The Sunderland Site Page 049

THE SUNDERLAND SITE - PAGE 049
SHIPBUILDERS - PAGE 9

May I suggest that you navigate the site via the index on page 001.PRIOR PAGE / NEXT PAGE

On this page ... Bell and Cairncross, Blumer, Briggs, Bradley and Potts, British Shipbuilders, G. Broad, Edward Brown, Brown J. & J., Brown & Johnson, Buchanan & Gibson, Burdon, J., Burn, Burn T., Byers, Cairncross, Candlish, Carr, Hylton, Carr, H. & W., Carr, James, Carr, William, Chilton W., George Clark Engine Works, Clarke M., Cooke S., Cornforth W., page bottom (AT&T advertisements).

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Corrections in any of the material which follows, however tiny, would be most welcome. And additions, of course! (21 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 25 + 5 + 2 + 1 + 3 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 10 + 3 + 6 + 9 + 5 + 2 + 3 + 7 + 1 + 1 + 1) = 111 Test.

Miramar, Plimsoll, images, xplornet, mariners-l.co.uk, MNL, eBay, Delcampe,

JOHN BLUMER (1855/1859)
PACE, BLUMER (1859/1864)
BLUMER AND COMPANY (1865/1890s)
J. BLUMER & CO. (1890s?/early 1900s)
J. BLUMER & CO. LTD. (early 1900s/1927)
JOHN BLUMER AND CO.

This is the second 'Blumer' page, made necessary by the increasing number of listings re 'Blumer' built vessels. The first page, with the first 100 vessels, is available here.

Lists? Firstly there is, on site, a 'Blumer' build list from its earliest days in 1859 thru to the very end. Here. Miramar lists? 9 pages, (highest hull number on page). It used to be that you could click on the links that follow & get to the relevant Miramar page. But no longer! The new procedure must be to go to Miramar (here) & log in (you must be registered to view any page). And once you are logged in, return to this page & all the following links should work for you:- 30, 60, 91, 120, 150, 180, 210, 240, 258. (258) Data is now on site re 41% of them!

'BLUMER' SHIPS BUILT AT NORTH DOCK

Ray Ranns advises me that a new hull numbering series was commenced when the move was made to North Dock in 1865. Commencing at No. 1 again.

101 Aylestone
2098/3380 (N/G) tons
Hull 232

140674
1917

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Portuguese page, wreck images, but ... the site is now a pay site), 2 (Portuguese ref.), 3 (Fernando de Noronha map), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 348.5 ft. (106.22 metres), signal letters JQBN, 356 NHP engines by John Dickinson & Sons Ltd., of Sunderland. Built for 'Aylestone Shipping Co. Ltd.', (Alexander Bros., the managers - 3 brothers it would appear, Thomas, George & a 3rd whose initial was I), of Newcastle. A site visitor's father was aboard the vessel in a 1924 voyage to the Gulf of Mexico.
On Jul. 08, 1926, the vessel was wrecked at Praia do Leão, Fernando de Noronha Islands, Pernambuco, Brazil, while en route, it is believed, from Rosario, Argentina, to the U.K. & the Continent, with a cargo of maize. In bad weather, it would appear, when in the dark sector of the Ilha da Rata lighthouse ('Entrou no setor escuro do farol da Rata'). Can anyone explain those words? The islands, volcanic in origin, comprise an archipelago in the S. Atlantic, 220 miles off Natal, Brazil. Any loss of life? WWW data is minimal. Have not spotted the exact wreck location but it would be at or about 03.88S/32.43W. Ms. Marta Granville, of Brazil, who photographed the wreck at 1, (now a pay site) would know. A model of the vessel is on display at 'St. Margaret's Museum', at St. Margaret's Bay, Dover, Kent, U.K. José Carlos Silvares, of Brazil, was, when ths vessel was first listed, in process of writing a book about Brazilian shipwrecks. If you have additional data about Aylestone, perhaps an image, I will gladly pass the data on to him. Can you add to the record? I see that I did not retain any wreck images that may, long ago, have been available.

102   Hatasu
1925/3193 (N/G) tons
Hull 239

140519
1917

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('uboat.net', sinking), 2 (ref. sinking 1918, Hatasu), 3 (sinking, Sefton Steamship), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 352.8 ft. (107.53 metres) long, perpendicular to perpendicular, speed?, signal letters JQFW, 365 NHP engines by Richardsons Westgarth & Co. Ltd., of Sunderland. Built, it would appear, for 'Sefton Steamship Co. Ltd.' ('Sefton'), of Liverpool, H. E. Moss & Co. the owners & managers. Which is a puzzle, because Sefton would seem to have been liquidated in Feb. 1909 (the earlier link to such data no longer works). That company was either resurrected or, more likely, another company was formed of the identical name. Possibly owned by Moss Steamship Co. Ltd., of Liverpool, however. (Another Hatasu, also 'Moss' related, was built by 'Blumer', in 1921). The vessel is listed in Lloyd's Register of 1918/19 & names C. R. Stewart as her captain.
On Sep. 27, 1918, while en route from Alexandria, Egypt, to Liverpool, with a cargo of cotton, currants & onions, the vessel was hit by a torpedo fired by UB-49, Oberleutnant zur See Adolf Ehrensberger in command, 50 miles N3/4W of Oran, Algeria, at 36.32N/00.53W. 2 lives lost. Have not read the circumstances. Can you provide more data about the vessel?

103   Luxor
3571 tons
Hull 241

140560
1918

A cargo ship. Which had a very short life indeed. Per 1 ('uboat.net', sinking), 2 (wreck data), 3 (UB-57), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 356.3 ft. (108.60 metres) long perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters JSKC, 394 NHP engines by North Eastern Marine Engineering Company Ltd. of Sunderland. The vessel is listed in Lloyd's Register of 1918/19 & names R. G. Muir as her captain. Built for 'Moss Steamship Co. Ltd.' (J. Moss), of Liverpool & completed in Mar. 1918. It must have been completed early in that month because on Mar. 19, 1918, defensibly armed, in ballast & en route from Cherbourg, France, to Barry Roads, Wales, via Weymouth, the vessel was torpedoed by UB-57 & sunk. Oberleutnant zur See Johannes Lohs, who sunk 77 ships & damaged many more, was in command of UB-57. At 50.16.9N/01.36.6W, 27 miles SWxS of St. Catherine’s Point, Isle of Wight. Wreck lies in 62 metres of water. All 40 crew were saved. Can you provide additional information? An image?

104 . War Coppice
3124 (or 3297) tons
Hull 247

142597

Nord
Réfrigérant
Baltraffic
Safina-E-Tariq
1918

A refrigerated cargo ship. Per 1 (United Baltic, Baltraffic), 2 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Baltraffic), 3 (data & image, Baltraffic), 4 (New Zealand), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 331 ft. (101.0 metres) long, speed of 11 1/2 knots. Built for The Shipping Controller, of London & managed for them by Morel Ltd. The vessel was sold, in 1919, to the French Government, & renamed Nord, a vessel name not referenced by Miramar. It was sold again, in 1920, to 'Compagnie Maritime de Transports Frigorifiques', of Lorient, France, & renamed Réfrigérant. A 1932 reference to S. Behr & Matthew Ltd., of London - perhaps the new managers? The vessel was sold, in 1933, to United Baltic Corporation Limited, of London & Newcastle, & renamed Baltraffic. In Jan/May 1940, the vessel supplied the British Expeditionary Force in France with refrigerated meat (5 return trips from Bristol Channel to River Loire). 12 convoy references in early WW2, incl. the 10 already mentioned. The vessel left Milford Haven on Sep. 24, 1940 for Auckland, New Zealand ('NZ'). There, as Baltraffic, managed by Union Steamship Co., the vessel visited Auckland, 35 times between Nov. 1940 & Apl. 1946 (but its role then was to carry refrigerated cargo from smaller ports to the main ports in NZ). The vessel was sold for the last time, in 1951, to Pan-Islamic Steamship Company Limited, of Karachi, Pakistan, & renamed Safina-E-Tariq. The vessel arrived at Karachi, probably at nearby Gadani Beach, in Q1 of 1957, to be broken up. Anything you can add? Was it a refrigerated ship when built?

105 . . War Highway
3125 tons
Hull 246

142394

Seatonia
Bracondale
Beresina
Berezina
Eforie
1918

A dry cargo ship. And a survivor - in service for 60 years! Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 101.0 metres long perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 11 1/2 knots. Built for The Shipping Controller, of London. The vessel was sold, in 1919, to Hartlepool Seatonia Steamship Co. Ltd., of West Hartlepool, & renamed Seatonia. It was sold again, in 1927, to J. E. Murrell S.S. Co. Ltd., also of West Hartlepool, & renamed Bracondale. And sold in 1934 to Sovtorgflot, of Russia & renamed Beresina (transliterated). In 1936 the owner was recorded as being the U.S.S.R. In 1950 the vessel was transferred to Sovromtransport, of Romania. And in 1959 transferred to NAVROM Romanian Maritime and Fluvial Navigation, of Romania & rebuilt. Name re-translated as Berezina. In 1962, the vessel was renamed Eforie. Jun. 06, 1975 was the date of its last reported movement passing Istanbul. The vessel was laid-up, at Constanţa, Romania, & in Apl. 1978 was reported due to be broken up there. But it would seem it lay derelict on the Macin Channel near the mouth of the Danube near Brăila, Romania, & still did so as late as 2005. And maybe it still is there in 2011? Much of the above data originated with two 'teesships' pages maintained by Ron Mapplebeck - but such pages are no longer available, alas. Anything you can add?

