Dunn was in collision with Urania off the coast at Cromer, Norfolk. When they collided, the crew of Jane Dunn jumped on board Urania. They tried to get back on board via a Urania ship's boat but it was not safe to do so. Jane Dunn went on shore at Sheringham, NW of Cromer, cut down to the water's edge, while Urania landed Jane Dunn's crew at Sunderland on Feb. 9, 1855. On Feb. 10, 1855, it was reported that Jane Dunn had broken up. All as per these (1 & 2) contemporary news reports. I have not spotted the name of the vessel's master at the time of her loss. Certainly 'Phillips' was her master in late 1854.
The vessel would not seem to have been granted an Official Number, on Jan. 1, 1855. I note, in passing, that Urania was built at Sunderland in 1837.
Is there anything you can add to or correct in the above text? #2679

18   Thomas & Hannah
243 later 226 tons

2717
1831

A snow or brig, built by W. Gales. Thomas & Hannah, which was launched in Aug. 1831, was Lloyd's Register ('LR') recorded from 1832/33 thru 1844/45 - owned by 'Longstaff' of Sunderland for service from Sunderland to America, later Bristol to Danzig (now Gdańsk, Poland). The vessel seems not to have been later LR recorded.
The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9, in Apl. 1848 data, records the vessel as registered at Sunderland & owned by T. Longstaff.
'Longstaff', Thomas Longstaff in fact, apparently died, I think in late 1850. I now learn that 6 vessels, all previously owned by the late Thomas Longstaff, were sold at an auction, held at Sunderland on Oct. 14, 1851. And at that sale (in green) Mr. Richard Robinson, of Monkwearmouth, Sunderland, bought Thomas & Hannah for the sum of £870.
So the North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5, in Mar. 1854 data, records Richd. Robinson, of Sunderland, as the vessel's then owner with Geo. Milburn her then captain. Such data is confirmed by Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1855 while TR of 1856 also records the 225 ton snow as owned by R. Robinson of Sunderland. As essentially does Christie's Shipping Register of 1858.
What finally happened to Thomas & Hannah? On Oct. 20, 1860, per line 395 here, the 226 ton snow foundered at sea while en route from Sunderland to Niewe Diep (Amsterdam) with a cargo of coal. The entire crew of 7 lost their lives. The vessel was then owned by Richard Robinson. The webmaster has not, so far at least, found a contemporary newspaper report re the vessel's loss. Which loss would have been, one would have thought, a 'newsworthy' event. The webmaster needs your help in finding related newspaper data & in confirming what happened to Thomas & Hannah & when. #2685

19   Thomas & Joseph
or
Thomas and Joseph
238 later 239 & 219 tons

2088
1831

A snow or brig, built by W. Gales. Thomas & Joseph, which was launched in Mar. 1831, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') recorded from 1831/32 thru 1838/39, from 1840/41 thru 1844/45, from 1847/48 thru 1864/65 & not thereafter. In the first two years of the first such period, the vessel was owned by Parkin & Co., likely of Sunderland, for service ex Liverpool, with 'Reynolds' stated to have been her captain - but the LR data thereafter is, to use a kind word 'skimpy' - i.e. registered at Sunderland, of 239 tons with 'Reynolds' her captain - with no owner name, no rig, no place & year of build, no proposed routing etc. A 'William Gales' build list available here indicates, however, that Thos. Nesbitt was the initial owner of the vessel.
From 1840/41 thru 1864/65, per LR, the vessel was owned by 'Wright' of North Shields - A. Wright (1841/42) became Wright & Co. (1847/48), became E. Wright (1855/56). For service from Leith, Scotland, to London, for service as a Newcastle coaster, from Shields or Newcastle to the Baltic & also to the Mediterranean. LR data is modest for many of those years, however. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/55 records, in 1854 data, Anthony T. Wright, of North Shields, as the vessel's owner with Thos. Stebbings her then captain. Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1856 records her then owner as being A. T. Wright of North Shields, which data is clarified by Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 to mean Anthony T. Wright of South Shields. Under 'Wright' ownership, the vessel, per LR, had a number of captains - 'Penfold' from 1840/41 thru 1844/45, G. Bird from 1847/48 thru 1849/50, 'Charlton' from 1850/51 thru 1854/55, 'T. Stbbngs' (Stebbings), in 1855/56 & 1856/57 & T. Lander from 1857/58 thru 1864/65. TR of 1855 reported R. Butcher as the vessel's then captain.
A little operational history. On Feb. 10, 1861 (in green) a brig of the name, Smith in command, was driven ashore & sank at Sunderland, having had great difficulty in getting into the harbour. I read here, thanks to Wikipedia, that the vessel had been en route from South Shields to Sunderland, was refloated the next day & towed in to South Shields on Feb. 17, 1861. Where its cargo was discharged, presumably so it could be repaired. Almost certainly 'our' Thomas and Joseph.
85.2 ft. long, signal letters HMRD. Some crew lists are available here.
The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') comes to our assistance re the vessel's later years. It records the vessel as registered at Shields from 1857 thru 1863, & at South Shields from 1864 thru 1871. MNLs of 1865 thru 1871 (1870) record John Hunter of South Shields as the then owner of the 219 ton vessel.
What finally happened to Thomas and Joseph? On Dec. 31, 1870, per line 1051 here, the 219 ton brig was stranded at Caister Shoal, S. of Caister, Norfolk, while en route from Yarmouth to Shields in ballast. Crew of 8 - none lost. Maybe a crew of 10. The vessel is noted there to have been owned, not by John Hunter but rather by Jas. Young. The 'Daily News', of London, on Jan. 3, 1871, advised that the vessel went ashore on the night of Dec. 31, 1870 on Caister Beach. And then states - '(Agreement £140 to get vessel off and safe into harbour at Great Yarmouth').' It seems likely that the vessel either could not be got off or if got off, could not later be repaired.
The 'Daily News', on Jan 6, 1871, stated that 'The Boys rescued the crew of ten men from the wrecked brig Thomas and Joseph. 'The Boys', I learn, was the name of a Caister lifeboat.
But we have one final surprise to reward you, dear reader! I will not spoil it for you. Who says that history is dull?
Can you add anything additional? #2581

20   Janet Willis
311 tons
1835

A barque, built by William Gales.
Janet Willis is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1836/37 thru 1853/53, ex 1840/41. It was owned, thru 1850/51, by Willis & Co. of London. Which, per this site means John Willis & Co. 'J. Willis' was LR listed as the vessel's captain to part way thru 1841/42 & 'Willis' was her captain again for parts of 1844/45 & 1845/46. The image of John Willis (1817/1899), known as 'White Hat Willis' is here along with details re his company, which is notable, perhaps, for having owned the Cutty Sark from 1869 to 1895. Per that page, the company was dissolved in 1899.
Back to Janet Willis - it initially traded from Sunderland to Demerera (British Guyana now Guyana), later ex London, from 1839/40 for service from London to Demerera, in the 1845/48 period from London to the West Indies, & from 1848/49 for service from London to Barbados. In Jul. 1846, the vessel arrived at Georgetown, Guyana, with 162 Portuguese immigrants ex Madeira (a Portuguese island off the NW coast of Africa). I note that 'Lloyd's Register Foundation' makes available a great many annual Survey Reports for the vessel. Just one of those reports.
In 1851/52, 'Robinson' of Sunderland became the vessel's owner for continued service to Demerera, now ex Sunderland. Such new owner was, more exactly, John Robinson of Deptford, Sunderland. I have read that the vessel had been sold in 1850.
It would seem that Janet Willis was abandoned, 'at the entrance of the Channel', on Oct. 10, 1852. A reference that is truly most vague.
The webmaster has now learned that on Jun. 11, 1852 Janet Willis, with 'Laing' in command, arrived at Odessa (Black Sea, Ukraine) from Genoa, Italy, likely to take on board a cargo of grain. 'Laing' would seem to have been the vessel's captain from 1845. I have not spotted when the vessel left Odessa to return to the U.K. but on Jul. 31, 1852 it passed Constantinople (now Istanbul, Turkey). It clearly made its way through the Mediterranean safely but later was abandoned, 81 days out of Odessa, by its crew when at 46.01N/12.39W - about 300 miles NW of the NW tip of Spain. Apparently on Oct. 10, 1852. As is confirmed at line 1783 on this U.K. Government wreck listing for 1852. The vessel was then on her beam ends, with 6 1/2 ft. of water in her holds & with her pumps choked. The crew of 14 were rescued by Durham, a schooner (likely built at Pictou, Nova Scotia, Canada, in 1848, LR referenced as a brigantine, registered at Belfast) & landed at Crookhaven (SW tip of Ireland) on Oct. 18, 1852. Durham itself was damaged having been in collision with Uruguay, a Liverpool barque (built Barnstaple, Devon, in 1861), off Castlehaven (near Cork, Ireland). Per this contemporary news report.
Of interest, John Willis & Co. later owned a 2nd vessel of the name, a ship built in Sunderland in 1850, as you can read here.
Can you add anything additional? #2892

21   Courier
320/280, later 389 & 347 tons

16399
1836

A snow, later a barque, built by J. M. Gales.
Courier, which was launched in Jan. 1836, was initially owned by J. M. Gales, of Sunderland, i.e. by her builder, for service from Sunderland to London with T. Gains her captain. In 1838/39, per Lloyd's Register ('LR', listed from 1836/37), the vessel became Liverpool registered & remained so for the rest (28 years) of the vessel's life.
Her new owner, in 1838/39, was, per LR, Barton & Co., with A. Smith her captain, for service from Liverpool to Calcutta (now Kalkata), India, in 1838/39 & 1839/40 & from Liverpool to Montreal, Canada, in 1840/41.
In 1841/42, the vessel became owned by A. Thompson of Liverpool, later 'A. Thomsn', who owned the vessel, per LR, for the next 15 years. With a number of captains over that period. J. R. Scott thru 1844/45, P. Burke briefly, 'Soutton' from 1845/46 thru 1848/49, 'Towerson' from 1848/49 thru 1852/53, T. Gavins in 1853/54, & E. Paine thereafter thru 1856/57. I note that on Mar. 07, 1852, 'Towerson', i.e. William Towerson aged 36, died while the vessel was en route from China to England.
From Sep. 15 thru Oct. 13, 1853, the vessel, lying at Liverpool, was advertised for sale. One of the sale annnouncements. The vessel was noted to have been 'almost rebuilt' by Mr. Wilson at Liverpool in 1849. The webmaster thinks it likely that Mr. Wilson was a shipbuilder/repairer & not the vessel's owner.
Marwood's North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5, in Mar. 1854 data, lists Alexander Thomson as Courier's then owner & Edward Paine her then captain. Her service under Thomson ownership? From Cork, Ireland, to Quebec, Canada, in the period from 1841/42 thru 1843/44, from Liverpool to Calcutta in 1844/45, 1845/46, 1848/49 thru 1850/51, & in 1853/54, from Liverpool to Mauritius from 1854/55 thru 1856/57 & otherwise ex Liverpool.
Three more owners, per LR!
'Alexander' in 1857/58, with 'Allen' her captain for continued service to Mauritius.
J. Litt, who served also as the vessel's captain, in 1858/59 & 1859/60, in the first such year for service from Liverpool to Suez, Egypt.
And finally 'Williams' of Liverpool, with 'Hughes' her captain thru to the end, i.e. 1866/67 per LR. For service from Liverpool to North America in 1860/61, from Bristol to Quebec in 1861/62, ex Beaumaris (Isle of Anglesey, North Wales) in 1862/63, & from Beaumaris to North America thereafter. The Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') of 1865 thru 1867 list John Williams of Valley, near Holyhead, Anglesey, Wales, as her then owner.
110.2 ft. long, signal letters MBJG, LR of 1848/49 first recorded Courier as a 389 ton barque (previously a snow), LR of 1860/61 first listed the barque at 347 tons only. A few crew lists are available here.
LR of 1866/67 notes that the vessel had been 'Abandoned'. It seems likely that, per Wikipedia (thanks!) that at an unknown date in Oct. 1866 (presumably prior to Oct. 23, 1866) Courier foundered in the Atlantic Ocean while en route from Liverpool to New York. Per 'The Times' of London of Oct. 23, 1866. A puzzle. MNL (scroll to #16399) listed the vessel as a steamship - in error I do believe. It would be good to be able to advise if the vessel's crew were all saved & which vessel may have rescued them.
Is there anything you can add or correct? Maybe provide the webmaster with the 'Times' article? #2472

22   Dorothy Gales
330 tons
1836

A barque, built by J. M. Gales. The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1836/37 thru 1849/50. It was initially owned by its builder, for service from Liverpool to Quebec, Canada, in 1836/37 & ex Liverpool in 1837/38. With T. Gainer serving as her initial captain.
In 1838/39, the vessel became owned by C. Moore of Liverpool, thru 1840/41, with G. Moore her captain, for service, per LR, from London to Cape of Good Hope, South Africa.
'Richardson', of Swansea, Wales, became the vessel's next & surely final owner in 1840/41 for service to Cuba i) ex London from 1840/41 thru 1845/46 & ii) ex Swansea from 1846/47 thru 1849/50. LR records 'Rees' serving as the vessel's captain from 1840/41 thru 1845/46 & 'Jobson' from 1846/47 thru 1849/50.
The webmaster did not spot, at 'Welsh Newspapers Online', references to either 'Rees' or 'Jobson'. It is clear, however, that the vessel had captains not LR referenced - i.e. 'Reed' in Sep. 1840, 'Richardson' in Apl. 1841, 'English' in Dec 1841 & Sep. 1842, 'Nash' in Mar. 1843, 'Gardiner' in Sep. 1843.
Some operational detail - i) On Mar. 29, 1841 the vessel arrived back at Swansea, two of its crew members having died en route during a voyage from Cuba. ii) On the night of Jan. 9, 1844, returning from Cuba with a cargo of about 450 tons of copper ore, the vessel 'was driven ashore', in conditions of thick fog, a little to the W. of Port Eynon Point, Gower, (about 15 miles W. of Swansea). Gardnor, (maybe Gardiner), was her master at the time. No lives were lost, the entire crew landing safely in a ship's boat. While it was hoped that much of its cargo would be saved, it was feared that the vessel itself, considerably damaged, would become a total wreck. But clearly that did not happen. Then owned by John Richardson. All as per this newspaper article. iii) On Jul. 19, 1845, the vessel, James English her captain, sought cargo for an advertised voyage to Valparaiso, Chile.
It seems clear that the vessel was for many years engaged in the shipment of copper ore from Cuba to the U.K., particularly  to Swansea in its later years. It is clear also, that in about mid Aug. 1848, the vessel left Swansea for Cuba, possibly for the noted copper ore port of St. Jago de Cuba. It arrived outside its port of destination there to encounter a severe gale. She surely succumbed to such gale since she was never heard from again. Her then captain was, I read, 'Stephens' who was, per this article, married with 4 children. Can you add to and/or correct this modest vessel listing? #2406

23   Jubilee
235 tons
1836

A vessel built by William Gales, initially a snow, later a barque. Jubilee, which was launched in Mar. 1836, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1836/37 thru 1849/50. Always LR stated to be owned by Gales & Co. of Sunderland, with 'Anderson' always LR noted to have been her captain. For service, per LR, from Sunderland to Gothenberg, Sweden, thru 1840/41, ex Liverpool in the next 4 years including to Genoa, Italy, in 1844/45, from Sunderland to the Mediterranean from 1845/46 thru 1847/48 & from London to the Mediterranean in 1848/49 & 1849/50. The vessel was LR listed as a snow thru 1844/45 & as a barque thereafter.
The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9 records, in Apl. 1848, the vessel as registered at Sunderland & owned not by Gales & Co. but rather by W. Anderson of Sunderland & R. Matthews of Ford Cottage. From a source I do not recall, I have understood that W. Anderson meant Will Anderson - who served as the vessel's captain.
As per this newspaper cutting, in Feb. 1850, before the 15th, Jubilee was wrecked on Brest Rocks (Firth of Clyde) while en route to Smyrna, Turkey. The vessel was there stated to be then owned by 'Anderson and Clay' of Sunderland. Such loss is essentially confirmed by line 48 here (a U.K. Government list of shipwrecks in 1850) which states that the 235 ton square was stranded at Girvan (S. of Brest Rocks, South Ayrshire, Scotland), on Feb. 6, 1850 while en route from Troon, also South Ayrshire, to Smyrna with a cargo of coal. Crew of 11 - none lost. Vessel then stated to be owned by Wm. Anderson.
It is always a pleasure to find a detailed account of the loss of any vessel. The loss of Jubilee was reported in many contemporary newspapers but a most detailed account of Jubliee's loss was published by 'The Express' of London on Feb. 9, 1850. The report is long & worthy of your interest - you can read it here. The crew were not all saved. 5 crew members (of 10) alas lost their lives in the mountainous seas. I note that 'McGregor', rather than 'Anderson' was the vessel's captain at the time of her loss. The first mate, who was one of the drowned, was W. Anderson, not the vessel's owner but rather his son. Those who were saved were saved as the resut of the heroic actions of two local fisherman & by a single young man on shore who rose to the occasion & did what he needed to do to save two lives.
Is there anything you can add? Or correct? #2568

24   Vernal
239/233 later 205 tons

2790
1836

A snow, built by J. M. Gales. The vessel, which was launched in Jun. 1836, is recorded in Lloyd's Registers ('LR') from 1836/37 thru 1843/44, owned by Potts & Co. of Sunderland for service from Sunderland to Archangel, Russia. With M. Potts always her captain. I cannot spot the vessel in any later LR edition.
The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9, however, lists Vernal, in Apl. 1848, as then registered at Sunderland & owned by R. W. J. Mills & Co., of Sunderland.
The North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5 tells us that in Mar. 1854 the vessel was registered at Sunderland & owned by John and Eleanor Tully, of Sunderland, & Edward White of Basingstoke, Hampshire, with Robt. Crawford then serving as the vessel's captain. While Turnbull's Shipping Registers of 1855 & 1856 list her then owners as being John Tully of Sunderland, & Eleanor Tully, Edward White & Mary Wanlace, all of Basingstoke, with, in 1855, John Thompson as her captain. Christie's Shipping Register, of 1858, confirms such ownership data.
On May 23, 1860, Vernal arrived at Sunderland ex Nieuwe Diep (N. Holland, inland but connected by canal), 'Clipp' in command. It presumably loaded more coal & was making a return voyage when, on May 29, 1860, per line 199 here, the 205 ton snow was abandoned off Texel (Frisian Islands, off the N. Netherlands coast), while en route from Sunderland to Niewe Diep with its cargo of coal. During a major storm. J. Clipp was in command. None of the crew of 7 were lost. The then owner was recorded as being John Tully. 'Lloyd's List', of Jun. 2, 1860, noted that J. Clipp, Vernal's master, had filed a deposition re the vessel's loss.
It seems clear that Mary Ann, a fishing boat, likely of Yarmouth, Robert Sutton in command, came to the assistance of Vernal on May 28, 1860. And took Vernal's crew aboard, to land them at Yarmouth 3 days later. Awards were granted to Captain Sutton & his 9 man crew for their service as per this page. The puzzle with such report is the location where Mary Ann's assistance is noted to have been provided. 70 miles WNW of Yarmouth would not be off Texel! A typo most certainly.
Is there anything you can add or correct? #2445

25   Grove
256 tons

1837

A snow or brig, bullt by J. M. Gales. Grove, which was launched in Jun. 1837, is only once referenced in Lloyd's Register ('LR'). LR of 1838/39 records the 257 ton vessel as Sunderland registered & captained by M. Potts. With no owner name, no year of build, no rigging data & no intended voyage info. The only 'good' reference that the webmaster has found re the vessel is in the North of England Maritime Directory of 1848, which states that in Apl. 1848, M. Moore of Sunderland was then the owner of the 256 ton brig, built at Sunderland in 1837. So no intended voyage data for the vessel is available, alas.
We can see that vessel was lost in early 1852. In late Jan. 1852, massive storms hit much of the eastern U.K. coast & particularly hit hard the coast of Yorkshire. On Jan. 25, 1852, Grove, 'Glen' in command, foundered near Robin Hood's Bay, West Yorkshire. The vessel was hit by the full force of the storm when 30 or 40 miles off Flamborough Head & it sank as a result. Just before the vessel sank, her crew had made their escape by a ship's boat - in which they were buffeted by the elements for two or more hours until they were picked up. So no lives were lost. As per these two references - 1 & 2 (both in red).
I can provide only modest data re this vessel. Can you add anything additional? #2417

26   Crusader
160, later 204/166 tons
1838

A schooner, maybe later a brig, bullt by T. Gales.
Crusader, which was launched on Jun. 19, 1838, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1839/40 thru 1849/50 & not thereafter. During such entire period, per LR, the vessel was owned by Union Shipping Co. of Stockton. With, from 1844/45 per LR, 'Dowell' (T. Dowell from 1848/49), serving as the vessel's captain. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9 confirms such ownership. It records, in May 1848 data, the Stockton registered vessel as owned by Union Shipping Company of Stockton.
I learn that the vessel, then noted to be a brig, foundered in the North Sea off the mouth of the Humber at 4 p.m. on Sep. 27, 1851. While en route from Stockton to London. Her eight crew were rescued by Louise, a Russian schooner which had been en route from Riga, Latvia, to Lisbon, Portugal, under the command of Captain Voscamp. There were massive gales in the area at the time, which gales damaged many vessels. 'McKetton' was, I read, the captain of Crusader at the time of her loss. A couple of contemporary news reports - 1 & 2.
Can you tell us anything additional? #2760

27   Deva
230/238 later 244 tons

32370
1838

A snow or brig, bullt by W. Gales. Deva, which was launched on Mar. 13, 1838, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1838/39 thru 1854/55 with the exception of 1849/50. And not thereafter. Initially owned by Morris & Co., of Aberdeen, Scotland, for service from Sunderland to Gibraltar, ex London, from Liverpool to Madras (now Chennai), India, & from London to Ceylon (now Sri Lanka).
In 1848/49 T. Smith of London became Deva's owner for service ex London including to Oporto, Portugal. From 1853/54 LR provides little detail. Signal letters QVSW. No crew lists seem to be available.
The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') clarifies matters. It records Deva as registered at Newcastle, U.K., in 1857 & 1858, & at Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, from 1859 thru 1864. From 1865 thru 1867, MNL records the vessel as registered at Newcastle, New South Wales ('NSW'), Australia, & lists 'The City Bank', of Sydney, NSW, as the vessel's then owner. MNLs of 1868 thru 1870 all list Alexander Smith, of Newcastle, NSW, as the then owner (likely managing) of the 244 ton vessel. 
On Dec. 11, 1870, per line 591 here, the 244 ton brig was abandoned at sea while en route from New Caledonia (Noumea, French, 750 miles off Australian E. coast) to Newcastle, NSW. About 30 miles off Port Macquarie (E. coast of Australia, N. of both Sydney & Newcastle). Then stated to be owned by Alexander Smith.
What specifically happened to Deva? The vessel, then owned by Henderson & Smith of Newcastle, NSW, was engaged in the coal trade from Newcastle, NSW, to New Caledonia. In about mid Nov. 1870, the vessel ran aground on a reef at New Caledonia, damaging her keel & planking. The vessel leaked as a result. There were no facilities at New Caledonia to repair the vessel so they sailed in ballast for Newcastle to presumably have the vessel repaired there. The vessel leaked badly on its voyage to Newcastle such that the crew could not keep up with the inflow of water. On the afternoon of Dec. 4, 1870, the whole crew (Captain Peter Davies (or Davis) & 9 crew) took to two boats rowing for Port Macquarie about 30 miles distant. The crew safely made land on Dec. 5, 1870 in two boats. All as you can read here. On Dec. 15, 1870, Diamantina (a 239 ton steamship owned, in 1870, by the Australasian Steam Navigation Co. of Sydney) arrived at Sydney with the entire crew of Deva.
The webmaster does not know why the date of Dec. 11, 1870 was referenced as noted above. Can you add additional data about the vessel's loss or otherwise add anything? #2509

28   Elizabeth Jane
251/233 later 206 tons

2944
1838

A snow or brig, bullt by J. M. Gales. The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1839/40 thru 1867/68. It was owned, thru 1856/57 or 1857/58, by 'Thompson' of Sunderland. With, per LR, T. Gains her captain thru 1845/46, 'Thompson' from 1845/46 thru 1848/49, 'Davison' from 1848/49 thru 1851/52, J. Smith in 1852/53 & 1853/54, & F. Gowland from 1854/55 thru 1857/58. 'Hutchinson' would seem to have been the vessel's captain in Apl/May 1858. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9 lists Elizabeth Jane, in Apl. 1848, as owned by Thompson & Lawson of Bishopwearmouth, Sunderland. The 1854/55 equivalent directory clarifies such owner names to mean, in Mar. 1854, Turner Thompson & Eliz. Lawson, both of Sunderland, with Ferguson Gowland her then captain. Turnbull's Shipping Registers of both 1855 & 1856 essentially confirm such data, the 1855 version also with F. Gowland as the vessel's captain. LR of 1856/57 provided little detail, which suggests that the vessel was out of commision or in process of being sold. 
A little operational history. a) On Sep. 23, 1855, Elizabeth Jane, Gowland in command, ran ashore at the North Point of the harbour at Yarmouth, Norfolk. She was assisted off having thrown part of her cargo overboard & was brought into the harbour with 7 ft. of water in her hold. b) On Mar. 17, 1856, again at Yarmouth & again with Gowland in command, en route from London to Sunderland, the vessel was assisted into port with main-mast cut away. c) From Sep. 1858 thru Apl. 1859 the vessel, 'Cuthbertson' in command, made a number of voyages from Sunderland to Lisbon, Portugal, & one at least to Oporto, also Portugal. The vessel likely had another captain after such dates.
The vessel's service while 'Thompson' owned? Per LR, from Sunderland to i) Hamburg, Germany, from 1839/40 thru 1844/45, ii) America from 1845/46 thru 1847/48, iii) London in 1848/49 & 1849/50 & iv) the Baltic in 1850/51 & 1851/52. From Shields to Hamburg in 1852/53 & 1853/54, & in service as a Leith, Scotland, coaster in 1854/55 & 1855/56.
LR of 1857/58 lists Elizabeth Jane with a new owner - W. Rennie of Sunderland, for consistent service ex Sunderland, with, per LRs, F. Gowland her captain in 1857/58 & 'Cthbrtson', presumably Cuthbertson, from 1858/59 thru 1867/68. The spelling of the owner's name is in doubt. Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 lists William Renney. While the Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL'), of 1865 & 1866, both list the vessel as then registered at South Shields & owned by Wm. Renny of Bishopwearmouth. So we have three different spellings of that owner's name.
It would seem that there were later ownership changes, not referenced at LR. MNL of 1866 lists Richard Nesbitt of South Shields as the vessel's then owner, while MNL of 1867 lists John Esson, also of South Shields.
84.3 ft. long, of 206 tons only from LR of 1858/59, a few crew lists are available here.
LR of 1867/68 notes that the vessel had been 'Wrecked'. This page, (scroll to #2944) advises that an advice re the vessel's loss was dated Jun. 27, 1867. Wikipedia reports that on May 22, 1867 a vessel named Elizabeth Lane, a collier brig, was wrecked on the Lemon and Ower Sand, in the North Sea while en route from Rotterdam, Netherlands, to South Shields. Her crew survived. Such sands are located, I understand, near Cromer, Norfolk. Could that be Elizabeth Jane, with her name mis-spelled? There was no British registered vessel named Elizabeth Lane at the time. Need help!
Is there anything you can add or correct? #2499

29   Lark
226/229 later 204 tons

2899
1838

A snow or brig. Built by J. M. Gales. The vessel, which was launched in Apl. 1838, is Lloyd's Register listed from 1838/39 thru 1845/46 & not thereafter. Owned, thru 1844/45 at least, by Baker & Co. of Sunderland with J. Proud her captain, for service from Sunderland to London. LR of 1845/46 lists no owner name, which suggests that the vessel may have been sold. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/49 lists the brig, in Apl. 1848, as owned by W. Bell, of Ford, & W. T. & J. Bell, both of Sunderland. While the equivalent directory of 1854/55 (Mar. 1854 data) records Wm. Thos., John, and Wm. Bell, all of Sunderland with Chas. Smith her captain. Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1855 clarifies the owner names to mean Wm. T. Bell, John Bell & Wm. Bell, all then of Sunderland, with C. Smith her captain. TR of 1856 lists W. T., J., and W. Bell of Sunderland as her then owners. While Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 lists W. T. and J. Bell of Sunderland and C. W. and W. M. Bell of Newcastle as her owners.
On Dec. 2, 1860, per line 892 here, the 204 ton 'square' was involved in a collision & sank at the Humber river, while en route from Grimsby to London. One of the 7 man crew lost his life. Lark is stated to have then been owned by Wm. T. Bell. No crew lists are available. Can you tell us more? #2344

30   Amazon
321/390 later 354 tons

24701
1839

A barque. Built by J. M. Gales. Amazon, which was launched on Apl. 13, 1839, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1839/40 thru 1859/60 with the exception of 1855/56. It was briefly owned by J. M. Gales of Sunderland for service from Sunderland to Merimac (maybe Merrimac, Massachusetts, U.S.A.). But later in 1839/40 became owned by Kirby & Co. of Liverpool, for service ex Liverpool thru 1840/41, & from Liverpool to Calcutta (now Kolkata), India, thru 1842/43. Her captains while 'Kirby' owned are LR recorded as being T. Gaine in 1839/40 & W. Holmes from 1840/41 thru 1843/44.
In 1843/44 per LR, the vessel became owned by J. Ridley of London, thru 1847/48, with B. Johnston stated to be her captain thru 1844/45, J. Parker from 1844/45 thru 1846/47 & 'Markham' from 1846/47 thru 1847/48. For service ex London, from Shields to the Mediterranean in 1844/45 & 1845/46, & ex Liverpool thereafter thru 1847/48.
The vessel was sold again. In 1848/49, per LR, Amazon became owned by Law & Co. of London, with T. Law serving as the vessel's captain. Her service in 1848/49 was noted to be from Liverpool to Cape of Good Hope ('CGH'), South Africa, which became from the Clyde to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, (thru 1849/50), ex London in 1850/51, & from Newcastle to CGH in 1850/51 & 1852/53. Now the LRs of 1853/54 & 1854/55 offer limited detail. It did seem likely that the vessel was in process of being sold, but that appears not to be the case. This page (1st item) tells us that the vessel was, in fact, registered at Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, on Aug. 5, 1854. I don't know until when but maybe until Jun. 23, 1856.
As noted above, LR did not list the vessel in 1855/56. In 1856, however, Turnbull's Shipping Register reports that the 353 ton Amazon was now registered at Newcastle & owned by J. Pippet of South Shields ('SS'). From 1856/57 thru 1859/60, the 354 ton vessel is LR confirmed to have been owned by J. Pippet of SS (J. Pippett in 1859/60). With 'W. Simpsn', presumably 'Simpson', her captain in 1856/57, & 'Str'sanbogh' (I learn means Strasenburgh or Strasenburg) from & after 1857/58. Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 also confirms J. Pippet of SS to be the then owner of the Newcastle registered vessel. In 1860, the vessel was rather registered at SS.
Thanks to the kindness of a site visitor, I am able to show you an 1853 painting, by J. Scott, of Amazon off the Cape of Good Hope, South Africa. The painting's plaque states the vessel to have been built by Laing. Which is incorrect as is confirmed by this contemporary newspaper cutting, which now has come to hand, that confirms (in red) that the vessel was indeed built by J. M. Gales.
What later happened to her? I read that on Oct. 30, 1859, 'Strasenburgh' in command, Amazon left Carthagena (surely Cartagena, Spain), for Palermo, Sicily, Italy. Later, in a Dec. 15, 1859 report from Cagliari (Sardinia, Italy), Amazon, 'Strasenburg' in command, was reported to have sunk 50 miles SE of Cape Carbonara (a promontory on the SE tip of Sardinia). The vessel was en route from Licata (S. coast of Sicily) to Newcastle with a cargo of sulphur. The crew were stated to be all safe. The webmaster has not read about the circumstances of her loss.
No crew lists seem to be available for the vessel. Can you add to or correct the above account? #2483

31   Maria
267/291 later 257 tons

25592
1839

A snow or brig. Built by John M. Gales.
Maria, which was launched in May 1839, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1839/40 thru 1869/70. Over its lifetime, the vessel had many owners & many captains.
The vessel's initial owner, thru 1842/43, was J. Hay of Sunderland. For service from Sunderland to Quebec, Canada, with B. Wilson LR noted to have been her captain.
In 1842/43, & thru 1845/46, Share & Co., also of Sunderland, became the vessel's owner, for service from Shields to the Mediterranean with D. Askam her captain.
From 1845/46 thru 1854/55, per LR, T. Sharer of Sunderland was Maria's owner for service i) from London to Odessa (Black Sea, Ukraine) thru 1847/48, ii) from Sligo (NW Ireland) to Quebec in 1849/50 & 1850/51, iii) ex Sunderland in 1851/52 & 1852/53, & iv) from London to the West Indies in 1854/55. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9, in Apl. 1848 data, confirms T. Sharer to have been the vessel's then owner. While 'Sharer' owned, the vessel, per LR, had four captains - J. Smith thru 1847/48, W. Duffill in 1849/50 & 1850/51, 'Dunn' from 1851/52 thru 1853/54 & 'J. Chudl'gh' in 1854/55. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5, in Mar. 1854 data, lists Thos. Shearer (with an 'e') as her then owner & Geo. Chudleigh as her then captain.
I note, however, that from Aug. 09, 1854 thru Oct. 03, 1854, Maria, then lying at West Indies Export Dock in London, was offered for private sale. One of the sale announcements.
It seems clear that W. Baxter of Wisbech or Wisbeach, Cambridgeshire, must have acquired the vessel, which I read was registered at Wisbeach on Oct. 31, 1854 (scroll to #25592). LRs of 1855/56 & 1856/57, both record W. Baxter, as the vessel's owner for service from Hull to the Mediterranean, with J. Inch serving as the vessel's captain.
From 1857/58 thru 1859/60, per LR, W. Brown of Cork, Ireland, owned the vessel. For service ex Cork to Quebec in 1857/58 & 1858/59. With J. P. Inch serving as the vessel's captain thru 1858/59 & then H. Heagarty.
From 1860/61 thru 1863/64, again per LR, R. Jobling (the 'R' means Roger, I read) of Shields owned Maria with J. Reay serving as her captain - for service from Shields to Spain.
Still more owners! I read (at a Sunderland shipping website that requests no links or recognition) that on Oct. 29, 1863 James Richard Edwards of South Shields became the vessel's owner.
LRs from 1863/64 thru 1864/65 record A. Grant of Shields as the vessel's owner for service from Shields to Rotterdam, with F. Patterson her captain (thru to 1869/70).
The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') records Maria as registered at Wisbeach from 1857 thru 1859, at London in 1860, at South Shields from 1861 thru 1864 (but apparently not listed in 1863) & at Shields thereafter. MNL of 1865 lists the vessel as then owned by Alexander R. Grant of North Shields - the 'R' means Reid, I understand.
Now LR of 1865/66 did record A. Grant as the vessel's owner but struck the name through, while later LR editions record no owner names at all. MNL comes to our rescue re the missing data. It tells us that from 1866 thru 1870, Ralph Morton of North Shields was the vessel's owner.
90.0 ft. long, signal letters PGQC, 1864 crew lists are available via this link, LR first recorded the vessel at 257 tons in 1857/58.
What finally happened to Maria? I learn that on Jul. 26, 1867, during a gale, Maria had to be abandoned (leaky) near Spiekeroog (an East Frisian island, located off the North Sea coast of Germany, about 70 miles off the North Sea archipelago of Heligoland) while en route from Hamburg to Shields in ballast. Her nine man crew were rescued by Pet, a smack, & landed at Yarmouth. 'Lord', I read, was Maria's captain at the time of her loss. He would seem to have become the vessel's captain in Nov. 1864. Now I have read, at the website noted above, that the vessel later came ashore, near the mouth of the River Jade (NW Germany, I believe), but have not so far found a news report which so confirms. Wikipedia tells us that Maria came ashore on Spiekeroog on Aug. 01, 1867. Some contemporary news reports - 1 & 2.
It is a modest puzzle that the vessel, which was lost in 1867, was MNL recorded thru 1870 & LR listed thru 1869/70.
Can you tell us anything additional? #2830

32

  Alyth
206/199 later 206 tons

22376
1840

A snow or brig. Built by J. M. Gales. Alyth? A town located 17 miles NW of Dundee, Scotland.
The vessel, which was launched in Feb. 1840, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1839/40 thru 1856/57 with the exception of both 1852/53 & 1853/54. The vessel's initial owner, thru 1840/41, was, per LR, 'Panton & S' (Sons), of Sunderland, for service from Sunderland to Bordeaux in 1839/40 & from London to the Mediterranean in 1840/41 - with J. Smith serving as the vessel's captain.
In 1841/42, per LR, Norman & Co. of Liverpool became the vessel's owners, thru 1851/52 at least. With J. Norman her captain thru 1844/45, W. Walker from 1844/45 thru 1846/47 at least, & W. Lovering from 1848/49 thru 1851/52. For consistent service ex Liverpool, incl. to Quebec, Canada, thru 1843/44, to Malta in 1844/45 & 1845/46, & to the Mediterranean from 1848/49 thru 1851/52.
LR did not list the vessel in 1852/53 & 1853/54. The North of England Maritime Directory of Mar. 1854, partially fills that data 'gap'. It lists John Pakhett, of Liverpool, as her then owner, with Wm. H. Lovering her then captain.
When LR listings resumed, in 1854/55, Alyth, now of 206 tons, is stated to be owned by' C. C'lthard' of Hartlepool, with R. Fairless her master, replaced by J. Brown in 1855/56 & 1856/57. Which owner name is clarified by Turnbull's Shipping Registers of both 1855 & 1856 to mean C. K. Coulthard of Hartlepool with T. Browse her captain. Despite the above data it seems likely that Coulthard acquired the vessel rather earlier, since this page (scroll to #22376) indicates that the vessel was first registered at Hartlepool on May 20, 1853. Under 'Coulthard' ownership, the vessel, per LR, served London ex Hartlepool.
Alyth is, to say the least, not a common vessel name. This Wikipedia page (thanks!) tells us that Alyth (surely our Alyth) foundered on Sep. 28, 1856 at 45.30N/8.10W (Bay of Biscay) in the North Atlantic, while en route from Barcelona, Spain, to Swansea, Wales. Further that her crew were rescued by the Netherlands schooner Alberdina. As per reports in the Newcastle Courant & the Liverpool Mercury of Oct. 24 & Oct. 25, 1856 respectively. It would be good to be able to read such reports since they may well contain greater detail. Should any reader have access to them, do consider providing copies to the webmaster for inclusion here.
The loss was also recorded in 'Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant' of Oct. 24, 1856 (search for Alyth). Which report told us, in Dutch, that Alberdina, captain Scherpbier in command, arrived at Lisbon, Portugal, from Newcastle on Oct. 12, 1856 with Alyth's crew aboard. No crew lists are available for the vessel.
Can you add anything additional? #2233

33   Amulet
208/206 tons

2431
1840

A snow or brig. Built by J. M. Gales. The vessel, which was launched in Jul. 1840 but Lloyd's Register ('LR') noted to be a June vessel, is LR listed from 1840/41 thru 1858/59 with the exception of 1855/56. It was, per LR, initially owned, for a very short period of time, by G. Noble of Sunderland, with 'Elliott' serving as her captain, for service from Sunderland to London. LR of 1841/42 records the vessel changing hands twice - first to S. & P. Mills, of Sunderland, & then to E. Lucas of Shoreham, Sussex. 'Lucas', per LR, owned the vessel thru 1847/48 for service from Shoreham to Sunderland thru 1843/44 & then service as a Shoreham coaster, with 'Crowhurst' consistently serving as the vessel's captain.
In 1848/49, per LR, 'Hindmarsh' of Blyth, Northumberland, became Amulet's owner, her final owner it would appear. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/49 records, that at Jul. 24, 1848, Thos. Hindmarsh was the owner of the Shields registered snow. The equivalent directory of 1854/55 (1854 data) indicates that Thos. Hindmarsh & John Foreman, both of Blyth, & John Young of Bellingham, were then the vessel's owners with John Foreman then her captain. Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1855 records Alex. Turner to be her then captain & lists J. Young as residing at Bedlington. As also does TR of 1856 (no captain's name). This page (scroll to #2431) seems to indicate that the vessel was first registered at Shields on Apl. 12, 1854. While 'Hindmarsh' owned, for service, where LR indicated, mainly ex Blyth, but ex Newcastle in 1856/57. In 1851/52 & 1852/53 LR notes service from Blyth to Le Havre, France, & in 1857/58 & 1858/59 notes service from Blyth to France. J. Forman (no 'e'), per LR, served as her captain thru the whole period of 'Hindmarsh' ownership (but we know that is incorrect - re Alex Turner, at least).
What happened to Amulet? The last link above notes that a certificate re the vessel's loss was dated Sep. 4, 1858. Wikipedia advises (thanks!) that on Aug. 21, 1858, while en route from Sunderland to Lisbon, Portugal, the brig was wrecked on Whitby Rock, Yorkshire. Further that her crew of 8 were rescued by the Whitby lifeboat. It would be good to locate a detailed account of the disaster but this page (in red) tells us that the vessel, which was carrying a cargo of coal, got inside the rock at about 9 p.m. The crew were taken off by lifeboat; the vessel became a total loss. What was left of Amulet was sold for £56. No crew lists are available. Is there anything you can add? #2349