106 War Sky
3116 (or 3072) tons
Hull 248

142666

Vera Kathleen
Thurston
1918

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('uboat.net', sinking, Thurston image), 2 (sinking, Thurston), 3 (image Thurston, but you must be registered to see it), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 101.0 metres long, speed of 11 1/2 knots. Built for The Shipping Controller, of London. In 1919, the vessel was sold to Hartlepool Seatonia Steamship Co. Ltd., of West Hartlepool, (Hessler & Co., the managers), & renamed Vera Kathleen. In 1927, the vessel was sold to Murrell Steamship Co. (Joseph E. Murrell & Son the managers), both of West Hartlepool & renamed Thurston. In early Mar. 1940, Thurston, unescorted, was en route from Takoradi, Dakar, Ghana, to Workington, Cumberland, with a cargo of manganese ore. Shortly after midnight on Mar. 03, 1940, Thurston collided with S.N.A. 1, a French steamer, (also Sunderland built), about 60 miles S. of Milford Haven. S.N.A. 1 sank. 31 of its crew members were taken aboard Thurston. 'At 05.23 hours on 4 Mar, 1940', Thurston was hit by a single torpedo from U-29, Korvettenkapitän Otto Schuhart in command, & sank within a minute. At 50.23N/5.49W, 32 miles W. by N. of Trevose Head (North Cornish coast). 64 died (Master + 33 from Thurston & 30 ex S.N.A. 1) while 4 survived (3 ex Thurston & 1 ex S.N.A. 1). The 3 were picked up by Moyle & landed at Cardiff. The 1 ex S.N.A. 1 was saved by a fishing trawler. Do you have more data?

107 Wulsty Castle
3566 tons
Hull 240

140576

Craggan Hill
Bonifacio
Campo Basso
1918

A cargo ship. Per 1 (turbo-electrically driven), 2 (French Line, Bonifacio), 3 ('uboat.net', 4 May, 1943), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 356.3 ft. (about 109 metres) long, speed of 9 1/2 or 10 knots. Turbo-electrically driven & with 'Ljungstrom' turbines. Built for Lancashire Shipping Co. Ltd., of Liverpool, (J. Chambers & Co., the managers). John Persson advises (thanks John!) that the vessel's turbogenerator unit was a problem & the vessel was, in Feb. 1921, laid up at Ghent, Belgium. Maybe thru Aug. 1926 when 2 diesel engines by Vulcan Werke AG of Hamburg, Germany, were installed. Those engines also gave trouble & the vessel was laid up at Antwerp from 1929 thru 1936, when William Beardmore, of Glasgow, triple expansion engines were installed. In Jun. 1936, the vessel was sold, for £6,200, to 'Rethymnis & Kulukundis Ltd.' or perhaps 'Kulukundis Bros.', of London & Piraeus, Greece, was transferred to 'Craggan Hill Steamship Co.' & renamed Craggan Hill. Became Greek registered in Jul. 1937. Also in 1937, the vessel became owned by 'Compagnie France-Navigation' ('France'), was renamed Bonifacio, & was involved in the Spanish Civil War. France was, it would seem, placed in receivership & in Sep. 1939, the vessel was transferred (or came under the management of), 'Compagnie Générale Transatlantique' ('CGT' or 'French Line'). Perhaps used to serve N. Africa. Can anyone explain these French words 'Sous gérance CGT à partir de septembre 1939, navigue sur l'Afrique du Nord. Remis à l'occupant le 3 décembre 1942 à Marseille suite aux accords Laval-Kaufmann.' The vessel was laid up again, was confiscated by the Germans in Dec. 1942, & in 1943, was 'allocated' to Italy, owned by the Italian Government (managed by Cie Italia?), & renamed Campo Basso. (Have read references to 'Campobasso' also). In early May 1942, the vessel, loaded with munitions, was sent to Tunis escorted by Perseo, an Italian torpedo boat. On May 04, 1943, the vessel was shelled & sunk by gunfire from destroyers HMS Nubian, HMS Paladin & HMS Petard, 8 miles E. of Kelibia (Qelibia), in north-eastern Tunisia, [off Raz el Hamar, (Ras el Melah)]. A now dead webpage stated that it was instead torpedoed. A good portion of the above data is thanks to John Persson. Do you have more data?

108 Cramond
3056 (or 3052) tons
Hull 250

142007

Tom
Archanda


laid down as War Moon
1919

A 'C' type dry cargo ship. Per 1 (image Archanda), 2 [Ben Line, Cramond (1)], 3 (refs. Jun. 1940, Orkanger), 4 (Spanish page, ref. Tom, 90% down), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 101.0 metres (perpendicular to perpendicular), 331 ft. long, speed of 11 knots. Laid down as War Moon for The Shipping Controller, of London. But delivered in Apl. 1919, as Cramond, to William Thomson & Co., of Leith, Scotland ('Ben Line'). The vessel was sold, in 1921, to 'Compañía Naviera Bachi', of Bilbao, Spain, (with 'Astigarraga Sons' the managers?), & renamed Tom. In 1937, during the Spanish Civil War, the vessel was, I read, captured by Spanish Nationalist forces. But was returned to its owners in 1938. On Jun. 12, 1940, while en route from Alexandria, Egypt, with a cargo of grain, Tom rescued (40 perhaps?) survivors of the torpedoed Orkanger (Norwegian), & landed them at Alexandria. Orkanger had been torpedoed by the Italian submarine Naiade, at 31.42N/28.50E, NW of Alexandria. (I see references to Naiade, often accompanied by Baroni in brackets, i.e. (Baroni). Can anyone explain what the Baroni ref. means? Lorenzo Colombo has come to my rescue - thanks! He indicates that (Baroni) refers to Tenente di Vascello (Lieutenant) Luigi Baroni, the commanding officer of Naiade. He also indicates that Orkanger was the first merchant ship sunk by an Italian submarine (or anyway ship) in WWII. Tom was sold, in 1954, to 'Compañía Naviera Vascongada', also of Bilbao, & renamed Archanda. On Jan. 19, 1960, the vessel was wrecked NE of Boa Vista Island, Cape Verde Islands, N. Atlantic. Have not read the circumstances. Said to have been a total loss. Any loss of life? Do you have more data? Or another image?

109 Cyprian Prince
3071 tons
Hull 252

142842

Moorish Prince
Gloucester City
Namaqualand
Kaderbaksh


laid down as War Planet
1919

A cargo ship. Per 1 [Prince Line, Cyprian Prince (2)], 2 [Bristol City Line, Gloucester City (3)], 3 (WW2 convoy duty, Gloucester City), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 331 ft. 4 in. (about 106 metres) long, speed of 10 knots. Laid down as War Planet for The Shipping Controller, of London. But delivered in Sep. 1919 as Cyprian Prince to Prince Line Ltd., of Newcastle, (which line was owned, from 1916, by Furness Withy & Co.). Sister to Algerian Prince. It would appear that in Aug. 1936 the vessel was renamed Moorish Prince, (to release the name of Cyprian Prince), though Miramar does not reference the new name. Maybe the name was not registered? Since later in 1936, the vessel was chartered to Bristol City Line, ('Bristol'), (Charles Hill & Sons, Ltd., managers) & renamed Gloucester City. In 1939, Bristol bought the vessel. 79 WW2 convoy references including 18 voyages across N Atlantic, service to W. Africa & coastal U.K. & the continent. On Jul. 30, 1940, the vessel left Liverpool for Trenton, New Jersey, in Convoy OB.191 with a cargo of china clay ex Fowey, Cornwall, via Milford Haven. On Jul. 31, 1940, Jersey City, also built at Sunderland, was sunk by U99 at 55.47N/9.18W, NW of Ireland. Gloucester City, the designated convoy rescue ship, rescued 43 of Jersey City's crew of 45. In 1949, the vessel was sold to South African Lines Ltd., of Cape Town, South Africa, & renamed Namaqualand. In 1951, it was sold to United Oriental Steamship Co., of Karachi, Pakistan, & renamed Kaderbaksh. The vessel arrived at Gadani Beach, near Karachi, in Dec. 1961, to be broken up. Do you have more data?