34   Constant
415/535 tons
1843

Constant, a barque which it would seem was always London registered, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1846/47 thru 1855/56, with the exception of 1853/54.
There is a little confusion about the vessel's year of build. LRs thru 1849/50 state 1842 but later LRs revise that date to read 1843. This Constant Lloyd's Register Foundation Survey document (three more such documents are also available), confirms that the vessel i) was launched in Dec. 1842, ii) was still under construction in Jan. 1843 & iii) was to sail to London for sale. The 1847 sale advertisement (see below) states, in error, that the vessel was launched in Apl. 1843.
About 116 ft. long, carried 6 guns, I read.
Its initial owner, thru 1849/50 per LR, was, 'Hemery' of London. With, per LR, J. Hemery (i.e. John Hemery) serving as the vessel's captain - for, per LR, consistent service from London to Madras (now Chennai), India.
Some 'best-efforts' Constant operational history. By captain - John Hemery - i) The vessel's first voyage was not to Madras. On Apl. 12, 1843, the vessel was cleared out of London for a voyage to Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, with convicts. On Aug. 29, 1843, the vessel arrived at Hobart, ex Dublin, Ireland, (left May 09, 1843) with 201 male convicts. And also many members of the 99th regiment which Constant took onwards to Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, arriving there on Sep. 16, 1843. On Dec. 23, 1843 the vessel left Sydney for London with 609 bales of wool, 217 cedar logs, black oil, sugar etc. And also 28 passengers. Some of whom were landed at Portsmouth - the vessel arrived back at Gravesend, London, on Apl. 23, 1844. ii) On Jul. 04, 1844 the vessel was at Deal, Kent, en route to Madras, where it arrived on Nov. 09, 1844, having encountered icebergs off the Cape of Good Hope. On Jan. 16 or 17, 1845 the vessel left Madras for Hong Kong ('HK') (arr. Apl. 02, 1845). On Aug. 28, 1845, the vessel arrived at Sydney said to be ex HK & Manila (Philippines), with a cargo of tea, sugar, cigars, etc. A side trip to Manila & back. At Sydney again on Feb. 28, 1846. A personal note. Mrs Hemery with servants seems to have consistently been on board the vessel. On Apl. 16, 1846 a son was born to Mr. & Mrs. Hemery while the vessel was in Darling Harbour at Sydney. On Jun. 19, 1846, Constant again arrived at HK, with a cargo that included valuable sandal-wood, went to & from Chusan (an island archipelago off Ningbo, China) & on Sep. 27, 1846 left HK for Whampoa (i.e. Huangpu, an outer port of Guangzhou, China). On Mar. 29, 1847, the vessel arrived back at Deal, ex HK (left Oct. 29, 1846).
Now the webmaster first site listed the vessel when he spotted that Constant, commencing on Apl. 14, 1847, was advertised for sale at a public auction to be held in London on Apl. 28, 1847. See below.
More 'best-efforts' operational history by captain. James Garnock - iii) On Dec. 19, 1847, Constant arrived at Sydney with a general cargo ex Liverpool (left Jul. 03, 1847). On Feb. 29, 1848, the vessel left Sydney for HK arriving there on Jun. 02, 1848. Later, on Sep. 01, 1848, a typhoon hit China generally. Constant, with a cargo of tea, was thrown on her beam ends by such typhoon. When her mizen mast was cut away she righted & put back, in a leaky state, to HK where her cargo of tea, much damaged, was discharged. I think that the vessel later arrived back at HK ex Adelaide (on Nov. 28, 1848) & loaded at HK for London.
The vessel was offered for sale a second time, commencing May 04, 1849, re a public auction to be held on May 16, 1849, again in London. Samples of such advertisement & also of the 1847 advertisement. I note that the vessel was surveyed, re a change of owners, from Jun. 14 thru 21, 1849.
In 1850/51, per LR, Constant became owned by 'R&RS'tter', also of London, which the webmaster believes to mean R. & R. Soutter. For service ex London with J. Coomb's (J. J. Coombes) noted to have been her captain.
More operational data. John James Coombes - iv) On Dec. 23, 1849 Constant arrived at Adelaide ex London & Plymouth (left Sep. 09, 1849) with 137 passengers. It went on to Sydney (arr. Feb. 04, 1850 with many of those passengers & also copper ingots & ore. On Apl. 27, 1850, the vessel left Sydney for San Francisco ('SF'), U.S.A., via Auckland, New Zealand. It would seem that the vessel went back & forth between HK & SF. On Jun. 14, 1852 the vessel arrived at Honolulu, Hawaii, ex California. The last reference to 'Coombes', so far as I can see. - Captain name unknown v) I think it went to Sydney & then Melbourne, Australia & was at Melbourne for a very long time. More research is needed to determine when the vessel eventually arrived back in the UK. And learn the name of her captain or captains.
What finally happened to Constant? The webmaster has noted that the vessel would seem not to have been granted an Official Number, which should mean that it was not in existence on Jan. 01, 1855. Which is a puzzle. What I believe happened to Constant is as follows:- On Nov. 08, 1854, the vessel left Southampton for Portland Bay, South Australia, with J. D. Kerr in command and 195 emigrants, arriving there on Feb. 22 or 24, 1855. It was delayed unloading its cargo & was anchored off Portland Bay on Mar. 19, 1855 when a particularly severe storm hit the area. Two vessels were driven ashore - Constant and Australasia (built at Sunderland in 1847). The crews of both vessels were saved. Initial reports were that Constant was on the beach undamaged. However I have read that the vessel ended up a wreck - 'too much injured and leaky to allow of her being got off with any advantage'. On Mar. 31, 1855, a public auction was a held on the beach at Portland to sell the wreck of Constant & its various fittings etc. The advertisement stated the vessel's tonnage - 535 - which the webmaster's believes confirms its identity. These images relate - 1, 2 & 3. I note that Australasia, referenced above, was also not granted an Official Number.
Can you tell us anything additional? Or correct the above in any way? #2921

35   Rebecca
155/128, later 129 & 115 tons

31720
1846

A snow or brig, later a schooner & a brigantine. Built by J. M. Gales. Rebecca is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1845/46 thru 1857/58 but not thereafter that I can see. I checked thru 1878/79 for reasons that are apparent below.
The vessel was owned, thru 1847/48, per LR, by 'Baldwin' of Sunderland (M. Baldwin per the 1848/9 North of England Maritime Directory in Apl. 1848), for service from Sunderland to Rochester, Kent. 'Baldwin' would seem to have sold the vessel & acquired another vessel of identical name, built at Sunderland in 1849.
In 1848/49, per LR, 'Peacock' of Arbroath, Scotland, became the vessel's owner for service from Arbroath to the Baltic but from 1854/55 (in which year the vessel became listed as a schooner), for service from Arbroath to the Mediterranean.
From 1854/55 thru 1857/58, LR lists Rebecca as owned by W. Ruthven of Dundee, Scotland, which owner name is confirmed by Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1856. With 'Maxwell' her then master. For service from Arbroath to Australia.
A search at 'Trove, Australia', shows that Rebecca left Dundee on Jul. 26, 1854 & arrived at Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, on Jan. 24, 1855 with James Steril in command. En route, she had to throw overboard a portion of her cargo of slates to avoid the vessel foundering in a storm off the Cape of Good Hope, South Africa. She went on to Sydney, New South Wales ('NSW') with a cargo which included 1278 tram rails & 156 cases of gin. She carried 205 tons of coal from Newcastle, NSW, to Melbourne, was later at Launceston, Tasmania & at Adelaide, South Australia. On Dec. 30, 1855 she left for Mauritius to soon return to Melbourne, on Apl. 25, 1856, with a cargo of sugar. There is probably more data at Trove - I ran out of time.
Now LR of 1857/58 records the vessel as owned by W. Ruthven but with no other detail, which suggests that the vessel may have been sold at about that time.
The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') comes to our assistance in the absence of LR data. It records Rebecca as Dundee registered from 1857 thru 1860, & registered at Melbourne from 1861 thru 1866, with James Laing of Williamstown, near Melbourne, her owner in 1865 & 1866. It would seem, however that such data is incorrect - the vessel became Melbourne registered on Apl. 9, 1857, owned by Jas. Laing & John Duncan, in relation to a sale dated Oct. 17, 1856.
In 1867 the vessel was, per MNL, registered at Newcastle, NSW, Australia, & owned by John Waddell of Newcastle. From 1868 thru 1878, the vessel was Sydney registered & owned thru 1874 (1870) by John Warburton & from 1875 thru 1878 by Chas. Geo. Warburton, both of Sydney. 
73.6 ft. long, signal letters QSDN. No crew lists seem to be available for the vessel in U.K. or in Canada.
A little operational history. On Sep. 12, 1869, Rebecca, then stated to be owned by J. C. and W. Warburton, with 'Neill' her master, had just left Sydney for Newcastle, NSW, in ballast, when she ran aground near Kirribilli Point, quite close to where the Sydney Harbour Bridge now stands. She was floated off & taken in tow by Breadalbane, a ship, hoping to safely reach nearby Darling Harbour. She suddenly sank, bow first in 9 fathoms of water. The vessel was insured & the owners abandoned the vessel - the insurers, it would seem hoped to have J. (John) Cuthbert raise the vessel. Cuthbert, apparently, had only recently extensively overhauled & repaired the vessel. All as per this newspaper cutting. The vessel was soon raised by Cuthbert with the assistance of divers. This article states that she was rather arriving from Newcastle with a cargo of coal.
The webmaster is puzzled by the vessel being reported as 'abandoned'. Temporarily it would seem. The vessel would seem to have been repaired & returned to active service, owned, both before & after the sinking, by members of the 'Warburton' family.
This page tells us (in blue) that on Oct. 13, 1878, Rebecca was lost at Broken Bay, which is located, I read, about 50 km. N. of Sydney. The vessel was en route from Newcastle to Sydney with a cargo of coal, Frank Lopez in command (from Dec. 12, 1877), when she encountered weather that blew off all of the vessel's sails & rendered her unmanageable. The vessel was driven onto & off a reef near Barrenjoey, & ended up a total wreck on the mainland. There was no loss of life, the crew reaching safety via a ship's boat. All as per this summary of the Board on Inquiry's findings.
National Archives of Australia has kindly made available a number of pages of shipping registry records re Rebecca available via this page. A fund of data for those who wish additional detail. But beware! One of the 5 pages there referenced does not relate to this particular Rebecca. There were additional owners or part owners not referred to above, incl. Andrew Jeffery, William Souter & owners named 'Pigott'. 
Can you tell us more? #2542

36


(ex here thanks!)
Lord Dalhousie
764/912 later 786/912 & 843 tons

25223
1847

Lord Dalhousie (1812/1860)? A famous statesman, politician & colonial administrator. Served as Governor General of both Canada & India (from 1848 thru 1856). You can read about him & his career here. Lord Dalhousie, the vessel, which sailed extensively to India, was likely named in his honour. 
Lord Dalhousie, which was launched on Sep. 24, 1847, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1848/49 thru 1869/70 & may well be listed in LR of 1870/71 - the required page in that edition is missing). For all of those years, the vessel, per LR, was owned by 'Harrison' of London. The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') records the vessel, always London registered, from 1857 thru 1872, owned in 1865 by Thomas O. Harrison of London. And from 1866 thru 1872 owned by John Smurthwaite of Sunderland. I note that 'Lloyd's Register Foundation' provides 12 documents re the vessel incl. this Survey, conducted while the vessel was being built.
Now the webmaster does not understand such ownership by John Smurthwaite. I say that having learned of the circumstances whereby he became the vessel's owner in 1865 as a result of researching the history of Devonport built by 'Smurthwaite' in 1865.
That history is as follows:- On Dec. 21, 1865, at Sunderland, a dispute between 'Harrison' & George Seymour (of the London brokerage firm of Seymour Peacock & Company) was addressed in court. The court case, while it relates to Devonport, more importantly relates to Lord Dalhousie. It would seem that 'Harrison' agreed to buy Devonport from 'Smurthwaite' for £14,750, such sum to be partially settled by the transfer to 'Smurthwaite' of Lord Dalhousie. With 'Smurthwaite' agreeing to repair Lord Dalhousie to bring her into such a condition that would permit her to be again classed AI at Lloyd's. 'Harrison' advanced to 'Smurthwaite' the sum of £6,000 secured by a mortgage on Lord Dalhousie while 'Seymour', in turn, issued a bond to 'Harrison' to guarantee that 'Smurthwaite' would repair Lord Dalhousie as just indicated. It is important to note that 'Smurthwaite' was adjudged bankrupt on May 01, 1865 & as a result of his bankruptcy could not repair Lord Dalhouise as had been intended. The webmaster expected to see that 'Harrison' had re-acquired Lord Dalhousie by exercising his mortgage rights re the vessel. The court concluded that the issue at hand was how much it would cost 'Harrison' to bring Lord Dalhousie back into an A1 condition. A jury determined that that sum was £1,800, presumably to be paid by 'Seymour' to 'Harrison'. The case was extensively reported in the contemporary press, particularly in the Shipping & Mercantile Gazette of Dec. 22, 1865. A summary of the case.
The webmaster expected to see MNL record 'Smurthwaite' as the vessel's owner for a short period only - i.e. while his estate in bankruptcy was being dealt with.
The vessel, per LR, had just 4 captains - J. (John) Ord thru 1849/50, 'Ferris' from 1850/51 thru 1857/58, 'Johnson' from 1858/59 thru 1859/60 & 'Markham' in the years from 1860/61 thru 1869/70. Initially for service from Sunderland to Calcutta (now Kolkata, India), thereafter always ex London - i) to New South Wales, Australia in 1848/49 & 1849/50, ii) to Calcutta in 1850/51 & 1851/52, iii) to Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, in 1852/53 & 1853/54, iv) to Calcutta again from 1854/55 thru 1857/58, v) to India in 1860/61 & 1861/62, vi) to the Mediterranean in 1862/63 & 1863/64, & vii) to Australia again from 1854/65 thru 1869/70.
Some 'best-efforts' details about the vessel's voyages. i) On Aug. 14, 1852, Lord Dalhousie, 'Ferris' in command, arrived at Hobart Town, Australia, ex Cork, Ireland (left Apl. 30, 1852) with 322 male convicts ex Dublin, Ireland. It left Hobart on Sep. 12, 1852 for Calcutta in ballast, arriving there on Dec. 06, 1852 & departing Jan. 27, 1853 for London. It was back at Gravesend, London, on Jun. 14, 1853. ii) On Feb. 15, 1854 the vessel (Ferris) arrived at Calcutta ex London. On Oct. 06, 1854 it arrived at Gravesend ex Cherbourg, France. iii) On Nov. 09, 1854 Lord Dalhousie was cleared out of London for Constantinople (now Istanbul, Turkey), in ballast, with 'Thompson' in command. It arrived back at Portsmouth on Oct. 14, 1855. iv) On Nov. 16, 1855 the vessel was at Malta ex Queenstown, Ireland. On to Constantinople (arr Mar. 10, 1856). v) The vessel (Thompson) arrived at Deal ex Calcutta on Aug. 08, 1857. vi) On May 21, 1859, the vessel (Mitchell) arrived off Dartmouth ex Bombay (now Mumbai), India. vii) On Sep. 24, 1859 Lord Dalhousie left Falmouth, with 'Markham' in command, for Calcutta. The vessel arrived at Singapore on Jan. 24, 1862 & left on Jan. 27, 1862 for England. viii) On Sep. 07, 1863 the vessel (George Harvey) left Gravesend for Swan River/Perth, Western Australia, via Portsmouth, with 270 convicts along with their guards & families. Have also read that the vessel left the U.K. on Sep. 23, 1863. It arrived at Swan River on Dec. 28, 1863. This extensive web site states that the vessel rather left Portland, U.K. on Sep. 25, 1863, notes that there were 89 passengers also & lists the names of all of those aboard. On Jan. 26, 1864, the vessel left Perth for Calcutta with 4 passengers & 82 horses & their grooms, 12 dogs & a small general cargo incl. timber. On Jan. 26, 1864 the vessel was back at Swan River ex Calcutta, still with 'Harvey' in command. On Feb. 01, 1865, the vessel arrived at Liverpool ex Hong Kong with 'Hardy' likely means 'Harvey' in command. ix) On May 02, 1868 Lord Dalhousie left Liverpool for Saguenay, St. Lawrence River, Canada. Was back at Liverpool in mid Aug. 1868. Lots more I am sure - out of time!
146.9 ft. long, 146 ft. 11 in. per the Lloyd's Survey noted above, signal letters PFCM, some crew lists thru 1872 are available via this page.
From Aug. 22, 1872 thru Sep. 23, 1872, Lord Dalhousie, then lying at Liverpool, was offered for sale. One of the advertisements. Which notes that a new iron mainmast had been installed in Feb. 1872.
It would seem likely that the vessel was sold to O. Holm of Stralsund, NE Germany, on the Baltic, who was, per a U.K. Government 1876 wreck listing, the vessel's owner when the vessel was lost in 1876. 'Holm' clearly re-rigged the vessel as a barque & did not change the vessel's name.
Some operational details while German owned:- i) On Oct. 10, 1872, the vessel was loading at Liverpool for a voyage to Havana, Cuba, with 'Ploetz' now her captain. And on Oct. 27, 1872 the vessel was towed out of Liverpool by Knight Templar, a steam tug, to commence her voyage to Havana. She put back to Liverpool on Nov. 01, 1872 & on Nov. 29, 1872 was reported to be at Southampton in a leaky condition & with damage. ii) On May 27, 1874 the vessel, with 'Ploetz' in command, left Pensacola, Florida, U.S.A., for Genoa, Italy. iii) On Sep. 29, 1875, the vessel, with 'Ploetz' or per Lloyd's List 'Schultz' in command, arrived at London ex Chicoutimi, Saguenay, Canada. With on board the captain (Chase) & 15 crew of Uncle Joe (an American vessel) which was abandoned at sea on Sep. 11, 1875, at 46N/39W (about 1,000 miles E. of St. John's, Newfoundland). iv) On Nov. 08, 1875 the vessel left Deal for Pensacola arriving there on Jan. 13, 1876 (Ploetz) & departing on Mar. 22, 1876 for Greenock, Scotland (arrived May 13, 1876).
What finally happened to Lord Dalhousie? On Jun. 05, 1876 the vessel left Greenock in ballast bound for Shediac (New Brunswick, Canada) to load a cargo of timber (deals). It safely arrived at Point du Chêne, Shediac, on Jul. 27, 1876 & on Sep. 06, 1876 was loaded & ready to depart for Liverpool when a gale hit the area. Lord Dalhousie was driven ashore at Point du Chêne, filled with water, became a wreck & was soon condemned. The wreck & its cargo was to be offered for sale by auction at Shediac on Sep. 20, 1876. Did it take place, I wonder? Per these contemporary news reports - 1 & 2. The U.K. Government 1876 wreck listing referenced above, names her captain at the time of loss as being W. Plotz (with no 'e').
Can you add anything additional? #2906