110 Kaiwarra
3051 tons
Hull 251

143324

laid down as War Star
1919

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Union Steam, Kaiwarra), 2 (1940 crew image), 3 (Kaiwarra wreck), 4 (Manuka, wreck), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 101.0 metres (331.3 ft.) long, speed of 11 knots, 2 masts. The vessel was laid down for The Shipping Controller as War Star. But was delivered, in 1919, to 'Union Steam Ship Company of New Zealand Ltd.', of Wellington, New Zealand ('NZ'), as Kaiwarra. The vessel visited Auckland, NZ, 64 times in the period of 1924/1942. The vessel stood by the wreck of Manuka on Dec. 16, 1929. In Dec. 1940, Kaiwarra carried NZ Air Force planes from Auckland to Fiji. Shortly after midnight on the night of Dec. 03/04, 1942, the vessel, loaded with coal, ran aground opposite Black Birch Creek, 1 1/2 miles N. of Motunau Island, North Canterbury (40 miles N. of Lyttelton), NZ. There was no possibility to refloat the vessel, due to bad weather. The 45 person crew was rescued, on Dec. 06, 1942, by Rescue II, a lifeboat ex Sumner. At the Court of Enquiry, Captain W. H. D. Gardiner was exonerated, but 2nd officer J. S. Melville was found guilty of dereliction of duty & errors of judgment. Do you have more data? Or another image?

111 Sheaf Spear
3050 tons
Hull 249

142825

Bougaroni
Modena


built as War Sun
1919

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('pdf', 1936 storm, 5th column from left), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 101.0 metres (342 ft.) long, speed of 9 (or 10) knots. The vessel was built for The British Government as War Sun, the second vessel of that name. In 1919, the vessel was sold to Sheaf Steam Shipping Co., of Newcastle, 'W. A. Souter & Co.' the managers, & delivered as Sheaf Spear. On Nov. 17, 1936, the vessel, likely en route from Liverpool to Hamilton, Bermuda, was damaged in mountainous seas 52 miles off Bermuda. It sent a wireless message advising that the ship's engine room was leaking badly. It must have made it safely! The vessel was sold, in 1937, to 'Compagnie France-Navigation' ('Navigation'), of Paris or maybe of Rouen, France, & renamed Bougaroni. Navigation was wound up in Apl. 1939 & Bougaroni was transferred to the management of 'Compagnie Française de Navigation à Vapeur Chargeurs Réunis'. Ownership also? On Dec. 07, 1942, the vessel was seized by the Germans at Marseilles, France, was transferred to the Italian Government & renamed Modena. The vessel was at Palermo, Sicily, on Mar. 22, 1943, when it was bombed by Allied aircraft & sunk. On Jan. 15, 1945, it was raised. To be later scrapped, also at Palermo - in 1948. Can anyone tell us if it was operational between 1945 & 1948? Do you have more data? Or an image? 

112 Daybeam
3024 (or 3101, 3354 in 1944/45) tons
Hull 253

143504

Sebastián
Itxas-Alde
Azteca
Sebastián
Empire Tees
Tees
Clonlee
Selamet
1920

A 'C' type cargo ship that had many names & owners & a long life. Per 1 (Spanish page, extensive data, Selamet), 2 ('Southampton City Council/Plimsoll', Lloyd's Register data, Sebastian, 1930/31 thru 44/45), 3 ('Southampton City Council/Plimsoll', Lloyd's Register, Empire Tees, 1945/46), 4 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, click on 'SHIP SEARCH' then insert Sebastian or Empire Tees), 5 (image, Selamet), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access, but there is little data there about the vessel). Either (the data is confusing) i) 331.3 ft. long (100.98 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, or ii) 325.7 ft. long (99.27 metres) perpendicular to perpendicular, 331.3 ft. long (100.98 metres) overall, speed of 9 or 10 knots, signal letters GFJN later MCPJ, EGPS & ZBCG. Built for 'Claymore Shipping Co. Ltd.' of Cardiff. In 1929, the vessel was sold to 'F. Sainz de Inchaústegui, of Bilbao, Spain, & renamed Sebastián. In 1934, the vessel was acquired by Marqués del Real Socorro ('Socorro'), also of Bilbao, with no change of vessel name. In 1936, the vessel was requisitioned by Gobierno de Euzkadi, i.e. the Basque Government, & renamed Itxas-Alde. Note Lloyd's Register only notes that name. The vessel was reported to have been operating, in 1936, as Azteca, under the Mexican flag - Lloyd's Register does not reference the name. On May 20, 1937, the vessel was captured by Almirante Cervera, i.e. Admiral Cervera, a Spanish Nationalist cruiser, at the entrance to Bilbao. The vessel was returned to Socorro & renamed Sebastián. In 1941, the vessel was sold to 'Cía. Comercial Marítima de Transportes S.A.', of Bilbao, ('Comercial de Transportes' in Lloyd's Registers) with no change of vessel name. On Oct. 29, 30 or 31, 1943, (have read all three dates), the vessel was captured by destroyer HMS Tynedale, off Cape Tortosa, SW of Barcelona, because, I read, its owners were 'a German front company'. The vessel was taken to Gibraltar, arriving on Nov. 21, 1943, & became owned by the Ministry of War Transport, managed by Euxine Shipping Co., of Gibraltar. Later renamed Empire Tees. There are WW2 convoy records as both Sebastian & Empire Tees. Just 2 WW2 convoys as Sebastian, from Dec. 24, 1943, which would seem to be when the vessel left Gibraltar for the U.K. In Feb. 1944, the vessel was nearly lost when all of the blades of the ship's propeller fell off at sea! We do not know exactly where but it was likely in the North Sea. The ship was abandoned but boarded by the crew of a Royal Navy vessel of name unknown. The ship's engines & boilers would seem to have been damaged by that Royal Navy crew & as a result Sebastian had to be towed to North Shields for extensive engine & boiler repairs. All of this thanks to Nick Webster whose father Dennis Webster was at that time Sebastian's Chief Engineer. Do read the full detail here. Perhaps renamed Empire Tees in Apl. 1944. 14 WW2 convoy references as Empire Tees, from Aug. 29, 1944, including 2 N. Atlantic crossings returning with paper & iron ore. Also service into the Mediterranean (Naples, Bougie, Bône now Annaba, etc.) & U.K. coastal. In 1947, the vessel, returning to the U.K. with timber from Hamina, (Fredrikshamn in Swedish), southern Finland, struck a rock & was beached at Rosla Island, Hanko, S. tip of Finland. The vessel was damaged but survived the experience. In 1950, the vessel was sold to 'Cía Marítima Tees S.A.', of Panama, & renamed Tees. Arthur Jurgenthal was appointed the vessel's manager. In 1951, the vessel was sold to Shamrock Shipping & Ltd., of Belfast, C. S. Brown, the manager, & renamed Clonlee. In 1954, the vessel was sold for the last time, for about £35,000, to either i) 'Hafiz Huseyin Taviloglu ve Kardesi Kollektif Sirketti', or ii) 'Muzaffer Taviloglu, Yakup Uzuner & Munittin Topcuoglu' ('Muzaffer'), both of Istanbul, Turkey, & renamed Selamet. The vessel was later sold to breakers, by Muzaffer, & on Apl. 04, 1968, arrived at Istanbul ship breakers, to be broken up. Do you have more data? Or another image?

113 Jacob Christensen
3594 tons
Hull 245

Baldur
1920

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data page, Jacob Christensen), 2 (WW2 convoy duty, Jacob Christensen), 3 (data), 4 (extensive data, Baldur sinking, in Spanish), 5 (link 4 WWW translated), 6 (image Baldur, Spanish dive page), 7 (Spanish text, also /2, unable to translate, see 'fullscreen'), 8 (Sceptre), 9 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 108.6 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular (356.3 ft.), speed of ? knots. Built for 'A/S August', (Jacob Christensen, also ship owners, the manager), of Bergen, Norway. A Caribbean (mainly Cuba) to New York service in years 1922/24. The vessel was sold, in 1923, to 'A/S SS Mathilda', also of Bergen, no change of manager. Just 7 WW2 convoy references through to May 1940, mainly to & from Norway from Methil, Firth of Forth, Scotland, probably carrying coal. In May 1940, following the German invasion of Norway, the vessel carried war materials ex Blyth, Northumberland, to Rouen, France. On Jun. 02, 1940, she left Rouen for Pauillac, Gironde River, N. of Bordeaux, France. On Jun. 18, 1940, when, I believe, at nearby Rochefort, she required 'machinery' repairs which could not be completed ahead of the German advance. The vessel was accordingly scuttled at Rochefort to block access to the harbour - the crew was safely carried to Plymouth. That was not the end of the vessel's life, however. The vessel was raised & repaired by the Germans (Seereederei "Frigga" A.G., of Hamburg, became the managers) & in 1941 the vessel was renamed Baldur. 3 years later, on May 23, 1944, the vessel was torpedoed & sunk by British submarine HMS Sceptre near Castro Urdiales ('Castro'), Bilbao, Spain (Saltacaballo, an iron ore port to the E. of Castro, is the exact site). 2 torpedoes were fired when the vessel was loading. From 4 km. out, if I understand the links. Have not read the exact co-ordinates. 4 lives were lost, & 15 wounded. It would seem that the British Government apologised for violating Spanish territorial waters in the attack. Anything to add? An image perhaps?

114 Mathilda
3650 (or 3649) tons
Hull 242

Kanarya
Kanarya 5
1920

A cargo ship. Per 1 (extensive data, Mathilda), 2 (Norwegian page, data, images), 3 ('convoyweb.org' WW2 convoy duty, Mathilda), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). About 113 metres long, speed of 9 1/2 knots. Built for 'A/S SS Mathilda', (Jacob Christensen the manager), of Bergen, Norway. A lengthy list of WW2 N. Atlantic convoy voyages in years 1939 thru 1945 - carrying a variety of cargoes including autos, iron ore, steel, pit props & sulphur. 106 convoy references including 11 North Atlantic crossings. Had an encounter with a U-boat on Sep. 20, 1942 when separated from her convoy in fog. Must have been a very lucky ship! The vessel was sold, in 1955, for £50,000, to 'Celikel Türk Ltd.', of Ortakligi, Istanbul, Turkey, & renamed Kanarya. In 1957, the vessel was renamed Kanarya 5. In Sep/Oct 1965, it was broken up at Istanbul - or was it at Split, Yugoslavia? Can anybody generally expand the above data? An image?

115 Rygja
3534 (or 3535 or 4001) tons
Hull 243
1920

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Rygja nr. page bottom), 2 (page in Norwegian & image), 3 (wreck site), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 108.6 metres (356.3 ft.) long, speed of 9 1/2 knots. Built for 'A/S J. Ludwig Mowinckels Rederi', of Bergen, Norway. Came under German control in 1940. On Apl. 04, 1943, while en route from Narvik, Norway, to Germany carrying iron ore, the vessel struck a mine & sank 3 miles off Skagen, Denmark. 1 life lost, a stoker. Do you have more data? Or another image?

116 William Blumer
3604 tons
Hull 244

William
Aenos
1920

A cargo ship. Per 1 (extensive data, 2nd item, & 3 images available of 1945 sinking by link), 2 (April 02 1945, low on page), 3 ('convoyweb.org', WW2 convoy duty, William Blumer), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 108.6 metres (356.3 ft.) long, speed of 10 knots. Presumably named after William Blumer (1789/1850) - see above. Built for C. H. Sørensen, of Arendal, (S. coast of Norway nr. Kristiansand). In 1921, the vessel became owned by C. H. Sørensen & Sønner, also of Arendal. On Dec. 21, 1928, the vessel, Arizona also, was in radio contact with Kobenhavn, (its interesting figurehead) a 5-masted barque en route from Buenos Aires, Argentina, to Melbourne, Australia, with a crew of 16 & 45 cadets. At 33.30S/34.00W. Kobenhavn was never heard from again. In Jul. 1939, the vessel was sold to 'A/S Drafn' [Pehrson & Wessel (managers?)], of Drammen, (SW of Oslo), Norway. Only 2 WW2 convoy references. On convoy duty from Halifax, Canada, to U.K., in Jan./Feb 1940 & to Norway from U.K. in Mar. 1940. [1 (#13) & 2 (the last name)]. Became part of the German Homefleet when Germany invaded Norway on Apl. 9, 1940. On Apl. 02, 1945, the vessel was sunk in a British air attack nr. Sandefjord, Norway. On Oct. 12, 1946 it was raised by 'Friis & Tandberg Bjergningskompani', of Drammen, & in Dec. 1946 arrived under tow at 'Sarpsborg Mek. Verksted', of Sarpsborg, Norway, for repairs. On Apl. 4, 1948, the vessel returned to service (with whom?). In 1949, the vessel was renamed William. In Feb. 1955, the vessel was sold to General Sea Transport & Navigation Co. Inc., of Monrovia, Liberia, & renamed Aenos. On Mar. 04, 1956, while en route from Vizagapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India, to Genoa, Italy, with a cargo of manganese ore, the vessel ran aground 3 miles N. of Galle, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). I presume that the vessel was lost. Do you have more data? Or an image?

117 Hatasu
3198 tons
Hull 254

145893
1921

A cargo ship. Per 1 (WW2 convoy duty, Hatasu), 2 ('uboat.net', data & image), 3 (data), 4 (Moss Hutchison Line, Hatasu), 5 (ON-19), 6 (U-431), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 107.5 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 352.7 ft., speed of 10 knots. Built for 'Moss Steamship Co. Ltd.', of Liverpool, pioneers of the steam trade to Egypt, their 2nd vessel of the name, the other being also built by Blumer, in 1917. The vessel was in collision with Alyn, a 350 ton cargo ship, in Liverpool Bay. No date or detail, but the court ref. is to 1923. In 1930, the vessel became owned by 'James Moss & Co. (Moss Line) Ltd.' ('Moss2'), J. Moss & Co. the managers. In 1934, the vessel was taken over by newly-formed 'Moss Hutchinson Line Ltd.', the result of the amalgamation of Moss2 with J. & P. Hutchison Ltd., of Glasgow. 24 WW2 convoy references including at least 2 N. Atlantic crossings, service into Indian Ocean (Aden, Suez), Mediterranean (Alexandria, Port Said, Piraeus), Africa (Freetown), plus UK local. At 23.45 p.m. on Oct. 02, 1941, while en route from Manchester to New York in ballast, & separated from convoy ON-19 as the result of a gale, the vessel was hit by one of two torpedoes fired by U-431, Fregattenkapitän Wilhelm Dommes in command. About 600 miles E. of Cape Race, Newfoundland, Canada. Hatasu opened fire upon the submarine with her stern gun & forced U-431 to submerge. The vessel was hit again 3/4 hour later, at 00.28 a.m. on Oct. 03, 1941, broke in two & sank. 40 lives were lost, including the Captain [William J. (Johnston) Meek], & 6 gunners. The only survivors, 7 in number, spent 14 days at sea in a lifeboat before being picked up, on Oct. 16, 1941, by Charles F. Hughes (DD 428), a U.S. destroyer, & landed at Reykjavik, Iceland. Do you have more data? Or images?

118 Ixia
2985 tons
Hull 256

139897
1922

A cargo ship. Per 1 (data) & 2 (data 30% down), 3 ('pdf' re contract law court case re 1929 cargo loss, WWW p.#2 (p.288) & onwards), 4 (wreck image), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 100.9 metres (331 ft.) long, speed of 10 knots. The last 'Blumer' vessel completed before the company failed (but see Cydonia below). The vessel was originally ordered by Norwegian ship-owners. It was launched on May 25, 1922 & completed in Jul. 1922 for Joseph Robinson & Sons, of North Shields (Stag Line) at a cost of £44,706. A tramp ship. It would seem that the vessel carried coal frequently from Wales to ports in Canada & the U.S.A. Joe Lee advises (thanks!) that on Jan. 24, 1928, while en route from Swansea to Providence, Rhode Island, Captain Beare in command, the vessel broadcast an SOS when its steering gear became disabled in rough weather. At 50N/33.40W, roughly in mid N. Atlantic. It would seem that the vessel was able to correct its problem & returned to Swansea, presumably to effect permanent repairs. The vessel travelled to other destinations also. On Jun. 30, 1929, while en route from Swansea, Wales, to Constantinople (now Istanbul, Turkey) with a cargo of coal, the vessel ran aground on Vyneck Rock, The Brisons, Cape Cornwall, (Cornwall, of course). The vessel was a total loss. There was no loss of life since the crew all rowed ashore. The circumstances were briefly that the vessel was equipped with a 'super-heater', a device which economises upon the use of coal by utilising what otherwise would be wasted steam. The Ixia 'super-heater' had not been working well, so alterations had been effected, & the ship had on board, when it left Swansea, 2 engineers to test the unit's revised performance. It was necessary for the ship to develop a full head of steam to perform the necessary tests, but that proved to be initially impossible - since the firemen were all drunk! Full steam was later raised & the ship put into St. Ives Bay, to drop off the two engineers. Upon resuming her voyage, Ixia did not directly return to her 'usual route' but rather followed the Cornish coast line essentially 'cutting the corner' (my words) & the grounding resulted. The conditions were overcast & showery. The later Court case is most interesting but is beyond the scope of this page. Can you add more? An image maybe?