37

  Alcides
296/325 later 299 tons

15687
1850

A barque, later a brig. Built by Lawson Gales. The vessel, which was launched in Sep. 1850 & Sunderland registered on Sep. 25, 1850 (scroll to #15687), is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1851/52 thru 1873/74. It was initially owned, per LR thru 1856/57, by J. Gales of Sunderland, (related to the builder, I wonder) for service from Sunderland to Barcelona, Spain, with J. Lawson serving as the vessel's captain. J. Gales would seem to mean John M. Gales. However, Marwood's North of England Maritime Directory of Mar. 1854 lists 'John M'Gales' as the vessel's owner with S. Gibson her then captain. The vessel is listed in other North East shipping registers. Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1855 lists John M. Gales as her owner with S. Gibson her captain. TR of 1856 lists J. M. Gales as her owner.
In 1857/58, per LR, Alcides became owned by J. Middleton of Sunderland for continued service to Barcelona thru 1858/59 & then from Sunderland to the Mediterranean, with J. Davis serving as the vessel's captain from 1857/58 thru 1858/59 then 'Wayman' from 1859/60 thru 1862/63. Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 clarifies the now 299 ton vessel's then owners to mean John Middleton, Edward Dobson & George Naisby, all of Sunderland. In 1861/62, LR records Dobson & Co. of Sunderland as her new owner, but such listing may reflect only a change in her managing owner.
In 1863, per the Mercantile Navy List ('MNL'), the vessel became Newcastle registered. Owned per LR of 1862/63 by 'Harnet' of Newcastle with G. Harnet her captain. Such LR edition also notes that the vessel had become rigged as a brig (previously a barque).
In 1863/64, per LR, Alcides became owned by G. Arnott of Newcastle, for service from Newcastle to the Mediterranean in 1863/64, from Newcastle to North America in 1864/65, maybe from Waterford, Ireland, to the Baltic in 1865/66 then Newcastle to North America, & from 1866/67, per LR, for service from Liverpool to the West Indies. MNLs of 1865 thru 1869 record George Arnott, of Newcastle, as her owner. During the period of 'Arnott' ownership, LR records G. Arnott as her captain thru 1864/65 or 1865/66 then M. Charlton.
The vessel's later history is unknown to the webmaster. MNL tells us that the vessel was sold to foreign owners per a certificate dated Feb. 24, 1869 (as I read the data (scroll to #15687). And no longer recorded the vessel from 1870. So far the webmaster has been unable to find out the nationality of the new owners nor whether they re-named the vessel.
99.4 ft. long, 299 tons from LR of 1859/60, signal letters LSHR. Some crew lists are available here. Can you tell us anything additional? Y

38

  Viking
294/319 tons

1011
1850

A barque. Built by Lawson Gales. A vessel which had a very short life. Viking, which was launched in Apl. 1850 & first registered, at Sunderland, on Apl. 26, 1850, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1850/51 thru 1856/57 only.
For reasons unknown, the vessel's name is often mispelled. The Mercantile Navy List recorded it as Vilking. Have seen it referred to as Vicking also.
Viking was owned for its entire, if brief, lifetime by Peter Scott of Sunderland. With, per LR, R. Dobson serving as the vessel's captain thru 1854/55 & J. Robinson thereafter. For service, thru 1854/55, from Sunderland to the Mediterranean, & in 1855/56 & 1856/57 for service to the Mediterranean ex Liverpool.
The North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5 records the vessel, in Mar. 1854, as registered at Sunderland & owned by Peter Scott, of Sunderland - with Richd. Dobson her then captain. Turnbull's Shipping Registers ('TR') of both 1855 & 1856 record 'Scott' as the vessel's owner, however the 1855 edition records Henry Claproth as the vessel's then captain.
It would seem that 'Dobson' was Viking's captain thru 1854, 'Claproth' from about Aug. 1854 thru Mar. 1855, & 'Robinson' thereafter.
Some 'best efforts' operational history for each captain. 'Dobson' - i) On May 10, 1850, the vessel left Sunderland for Constantinople (now Istanbul, Turkey), clearly went on to Odessa (Black Sea, Ukraine) & on Nov. 9. 1850 arrived back at Bristol via Falmouth. ii) In late May 1851, Viking left Matanzas, Cuba, for Taganrog (Rostov Oblast, Russia, Sea of Azov, Black Sea) via Trieste, Italy, & also Constantinople. It was back at Constantinple on Nov. 19/20, 1851. I did not spot when it later returned to the U.K. iii) On Mar. 31, 1852 the vessel arrived at Carthagena (SE Spain) ex Sunderland, went on to Berdjanski (Sea of Azov) & left Constantinople in early Aug. 1852 returning to either Queenstown or Falmouth for orders. iv) On Jan. 17, 1853, the vessel would seem to have left Cardiff & then Milford (both Wales), for Havana, Cuba. v) On Sep. 27/28 1853, the vessel arrived at Constantinople ex Venice, Italy, went on to Taganrog & presumably back to the U.K. 'Claproth' - vi) On Aug. 12, 1854 Viking arrived at Carthagena, left for Villaricos & Garrucha (both Almeria, Spain) & then on to Alexandria, Egypt. It arrived back at Liverpool on Mar. 1, 1855 via Queenstown. 'Robinson' - vii) On May 19, 1855 the vessel arrived at Alexandria ex Liverpool & returned to Liverpool on Aug. 27, 1855. viii) It left Liverpool  for Alexandria again on Oct. 27, 1855, & arrived there on Nov. 30, 1855. I think it went on to Crookhaven (SW Ireland). ix) The vessel must have made another voyage to Alexandria. On Jan. 26, 1856, returning from Alexandria with a cargo of wheat, the vessel arrived at Cagliari (Sardinia, Italy) after being driven onto some mudflats en route. It jettisoned some cargo & got off without injury. x) On Aug. 8, 1856 the vessel arrived at Alexandria ex Falmouth. On Sep. 13, 1856, the vessel left Malta for Queenstown but had to put back to Malta. It never made it to the U.K. You can read what had happened below.
A Sunderland shipping website that requests no links or recognition tells us that Viking was 97.3 ft. long. No crew lists seem to be available for the vessel.
What happened to Viking? In this 'Lloyd's List' report from Paris, France, Viking, on Sep. 23, 1856, with Robinson in command, returning to Cork or Falmouth with a cargo of wheat ex Alexandria, stranded at Ras-el-Mahmoura, on the Mediterranean south coast S. of Cape Bon (which is located at the tip of a peninsula, NE of Tunis, Tunisia). This further 'Lloyd's List' report (in blue) confirms the Paris report but tells us additionally that the vessel's crew were driven away by 'Arabs', who plundered the vessel. The vessel's crew reached Tunis via a ship's long boat.
Is there anything you can add? Or correct? #2639

39

  Rubicon
507/626 later 555 tons

13754
1851

A barque. Built by Lawson Gales. Rubicon, which was launched in Aug. 1851, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1851/52 thru 1864/65. Always, per LR, owned by 'Thompson' of Sunderland, with C. Vaux serving as the vessel's captain thru 1859/60 & 'Bainbor'gh', (presumably 'Bainborough' but I think correctly James Bambrough) thereafter thru 1864/65.
The North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5, in Mar. 1854 data, lists Geo. Thompson, Ann Gales, Margaret J. Gales & Cuthbert Vaux, all of Sunderland, as Rubicon's then owners, with Cuthbert Vaux her then captain. Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1855 lists George Thompson, John F. Gales and Cuthbert Vaux, all of Sunderland, as her owners with, rather, G. W. Spurring serving as her captain. TR of 1856 records G. Thompson, J. F. Gales and C. Vaux as the vessel's then owners. While Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 lists Geo. Thompson, John F. Gales & Cuthbert Vaux.
The vessel's voyages per LR? i) From Sunderland to the Mediterranean from 1851/52 thru 1853/54, & from 1861/62 thru 1864/65, ii) for service as a 'London Transport' from 1854/55 thru 1859/60, & iii) ex Sunderland in 1860/61.
132.6 ft. long (132 ft. 8 in. per Lloyd's Survey), of 555 tons from LR of 1860/61, a few crew lists are available here.
Some 'best efforts' operational snippets re Rubicon. i) So far as I can see 'Vaux' was the vessel's captain only thru Mar. 1854. While he was her captain, the vessel made voyages to Bombay (now Mumbai), India, & to Colombo (Ceylon now Sri Lanka), Kurrachee (now Karachi, Pakistan), & Cochin (W. coast of India. ii) LR is incorrect when it reports that the vessel was a 'London Transport' for six years from 1854/55. 'London Transport' clearly refers to the vessel being engaged in providing transportation services relating to the Crimean War of 1854/56. I note that the vessel was Lloyd's surveyed in Mar. 1854 which survey refers to the vessel having been involved in a collision. The vessel was one of many (more than 74) vessels so engaged. Rubicon, with 'Davies' in command, left Woolwich, London, on Apl. 26, 1854 for Constantinople (now Istanbul, Turkey) via Torbay & Malta, with 55 or so officers & men, 48 horses & supplies for the Crimean campaign. It arrived at Varna (Bulgaria, northern Black Sea coast) on Jun. 20, 1854, one of two vessels under the tow of Jason, a steamship. And left Varna for the U.K., via Lisbon, Portugal, on Aug. 04, 1854 with 28 soldiers' wives & children. It arrived back at Gravesend, London, on Sep. 17, 1854, iii) In mid Oct. 1854, the vessel was advertised for a voyage to Calcutta (now Kolkata), India, with J. B. Davis (Davies I believe) & then Wm. Good in command but it left Gravesend, London on Dec. 09, 1854 with 'Spuring' in command. It arrived at Calcutta on May 28, 1855 & left there on Aug. 21, 1855. It was at Portsmouth, en route to London, on Feb. 08, 1856 having lost two anchors. iv) On Apl. 08, 1856, the vessel left Swansea, Wales, for Coquimbo, Chile, with 'Cormack' now in command. Stated to have been 'leaky', it put into Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Jun. 10, 1856 but would seem to have required extensive repairs because it left Rio only on Sep. 12, 1856. On Jul. 24, 1857, the vessel arrived at Cork, Ireland, from Callao, Peru, with a cargo of guano & soon went on to London. v) On Oct. 10, 1857, the vessel, now with 'Hall' in command, left Cardiff, Wales, for Calcutta (arr. Mar. 22, 1858), likely with a cargo of coal. At Calcutta it collided with Bell Rock, an American vessel, doing damage to both vessels. The vessel was cleared, on Apl. 24, 1858, for departure from Calcutta to Demerera, West Indies, & on Jan. 26, 1959 arrived back at Gravesend, London, ex Demerera. vi) The vessel may have carried stores to Gibraltar for the Admiralty. vii) On Jul. 14, 1859, 'Bambrough' now in command, the vessel left Sunderland for Naples, Italy, went on to Constantinople (arr. Oct. 21, 1859) & then to Sulina (Romania, Black Sea, at the mouth of Sulina branch of the Danube River). It later, on Jan. 09, 1860, delivered its cargo of barley ex Sulina at Dublin, Ireland. viii) On Mar. 28, 1860, Rubicon left Cardiff for Calcutta again, with 850 tons of coal. It did a side trip to Mauritius, then back to Mauritius a 2nd time to load a cargo of sugar for Falmouth for orders & eventual delivery at Bristol. When it arrived at Falmouth, on Mar. 15, 1861, it fouled & damaged Ino, a Norwegian barque. ix) In Apl. 1861 the vessel left Bristol for Montreal, Canada, & on Jul. 11, 1861 was back at Gravesend with a cargo of wheat & flour ex Montreal. x) On Sep. 26, 1861, the vessel left Sunderland for Alexandria, Egypt, departing that port for Liverpool on Jan. 22, 1862. A little more data when time permits - hopefully soon.
What finally happened to Rubicon? LR of 1864/65 tells us that the vessel had been 'Abandoned'. On Oct. 26, 1864, in a report from Vigo, Spain, it was advised that the vessel, en route from Sulina, foundered on Oct. 20, 1864 & that her crew were all saved. Vigo is in NW Spain, just N. of the border with Portugal - I presume that the vessel was therefore lost in the Atlantic Ocean. Alas, I can tell you nothing more, not even the name of her captain - there are many reports but no additional detail. I note, however, that on Sep. 12, 1864, Rubicon, 'Bainborough' in command, was at Constantinople ex Sulina. So I presume that 'Bainborough' or 'Bambrough' was her captain at the time of her loss.
Can you tell us more? Or correct the above in any way? #2796

40

Scott
370 later 345 or 346 tons

14106
1852

A wooden barque built by Lawson Gales at South Hylton & first registered in 1852. I have read that it was launched in Jan. 1851. Per 1 (article from Norfolk Chronicle of Aug. 14, 1869. See 'Craxford' below). The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1851/52 thru 1873/74. For most of those years, from 1851/52 thru 1872/73, the vessel was owned by Peter Scott of Sunderland. Under 'Scott' ownership, the vessel had 4 captains - initially 'Stainburgh' thru 1858/59, 'Robertson' thru 1860/61, 'Downes' from 1861/62 thru 1863/64 & 'Laycklock' from 1863/64 thru 1872/73. For, per LR, some most varied service. Which service includes i) from Sunderland to the Mediterranean (1851/52 thru 1855/56, in 1861/62 & 1862/63, in 1868/69 & 1869/70), ii) from Swansea, Wales to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 1856/57 thru 1858/59, iii) from Liverpool to South America in 1859/60 & 1860/61, iv) from Belfast to the Mediterranean in 1863/64 & 1864/65, v) from Liverpool to Ceylon, now Sri Lanka, in the period from 1865/66 thru 1867/68. Scott's ownership of the vessel is well documented. Marwood's North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5, in Mar. 1854 data, lists Peter Scott of Sunderland as the vessel's then owner with John Stainsburgh her captain. Scott's ownership is also set out in Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1856 & Christie's Shipping Register of 1858. Rather later, the Scott ownership is again confirmed by the Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') of 1865 thru 1872. MNL of 1870 is here. The vessel was first LR recorded at 345 tons only in 1865/66. We thank Alan Craxford for the newspaper cutting from the Norfolk Chronicle of Aug. 14, 1869 available at link 1 above. James & Mathew Nessworthy, Alan's family members, both part of Scott's then crew, were both given 12 weeks hard labour it would seem. In 1872/73, per LR, the vessel became owned by R. Curry & Co., also of Sunderland, for service from Sunderland to the Mediterranean with 'Garrick' & then 'R. Wilson' serving as the vessel's captain.
110.5 ft. long, signal letters LKSH.
LR of 1873/74 notes that the vessel had been 'Lost'. Thanks to the folks at 'Google Books' you can read exactly what happened, in the article available at left, ex  true pages 12 thru 14 in Vol. IX of The Lifeboat, the Journal of the National Life-Boat Institution, which volume 'Google' scanned & made available. Scott was bound from Sunderland to Algiers, Algeria, with a cargo of coal, under the command of Captain Wilson & with a crew of 10 all told. They encountered 'much stormy and thick weather' & ran onto the Kentish Knock Sands, a dangerous shoal lying about 32 miles E. of the Essex coast, in the outer Thames Estuary, at 5 in the morning of Oct. 22, 1873. ... Per the article, 'within five minutes of the vessel's striking she began to break up ; the boats were washed away, the deckhouse was torn to fragments and carried away piecemeal ; the deck began to twist, and buckle, and open, and then was speedily ripped up by the force of the seas, and torn away plank after plank. The vessel broke her back and heeled over on the starboard side, and settled down upon the Sands ; the men could not make any signal of distress, and if they could have done so, they were miles away from any Life-boat, and at any moment the masts might give, and they be plunged into the boiling sea.' Do read the article. No summary words of mine could do the scene justice. Fortunately a brig spotted the crew in the rigging from a distance, passed a message via a smack to Broadstairs, Kent, & at 6 p.m. that day Aid, a Ramsgate (East Kent) harbour steamer, was dispatched to the scene with Bradford, the Ramsgate lifeboat in tow. They lay by until daylight & eventually after the Scott crew had been clinging to the rigging for 26 hours, all 10 crew members were rescued by Bradford, transferred to Aid, & landed safely at Ramsgate. The rescuers were granted modest awards for their amazing bravery. There are many other references in the book to Scott. Do see true page #48 in red) in that regard. Is there anything you can add? #1958

41

Ariosto
295/278 tons

4667
1854

A wooden 'snow', later a brig, built by Lawson Gales in 1854. Per 1 (ownership data, Ariosto, in 'Christies Shipping Register ...' for 1858), 2 (Ariosto wreck ref. 70% down). Signal letters JDMC. This vessel was launched in mid Jun. 1854, for Thomas Cropton, intended for the American trade. The webmaster has Lloyd's Registers available ex Google books - see left. In all of the 1855/56 thru 1860/61 Lloyd's Registers, 'Cropton &' was the listed owner. That it would seem means 'Cropton & Co.' i.e. Cropton & others. Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1855 lists 'Ariosto (of London)' as registered at Sunderland & owned by T. Bull, of London & T. Crofton, of Sunderland, with T. Consitt, her then captain. TR of 1856 lists Ariosta (not Ariosto) as being owned by S. T. Bell of London and T. Cropton of Sunderland. - in 1858 'Christies' records the vessel as then being owned by 'Thomas Bull of London & Thos. Cropton, of Sunderland. It would seem that the vessel traded with Oporto, Portugal.
On Mar. 12, 1861, per line 1137 here, the 295 ton brig was stranded near 'Milltown', while en route from Limerick to Philadelphia. Crew of 10 - 4 lost. Vessel then stated to be owned by Thomas Cropton. In late Feb. 1861 or early in Mar. 1961, the vessel, then described as a brig, left Limerick, Ireland, in ballast, bound for Philadelphia, U.S.A. Limerick is inland, & the vessel proceeded down the Shannon River towards the open sea. Encountering bad weather, it put into Scattery Roads for three days. Scattery Roads is a relatively sheltered anchorage off the coast of County Clare, Ireland, in the Shannon estuary, S. of Kilrush. William Tullock was in command, with a crew of 10 all told, one of whom was a 14 year old boy. Possibly that should be 11 aboard her - a deserter was found on board after they put out to sea. The ship should best have stayed longer at Scattery Roads! But it did not. It proceeded to sea, on Mar. 9, 1861, but did not make it very far. At 2 o'clock a.m. on Mar. 12, 1861, after battling thru appalling weather conditions, the vessel was driven onto rocks at Crane Point near Miltown, which seems to truly mean Cream Point, Miltown Malbay, located on the Atlantic coast of County Clare. At 52.52N/09.26W. 2 states at 'Little Creek'. Located about 20 miles N. of Scattery Roads, as the crow flies but 45 or so miles NE of the mouth of the Shannon. A giant sea swept the decks & the Captain was lost in the boiling surf. A heavy sea drove the ship over a rocky reef. She ended up on rocks surrounded by her spars, ribs & other assorted debris - a 'complete' or total shipwreck. Only six were left aboard at this point, including the 14 year old. The first mate jumped from the stern of the ship, almost perpendicular & separated from the main hull, then high & dry 100 yards inland, & safely reached a rock. Via a rope thrown to him, the others made it one by one to shore, however the 14 year old lost his grip on the rope, fell into the boiling sea & was lost. So only 5 survived of the crew of 10. They made it to the warmth & safety of a nearby coastguard station. One of the 5, an American, had amazingly been wrecked 3 times in the previous 4 months. The wreck? Such as it was, it was sold within days, to 4 local citizens. WWW data about the vessel is quite limited. Can you provide more?
The above data is essentially a summary of an extensive newspaper article, published on Mar. 14, 1861 by the 'Clare Journal' of Ennis, County Clare, Ireland. The article was transcribed & made available by an Irish website which requests no links or recognition. Should any site visitor wish to read the complete report, you can find such site & the report by Google searching for 'Ariosto White Strand'.

B. & J. GARDNER
G. GARDNER
JAMES GARDNER
HODGSON & GARDNER

Can you help with the history of this shipbuilder or these shipbuilders? Because I so far know little about him/them. Even if the names that I have listed above are fully accurate. And if the names are in fact related.

So far as I can see, Hodgson & Gardner built 28 vessels in the period of 1849 to 1861. G. Gardner built 28 vessels from 1855 thru 1867. B. & J. Gardner built 22 vessels in the period of 1861 thru 1876. While J. Gardner built just 4 vessels in period of 1874 thru 1877.

I am kindly advised however, by Clive Hodgson, of the U.K., that the 'Hodgson' in the partnership was Cuthbert Hodgson (Oct. 6, 1809, born at sea/Oct. 19, 1877), the son of Cuthbert Hodgson, also a mariner, & Clive's GGG grandfather. He owned & was the Master of Empress of Sunderland for several years. But, written now many years later in 2013, I think that that reference correctly is to Empress, of the port of Sunderland, rather than Empress of Sunderland. Hodgson is shown in Lloyd's Registers as being the master of Empress from 1839/40 thru 1848/49. Empress was registered thru those years in the name of Hutchinson of Sunderland & became owned by Hodgson in 1848/49. The family then surely must have liked the name of Cuthbert ~ because he had a son also of that name, also a ship's Master. So three generations with an identical name! And the 'Gardner' in the partnership was indeed James Gardner. Thanks so much, Clive, for that interesting data. Perhaps one day we will hear from a descendent of 'Gardner'?

Charles Hodgson has been in touch, in July 2015, to advise that Hodgson & Gardner also built ships at Hartlepool. Charles believes that Cuthbert Hodgson, i.e. the Hodgson of the shipbuilding partnership, was his great great grandfather. He notes that the name of Cuthbert has continued into further generations - Cuthbert is Charles's middle name.

Clive Hodgson also provided some considerable historical data about Empress of Sunderland, or, I rather believe Empress of Sunderland, which data, however, does not include where she was built.

Hodgson & Gardner are recorded as building, in 1856, John Robinson & Dorothy of 445 & 235 tons respectively. And in 1857, Emblem, Il Trovatore, & Isabel, of 253, 142 & 351 tons, respectively.

Names of just a few of the vessels constructed by 'Gardner' of Sunderland - as I happen to spot references to them. In a table in build date sequence.

VESSELS BUILT BY 'HODGSON & GARDNER'

1

  Ann Eliza
158 tons
1851

A snow or brig. A vessel which had a short life - Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1851/52 thru 1856/57 only. Ann Eliza, which was registered at Whitby, Yorkshire, was always owned & captained by 'Sleighth'lm' of Whitby. Which name is clarified by the North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/55 to mean, in 1853 data, Robert Sleightholm. And also by Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1856, in 1855 data (Sleightholme). And also by this Whitby shipping history book page.
LR tells us that the vessel's service was consistently from Sunderland to the Baltic. Certainly there are many references to Ann Eliza sailing to Swinemunde (now Świnoujście, NW Poland), & Stettin (Szczecin, Poland), returning most often to the north-east but also to Leith, Scotland, & to Littlehampton, Sussex. But ... On Feb. 27, 1853, the vessel was at Gibraltar, ex Marseilles, cleared for departure to the Clyde (arr. Apl. 05, 1853). On Sep. 24, 1853 the vessel was off Dover arriving from New York. On Jul. 23, 1854, the vessel was en route to Danzig (now Gdańsk, Poland), ex Hull. All with Sleightholm serving as her captain. I also note that a vessel of the name was reported on shore at Bridlington, Yorkshire, on Sep. 22, 1852. A minor & short-lived grounding when weighing anchor that occurred on Sep. 20, 1852. The vessel was of Whitby & surely was 'our' Ann Eliza.
I note that the vessel was not issued an Official Number, so it could no longer have existed on Jan. 01, 1855. Indeed the Whitby shipping book referred to above tells us that the vessel was lost on the Isle of Majorca in 1854. In fact, the vessel only missed that deadline by a few days.
I learn that on Nov. 21, 1854, Ann Eliza left West Hartlepool for Marseilles, France, with a cargo of coal. 'Lloyd's List' reported that 'Bond' was then her captain but that seems to have been in error. She had a crew of seven all told. In a Dec. 31, 1855 report from Port Mahon (Mahón, or Maó, the capital of the Spanish island of Menorca, Balearic Islands), it was reported that on Dec. 19, 1854, Ann Eliza, en route from Hartlepool to Marseilles with a cargo of coal, struck rocks at Campos (S. coast of Menorca) & capsized. Five of her crew had been drowned, the cargo was lost & the vessel was in a 'very bad condition'. A later report from Majorca, published in a number of U.K. newspapers including 'The Express' of London, provided extensive detail about the disaster including the name of her captain (Boer) & the names of most of the crew members both lost & saved. The two crew members who survived were, I read, rescued by a fishing boat. Such article revises the date of the vessel's loss to Dec. 20, 1854.
Can you add anything additional? #2643

2

  Emporium
327/350 tons
1852

A barque which would appear to have had a very short life. Launched in Feb. 1852, the vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1852/53 thru 1854/55 only. Emporium was initially owned by 'Lumsdn' & Co. of Sunderland, with 'W. Hods'n' LR listed as being her captain. In LRs of 1853/54 & 1854/55, R. Cleugh of Shields is listed as her owner with T. Bruce serving as her captain. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5 clarifies such ownership. It records i) the vessel as Shields registered & ii) Robert Cleugh & Thos. Bruce, both of North Shields, as her 1854 owners, with Thos. Bruce her then captain.
What happened to the vessel? This page (ex here) tells us that on Oct. 18, 1854, the vessel was en route from Quebec, Canada, to Sunderland, with a cargo of timber & a crew of 15, (maybe only 12) when it stranded 2 or 3 miles south of Robin Hood's Bay, Yorkshire, during a heavy gale. Wikipedia references the date as Oct. 17, 1854 & indicates, presumably based upon the contemporary sources they reference, i) that the vessel was rather en route to South Shields & ii) that survivors were rescued by means of a rocket apparatus. The vessel was got off, & on Oct. 26, 1854 she was taken into Whitby Harbour a little to the north, still with most of her cargo aboard. The stranding must have been most stressful - I read that four of the vessel's crew lost their lives in the disaster. It would seem that the vessel was likely damaged beyond repair. I say that because Emporium was not granted an Official Number which means that the vessel did not exist on Jan. 01, 1855 or in the short period thereafter. Can you tell us more? Provide newspaper accounts of such stranding, perhaps?
I have now spotted three accounts of the unfortunate event. This extensive account & two articles. A detailed article in the 'North Wales Chronicle ...', & an article in the 'Daily News' of London. At 10 or 11 a.m. on Oct. 18, 1854, the vessel struck rocks 1,000 yards off Peak Way Fort - described as a 'fearful place'. Battered by powerful winds & high seas, some hours later, at 2 or 3 p.m., the vessel fell over onto her starboard side - at which point her master, stated to be Charles Bruce, his 14 year old son Thomas Bruce, & two of her crew members (Robert Brown & either Allen Crills or Colin Kelly) were washed overboard & drowned. With great difficulty, the Coast Guard, lead by Lieutenant Benjamin Wooley, succeeded in firing a line to the vessel using Carte's rockets. Later, at about 5:30 p.m., via that line it would appear, the remaining 8 crew members were all brought to shore. The first link above extensively references the rescue efforts of James Whitten, John McDonald, & many others, all apparently boatmen. It seems likely that the crew were saved by boats moving along & tethered to the rocket line. Additional info. would be welcomed. #2328

3

  Conciliator
338/357, later 358 & 313 tons

27076
1852 or 1853

There would seem to be confusion as to when Conciliator was first built or registered, with Lloyd's Register ('LR') consistently reporting the vessel as built in 1853 & 4 maritime lists referenced below rather listing 1852.
The webmaster hoped that the Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') might help with the vessel's year of first registry. But the record is confusing. It records the vessel in 1857 (scroll to #27076) as Conciliation, first registered at Shields on Sep. 08, 1854. Such data seems not to help any. From 1858 thru 1878, MNL lists Hylton built Conciliator, registered at Shields thru 1869 & at North Shields from 1869 thru 1878. MNLs from 1872 thru 1878 record the vessel as an 1852 vessel.
The vessel, a barque, is LR listed from 1853/54 thru 1878/79. Owned thru 1861/62 by 'Atkinson' of North Shields. For service from Sunderland to the Mediterranean thru 1858/59 & from Hull to the Mediterranean in 1859/60 & 1860/61. With A. Jackson serving as the vessel's captain thru 1858/59 per LR & A. Hastings from 1859/60 thru 1862/63. Marwood's North of England Maritime Directory of 1854 lists the Shields registered  Conciliator of 1852 as owned by Matthew H., Thomas H., & John Atkinson, all of North Shields with Aaron Jackson serving as the vessel's captain. Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1855 lists Matthew H., W. H., & J. Atkinson as the vessel's owners with Alfred Hastings serving as the vessel's captain. TR of 1856 confirms the above 1854 data. While Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 lists Matthew Hand & John Atkinson of North Shields as the vessel's then owners. I suspect that Matthew Hand means Matthew Hand Atkinson.
It seems likely that for a brief period in about 1861/62 the vessel was owned by Thompson jr. of Sunderland.
By 1862/63 Conciliator would seem to have been owned by J. Somerville of North Shields, who owned it, per LR, thru 1868/69. For service to the Mediterranean i) ex Sunderland (in 1862/63 & 1863/64), ii) ex Shields (in 1865/66), iii) ex Newport, Wales (in 1866/67 & 1867/68). With J. Robinson serving briefly as the vessel's captain, soon, from 1864/65 thru 1868/69, H. Frost.
Such ownership data may be in error. MNLs of 1865 thru 1868 rather record Henry Frost of Sunderland as the vessel's then owner or managing owner.
In 1868/69, Conciliator, per LR, became owned by A. Leake of South Shields (later of North Shields), who also served as the vessel's captain thru 1873/74 & from 1875/76. J. Burdon served as captain from 1873/74 thru 1875/76. For service from Shields to either Spain or the Mediterranean. Such ownership data is confirmed by MNLs of 1869 thru 1878 all of which list Ambrose Leake, of South Shields, as the vessel's owner or managing owner. But TR of 1874 lists Ambrose Leake as the vessel's then sole owner.
115.0 ft. long, signal letters PNTB, many crew lists are available via this page. Of 314 tons from 1869 per MNL.
LR of 1878/79 notes that the vessel had been involved in a 'Collision'. In mid Sep. 1878, the vessel, stated to be of 313 tons only & then owned & captained by A. Leake, was en route from South Shields to Savona, Italy, with a cargo of coal. On Sep. 20, 1878 Conciliator and Richmond, an 1106 ton steamship built at Middlesboro' in 1871, were in collision when 10 miles S. of Europa Point, Straits of Gibraltar. Conciliator was, I read, run into by Richmond during conditions of dense fog. Richmond had been en route from Taganrog (Sea of Azov, Black Sea, Russia) to Amsterdam with a cargo of rye grain. Crew of 10, no lives lost. As per this page. And also as per these contemporary news reports - 1 & 2 - the 2nd of which notes that Ambrose Leek (surely Leake) was at the time both Conciliator's owner & captain.
The webmaster initially thought, having read the LR entry in 1878/79 re Richmond, that it must also have been lost in the collision. It was lost in 1878 but later in the year & under other circumstances. A court case in Admiralty Court, in Feb. 1879, did deal with the Conciliator/Richmond collision. As you can read here. The Court concluded that Richmond was solely at blame. 
Is there anything you can add? Or correct? #2823

VESSELS BUILT BY 'B. & J. GARDNER'

1

  Ann Mills
335 later 319 tons

44493

1862

The barque, which was launched on Aug. 25, 1862 & first registered, at Sunderland, in 1862 (scroll to #44493), is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1862/63 thru 1875/76. Wikipedia advises (thanks!) that on Oct. 24, 1862, the vessel ran aground on the Pergas Shoals, in the Dardanelles, Turkey, (the Dardanelles strait separates Europe from Asia), but was refloated. The vessel was owned, thru 1871/72 per LR, by W. Mills of Sunderland, with W. Watson serving as her captain thru 1866/67 followed by G. Charlton thru 1871/72. Under 'Mills' ownership the vessel, per LR, served the Mediterranean, ex Sunderland thru 1865/66 & ex the Clyde thereafter. The Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') of 1865 thru 1870 list W. Mills of Bishopwearmouth as the vessel's owner & in 1872 list Wm. Mills of Sunderland. The vessel was first LR recorded at 319 tons in 1871/72. The vessel's ownership from 1871/72 is confused. LR advises that from part way thru 1871/72 the vessel became Blyth, Northumberland, registered & owned by J. Stavers of Blyth, with such owner name amended to J. Staver from 1872/73. With J. Redford the vessel's captain thru 1875/76. MNLs of 1874 & 1875 rather report the vessel to be registered at North Shields & owned by Thos. Anderson Smith of Blyth. It would seem that the MNL data is correct. 114.0 ft. long, signal letters TVJD.
On Jul. 25, 1875, the vessel left St. Jean d'Acre (Acre, in northern Israel today), for Plymouth, for orders, with a cargo of 540 tons of wheat & dari seed. Dari is a seed, rich in proteins & oils, also known as millet or sorghum, extensively today used in bird seed. The vessel was under the command of Thomas Anderson Smith with a crew of 11 all told. The vessel's voyage was uneventful until she entered the Bay of Biscay on Oct. 8, 1875 when the breeze became gale force. On. Oct. 12, 1875 the vessel shipped a heavy sea over her port bow which resulted in much damage to the vessel & the shifting of the vessel's cargo to starboard. The vessel took on water which the pumps were unable to control & by 8 a.m. on Oct. 13, 1875 the vessel's starboard side was under water & the pumps were clogged with grain & useless. A 2:30 p.m. that day a sail was seen & Ann Mills sailed towards it & hove to on her lee bow. It proved to be Pierre, a French brig. Unfortunately, in raging seas & high winds, Pierre struck Ann Mills abaft the main rigging causing the crew to jump for their lives. Only the captain was able to get aboard Pierre. The 10 remaining crew aboard Ann Mills launched the ship's boat but it capsized. An attempt was made to launch Pierre's boat to try to effect a rescue but nobody was, in the conditions, prepared to man her - 'no boat could live in such a sea'. At 11:30 p.m., on Oct. 13, 1875, Ann Mills vanished from sight & sank with the 10 men still aboard her. At 46.15N/9.54W in the Bay of Biscay. Line 452 on this page records the basic data re her loss but offers a confusing date for that loss. Which is clarified to be Oct. 13, 1875 by this report of the later Inquiry into her loss (ex page #287 about 75% down the volume available here). The Court concluded that stress of weather was the cause of her loss but believed that the vessel's cargo could better have been stowed. Crew lists are available here. Is there anything you can add? #2175

VESSELS BUILT BY 'G. GARDNER'

1

  Chowdean
384 or 385 tons

7304
1855

A wooden barque, which was launched in Oct. 1855. Per 1 (lost in 1879). The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1856/57 thru 1869/70, then an LR silence, & again from 1874/75 thru 1879/80. It was owned, for its entire lifetime, per LR, by J. Tully of Sunderland. i.e. by J. Tully & J. Tully, jun. per both Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1856 & Christie's Shipping Register of 1858. The Mercantile Navy Lists from 1865 thru 1880 (1870) all list John Tully of Sunderland as the vessel's owner. While TR of 1874 advises that the vessel was then owned by John Tully & John Tully, jun., each with 32 shares. Per LR, the vessel served thru 1869/70 always ex Sunderland with the exception of 1860/61, when it served ex Swansea, Wales. In LR editions of 1861/62 & 1862/63 only was a destination stated - to the Mediterranean. From 1860/61 thru 1869/70, per LR, J. Anderson was the vessel's captain.
Some operational details. On Nov. 23, 1866, the vessel, en route from Pomaron (Pomarão, noted for the shipment of copper & sulphur ores), Portugal, to North Shields, ran aground at North Shields - she was refloated. I read (A & B, in red) that during the first 6 months of 1867, the 10 man crew of Chowdean, & indeed the vessel itself, were saved as a result of actions by a lifeboat of the National Lifeboat Institution. You can read about it here (1 (search for Chowdean) & 2). The vessel, en route from South Shields to either Naples, Italy, or Lisbon, Portugal, ran aground at Great Yarmouth, on the night of Jan. 17/18, 1867. With the help of the Gt. Yarmouth lifeboat Duff, & a steam-tug named Sailor, the vessel was brought into Lowestoft, Suffolk, in a leaky condition. It would seem that, at least from Mar. 1877, 'Dryden' was the vessel's captain. 'Welsh Newspapers Online' records the vessel leaving from Cardiff or Newport i) for Vigo, on Mar. 12, 1877, ii) for Barcelona, on Jun. 18, 1877, Jun. 3, 1878 & Feb. 28, 1879, iii) for Tarragona on Nov. 16, 1877 (all Spain). The vessel arrived at Cardiff on Jul. 6, & Oct. 9, 1878 & on Feb. 13, 1879 with iron ore from Huelva, southern Spain.
120.0 ft. long,, from 1874/75 121.5 ft., signal letters JSKV. Many crew lists are available here.
LR of 1879/80 notes that Chowdean had 'Foundered'. On Nov. 29, 1879, per line 1096 here, the vessel was en route from Villa Real, (I think now Legutio, also known as Villarreal de Álava, Basque country, N. Spain), to Newcastle, with a cargo of 520 tons of sulphur ore & a crew of 13. During a heavy gale, the vessel became leaky & was abandoned when 200 miles NW of Cape Finisterre (NW Spain). 2 crew members were lost. The vessel was noted to be then owned by J. Tully of Sunderland. This newspaper article tell us that Captain Dryden was then in command & that he was one of the crew members who were lost. And further that the survivors were rescued by Regina, a Russian barque from Helsingfors, Sweden, (Captain Hacklin) & landed at Cadiz, Spain, on Dec. 7, 1859. Can you add to or correct the above data? #2294

2

Fugitive
471  (or 476) tons

50066

Anders Dedekam
1864

A wooden barque, with iron beams. Per 1 (launch of vessel, at page bottom), 2 (data), 3 (an 1867 voyage from Launceston with wool, wheat etc.), 4 (Norwegian data, ex a site no longer available), 5 (1884 sinking reference). The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Register available to him from 'Google' books, see left. There are many references to the vessel at Trove, Australia. 144.2 ft. long, signal letters WGNQ & HVNM. The vessel was built for T. B. Walker & Co. ('Walker'), (Thomas Boss Walker), of London & registered at London. It would seem that Walker owned the vessel thru 1878, & further that W. R. Barwood ('Barwood') was her captain thru 1876, when he became the captain of Lanoma, also a Walker vessel, & built by Austin & Hunter at Sunderland in 1876. The vessel saw service initially to Launceston, (i.e. Tasmania) then to Australia & from 1872/73 to Van Diemen Land (an early name for Tasmania). I spotted a brief ref. to the vessel arriving there in Jan. 1875. In Apl. 1878, the vessel was sold to 'J. Chr. Larssøn m.fl.', of Arendal, Norway, & became Anders Dedekam. With captains J. C. Larssøn & later P. T. Larrsøn. It would seem the vessel sank, off Newfoundland, in Aug. 1884. Link 4 provided the following Norwegian text which proves to be difficult to WWW translate - '8/1884: påseolt den 14/8 av et engelsk dampskip ved Newfoundland og sank'. Which may mean that the vessel was in collision with a steamship, & sank as a result. The final link above advises us that, in fact, the vessel was hit & sunk by Benmore on Aug. 14, 1884 & that all of her crew were safely aboard that steamer & landed - at Washington (near Washington D.C.?), U.S.A. Need help!

3

Araunah
449 (later 448, 461 & 480) tons

54728
1866

A wooden barque with iron beams. Per 1 & 2 (1866 maiden voyage to Launceston & its cargo), 3 (Dec. 13, 1881 arrival at Launceston), 4 (death of T. B. Walker, on Mar. 29, 1885). 145.0 ft. long but length varies per Lloyd's Registers at left from 145.0 to 146.7 ft., signal letters KMFB & later H?SMJ. The vessel was built for T. B. Walker & Co., (Thomas Boss Walker) of London, noted for their regular service to Tasmania & particularly for returning with wool. Registered at London. A great many references to the vessel at 'Trove', Australia. The vessel left Gravesend, river Thames, London, on its maiden voyage, on Aug. 14, 1866 for Launceston, Tasmania, under the command of Captain Thomas B. Whittingham. It arrived on Nov. 23, 1866 after a voyage of 101 days, delayed by 'baffling'  winds. The vessel, which left for London on Jan. 23, 1867, arrived there on Apl. 27, 1867 with a cargo mainly of wool but also 1,802 bags of ground bark. A great many subsequent voyages to Launceston. e.g. it left for London on Feb. 2, 1869 with 1,708 bales of wool & 900 bags of bark. And left on Jan. 26, 1870 with 1,484 bales of wool & 2,014 bags of bark. The vessel often carried tin in ingots on its return voyage to London. H. Barfield became her Captain, I believe in 1879 when appointed in Launceston, & by Apl. 1880, Alexander Findlay was her Captain. After an 1881 92 day voyage from Launceston, the vessel was overhauled & re-coppered at London with new decks installed. She arrived back at Launceston in Dec. 1881 after a passage of 86 days ex London. Captain Findlay died at Launceston in late Feb. 1885, at age 46, after a long illness (dropsy & heart disease). The vessel left Launceston for the last time, on Apl. 18, 1885, under the command of G. P. Brown, previously the vessel's chief mate. Note - Whittingham, along with 11 others, was drowned in the wreck of Lanoma (loss report) in Mar. 1888. The 1885/86 edition of Lloyd's Register records the vessel as sold to C. Henckel of Helsingborg, Sweden, presumably as a result of the death of T. B. Walker on Mar. 29, 1885. The vessel stayed in such ownership thru 1894/95, the last edition of Lloyd's Register I am able to access. I am not aware of what finally happened to the vessel. I need help!