119 Sac 2
2959 tons
Hull 255

5304449

Sac Badalona
1922

A cargo ship. Per 1 (Palomares 1966 incident), 2 & 3 ex 4 (1952 references in Dutch & Spanish, 'El Buque Espagnol', right column), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 331.0 ft. long perpendicular to perpendicular, 104.8 metres (344 ft.) long overall, speed of 10 (or 8) knots, signal letters MBCP. Built for 'La Sociedad Anónima Cros', of Barcelona, Spain. The vessel was sold, in 1950, to 'Transportes, Aduanas y Consignaciones S.A.' ('TAC') of Alicante, Spain, & renamed Sac Badalona. On Nov. 6, 1952 something of significance happened to the vessel. In Dutch - 'Stoomschip, in Hubertsgat aan de grond'. Does that mean that the vessel ran aground at Hubertsgat? Can anyone advise the meaning of the data at links 2, 3 & 4?
We thank Peter de Lange for coming to our assistance. With an image from his father's photo album & the following words:- 'My father came from the island of Schiermonnikoog and it was not far from there where this ship ran aground on the shallow Frisian coast in a storm in early Nov. 1952. As far as I know the ship was saved by the crew of the lifeboat Insulinde which assisted her by avoiding the more dangerous spots when things went wrong. Eventually the ship was salvaged by the tugboat Holland (Doeksen Terschelling) allowing this ship to sail for another 2 decades.'
In Jan. 1966, a B-52G Bomber of the USAF Strategic Air Command flew a mission that was to take it from North Carolina towards the European borders of the Soviet Union & back again. Due to the length of the flight, it had to be aerially refuelled twice. On Jan. 17, 1966, on the return portion of its flight, it was being refuelled at 31,000 ft. by a southern Spain based KC-135 tanker, off the Mediterranean coast of Spain, near Almería. The two planes collided. The KC-135 tanker blew up killing all four crew members, while the B-52G broke apart, killing three of its seven member crew. Three of the other four parachuted safely into the sea, while the 4th, who could not separate himself from his ejection seat, parachuted & survived a ground landing. A giant disaster & an international nuclear incident - since the bomber carried 4 Mk 28 hydrogen bombs! One of which landed in the sea & seemed unrecoverable! It is beyond the scope of these pages to relate the whole story. But in a nutshell, the 4th bomb was recovered 80 days later, by the brilliance of Dr. John P. Craven, a mathematician, who determined by the laws of probability (Thomas Bayes theorem) & with the assistance of Francisco Simó Orts (or Simó-Orts), a local fisherman, where the bomb would likely be, & was right on target. 2,550 ft. down in a steep undersea canyon. A fleet of over 20 vessels & 150 divers assisted in the recovery. The bombs which landed on land at Palomares, Spain, created considerable radioactive contamination. Sac Badalona's involvement in all of this? A modest one it seems. It was in the area & saw a parachute falling in the distance & picked up a rubber raft. The vessel arrived at Barcelona, on Dec. 04, 1974, to be broken up. Can you add more? An image maybe?

120 Usworth
2189/3535 (N/G) tons
Hull 257

149420
1926

A cargo ship, 2 masts, schooner rigged. Per A (e-Bay, cutting re awards re rescue), B (Delcampe, award re Jean Jadot involvement in Usworth rescue), C (e-Bay image of Usworth at sea, taken from aboard Ascania), D (e-Bay image of Captain Reed & Jean Jadot), 1 ('Southampton City Council/Plimsoll', Lloyd's Register data, 1930/31 thru 1934/35), 2 (Board of Trade wreck inquiry report), 3 (NZ, newspaper report), 4 (medals on page 324 - click on Close), 5 (Jean Jadot sunk in 1943), 6 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access).
356.3 ft. long, signal letters GDKT, speed of 11 knots, 301 NHP engines by John Dickinson & Sons Ltd., of Sunderland.
Usworth was launched on Nov. 04, 1926, first registered at Newcastle on Nov. 23, 1926 & completed in Dec. 1926 for 'Dalgliesh Steam Shipping Company, Ltd.', of Newcastle, (R. S. Dalgliesh, the manager), at a cost of £51,500.
On Dec. 02, 1934, Usworth, under the command of Capt. John J. (Joseph) Reed, left Montreal, Canada, for Queenstown, Ireland, with a cargo of wheat & a crew of 26. She bunkered at Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada, & left there on Dec. 06, 1934, headed east. She encountered high winds & rough seas, conditions which worsened over the next several days. The ship suffered damage (steering gear disabled) on the morning of Dec. 11, 1934, & called for help when 1,000 miles E. of Newfoundland. Belgian vessel Jean Jadot (Lloyd Royal Belge, built 1929, Captain Gonthier in command) responded to the SOS & a towing hauser was rigged between the 2 vessels, which hawser broke after about 3 hours. Usworth had meantime effected temporary repairs to her steering gear & set her course for Ireland. The winds became hurricane force. A series of waves hit Usworth including a massive wave which engulfed the ship & caused great structural damage. Water entered the ship which began to list to port, initially at 12 but soon at 25 degrees. The vessel's fires were put out. The ship was close to capsize. Jean Jadot, which had been blown off the scene, returned & was soon joined by Cunard liner Ascania, under the command of Captain J. G. Bisset, en route to Halifax, Nova Scotia. Both vessels spread oil to quieten the sea.
Jean Jadot launched a boat with 10 volunteers & took 14 survivors aboard, but the lifeboat capsized & 14 lives were lost, 12 from Usworth & 2 of the rescuers. Ascania launched a 30 ft. lifeboat. 2 crewmen jumped too hastily, and, in efforts to save them, a third crewmen was lost, all either drowned or choked to death by fuel oil. The Ascania boat eventually got alongside the stricken ship & with great difficulty Captain Reed, his Chief Engineer complete with broken ribs, 3rd Engineer & 6 crewmen were rescued. Usworth, then a derelict, drifted away & presumably sank at or about 48.01N/31.49W on Dec. 14, 1934. A total of 17 lives were lost including 2 from Jean Jadot.
The Ascania's lifeboat crew & Captain Bisset were all awarded the Lloyd’s Silver Medal for gallantry at sea, while the Captain & 8 crew members of Jean Jadot were also recognised. They were awarded medals by the Life Saving Benevolent Association of New York. The vessel was underinsured, it would seem, its higher coverage having expired at midnight on Dec. 10, 1934 (what unfortunate timing!). The press coverage at the time was extensive. One contemporary news report & an illustrated page ex 'The Illustrated London News' of Jan. 05, 1935.
Can you add more? Another image perhaps?

121 Cydonia
3517 tons
Hull 258

148802
1927

A cargo ship. Per 1 ('convoyweb.org' WW2 convoy duty, Cydonia), 2 (Stag line history, about 80% down, Cydonia), 3 ('Southampton City Council/Plimsoll', Lloyd's Register data, 1930/31 thru 1945/46), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). 356.3 ft. (108.6 metres) long perpendicular to perpendicular, 365.0 ft. long overall, speed of 10 knots, signal letters KVNL later GKTF, 301 HP engines by John Dickinson & Sons Ltd., of Sunderland. The last 'Blumer' vessel. The vessel was on the stocks at North Dock for 4 years after the company failed in 1922. The keel was laid in 1922, & it was launched on Dec. 03, 1926. It was finally completed, in Jan. 1927, & sold to Joseph Robinson & Sons, of North Shields (i.e. Stag Line Ltd.). A tramp ship. 115 WW2 convoy references, including at least 13 North Atlantic crossings, service to the Mediterranean & many U.K. coastal voyages. Carrying cargoes such as iron ore, grain, steel & lumber. In Jul. 1940, the vessel sailed from Casablanca to Liverpool in a 23 ship convoy which was attacked by a German bomber near Gibraltar. 3 bombs landed near Cydonia but did not damage it. We thank Mark Rogerson for the image at left, taken aboard Cydonia at the time, showing a group of Polish Air Force personnel on deck, including Mark's father who was soon to see service with the Royal Air Force. On Feb. 27, 1945, the vessel left Immingham (Humber Estuary) & on the next day, i.e. Feb. 28, 1945, the vessel hit a mine & was severely damaged. It limped into nearby Hull, presumably to effect repairs. On Oct. 21, 1949, while en route from Workington to Cardiff, the vessel had the misfortune to hit a wartime mine, 32 miles N. of Strumble Head, N. Pembrokeshire, Wales. At 52.15N/5.36W. What bad luck! To have hit two mines in its lifetime. They tried to take evasive action to avoid the mine that they had seen about 200 yards away, but due to the force of the wind, the vessel drifted onto the mine. The engine room flooded & 1 life was lost, a greaser. John Jones has been in touch (thanks John!) to advise that that greaser was none other that John's grandfather, Thomas Joyce, who left behind wife ?, & also 4 children & 18 grandchildren. Had circumstances been different, Thomas would have been aboard Royal Navy cruiser HMS Hampshire, which hit a mine on Jun. 05, 1916, during WW1, & might well have then lost his life as did Field Marshal Lord Kitchener, British Secretary of State for War. You can read John's complete message here.
There would seem to be much debate to this day about the total circumstances surrounding the loss of Hampshire. More lives might have been saved had the locals been permitted to help, but that help was rejected by authorities at the time, though which specific authorities seems not to be known. Lord Kitchener was a controversial figure indeed. Who was featured on this famous WW1 1914 recruitment poster, designed by Alfred Leete. But while that poster is amazingly well known, I read that it never was an official recruitment poster - though it did appear on the front cover of the then popular magazine 'London Opinion'. All most interesting, but beyond the purposes of this page & site.
The Cydonia crew was rescued by St. Clears, of South American Saint Line Ltd. The vessel was beached the next day. In fact, the vessel was re-floated & towed to Milford Haven by the tug Englishman. But the damage was 'beyond economical repair'. And Cydonia was broken up, accordingly - at Milford Haven. Do you have more data? Or perhaps another image?