4 Cleta
530 tons

56780

Nelly & Mathilda
Frideborg
1866

A composite (wood on an iron frame) barque. That had a long life (71 years), & many owners, names (& collisions!) Per 1 (extensive data & their sources, thanks to Lars Bruzelius). 153.3 ft. long, 46.09 metres, signal letters HNSC. The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Register available to him from 'Google' books, thru 1889/90 - see left. Built by 'James Gardner' for John Hay of London. Involved in the tea trade thru May, 1873, it would seem, & traded between New York & ports in the Far East (Hong Kong, Japan (Yokohama), & China (Foochow, Canton & Shanghai). In 1873, or 'about 1875', the vessel was sold to Balfour, Williamson & Co., of Liverpool, & mainly used in the Australian trade. In 1881, the ship saved the crew of the sinking barque Standard Bearer in the North Atlantic. In 1885, the vessel was owned by J. S. Davis of Liverpool. It was laid up in Princes Dock, Liverpool, until she was sold, in 1887, to Elias Theodor Norrman, of Malmö, Sweden, (who became her master for a number of years), & renamed Nelly & Mathilda. Became 151.1 ft. long only. On Apl. 8, 1894, the vessel was in collision with Bravo (of Höganäs, Sweden) off Smygehuk, Sweden. A voyage to the Wear in 1897 with pit props. The vessel collided again, on Aug. 13, 1900 - on this occasion with steamship Agne of Stockholm - at the entrance to Landskrona, Sweden. In 1901, Edward Jansson of Malmö, Sweden, became the managing owner. On Jul. 27, 1907 the vessel was involved in another collision, this time with Bonden, a barque, at Grimstad, Norway - the vessel suffered a broken bowsprit which took more than a month to repair. That collision was the subject of a court case, I see. On Mar. 14, 1916, the vessel was sold - 'to Ola Olsson, Åhus, together with Carl Johansson, Kalmar, and Nils Friberg, Visby'. And was sold again, a couple of weeks later, on Mar. 30, 1916, to 'Björknäs Aktiebolaget' ('Björknäs'), (Gustav Erstad), of Björknäs, Sweden. In 1917, after damage to her rigging, she was re-rigged as a barquentine. Have read that Björknäs, went into liquidation in 1922 & the vessel was then sold - to Eliel Henricksson of Mariehamn, Finland - data which is not confirmed at 1. In 1923, 'AB Hampion' became her owner & on Dec. 22, 1924 the vessel was sold again, for 7750 Swedish Crowns, to Johan O. Holmström, of Ramsjöstrand, Sweden. In Apl. 1926, the vessel was sold, for 9625 Swedish Crowns, to V. A. Engblom & F. Henriksson of Kumlinge, Finland. with Captain F. Henriksson, a shareholder also, & was renamed Frideborg. A regular trader to Yarmouth & other U.K. ports. In 1934, the vessel was sold again, to Valdemar Nordlund of Mariehamn. On Sep. 7, 1937, the vessel ran aground, off Kalix, Sweden (E. coast of Sweden at the northern end of the Gulf of Bothnia). While the damage was apparently slight, the vessel was condemned as a result. The cabin was brought ashore & served as a summer house! Can you add to and/or correct the above? Another image perhaps?

GIBBON & NICHOL of South Hylton.

Can you help with the history of this shipbuilder. Who, so far as I can see, built 17 (or thereabouts) vessels during the period of 1862 thru 1871.

Note that there would appear to have been other Sunderland shipbuilders named Gibbon -  'Gibbon & Son J.', 'Gibbon J. & J.', & 'Gibbon N.' Need help re all of them!

Four vessels built by 'Gibbon & Nichol' are now detail listed below. To the best of the webmaster's present knowledge, all of the other vessels built by 'Gibbon & Nichol' are named (but not detail listed) below.

Vessels built by 'GIBBON & NICHOL'

1

  Margaret
284 later 285/293 (N/G) tons

44300
1862

A snow. The webmaster believes that the launch of the vessel, early in Jul. 1862, is referenced in this newspaper cutting, but it would seem to have been a snow rather than a barque. Launched on Jul. 03, 1862, I learn. The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1862/63 thru 1881/82. Its initial owner, per LR, was H. Robson of N. Shields for service ex Sunderland, with 'Stevens' serving as the vessel's captain. From 1865/66 LR records M. Robson as the vessel's owner for service from Newcastle to the Mediterranean, with D. Cooper her captain (from 1865/66 thru 1873/74). From 1865 thru 1871 (1870), the Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') clarifies such owner name as meaning Mark Robson of Howdon Dock, Northumberland. LR of 1870/71 lists J. Bedlington as the new owner of the vessel, still registered at North Shields, with D. Cooper still her captain, for a continuation of service to the Mediterranean. G. Smit became the vessel's captain in 1873/74 & remained, per LR, her captain thereafter. In 1873/74, the last year in which a vessel's intended voyages were LR recorded, service from Shields to the Baltic is referenced. LRs from 1876/77 thru 1880/81 rather list I. Bedlington as the vessel's owner. It would seem there may (must?) have been more than one 'Bedlington'. MNL of 1872 lists the Shields registered vessel as owned by Isaac Bedlington of West Hartlepool. While Turnbull's Register of 1874 lists the vessel as a barque (incorrectly) & reports her then owners as being J. Bedlington, W. Toyn & T. Austin with respectively, 32, 16 & 16 shares. Per MNL, the vessel was registered at West Hartlepool from 1874 thru 1880. LRs from 1880/81 list R. D. Clark & Co., of West Hartlepool, as the vessel's new (maybe managing) owners. 104.5 ft. long, from 1865/66 104.0 ft. long, signal letters TSMG.
I read that on Feb. 01, 1879 the vessel, en route from Boulogne, France, to West Hartlepool with a cargo of coprolite, stranded on the Goodwin Sands (located in the English Channel 6 miles E. of Deal, Kent). Coprolite? A new word to the webmaster that means, amazingly, fossilized feces of animals that lived millions of years ago. Apparently of value due to their phosphate content. The vessel was then said to be owned by J. Bedlington & others. And not R. D. Clark & Co. as stated above. An Official Inquiry into the loss of the vessel was held in Middlesboro' on Feb. 19, 1879 - the casualty was caused by the vessel's mate not keeping safe & proper courses & neglecting to use the lead. The mate's certificate was suspended for three months. As per this summation of the Court of Inquiry. A great many crew lists are available here. Is there anything you can add? #2204

 

  San Juan
247 tons
43770
1862

A snow. Initially owned by T. Riley of Sunderland.

2

  Medora
298 later 315 tons

44514
1863

The snow, which was launched in Jan. 1863, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1862/63 thru 1878/79, owned thru 1870/71 by Davison & Co. of Sunderland. Which surely means Davidson, see below. For initial service, per LR, from Sunderland to the Mediterranean, in 1864/65 & 1865/66 for service from Cork, Ireland, to the West Indies, in 1866/67 for service from Liverpool to South America, from Clyde to the West Indies in 1867/68 & 1868/69 & from Sunderland to the Mediterranean in 1870/71. The Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') of 1865 thru 1870 all record the vessel as then owned by D. Davidson of West Sunniside, Sunderland, & registered at Sunderland.
In 1870/71, per LR, the vessel became owned by Hern & Robinson, also of Sunderland, for service from Sunderland to the Mediterranean in 1870/71 & 1871/72 & from Sunderland to the Baltic in 1872/73 & 1873/74. R. Hern was the vessel's captain, per LR, from part way thru 1874/75 to 1878/79. It would seem, however, that 'Hern' was the vessel's captain as early as Sep. 1871. The vessel became listed at 315 tons in 1874/75. MNL of 1871 lists William Hern, of Sunderland, as the vessel's then owner. While MNLs of 1874 thru 1878 advise that Henry Robinson, of Sunderland, was then the vessel's owner. Note that Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1874 lists the Sunderland registered vessel as then owned by W. Hern & H. Robinson with, respectively, 42 & 22 shares.
105.0 ft. long, signal letters TVKM, many crew lists are available via this page.
LR of 1878/79 notes that the vessel had been 'Lost'. On Jun. 25, 1878, per item 862 here, the 319 ton snow foundered while en route from Alexandria, Egypt, to Falmouth with a cargo of 450 tons of cotton seed in bulk. As is confirmed by this U.K. Government wreck listing page. The vessel was struck by a heavy sea during a gale & sprang a leak. At 37.12N/9.40W in the North Atlantic. Crew of 9 - none lost. Vessel then stated to be owned by H. Robinson of Sunderland.
I learn, per this Lloyd's List report, that the vessel, was struck by the heavy sea when about 10 miles off Cape St. Vincent. After being struck, the vessel become badly waterlogged with 10 ft. of water in her holds. The crew took to a ship's boat & were alongside San Jose, a Spanish schooner, when County of Sutherland (a steamship built at Glasgow in 1873, 'Bain' in command) arrived on the scene. That vessel took the Medora crew aboard & landed them at Le Havre, France, on Jul. 01, 1878. Robert Hern was the then captain of Medora - which sank at a point about 35 miles NW of Cape St. Vincent.
Is there anything you can add? #2205

3

  Ullswater
246/292 (old/new, I think) tons

47596
1863

A snow. The vessel, which was launched on Oct. 13, 1863, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1863/64 thru 1873/74, owned initially by Longton & Co. of Liverpool for service from Sunderland to the West Indies. In 1864/65, T. Longrigg, also of Liverpool became LR recorded as her owner, for similar service which however, in 1866/67, became from Liverpool to South America. Ullswater's owners' names are clarified by the Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') of 1865 which lists '(b) Thos. Longrigg', of Liverpool as the vessel's then owner. The letter b in brackets, I learn means 'reported to be sold'. The equivalent lists of 1866 thru 1868, list the vessel as still registered at Liverpool but owned by Peter Longrigg, of Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland. Even though the vessel is LR listed thru 1873/74, the vessel was not listed in MNL of 1869. B. Newton would seem to have been the vessel's sole captain. 99.5 ft. long, signal letters VPHB.
Line 1 on this page advises that on Jan. 11, 1868, a 247 ton brig of the name, stranded at Salt Rock, County Wexford, E. coast of Ireland, at a point 7 miles SSW of Arklow. While en route from Liverpool to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with a general cargo. The vessel was said to have had a crew of 11 of which all but one died. The vessel soon became a total loss. An anomaly for sure is that such Ullswater is noted to have been 11 years old (should be 4 or 5 only). Likely just an error. The wreck is noted on this page (search for Ullswater). Contemporary newspaper reports re the vessel's loss are available here.
There was much more data available when this listing was last updated in Apl. 2018. On Sep. 13, 2016, a bronze plaque to the memory of each of the 10 crew members who lost their lives, was unveiled at Saleen Lane, Ballymoney, near the site of the vessel's loss. Present at the ceremony was Mr. Ken McQuhae, of the U.S.A., whose great grandfather James Duff, Ullswater's mate, had lost his life in the 1868 wreck. We thank Mr. McQuhae for both proposing & financing the erection of the plaque. As per these (1 & 2) articles in the 'Gorey Guardian' newspaper. Neither article refers to where Ullswater had been built. It is my belief that it was built at Hylton, just W. of Sunderland. Crew lists for 1867 & 1868 are available here. It would be good to be able to show on site an image of the plaque with the crew names all legible & particularly the captain's name. But .. this page tells us that B. Newton was, indeed her then captain. It lists the date of loss as being Jan. 12, 1868. Newton was, I learn, one of those who were lost. Can anybody tell us anything more? #2206

 

  Maid Marion
311 tons
47289
1864

A barque. R. Bamfield, later (1870) Robert H. Bamfield, both of St. Ives.

 

  Golden Plover
295 tons
53128
1865

A snow. Morgan & Co., later (1870 & 1880) John Morgan, both of Sunderland.

 

  Loch Lomond
286 tons
49775
1865

A snow. Dodd & Co., later (1870) Philip Dodds, both of North Shields.

 

  Alswold
300 tons
56111
1866

A brig. Bennett & Co., later (1870) Thomas Bennett, both of South Shields, later (1880) William Allen of Weybourne, Norfolk. Lost Oct. 10, 1880.

 

  Envoy
298 tons
53466
1866

A snow. J. Short, later (1870) John Short Bank, both of North Shields.

 

  Eleanor
298 tons
58700
1867

A snow. 'W&TBnntt', later (1870) Thomas Bennett, both of South Shields. 109.9 ft. long. Lloyd's Register of 1876/77 notes that the vessel, then owned by Mrs. E. Bennett, had stranded.

4

  Thornhill
290 tons

58070
1867

A brig. The vessel, which was launched on May 18, 1867 & first registered, at Sunderland, on Jun. 6, 1867 (scroll to #58070), had a very short life. It is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1867/68 thru 1869/70 only. Now LR of 1867/68 lists T. J. Reay, of Sunderland as the vessel's owner, while LRs of the following two years rather list J. T. Reay. The Mercantile Navy Lists of 1868 & 1869 have it differently again - they both record Thomas S. Reay of Sunderland as her then owner. I. Abbott is consistently listed by LR as the vessel's captain. For continued service ex Sunderland. 109.5 ft. long, signal letters HTKL.
LR of 1869/70 notes that the vessel had been 'Wrecked'. Line 13 on this page, tells us that on Mar. 21, 1869 the vessel, stated to be a 2 year old 289 ton brig, stranded near Brules, Egypt, while en route from Newcastle to Port Said, Egypt, with a cargo of coal. 'Brules', I believe, means 'Brulos' - 'Cape Brulos' is on the N. Egyptian coast about 1/2 way between Alexandria & Port Said. The vessel is stated to have had a crew of 10, 7 of whom lost their lives in the disaster. Hopefully in due course, detail will emerge as to the circumstances of the vessel's loss. Some crew lists are available here. Is there anything you can add? #2207

 

  Hampshire
346 tons
62494
1868

A barque. T. Bull, later (1870) Thomas Bull, both of Sunderland. 120.2 ft. long, signal letters HJKL.

 

  Clifton
365, later 380 & 393 tons
62516
1869

A barque. See here.

 

  Meggie
39 tons
62567
1870

A sloop. See here.

 

  Triune
369 later 262/385 (N/G) tons
62558
1870

A barque, which later became a steamship. See here.

 

  Olive
390 tons
62615
1871

A barque. See here.

Vessels built by 'J. & J. GIBBON'

 

  Cognac
299 tons
51160
1864

A snow. Bassett & Co., later (1870) John S. Barwick, both of Sunderland, later (1880) Wm. Hearley of Blyth.

 

  Evening Star
296 tons
53116
1865

A snow. 'Donldsn' & Co, later (1870) Benjamin Dodd, both of Sunderland, later (1880) John Monro of Arbroath.

 

  Hopeful
294 tons
58094
1867

A brig. Gooding & Co., later (1870) James Gooding, both of Sunderland.

 

  Albany
293 tons
63459
1871

A brig. Foulds & Co. of Greenock, Scotland.

 

  Live Oak
347 tons
62645
1872

A barque. H. Egglestone

P. GIBSON

The webmaster's knowledge about P. Gibson, of Bishopwearmouth, is non-existent. A list of Sunderland built ships, available to the webmaster, lists 13 vessels built by the shipbuilder from 1853 thru 1858. Need help with background about the builder.

1   Snowdrop
438/457, later 396 tons

7338
1854

A barque. Snowdrop, which was launched in Dec. 1853, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1854/55 thru 1862/63 only. In such a brief lifetime the vessel had many owners & a most unusual final life chapter. Read on!
From 1854/55 thru 1856/57, per LR, the vessel was owned by J. Allcock of Sunderland. For service, per LR, from Sunderland to the West Indies in 1854/55 & 1855/56 & for service from Plymouth, Devon, to the Mediterranean in the following two years. With 'Fleming', LR noted to have been her captain.
In 1857/58, per LR, Snowdrop, now of 396 tons, became Shields registered & owned by R. Crawford. With J. Cottew serving as the vessel's captain. Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1856 confirms that the vessel was then Shields registered & owned by R. Crawford & J. Cottew, both of South Shields. While 'Crawford' owned, the vessel, per LR, continued to serve from Plymouth to the Mediterranean until 1858/59 when service from Shields to the Mediterranen is referenced.
In 1859/60, per LR, T. & H. Metcalf, of Shields, became the vessel's new owners, thru Sep. 1863 it would seem. For service from Shields to France, becoming Shields to the Mediterranean in 1860/61 & 1861/62. Such 'Metcalf' ownership is confirmed by Christie's Shipping Register of 1858, which notes that the vessel, still Shields registered, was owned by Thomas, Henry & Elizabeth W. Metcalf & John Cottew. With J. Cottew her captain.
Some 'best efforts' Snowdrop operational history. On Jan. 28, 1854, the vessel (Fleming) left Sunderland for Havana, Cuba. On Jun. 15, 1854, en route to Trieste, Italy, ex Havana, the vessel put into Falmouth, leaky, but went on to Plymouth where her cargo was discharged & repairs effected. In late Sep. 1854, the vessel (Fleming) left London for Point de Galle & Colombo (both Ceylon, now Sri Lanka), went on to Akyab (now Sittwe, Myanmar), Clemens in command, & on May 21, 1855 left Akyab for Falmouth (Fleming), en route to Hamburg, Germany. On Aug. 20, 1856 (Cottew) the vessel arrived at Bristol, ex Constantinople (now Istanbul, Turkey), went on to Cardiff, Wales, & on Dec. 4, 1856 was en route to Calcutta (now Kalkata, India). On Dec. 26, 1857, the vessel arrived at Deal ex Shields bound for Constantinople & on May 22, 1858 left Odessa (Black Sea, Ukraine) for Queenstown, Ireland. On Apl. 19, 1859 the vessel (Cottew) left Le Havre, France for Quebec, Canada. A further voyage to the Indian Ocean it would seem, to Galle, Tutucoreen (Thoothukudi, SE India) & Karachi (Pakistan).
Now there was a later change of ownership. LR of 1862/63 did not advise a new owner name but did delete the 'Metcalf' name references. For service ex London.
I have now learned that in Sep. 1863, Snowdrop was sold in London - for £2,120. To Wm. White of Newcastle who owned 1/3 of the vessel, the remaining 2/3 being owned between two gentlemen named 'Rowell' & 'Johnson'. While LR still referenced J. Cottew as the vessel's captain, her new captain was, in fact, Joseph John Mitchison White ('JWhite'), the brother of Wm. White. The vessel made voyages to the West Indies & to the Mediterranean, with JWhite in command.
In Sep. 1864, Snowdrop left London for Cronstadt (St. Petersburg, Russia) in ballast, with a crew of 13, with 'JWhite' her captain & Robert Sutton her mate. At Cronstadt they were to load a complete cargo of grain for delivery to England. At 4 a.m. on Oct. 4, 1864, the vessel ran aground, indeed struck twice, on Stone Scar Reef ('Stoneskar', a small rocky island, located near Reval in the Gulf of Finland). Her hull would seem to have been undamaged - no water was entering the vessel.
The vessel's insurance policy apparently provided that there would be a valid insurance claim only in the event of the total loss of the vessel.
Amongst Snowdrop's crew was one William Craig, the ship's carpenter. Upon his return to the U.K., Craig, unsolicited, went to Lloyd's & told Captain Downward there that he had scuttled the ship. A crime for which, if found guilty, he might be punished with life imprisonment. Other crew members similarly spoke to Lloyd's. Craig stated that JWhite had provided him with drink, told him that JWhite & his brother would be ruined without an insurance payout, & requested Craig's assistance to see that the vessel ended up a total loss. Craig stated that JWhite prevailed upon him to bore holes in the ship's bottom. And while other crew members were kept busy, a few hours after the grounding, Craig drilled such holes, partially in the presence of Sutton.
The crew all transferred to a nearby small island leaving the vessel abandoned. The vessel later became swamped with water & in due course broke up, a total wreck.
JWhite & Sutton were charged with having scuttled Snowdrop in a number of legal actions taken by Lloyd's Salvage Association. Both defendants requested but were denied bail & spent some time in Newgate Prison. On Feb. 1, & 2, 1864, the case was heard in Central Criminal Court in London. The defence made many arguments. That £470 had been spent on yellow metalling Snowdrop's hull, that the owners had not insured the vessel for its full value, that the return voyage would have been profitable, that their was no evidence of any plan to defraud. Persons representing JWhite & Sutton stated that they knew nothing of the scuttling charges. Character witnesses attested to the good character of jWhite & Sutton. Defence, in their summation of the total evidence, contended that that the credibility of Craig was paramount. And that Craig should not, in their view, be considered to be a reliable witness.
Before 1 p.m. on Feb. 2, 1864, the jury retired to consider their verdict. 'They were only absent for a few minutes, when they returned into court and found both prisoners Not Guilty'. Maybe 15 minutes of deliberation.
The whole matter was extensively reported in the U.K. press of the time - so extensively that the webmaster would have difficulty in deciding which of the many giant reports to provide here. So I, for the moment at least, I provide one article only, dated Dec. 11, 1864. I refer you to the newspapers of the period, for the giant articles that cover the later hearings of Feb. 1 & 2, 1864.
Can you add to or correct any of the above? #2578

JOHN GILL of Pallion.

The webmaster's knowledge about John Gill is non-existent. A list of Sunderland built ships, available to the webmaster, lists 22 vessels built by the shipbuilder from 1857 thru 1874. Three of such vessels are now detail listed below. Need help with background about the builder.

1

  Balmacarra
465/376
later 376 tons

44958
1863

A barque. The vessel, which was launched on Feb. 5, 1863 i& first registered, at Leith, Scotland, on Feb. 26, 1863 (scroll to #44958), is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1862/63 thru 1872/73. The vessel was owned, thru 1871/72, by Williamson of Leith, for initial service from Sunderland to China. From 1864 the vessel served ex London to, where destinations are noted, India (1866/67) & Hobart Town, i.e. Hobart, Tasmania, (1867/68 thru 1869/70). The Mercantile Navy Lists of both 1867 & 1870 record Williamson & Stark, of Leith, as the vessel's then owner. In 1871/72, Addison & Co., of London, became the vessel's owner for service ex London. 133.0 ft. long, signal letters VBJF.
LR of 1870/71 states 'wrecked'. On Jun. 23, 1872, per line 2488 here, the 376 ton barque was stranded at Langeroa (where is it, I wonder), while en route from Bahia, Brazil, to Bremen, Germany, with a cargo of tobacco.  Crew of 11 - none lost. Then owned by Addison & Whitehead. Can you tell us more? #2218

2

  Yeavering Bell
493, later 485/508 tons

45627

Editha
1863

Yeavering Bell? A twin-peaked hill near the River Glen in N. Northumberland. A barque. The vessel, which was launched on Dec. 13, 1863 & is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1863/64 thru 1879/80. It was owned, per LR, thru 1877/78 by 'Fenwick' of North Shields - 'Fenwick' thru 1868/69 & G. Fenwick from 1868/69 thru 1877/78. With J. Peart the vessel's captain thru 1870/71 then R. Crozier thru 1877/78 - when the vessel was sold. The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') records her ownership rather differently. It records John Anthony Peart as the vessel's owner from 1865 thru 1874 (1870), then Geo. Fenwick in 1875 & 1876. It seems clear that the differing ownership data is the result of changes in her managing ownership since both Fenwick & Peart were shareholders in the vessel. In that regard, Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1874 reports her then ownership as being John A. Peart & George Fenwick, both of North Shields, with respectively 24 & 16 shares, John R. Fenwick of London (16) & John Johnson of Tynemouth (8).  During the Fenwick/Peart period of ownership, Yeavering Bell served, per LR, the East & Far East - from Sunderland to China thru 1865/66, from Shields to India in 1866/67 & 1867/68, from Gloucester to India in 1868/69, ex Shields to China in 1869/70 & to Singapore in 1870/71 & 1871/72, & from London to Singapore in 1872/73 & 1873/74.
In 1877/78, per LR, the vessel, now of 485/508 tons, became owned by 'Adamson & Short' of North Shields. With J. Trainer her captain. MNL of 1878 lists Henry E. P. Adamson, of North Shields, as her then owner. In 1878/79 the vessel was renamed Editha.
A little operational data. On Dec. 13, 1878 the vessel, Trainer in command, arrived at Cardiff, Wales, in ballast ex London. On Dec. 20, 1878 the vessel was cleared for departure to Havannah (Havana, Cuba) with a cargo of coal.
142.6 ft. long, signal letters VFCR. Many crew lists are available.
LR of 1879/80 notes that the vessel had 'Foundered'. On Nov. 22, 1879, per line 1094 here, Editha was lost in the North Atlantic at 44.30N/43W (about 700 miles SE of St. John's, Newfoundland), while en route from Philadelphia, U.S.A. to Cork, Ireland, or Falmouth for orders, with a cargo of 700 tons of corn. She was 'nearly thrown on beam ends during a heavy gale and cargo shifted. She afterwards encountered another gale & sprang a leak. Cause of casualty apparently stress of weather'. A less than satisfactory description of what happened, to the webmaster at least. I learned, however, more detail in this newspaper article. The vessel had left Glasgow, Scotland, on Sep. 11, 1879 for Philadelphia, with Trainor in command. She encountered a fearful storm on her return journey & sprang a leak, as a result of which she had to be abandoned - on Nov. 2, 1879 per the article. The crew took to the ship's boats just before she went down & 4 days later they were sighted by Atlas, a 2393 gross ton Cunard steamer, (ON 28477), taken aboard & landed at Boston, Massachusetts. So crew of 13 - none lost. Then owned by Adamson & Short. Can you tell us more? #2295

3

Clairellen
448 tons

63697
1870

A wooden barque, launched or completed on Dec. 20, 1870, which is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1870/71 thru 1876/77 only. For such entire if brief period, LR advises that the vessel was always registered at London & owned by W. A. Guesdon of London. The Mercantile Navy Lists of 1872, 1874, 1875 & 1876 all record Wm. Andw. Guesdon of London as the vessel's owner but re 1874 & 1875 advise that the vessel was in those years registered at Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, Just one captain per LR, i.e. J. (John) King. For service thru 1871/72 from Sunderland to the West Indies & in 1873/74 & 1874/75 for service from London to Hobart Town, Tasmania, Australia.
Some partial 'best efforts' detail about the vessel's voyages to New Zealand ('NZ') & Australia. i) On Dec. 2, 1871 the vessel, on her 2nd voyage, left Cardiff, Wales, for Otago, NZ, (Dunedin) with rolling stock & other materials for the Port Chalmers Railway. It went on to Lyttelton, NZ, (Christchurch) to load wool, grain & tallow for London. On its return voyage, on May 14, 1872, the vessel collided with ice, became badly leaky & had to put into Valparaiso, Chile, to effect repairs. ii) On Nov. 27, 1872, the vessel left London, Gravesend, for Hobart, & arrived there on Mar. 6, 1873 carrying railway plant & with 184 immigrants all navvies (for the Main Line Railway Co.) & their families. The vessel went on to Newcastle, New South Wales ('NSW'), in ballast, & left Newcastle on May 12, 1873 with 718 tons of coal bound for Hong Kong. iii) On Mar. 21, 1875 the vessel arrived at Sydney, NSW, ex Mauritius, likely with sugar, went on to Newcastle to load coal for Port Adelaide. iv) On Feb. 3, 1876 the vessel left Adelaide for Falmouth, Cornwall, with 5499 bags of wheat.
134.7 ft. long, signal letters JTSD. LR of 1876/77 notes that the vessel had been 'Abandoned on Fire'. In Oct. 1876, the vessel was en route from Hull to Valparaiso, Chile, with a cargo of 670 toms of Hartley coal ex the Wheddale, Frystone and Victoria collieries. On Oct. 10, 1876, per item 598 here, the vessel was abandoned, on fire, at 20.46S/40.15W in the South Atlantic off the Brazil coast. An Inquiry into the vessel's loss (where held?) concluded that the fire was caused by the spontaneous combustion of the cargo & that all that could have been done to save the vessel had been done. Crew of 14, no lives lost. I read that the crew were 6 days at sea in ship's boats, were picked up & were later landed at Rio de Janeiro. Some crew lists are here. An oil on canvas painting of the vessel, in the English Channel off Dover, by artist Richard B. Spencer (1812/1887) was sold at a Christie's Art Auction at New York on Jan. 31, 2007 for U.S. $9.600. An image of the painting is at left. Is there anything you can add? Or correct? #2061

WILLIAM GRAY & CO.
WILLIAM GRAY & CO. LTD.
WILLIAM GRAY & CO. (1918) LTD.
WEAR SHIPYARD LTD.

First a few images. Hover your mouse over each thumbnail to read the subject matter.

Can you help with the history of this shipbuilder? Because I so far know very little about them. They would appear, however, to mainly be shipbuilders from West Hartlepool, and per 'Miramar' they conducted business there in the above 3 names plus also, & probably earlier in time, 'Denton, Gray & Co.'. Miramar further lists the Sunderland facility as being either the 'Wear Shipyard of W. Gray & Co. (1918) Ltd.)' or 'William Gray & Co. Ltd.' Lloyd's Register records Knaresboro', later City of Windsor, as having been built by Wear Shipyard Ltd. of Sunderland.

So far as I can see from a quick read, one hull numbering system seems to have been used for the two facilities. In rough terms, it would seem that there were 'give or take' 35 vessels built at Sunderland & 1200 or so vessels were built at West Hartlepool. Hence the high hull numbers that will show below re Sunderland built vessels, built in the period of 1919 through 1930.

Thanks to Tony Frost, of Sunderland, I can now advise as follows:-

Wm. Gray's Sunderland yard at Pallion was originally set up by E-llerman, G-ray, I-nchcape & S-trick & was to be called the 'EGIS' yard to build Government war-time standard vessels. The name was changed to Wm. Gray 'Wear' yard because all the hulls were sub-contracted from their West Hartlepool yard where they were taken after launching to be completed (hence the continuity of contact numbers). A similar arrangement was used by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson's Southwick yard across the river. This give rise to the people of Sunderland's nick-name MAK'EMS and TAK'EMS, because we 'mak'em ower er' (make them over here) and 'tak'em ower ther' (take them over there). The first ships built there were originally ordered by the Shipping Controller & allocated the prefix WAR ...... but were sold on the stocks to private companies due to the end of WW1 hostilities.

Where exactly was the yard? With a bit of other history we can now address that question. Steel & Company Ltd., started in 1879, was a builders merchant that expanded into both heating & ventilation. In 1939 they purchased Henry J. Coles Limited, a manufacturer of cranes. And then they bought, in 1939, what used to be the Egis shipyard at Pallion & renamed it the Crown Works - perhaps 'in recognition of the amount of Government work the expanded group was carrying out.' So the question for the webmaster became not only where was the Egis yard but also where was 'Crown Works'?  And those questions are now answered - on the south bank of the river just west of Shorts & shown as 'Steel & Co. Ltd. Crown Works' at left on this map.

Names of just a few of the vessels constructed by 'Gray' of Sunderland - as I happen to spot references to them. In a table in build date sequence. It will take a while to populate the list because it took 2 or 3 years of this site existing, to find a reference to my very first Sunderland built 'Gray' vessel.

Miramar lists re vessels built at Sunderland (highest hull number on page). It used to be that you could click on the links that follow & get to the relevant Miramar page. But no longer! The new procedure must be to go to Miramar (here) & log in (you must be registered to view any page). And once you are logged in, return to this page & all the following links should work for you:- 1019, 1037.

I should add that the two linked pages at Miramar advise that Gray built 37 vessels at Sunderland. However I am also advised that 'Shipbuilders of the Hartlepools', written by Bert Spaldin & published in 1986, provides a list of 'Gray' built ships with those built at Sunderland specifically identified. That Spaldin list contains 32 vessels only. Further there are modest discrepancies in the details between the two lists. Hence my 'give or take 35' words above. Perhaps in time the number will be clarified.

Tony Frost has now kindly provided his list of the 'Gray' vessels that were built at Sunderland.  The following list is of vessels not already listed below (just 14 so far):-

War Owl/Golconda (931), War Bat/Garada (932), War Fly/Garbeta (933), War Moth/Jeypore (934), Nagina (941), Colorado (945), City of Salisbury (955), City of Bedford (960), Solon (972), Quebec City (991), Nohata (994), Thirlby (997), Alphacca (1004), Alpherat (1005), Prince Rupert City (1019), Tacoma City (1020), Vernon City (1021), Victoria City (1022), Glendene (1029), Lady Plymouth (1031), Veerhaven (1032), Delfshaven (1033), Atthis (1036). 37 names in total including the 14 listed below.

A few discrepancies again, [Miramar record additionally Karonga (942) & City of Athens (947) but exclude Tacoma City (1020) & Victoria City (1022)] - but good progress none the less.

1

City of Adelaide
6589 tons
Hull 939

143683
1920

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Hall Line, City of Adelaide (2)], 2 (Ellerman Line history), 3 (I-8), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert City of Adelaide), 5 (Mar. 30, 1944 sinking), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 132.0 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 450 ft. 9 in., speed of 12 (or 11 1/2) knots. Built for Ellerman Lines Limited, of London, or maybe 'Ellerman's Hall Line', managed by Hall Line Limited, of Liverpool. I have seen a 1924 Australian newspaper ref. to 'Australian & American Line'. Can anybody explain that reference? 46 WW2 convoy references, including at least 2 N. Atlantic crossings, service to West Africa (Freetown, Takoradi), in Mediterranean (Port Said, Alexandria) in Indian Ocean (Aden, Bombay, Bandar Abbas, Khor Kwai - now Khor Khwair, United Arab Emirates) & many U.K. coastal. Likely in 1941 or 1942 (have not read the exact date), the vessel was in collision with Benmohr, in Ismail Basin, Port Said, Egypt. Both had local pilots aboard - there was contact between the port bows of both vessels. On Mar. 30, 1944, the vessel, Richard James Ross-Rickets in command, was en route, in ballast, from Karachi (then India, now Pakistan) to Fremantle, Western Australia. It was sunk (torpedoed & then gunned) by Japanese submarine I-8, Ariizumi Tatsunosuke ('Ariizumi') (his image) in command. At 12.01S/80.27E, in the Chagos Archipelago, Indian Ocean, SE of Diego Garcia. Ariizumi was known as the 'Butcher' for his treatment (slaughter) of seamen that he captured. James Hamilton has been in touch to advise that his father, James A. (Arthur) Hamilton, was the ship's 1st Radio Officer when it was sunk, & used to recount details of Japanese atrocities by submarine crews. However he never mentioned atrocities in connection with City of Adelaide. James has now provided a link to a site in which seaman Christopher Tulett advises exactly what happened to City of Adelaide. The ship was hit by a torpedo, late on Mar. 30, 1944, when silhouetted against the setting sun. Extensive gunfire followed. The crew were able to abandon the ship in 6 lifeboats, one of which was motorized. Darkness soon followed & the crew heard the diesel engines of the submarine as it searched for, but never found them (fortunately it did not use its searchlight). The crew were rescued, after 3 days at sea, roughly in the middle of the Indian Ocean, by Carole Lombard, a Liberty ship en route from Fremantle to Colombo, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). Thank you, James! The crew were most fortunate not to have been found by Ariizumi - they likely would have all been slaughtered. Ariizumi massacred the crew of Tjisalak, (& here, 99 lives lost) & later committed suicide to avoid capture & trial for his crimes. Amazingly, he was posthumously promoted to Rear Admiral. Can you correct and/or add to the above?

2

Siantar
8438 later 8867 (or 8806) tons
Hull 943

5605397
1921

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Rotterdam Lloyd, Siantar), 2 (Rotterdam Lloyd history), 3 (Dutch page re sinking, 30% down), 4 (link 4 WWW translated), 5 (Dutch page, image), 6 (image), 7 & 8 (both I-1), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for 'N.V. Rotterdamsche Lloyd' (Rotterdam Lloyd), of Rotterdam, Holland. ('W. Ruys & Zonen', the managers). 132.0 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 471 ft. 3 in., speed of 11 1/2 knots. Sister to Modjokerto. In 1934, the vessel was lengthened (where, I wonder?) to 143.6 metres, a diesel engine installed & the speed became 15 knots. The gross tonnage became 8867 or maybe 8806 tons. In early 1942, the vessel was at Tjilatjap, (now Cilacap), on the S. coast of Java. On Mar. 2, 1942, (or maybe Mar. 3), trying to reach Australia & about 800 miles S. of Tjilatjap (W. of Exmouth, West Australia, NW of Shark Bay), the vessel was torpedo attacked by Imperial Japanese Navy cruiser submarine I-1 (2135 tons), but the torpedo missed. I-1 surfaced & opened fire. Siantar took evasive action & returned fire but the gun jammed. A second shell resulted in a fire aboard Siantar. 30 hits & another torpedo later, Siantar sank by the stern. At 21.20S/108.45E. 21 lives were lost. 37 were rescued by Van Spielbergen. Have not read where they were landed. Can you correct or add to the above?

3

Modjokerto
8396 (or 8381 or 8404.23) later 7080 & 8806 tons
Hull 948
1922

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Rotterdam Lloyd, Modjokerto (1)], 2 (Rotterdam Lloyd history), 3 (Dutch page re sinking), 4 (link 3 WWW translated), 5 (discussion re sinking), 6 & 7 (Chikuma), 8 (Lloyds Register data, 1930/31 thru 1943/44, thanks to 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for 'N.V. Rotterdamsche Lloyd' (Rotterdam Lloyd), of Rotterdam, Holland, 'W. Ruys & Zonen', the managers. 132.0 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 480.1 ft. overall, speed of 13 knots. sister to Siantar, signal letters PMFM & PGAJ. In 1934, the vessel was lengthened (where, I wonder?) to 146.3 metres, a diesel engine installed & the speed became 15 1/2 knots. In Feb. 1942, the vessel was at Tjilatjap, (now Cilacap), Java. On Feb. 27, 1942, under the command of Captain J. Verhagen, the vessel left Tjilatjap bound initially for Colombo, Ceylon, (now Sri Lanka), with the intent of ultimately reaching Australia. About 250 miles SW of Tjilatjap, the vessel was  sunk. At 12.40S/106.40E. 42 lives were lost. Some differences of opinion as to exactly what happened, which makes the following words most uncertain. It would seem, however, that the vessel was located at sea by a float-plane from the Japanese cruiser Chikuma & was intercepted by Chikuma & Tone, along with destroyers Kasumi & Shiranuhi. Was fired upon but escaped - in a damaged condition. The vessel was located again by Japanese submarine I-54 (later became I-154), which attacked with gunfire & torpedoes, & sank the vessel before noon on Mar. 1, 1942. The crew? It seems that the crew took to the lifeboats, were taken (by which ship? It looks, however, to have been I-54) to Celebes (now Sulawesi) & were there all executed. A mass grave was located in 1946 in Kendari, South Sulawesi, with the remains of some of those who were executed. Can you correct the above and/or add more?