BRADLEY & POTTS

A shipbuilder that, so far as I can see, built just 3 vessels in 1850 & 1851.

1   Swan
26 later 23 tons

2481
1850

A vessel of unknown rig. This modest vessel, which was launched in Sep. 1850, was, so far as the webmaster can see, never Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed. But I should note that the webmaster only searched thru 1862/63. A tiny portion of what may have been the vessel's lifetime - read on. Too small likely for LR inclusion. From other sources, however, we know a little about the vessel.
The North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5 lists Swan, in Mar. 1854, as registered at Sunderland & owned by "Bradley & Potts" of Sunderland. With Lawther Davison her then captain. Turnbull's Shipping Registers ('TR') of 1855 & 1856 both also list Bradley & Potts as the vessel's owner - while TR of 1855 lists Lowthan Davison as her captain. Last but not least, Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 records the vessel as now owned by Anthony Embleton of Sunderland. I note that none of the three registers referenced above state the vessel's rig.
The vessel is site listed having seen a reference to what surely must be this vessel here (in green) in a Lloyd's List report of events of Jan. 26, 1860. With 'Davidson' noted to be her captain. On that day, 10 vessels including Swan, were on shore at Robin Hood's Bay ('RHB') (SE of Whitby) & many more were lost or damaged elsewhere on the east coast. As a result of a violent gale & snowstorm that hit on the evening of Jan. 26, 1860. The vessel, it would seem, was not lost that day. I say that because the vessel is not included in a U.K. Government 1860 wreck list, available here. And because of further data recorded below.
'The Standard' newspaper, of London, in an extensive article you can read here, tells us of the extent of the storm & of the vast damage that was incurred by vessels large & small. Swan is mentioned in the article but oh so briefly.
Signal letters HPJK. To the astonishment of the webmaster, a great many crew lists are available for the vessel - thru to 1913. At Bristol.
Knowing that, I checked further at the Mercantile Navy List ('MNL'). It records Swan as registered at Sunderland from 1857 thru 1871, owned from 1865 thru 1871 by Anthony Embleton of Sunderland. MNL does not record the vessel after 1871.
Can you add to or correct any of the above? #2600

JAMES BRIGGS
WILLIAM BRIGGS
W. BRIGGS & SON
BRIGGS SON & CO.

OF PALLION

Can you help with the history of this shipbuilder? The webmaster has seen a few references to vessels built by 'Briggs of Sunderland'. But, so far at least, has found no WWW data whatsoever about the shipbuilder other than a brief reference ('19th century') to 'William Briggs, a local timber merchant and ship builder', who bought Hylton Castle some years after 1840. Shipbuilding activities maybe operated as 'W. Briggs', 'W. Briggs & Son' or 'Briggs Son & Co.' The correct Briggs?

A message left in my guestbook suggests there may also have been a 'James Briggs'. Yes indeed.

But we now have lots of data about the shipbuilder on page 216 re Emma built 1865. Thanks to Meg Hartford. As follows:

William Briggs was born in 1803. He married Margaret Hedley. Both were born in Richmond, North Yorkshire. By 1841 the family were living in Sunniside West, Sunderland, and William is recorded as a merchant. The family comprises of eight children ranging in age from 13 to 2 years old and there are three servants.

By 1856 William Briggs and Co. were building ships at North Hylton and the 1861 census records William as a timber merchant and shipbuilder living at The Esplanade, Sunderland. His eldest son, Robert, now aged 33, is enumerated as a ship builder and ship broker.

In 1862 William bought Hylton Castle, which stands on the north side of the River Wear. He made alterations to the building to make it look 'more medieval'. He never lived there. His second son, Charles James Briggs, inherited it on the death of his father and he lived there until his death in 1900.

William Briggs had retired by 1871 when he lived at Moorlands, South Moor, Sunderland. Some of the Briggs family continued to live there until the 1950’s. This is the site of the present Southmoor School and I believe that parts of the house were retained. Robert Briggs is a timber merchant in 1871 and this business is listed in Whelan’s Directory of 1894, with offices in John Street. It appears that the ship building and brokerage interests had either been sold or had closed.

William Briggs died in July 1871, his wife Margaret in April 1872 and his son Robert in November 1913. All are buried in the family plot at Sunderland (Grangetown) Cemetery.

Anyway, names of vessels constructed by 'Briggs' of Sunderland - in a table in build date sequence. 25 vessels so far. Also to be added in is Prince Rupert (later Biland) built in 1865.

VESSELS BUILT BY 'W. BRIGGS & M. CLARKE'

1   Miaza
209 later 195 tons

2542
1850

Miaza, a snow or brig, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1850/51 thru 1869/70, & not thereafter. Its builder is a bit of a puzzle. It is recorded in one Sunderland build list available to the webmaster as being built by W. Briggs/M. Clarke. In another list, W. Briggs and W. Clarke are each stated to have built the vessel.
Miaza was owned thru 1862/63, per LR, by 'Milburns' of Sunderland, thru 1854/55. For service i) from Sunderland to Southampton, Hampshire, thru 1854/55, then, ii) from 1855/56 thru 1858/59 for service from Sunderland to the Baltic, & iii) thereafter ex Sunderland.
The North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5 records Miaza, in Mar. 1854 data, as owned by Robt. Milburn & Robt. Robinson sen., both of Sunderland, with Robt. Milburn her captain. Turnbull's Shipping Registers ('TR') of both 1855 & 1856 record her then owners as being R. Milburn of Sunderland & R. Robinson, sen., of Hunwick (N. of Bishop Auckland, County Durham). While Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 states her then owners to be Robert and Robert, Jun. Milburn of Sunderland & Robert Robinson, Sen., of Hunwick.
In 1862/63, Miaza became, per LR, owned by C. Young of Seaham, Durham, for service ex Sunderland. Per LR, 'Young' continued to be the vessel's owner thru 1869/70. But see below for the Mercantile Navy List record.
I note that LR records G. Milburn as the vessel's captain for the full period of LR listing, i.e. from 1850/51 thru 1869/70. TR of 1855 states Robert Milburn, jun.
The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') lists the vessel from 1857 thru 1872, always registered at Sunderland. MNL of 1865 records C. B. Young, of Seaham, as the vessel's then owner or managing owner. MNL of 1866 rather records Thos. Elliot, also of Seaham. And MNLs of 1867 thru 1872 (1870) all list Robert Thorman, of Seaham, as Miaza's owner or managing owner.
84.0 ft. long, signal letters HPNK, of 195 tons from LR of 1862/63, of 196 tons from MNL of 1865, many crew lists are available via this page.
What finally happened to Miaza? I should first note that Robert Foster would seem to have become the vessel's captain in Oct. 1870. I have not researched the vessel's movements with 'Foster' in command but noted a number of voyages to Hamburg, Germany, ex Seaham, presumably with cargoes of coal.
On Jan. 14, 1872, per line 2928 (here) of a U.K. Government 1872 wreck listing, the 196 ton Miaza was stranded at Hasboro' (Hasborough Sands, near Cromer, Norfolk), while en route from London to Seaham in ballast. Crew of 6 - none lost. Then owned by Robert Thorman. I note that that last link incorrectly records the vessel as built in 1856. Some related news reports - 1, 2 & 3.
In the 3rd report, Captain Foster advises that Miaza had, he thought, struck a sunken wreck - at about 2:50 a.m. on Jan. 14, 1872. The vessel kept going but ten minutes later, as the vessel hit the Hasborough Sands, Miaza had 4 ft. of water in her holds. She bumped over the sands, the crew took to a ship's boat, & 20 or so minutes later the vessel sank. 'Foster' tells us that they all made their way to the Hasborough Lightship, where they were kindly treated. And then on to Mundesley (coast of Norfolk, SE of Cromer). The 2nd report states that Mundesley beachmen went to the crew's assistance indeed rescued them, but 'Foster' did not refer to the matter. I also read that the vessel was then owned by Messrs R. Thorman & Co., of Seaham, & was uninsured.
Can you add anything additional? #2939

VESSELS BUILT BY 'JAMES BRIGGS'

1   Renown
440 tons

28750
1860

A wooden barque which was launched on Jun. 29, 1860 & first registered on Jul. 5, 1860 (scroll to #28750). The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1861/62 thru 1870/71, owned for its lifetime by T. (Thomas) Todd of London. Initially for service from Sunderland to China, soon London to Algoa Bay (E. coast of South Africa), then London to Australia & then ex London. With W. Wellbury serving as her initial captain (thru 1862/63), then W. Kewley (1862/63 thru 1865/66) & G. Adams (1865/66 thru 1870/71). The vessel made two voyages to Australia, the first of which arrived at Adelaide, South Australia, on Mar. 03, 1863, with a general cargo & a single passenger, after a 103 day voyage from London (left Nov. 20, 1862). With W. Kewley in command & George Adams her chief officer. She left for Guam on Apl. 09, 1863, either in ballast or with a cargo of wheat & flour (both are stated). She arrived again, with a general cargo & 6 or 7 passengers, on Feb. 09, 1866, G. E. Adams in command, at Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, having left Deal, Kent, on Oct. 13, 1865. She went on to Sydney, New South Wales, in ballast & on Apl. 30, 1866 left Sydney for Shanghai, China, with 652 tons of coal. So far as I can see, the vessel made no later voyages to Australia. The WWW available Mercantile Navy Lists of 1865 thru 1870 all list Thomas Todd of London as her owner. 129.5 ft. long, signal letters QBSN.
LR of 1870/71 notes that the vessel had been 'Wrecked'. On Feb. 10, 1870, per line 54 here, the 440 ton barque was stranded at Pelew Island (Palau, Micronesia, E. of the Philippines) while en route from Bangkok, Thailand, to Yokohama, Japan. Crew of 13 - none lost. Then owned by Thomas Todd. Can you add anything additional? #2085