4

Nalgora
6579 tons
Hull 946

146303
1922

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Nalgora), 2 ('uboat.net', sinking, Nalgora, image), 3 (OBE awarded Captain Davies, 50% down), 4 (Lloyd's Register data, 1930/31 thru 1940/41, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 132.0 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular (433.0 ft.), speed of 10 knots (10.9 knots at trials), capacity for 8 passengers, signal letters KMNT, later GFTS. Built for 'British India Steam Navigation Co. Ltd.', of London. Nalgora? A village in West Bengal, was India, now in Bangladesh. The vessel was engaged in trade to & from India. Many 'snippet' references to multiple arrivals in Australia. The vessel suffered a fire in No. 4 Shelter Deck, in a cargo of jute, on Feb. 27, 1927. Just 10 WW2 convoy references, including service to West Africa, a return voyage to the River Loire (France) in Sep. 1939 & U.K. coastal. In Mar. 1940, the vessel 'came under the Liner Division'. Can anybody explain the meaning of those words? On Dec. 19, 1940 Nalgora, under the command of  Aubrey D. (Devereux) Davies, left Liverpool for Alexandria, Egypt, via Cape of Good Hope, with a cargo of boom defence gear ex Leith, Scotland. It was part of convoy OB-261 but dispersed from it on Dec. 22, 1940. At 10:07 p.m. on Jan. 2, 1941, proceeding independently, the vessel was hit by a single torpedo fired by U-65, Korvettenkapitän Hans-Gerrit von Stockhausen in command. At 22.24N/ 21.11W, about 350 miles N. of the Cape Verde Islands, or 250 miles W. of Port-Étienne, French West Africa. The vessel listed sharply but did not immediately sink, & while all aboard were trying to evacuate the vessel in 5 lifeboats, Nalgora was fired upon by 70 rounds of U-65's deck gun. The vessel sank in 20 minutes. There were 105 aboard including 3 passengers. All were later saved, 52 being picked up by Nolisement & landed at Freetown, Sierra Leone, while 34 were picked up, at 21.35N/20.59W, by Umgeni & were later landed at Glasgow on Jan. 13, 1941. The final 19, all crew members, safely reached San Antonio, Cape Verde, in a lifeboat & possibly then were transferred to Freetown. I have read (correct?) that the date that they reached Cape Verde was also Jan. 13, 1941. Captain Davies was awarded the Order of the British Empire for his actions that resulted in the saving of 26 lives. Can you correct the above and/or add more?

5

Knaresbro'
7218 later 7247 tons
Hull 958

147560

City of Windsor
1923

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Ellerman & Bucknall, Knaresboro'), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert City of Windsor), 3 ('May 13th, 1942, Atlantic Ocean', Denpark), 4 (Lloyd's Register data, 1930/31 thru 1945/46, ex 'Southampton City Council/Plimsoll'), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for 'Ellerman & Bucknall Steamship Co. Limited', of Glasgow. 447.5 ft. long (136.40 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 12 knots, signal letter KPSL, later GJYR, with 777 NHP engines by Central Marine Engineering Works  Ltd. of West Hartlepool. In 1926, the vessel was renamed City of Windsor. Registered at London. 59 WW2 convoy references, including, it would seem, at least 6  N. Atlantic crossings (data at 2 is confusing, especially since I am not permitted to access independent voyages), extensive service into the Mediterranean (Malta, Italy, Piraeus, Port Said & Alexandria), to South Africa (Cape Town, Durban) & West Africa (Freetown). On May 13, 1942, the vessel was in Convoy SL 109, bound from Takoradi, Ghana, West Africa, to Liverpool. Denpark, also in that convoy, was hit & sunk by a torpedo fired by U-128. At 22.28N/28.10W, 300 miles NW of the Cape Verde islands. The vessels City of Windsor & Nordlys, combined, rescued 25 Denpark survivors (22 crew & 3 gunners). Denpark's Master & 20 of her crew were lost. I have been able to WWW find very little about City of Windsor's WW2 service. However, an eBay listing stated that the vessel's 'profile was unique in the Ellerman Group'. And that it was 'involved in many of the evacuations and troop carrying during WWII including Salerno'. It also indicated 'back in commercial use in 1944' but there are convoy references thru Apl. 1945. Can you expand upon those words? And explain the reference to 'profile'. The vessel arrived at Briton Ferry on Jul. 14, 1953, to be broken up. Anything to add or correct?

6

Naringa
6607 tons
Hull 959

146333
1923

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('British India', Naringa), 2 (image, Naringa, link at right), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Naringa), 4 (1923 collision with Muritai), 5 (Lloyd's Register data, 1930/31 thru 1945/46, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 132.0 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 433.0 ft., speed of 10 knots, with accommodation for 8 passengers, signal letters KNVP later GJTX. Built, at a cost of £283,600 for 'The British India Steam Navigation Company Limited' of London. Naringa? WWW references to the name are few but the name may well originate with a river of the name in the then Indian state of Hyderabad. Is that the correct origin of the name? In Aug. 1923, the vessel was slightly damaged when in collision with Muritai, a ferry steamer, at Eastbourne, New Zealand. Naringa was repaired at Bombay, India. And in the first days of Jan. 1925, the vessel was in collision, at Port Said, with the Dutch steamer Celebes. The vessel was engaged in trade to & from India & from 1935 commenced service between India & Australian ports. 13 WW2 convoy references, all in the Indian Ocean (Bombay, Colombo, Suez, Bandar Abbas, Durban, Trincomalee, Karachi). Presumably her WW2 service was mainly independent. While I have not read the detail, the vessel was apparently damaged by a fire in 1948, was sold to 'BISCO' (British Iron & Steel Company, then an arm of the British Government, but now owned by Tata, of India) & on Aug. 6, 1948 arrived at Rosyth, Firth of Forth, Scotland, to be broken up. WWW data re this vessel is most limited. Can you add more? Another image?

7

City of Delhi
7443 tons
Hull 969

148871
1925

A cargo ship. Per 1 ['Ellermann's City Line', City of Delhi, (4)], 2 (data & fine image, 40% down, City of Delhi), 3 (image, City of Delhi), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert City of Delhi), 5 (Lloyd's Register data, 1931/32 thru 1945/46, ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 469 ft. 0 in. long (142.95 metres) overall, 450.5 ft. long (137.3 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 12 1/2 knots, signal letters KSWL later GLBW. Built for 'Ellerman Lines Ltd.' of London & Glasgow, 'The City Line Ltd.', of Glasgow, the managers. The vessel was engaged in trade to Calcutta, Bombay, Karachi & other ports in then India ex Glasgow, Liverpool & London. 42 WW2 convoy references, including, I believe, just 1 N. Atlantic crossing, service into the Mediterranean & into the Indian Ocean. It would appear that the vessel spent much of the war in Australian & New Zealand waters & into the Indian Ocean & Caribbean also. In Aug. 1943, when at Bizerta, Tunisia, the vessel was attacked from the air - a crewman was wounded. The vessel was sold to 'British Iron and Steel Corporation (Salvage), Ltd.', of London, & on May 28, 1957 arrived at their Bo'ness, Firth of Forth, ship breaking facilities, to be broken up. WWW data re this vessel is most limited. Can you add more? Another image?

8

Platon
4550 (or 4561) tons
Hull 971

5606328
1925

A cargo ship. Per 1 (construction data available), 2 (French page, d'Orbigny), 3 (link 3 WWW translated), 4 (Lloyd's Register data, Platon, 1930/31 thru 1945/46 ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for 'Compagnie de Navigation d'Orbigny', of La Rochelle, France, which company linked Bristol, U.K., with French English Channel (La Manche) ports. 122.0 metres long (400.0 ft.) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 10 knots, signal letters OUGX, later FOTW. Platon was the company's flagship vessel. The company named its ships after famous names in Greek history - hence Platon (French for Plato). WWW data re this vessel is limited, & to the webmaster at least, is confusing. I read that in 1939, all of the company's vessels were taken over by the French Government. But have also read that Platon & Fauzon were taken over by the French Vichy Government (in power from Jul. 1940 to Aug. 1944) to serve North Africa. I also read that Platon was captured by the Germans 'in the beginning of WW2' (would seem to have actually happened on Oct. 7, 1943). Can anybody clarify or correct that data? I also read that the vessel was sunk by the Allied Navy in 1944. To the webmaster 'sunk' implies something that seems not to be so. The vessel, on Aug. 27, 1944, was scuttled by the Germans in 'Passe du Port de la Lave', Marseilles, France. The vessel was raised on Jul. 1, 1945, but condemned on Dec. 18, 1947. And presumably then broken up - where I wonder? Some of the above data came from WWW 'snippets', easily misinterpreted especially when not in one's native language. I need help re this vessel's history! Can you add more? An image?

9

Querimba
7769 tons
Hull 964

148548

Kizan Maru
1925

A cargo ship. Per 1 [British India, Querimba (2)], 1 (image, Querimba), 2 (data, Querimba, 80% down page with image), 3 (many Australian newspaper refs., Querimba), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Querimba), 5 (Lloyd's Register data, Querimba, 1930/31 thru 1945/46 ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for British India Steam Navigation Company Limited, of London. 148.4 metres long (487.0 ft.) perpendicular to perpendicular, 501.1 ft. overall, speed of 12 knots, signal letters KSFG, later GKWT. BI served mainly Indian Ocean, & E. to Singapore & Japan. I read, however, that this vessel usually ran between Australia (Melbourne & also Brisbane & Sydney) & Madras/Calcutta, India, carrying brumbies (wild horses). Thru Dec. 1949. Other cargoes also, of course, jute & coal included. Visited Auckland, New Zealand, once on Jan. 30, 1935. 8 WW2 convoy references, all local voyages both Australia & India (Calcutta/Colombo). Am not permitted to access independent WW2 voyages at 'convoyweb.org'. In 1951 the vessel was sold, presumably to Japanese owners, converted into a fish factory & renamed Kizan Maru. Have not seen the name of the Japanese purchaser. The vessel was broken up, in Japan, in 1965. No WWW data re Kizan Maru, & limited data re Querimba. Can you add more?

10

Leeds City
4758 (or 4749)  tons
Hull 990

148831

Terushima Maru
1927

A cargo ship. Per 1 [William Reardon Smith, Leeds City (3)], 2 (Reardon Smith), 3 ('pdf', St. Elwyn, JANE p#234, 73% down), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Leeds City), 5 (Japanese page, #75, image Terushima Maru), 6 (Lloyd's Register data, Leeds City, 1930/31 thru 1945/46 ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for 'Saint Just Steamship Company', owned by Sir William Reardon Smith & Sons Ltd., which in 1928, became Reardon Smith Line Limited, of Cardiff. It would seem that the vessel later became owned by 'Leeds Shipping Company Ltd.', another Reardon Smith subsidiary company. 122.1 metres long (400.5 ft.) perpendicular to perpendicular, 415 ft. overall, speed of 10 knots, signal letters KWJP, later GDXQ. Registered at Bideford. The vessel collided on Feb. 4, 1931 with Napier Star at Buenos Ayres, with 1 life lost & injuries aboard Napier Star. 51 WW2 convoy references, including at least 4 N. Atlantic crossings with a variety of cargoes (grain, lumber, metals, etc.), service in the Caribbean, Mediterranean, Africa (Capetown, Durban, Freetown, Takoradi). On Nov. 28, 1940, the vessel rescued 16 crew members of St. Elwyn, sunk by a torpedo fired by U-103, 500 miles E. of Bishop Rock, & landed them at Gourock, Scotland. On Feb. 26, 1941, while in convoy OB.290, en route from Glasgow to Durban & the Middle East with Army stores & motor transport, the vessel was damaged in an aerial attack. Where I wonder? 'convoyweb.org' advise, however, that the vessel had engine trouble & was taken in tow. In 1951, the vessel was sold to 'Iino Kaiun', of Japan, & renamed 'Terushima Maru'. On Aug. 20, 1952, while en route (from Calcutta?) to Kawasaki, Japan, (her cargo?), the vessel broke her rudder & ran aground on a sandbank 12 miles S. of Calcutta, India - in the Hooghly River, just below Garden Reach near Budge. Unsuccessful attempts were made to tow her off. She broke her back & was a total loss. Can you add more?

11

Ramillies
4553  tons
Hull 989

148293
1927

A cargo ship. Per 1 (construction data available, though I can not figure out how you can access the actual data!), 2 ('uboat.net', sinking, Ramillies), 3 (1941 sinking, incl. lost crew list), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Ramillies), 5 (Lloyd's Register data, Ramillies, 1930/31 thru 1940/41 ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 121.5 metres (398.8 ft.) long perpendicular to perpendicular, 412 ft. 8 in. long overall, speed of 10 knots, signal letters KWLG, later GNFR. I have seen references to the ship being built for/owned by 'John Cory & Sons Ltd.' ('Cory'), of Cardiff. But that may not be correct. two links above indicate that the ship was rather built for Roath Steamship Company Limited ('Roath'). In the 1931/32 Lloyd's Register, 'British Steam Shipping Co. Ltd.' ('British Steam'), of Cardiff, had become the vessel's registered owners with Cory the managers. I believe, however, that Cory, Roath & British Steam were, in fact, all related companies. I like to advise about WW2 convoy service. Hopefully you might access that data via 3 but beware! - the page you come to has at least 3 ships named Ramillies on it, & I am unable to access the further data that would clarify the situation. In early May 1941, the vessel was en route from the Tyne to Baltimore, Maryland, via Oban, with William H. (Henry) Macey in command, & a cargo of 3,074 tons of coke. The vessel was dispersed from convoy OB-317. German submarine U-97, Korvettenkapitän Udo Heilmann in command, tracked the ship & fired, over many hours on May 7 & 8, 1941, two torpedoes that missed their targets. At 6:13 p.m. on May 8, a third torpedo hit the ship & stopped but did not sink it. Another torpedo failed. At 7:03 p.m. on May 8, 1941, however, a fifth torpedo hit Ramillies in the stern. It quickly sank 'in the vertical'. At 48.05N/32.26W, SE of Greenland, essentially in the middle of the N. Atlantic. There were 41 aboard the ship. 29 lives were lost including the Captain & 3 gunners. 12 others, including a gunner, were saved by Geddington Court & landed at Halifax. Can you add more? Another image?

12

King City
4744 tons
Hull 1002

148835
1928

A cargo ship. Per 1 (ref. 22% down), 2 [William Reardon Smith, King City (2)], 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert King City), 4 ('wrecksite.eu', sinking data), 5 (Lloyd's Register data, King City, 1930/31 thru 1940/41 ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for 'Saint Just Steamship Company', owned by 'Sir William Reardon Smith & Sons Ltd.', which in 1928, became 'Reardon Smith Line Limited' ('RSLine'), of Cardiff. 122.1 metres long (400.5 ft.) perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 knots, signal letters LBFD later GJCZ, intended to be a grain carrier. The 1930/31 edition of Lloyd's Register indicates RSLine to then be the registered owner. The ship was requisitioned by the Admiralty for WW2 service & used as a collier. Just 5 WW2 convoy references, including at least 1 North Atlantic crossing. The vessel's independent voyages included service on the W. coast of North America. In Aug. 1940, the vessel was en route from Cardiff to Singapore with a cargo of coal & coke. In mountainous seas, N. of the island of Rodriguez, E. of Mauritius in the Indian Ocean, she had chronic engine troubles which caused her to be erratic in her movements. On Aug. 24, 1940, after being shadowed for 2 hours, the vessel was attacked by German raider Atlantis with a torpedo (which missed) & a 155 mm gun salvo, which salvo caused 5 deaths aboard King City & the vessel to soon be ablaze. 4 of the lives lost were cadets. At 16.53S/65.17E. The King City crew abandoned the ship & Atlantis rescued them in swells of 10 to 12 ft. Capt. H. W. Marshall was taken prisoner along with the rest of the crew (one, a sailor, soon died - on the operating table aboard Atlantis). The vessel rolled over & sank. 6 states it was, in fact, scuttled but it would seem that the crew barely had time to take to the boats let alone time to scuttle her. 'The Cruise of the German Raider Atlantis', by Joseph P. Slavick, (portions of it are available via Google Books), has extensive text re the King City sinking, commencing at page 82. Can you add more? Another image?

13

New Westminster City
4747 tons
Hull 1018

148838

Dingle Bay
Asakaze Maru
1929

A cargo ship. Per 1 (the 1st of 4 pages re the vessel, from 'Gray' archive records, though I can not figure out how you can access the actual data!), 2 (Convoy PQ 13), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert New Westminster City), 4 (3 images), 5 (data, New Westminster City), 6 (many interesting references throughout), 7 (Lloyd's Register data, New Westminster City, 1930/31 thru 1943/44 ex 'plimsollshipdata.org'), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for Reardon Smith Line Ltd. ('Reardon'), of Cardiff, with Sir William Reardon Smith & Sons Ltd. the managers. 121.9 metres long (400.0 ft.) perpendicular to perpendicular, (416 ft. 6 in. overall), speed of 10 1/2 or 11 knots, signal letters LDMJ, later GFDK. A tramp ship. Was requisitioned by the Admiralty in WW2 & saw service, I read, in 34 WW2 convoys. The vessel's convoy service included at least 7 North Atlantic crossings, service to W. Africa (Freetown) & many U.K. coastal trips. And many independent voyages also. In Aug. 1941, the vessel, fitted out for Arctic service, left Liverpool for Archangel & returned safely. On Mar. 10, 1942, the vessel left Loch Ewe, Scotland, in Convoy PQ 13, carrying munitions, & arrived unscathed in Murmansk, Russia, on Mar. 31, 1942, after a difficult voyage in some very bad weather. Much of the cargo was quickly unloaded but not all. On Apl. 3, 1942, she was sunk during raids by two German bombers. One bomb exploded in No. 2 hold, which contained ammunition. You can read the detail at 6. 2 lives were lost, gunners Connelly & Bottomley, both hit by flying bomb splinters. I read that the vessel was then considered to be a constructive total loss, (the vessel's holds were flooded & the crew accommodation was gutted) & that insurance compensation was paid to Reardon. Captain William Harris stayed aboard, alone it would seem, to avoid legally 'abandoning' the ship. I am not sure how long he stayed aboard. In Mar. 1947, the vessel was re-floated by the Russians & towed to Penarth, Cardiff, South Wales, with a Russian crew aboard to be repaired. And once repaired (I presume), was then returned to Reardon management. Can anyone clarify what that means. Who then owned the vessel? In 1948, the vessel was sold to 'Henry P. Lenaghan & Sons Ltd.', of Belfast, Ireland, & renamed Dingle Bay. The vessel was sold again, in 1951, to 'Nakamura Kisen K.K.', of Kobe, Japan, & renamed Asakaze Maru. And in Oct. 1965, the vessel arrived at Sakai, Osaka Bay, Japan, to be broken up. Can you add more?

14

Thetis
4123 tons
Hull 1037

Ely
1930

A cargo ship. Per 1 (French page, data & sinking, Ely, 7th ship down), 2 (link 2 in Google translation), 3 ('plimsollshipdata.org', Lloyds Register data, Thetis, 1930/31 thru 1945/46), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 403 ft. 6 in. overall, 119.0 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, 390.7 ft., speed of 10 1/2 knots, signal letters JHMC later SVJN. Into service in Jun. 1930. Built for 'Elias E. Hadjilias', of Athens, Greece. Likely managed however from London, maybe by Hadjilias & Co. Ltd. or a predecessor. The 1932/33 edition of Lloyds Register records 'Nereus Steam Navigation Co. Ltd.' ('Nereus'), as the owners, E. E. Hadjilias the manager. Nereus was probably from Athens, Greece, & was likely owned by the Elias E. (Emanuel or Emmanuel) Hadjilias family. I am unable to track any WW2 service for the vessel. In 1955, the vessel was sold to 'A. Ramirez Escudero' of Costa Rica, & renamed Ely. The end for the vessel came in 1959, but I need help to explain exactly what then happened. 2 advises that the vessel was involved in a collision on Jan. 30, 1959. At 50.30N/00.10E in the North Sea. Which is strange because that location is rather in the middle of the English Channel, roughly S. of Eastbourne. I have not read the name of the other vessel. Presumably no loss of life. 2 also advises that the vessel was (in translation), 'abandoned and raised' in the North Sea & towed by Jean Bart (a French tug presumably) to Dunkirk, France. Where the ship capsized at the pier, for reasons unknown, on Feb. 1, 1959. At 51.03.83N/2.21.60E. Clearance of the wreck took place, I read over the extended period of Oct. 1962 to Jan. 1966. Can you explain what really happened? Or add an image?

TO END THE PAGE

For your pleasure and interest.

A total change of subject matter! A wonderful artwork, an oil on canvas by French artists Pierre-Jacques Volaire (1729-1802). The artist's impression of the scene when Mount Vesuvius erupted in A.D. 79, & buried the Roman cities of Pompeii & Herculaneum.

Enjoy. Do view it in a larger size by clicking the image below.

There have been, I understand, many eruptions of Mount Vesuvius over the centuries. The artist was at Naples, Italy, & maybe was inspired by one such eruption, in 1771. He painted a number of works featuring Mount Vesuvius. The volcano is, I read, today regarded as being one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the whole world - because of the sheer number of people (3,000,000) who live nearby.

May I suggest that you navigate the site via the index on page 001.PRIOR PAGE / NEXT PAGE

To Thomas M. M. Hemy Data Page 41. All of the other Thomas Hemy pages, including image pages, are accessible though the index on Thomas Hemy page 05.  [ ] £ É è

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