VESSELS BUILT BY 'WILLIAM BRIGGS' and/or WILLIAM BRIGGS and SONS

1 Anglo-Indian
444 tons

22181
1858

A wooden barque. Per 1 (Lloyd's data), 2 (Apl. 02, 1863 collision with Boanerges, ex 3), 4 (data & ref. to Krakatoa), 5 (the 'Krakatoa' 1883 voyage to Brisbane). 133.4 ft. long, signal letters NKJR, or for a year or so only, NKTR, a typo most likely. The vessel's name is a puzzle, being sometimes recorded as Anglo Indian & sometimes as Anglo-Indian. Built on speculation, it would appear, since 'W. Briggs' is recorded as the owner thru 1864. The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Register available to him from Google Books, thru 1887/88 - see left. The vessel may well be recorded in the 1889/90 edition, the last the webmaster has available, but the needed section of that register is missing. During an 1863 voyage from Foochow, China, to Melbourne, Australia, with a cargo of tea, the vessel was in collision with Boanerges on Apl. 02, 1863. At approximately 20.38N/114.59E, off Hong Kong. The rigging of both vessels was damaged. It would seem that Anglo-Indian made for Singapore & was likely repaired there. In 1864/65 the owner became 'Cottam & Co.' ('Cottam'), of London. In 1869/70, the ownership changed from Cottam to A. Lambert, also of London. However the Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') of 1870 states Henry Turner, of London, to be the owner. A new deck in 1871. Damaged & repaired in 1877. In 1879/80, in a confused Lloyd's listing, the vessel would seem to have become owned by 'Anderson, Anderson & Co.', of Aberdeen. By James Anderson of London per the 1880 MNL. In May 1883, the Krakatoa (1 & 2) volcanic eruption commenced, the giant explosion being later that year, on Aug. 27, 1883. Anglo-Indian was in the area, en route from Glasgow (left Jul. 07, 1883) to Brisbane (arrived Oct. 02, 1883). The vessel 'Passed Krakatoa Island on the 23rd, and when doing so we were literally covered with sand and small stone from this volcano'. It would seem that the vessel was one day's sailing from the island of Sumatra, when the volcano blew. The vessel was owned, in 1883 it would seem, by 'a) F. Ringer; b) Grand & J. Sharp', of Shanghai, China. Or maybe by 'P. V. Grant & Sharp' in 1884 rather than in 1883. In 1887/88, C. H. C. Moller, also of Shanghai, was the owner. A puzzle in the 1887/88 register. The builder, recorded as Briggs for over 20 years, became recorded as 'J. M. Reed', of Sunderland, for reasons unknown. MNL of 1890 lists the vessel as registered at Shanghai but owned by Mrs. Annie M. Moller of Nottingham, U.K. No other WWW data that I can find. Its final disposition? Need help!

2   Belvidera
684 or 685 tons

28379
1860

A wooden ship. Which was, I read, launched on Apl. 12, 1860 & first registered (scroll to #28379), at London, on Apl. 13, 1860. There would seem to be some modest confusion as to the vessel's name, being often referred to as Belvidere. It is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1860/61 thru 1871/72, always as Belvidera, of 684 tons & owned for that entire period by Allan & Sons of London - for service initially from Sunderland to India, but from 1861/62 from London to India. LR notes that her captain, thru 1864/65 was 'Atkinson', then, thru 1868/69 or 1869/70, W. Deane, & finally F. Gedye. The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') initially, i.e. from 1862 thru 1864, lists the vessel as Belvidere, but from 1865 thru 1872 lists the vessel as Belvidera, owned by John Allan or John H. Allan, of London (MNL of 1870 is here). Per MNL always of 685 tons. 152.5 ft. long, signal letters PWFT.
LR of 1871/72 notes that the vessel had been 'Wrecked'. On Nov. 07, 1871, per line 1634 here, the ship, stated to be of 685 tons, was wrecked at Pondicherry (now Puducherry, E. coast of India, then a French colonial settlement), while en route from Madras, now Chennai, India, to Pondicherry with an unstated cargo. Crew of 24 - none lost. Then owned by John H. Allan. The loss is modestly referred to in this newspaper article - as Belvidere - which tells us that the vessel was lost in a cyclone. The loss is also referenced many times at 'Trove', Australia, generally as Belvidere, all noting 'wrecked at Madras'. Some crew lists are available here. Can you add anything additional? #2082

3 Frances
489 later 490/490 (N/G) tons

28169
1860

A wooden barque which was, I read, launched on Jun. 29, 1860 & first registered (scroll to #28169), at Dartmouth, on Aug. 18, 1860. Per 1 (image). The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1861/62 thru 1892/93, owned thru 1887/88 by Hurrell & Co. (from 1876/77 R. Hurrell, from 1885/86 J. & F. Hill, & in 1887/88 F. W. & J. H. Hill), all of Salcombe, Devon. The names of 'Hurrell' & 'Hill' seem to be closely related. Frances was clearly, however, per Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') initially registered, thru 1864, at Dartmouth. Per MNLs, the vessel was registered at Salcombe & owned from 1867 thru 1883 (MNLs of 1870 & 1880) by Robert Hurrell of Kingsbridge, Devon (later of Buckland Tout Saints, Devon) & from 1884 thru 1887 (MNL of 1887) by John Hurrell Hill, of Powderham Villa, Salcombe. Under 'Hurrell' ownership the vessel served India ex Sunderland thru 1863/64, thereafter, thru 1870/71, from London incl. i) to Ceylon, now Sri Lanka (from 1866/67 thru 1868/69), & ii) to Singapore (in 1869/70 & 1870/71). From 1871/72 thru 1873/74, service from Liverpool to South America is LR referenced. Captains? Hill, F. Hill or F. W. Hill served as the vessel's captain from 1861/62 thru 1880/81 & in 1882/83 & 1883/84. Randle or C. (Charles) Randle is reported to have been the vessel's captain in parts of 1880/81 & 1881/82 & in 1885/86 & 1886/87. My apologies for the collective above text - the data is most complicated.
In 1887/88 LR reports that W. Barrett had become the vessel's owner, which name is clarified by MNL of 1888 to mean William Barrett of Sailors' Home, Swansea, Wales.
In or about 1887 the vessel was sold to owners from Norway. The vessel is last MNL listed in 1888 (no longer U.K. registered). The new Norwegian owner was T. Henrichsen, of Arendal, Norway, who sold her in 1890 to S. Allum of Drammen, Norway. H. Henrichsen was her captain thru 1891/92 & 'Eriksen' in 1892/93. S. Allum means, I learn, Simon Allum, who in 1891/92 owned just 2 vessels, i.e. this vessel & also Dorothy (also built by William Briggs, in 1861, & covered below).
137.0 ft. long, a poop deck 42 ft. long, & a short forecastle of 8 ft., signal letters PVHT.
Operational details re the vessel are limited. In that regard the webmaster needs help - from anyone who has a copy of 'Sea Breezes' Vol. 23/24 of 1957. The vessel is referenced on pages 155 & 235 in such volume. Only a 'snippet' of the text can be WWW viewed. Sea Breezes in part tells us - 'The Frances was a wood barque of 490 tons, built in 1860 by Briggs at Sunderland for Robert Hurrell and Company of Kingsbridge, Devon. The Frances was employed trading to the Cape & East Indies for about 15 years and then became a general trader, going where suitable freights .... In 1883 he (Who?) went into partnership with his brother and bought the barque from Hurrell. In 1887 the Frances was sold to T. Henrichsen of Arendal, Norway, who resold her in 1890 to Simon Allum of Drammen.' That is as much as I was able to glean with some effort. The complete articles would help greatly. I read that in Dec. 1885 Charles Randle, then 24 years old, was the vessel's captain (as noted above) & that on Dec. 14, 1885, 'somewhere off the coast of Ceylon' his wife (Florence Eliza Hawke) gave birth to a son, named Archie Ceylon Randle. You can read about him here.
On Mar. 03, 1893, a Lloyd's report was published which stated as follows - 'The Norwegian barque Frances, from Sunderland for Santos, was abandoned and afterwards sank. Crew landed at Grimsby'. Santos is today's São Paulo, Brazil. Many Frances crew lists are available. See also here re masters & owners of the vessel thru 1881. Can you add anything additional? #2086

4   Rifleman
346 tons

28370
1860

A wooden barque, which was, I read, launched on Mar 8, 1860 & first registered (scroll to #28370), at London, on Mar. 19, 1860. Per 1 ('wrecksite.eu'), 2 (Report of Court of Inquiry), 3 (House of Commons papers, Vol. 75, published in 1877). The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1860/61 thru 1876/77, & owned thru 1872/73 by 'Shepherd' of London - per the Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') of 1865 thru 1872, 'J. Shepherd'. (MNL of 1870). With Jean, later Lean, serving as the vessel's captain thru 1864/65, then Parson, later G. Parson, so serving from 1864/65 thru 1872/73. For initial service from Sunderland to the West Indies, but from 1861/62 thru 1872/73 always ex London i) to China in 1861/62, ii) to the West Indies in 1862/63 & 1863/64, iii) to Japan from 1864/65 thru 1869/70, & iv) to Mauritius in 1870/71 & 1871/72.
In 1872/73, per LR, the vessel became owned by Suart & Simpson, of London, with 'Little' serving as the vessel's captain, per LR for the balance of the vessel's life. Thru 1873/74, the last year for which LR listed intended voyages, the vessel served the West Indies, ex London. In 1876/77, LR rather lists G. S. Simpson, of London, as the vessel's then owner. MNLs of 1874 thru 1876 name Geo. S. Simpson as her owner (MNL of 1874). LR of 1877/78 advises that the vessel had been 'Burnt'. From 1875/76, LR listed the vessel at 347 tons - MNL had so recorded from 1865. 120.0 ft. long, signal letters PWFH.
On Jan. 13, 1877, Rifleman left London for Demerera (Guyana, N. coast of South America) with a general cargo & a crew of 12 all told & arrived at Demerera on Mar. 05, 1877. She was then owned by G. S. Simpson & three others. She there loaded a cargo of sugar, rum, cocoa-nuts & cocoa-nut beans for her return voyage to either London or Liverpool (both are referenced), leaving Demerara on Apl. 11, 1877 (or maybe on Apl. 16, 1877). On the afternoon of Apl. 25, 1877 the vessel was at 26.06N/55W, about 1,750 miles due E. of the S. Florida coast, & about 700 miles NE of the U.S. Virgin Islands. Three crewmen were in the forepeak of the vessel, which contained about 2 tons of coal, 2 water tanks etc. The forepeak was separated from the cargo of rum by a bulkhead of 1 in. boards. A fire broke out in the forepeak. All possible efforts were made to contain the fire, but it could not be extinguished & over the course of the next day, 4 explosions took place of increasing intensity. Soon after 9 a.m. on Apl. 26, 1877 the crew took to two ship's boats, & witnessed the vessel sink at about 1 a.m. on Apl. 27, 1877. One boat made the island of St. Kitts on May 07, 1877 after 20 days at sea; the other (with the captain aboard), was found by Star of the West, a brigantine, on Apl. 30, 1877 & its six occupants were landed back at Demerera. So there was no loss of life. The loss was the subject of a Court of Inquiry, held at London, whose 'pdf' report can be read here. All of the crew attended the Inquiry except for the three crew members who had been in the forepeak. They had joined another vessel & had left the country. To cut a long story short, after hearing all of the evidence, the Court concluded that the 3 crewmen must have been trying to get at the rum stored behind the bulkhead & inadvertently started the fire. The master was held not to be at blame - the Report seems not, however, to name him, but link 3 does - Kennedy. This contemporary newspaper article tells us that the captain's name was, in fact, 'Scott'. Many crew lists are available here. Can you add anything additional? #2090

5   Royal Sovereign
324 tons

28799
1860

A wooden barque which was, I read, launched on Oct. 16, 1860 & first registered (scroll to #28799), at Sunderland, on Oct. 29, 1860. The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1861/62 thru 1870/71, always owned by 'Collingwood' of Sunderland, with 'Dale' always her captain. For continued service ex Sunderland, specifically to New York in 1861/62. I note that there was an earlier vessel of the name, built at Sunderland in 1848, also owned by 'Collingwood'. Marwood's North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5, in Mar. 1854 data, lists that earlier vessel as being then owned by Jas. W. Collingwood of Sunderland. It seems likely that 'Collingwood' sold his earlier vessel named Royal Sovereign, & gave that name to a replacement vessel, also built at Sunderland, site listed here. A puzzle is that the Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') records the vessel thru 1864 only. And that only one crew list is available, that of 1864. LR of 1870/71, however, notes that the vessel had been 'Wrecked'. The first link above notes that advice re the vessel's loss had been received on Dec. 12, 1870.
That is all I can tell you about the vessel. So far I have found no other references either to the vessel or to the vessel's loss. 113.0 ft. long. Can you add anything additional? #2091

6   Skimmer of the Waves
396, later 392/410 tons

28435
1860

A wooden barque which had a very long life. It was, I read, launched on Feb. 23, 1860 & first registered (scroll to #28435), at Sunderland, on Apl. 02, 1860. The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1861/62 thru 1888/89, owned thru 1880/81 by 'Thompson' of Sunderland, 'J. Thompson' from 1876/77. The Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') of many years thru 1868 clarify the owner's name as meaning J. and J. Thompson (MNL of 1865), from 1870 John Thompson (also per Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1874 & MNL of 1880), in both cases of Saw Mills, Sunderland. With 'Hammond' serving as the vessel's captain thru 1867/68, R. (Robert) Gouch (often spelled 'Goouch' incl. here) thereafter thru 1879/80, & E. Lackey (maybe Lackeye) from 1880/81. 'Lackey', per LR, remained the vessel's captain for the balance of the vessel's lifetime. The vessel, owned by Thompson, served ex Sunderland to i) India (in 1861/62 & 1862/63), ii) Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) (in 1867/68 & 1868/69) & iii) Cape of Good Hope ('CGH'), South Africa, (from 1871/72 thru 1873/74). The vessel served CGH ex London in 1869/70 & otherwise served ex London or Sunderland. In 1881/82, per LR, the vessel became registered at Dundee, Scotland, & owned by D. Bruce & Co. of Dundee - David Bruce per MNLs of 1882 thru 1893, the last year in which the vessel is MNL listed. (D. Bruce per Turnbull's Register of 1884). LRs of 1887/88 & 1888/89 note that the vessel was then a hulk.
128.0 ft. long, signal letters PWKN, crew lists thru 1880 are available via this page.
Such operational history as I was able to find. i) On Oct. 10, 1860 the vessel encountered a heavy gale en route to Mauritius. ii) On May 16, 1861 the vessel was en route from Mauritius to London. iii) On Aug. 31, 1873, the vessel put into Melbourne for repairs (1 & 2), ex New York (left May 14, 1873, Gooch in command) en route to Dunedin, New Zealand. The vessel's chief officer is stated to have suffered the fracture of several ribs in a hurricane encountered en route. On Sep. 25, 1873 the vessel was cleared for Auckland via Dunedin & Wellington. It left Auckland for New York on Dec. 14, 1873 with a cargo that included kauri gum. iv) The vessel arrived at Melbourne on Dec. 29, 1875 ex New York (left Sep. 07, 1875. Gooch in command) with a varied cargo that included 5,000 cases of kerosene. On Jan. 17, 1876 the vessel left for Melbourne for Launceston, Tasmania, in ballast & there loaded 1,346 bales of wool, 90 tons of bark, tin etc. for London, in a cargo valued at £27,968. It arrived at Gravesend, London, on Jun. 29, 1876. v) On Oct. 16, 1877, the vessel arrived at Newport, Wales, with 400 loads of pit-props ex Bordeaux, France. It left Newport for Colombo, Ceylon, on Oct. 25, 1877, with 560 tons of coal. vi) On Aug. 18, 1878 the vessel arrived at St. Helena ex Tuticorin (now Thoothukudi, Tamil Nadu, India), en route to London. vii) On Mar. 23, 1878 the vessel arrived at Colombo ex Newport. viii) A report in Dutch from St. Helena, dated Mar. 29, 1879 (reported Apl. 21, 1879), seems to state that the vessel landed 12 crew members of Batavia (built 1877 at Quebec, Canada) at Mauritius, further that three Batavia crew members had drowned in the Mar. 06, 1879 wreck. The survivors of Batavia had, I learn, been rescued by Sunbeam, an American barque, & presumably were later transferred to Skimmer of the Waves. ix) On Jul. 14, 1880 the vessel arrived at London ex Colombo. x) The vessel arrived at Penarth Dock, Cardiff, on Aug. 25, 1880 ex London in ballast. It left for St. Johns, Newfoundland, on Sep. 02, 1880 with 550 tons of coal. xi) As stated above, LR notes the vessel was a hulk from 1887/88. Now it might be expected that the vessel would have been hulked at Dundee. But it would seem to have been rather hulked at St. Johns, Newfoundland. Per this article. I read (on page 25 here) that in early 1898, Cabot Steam Whaling Co. Ltd., both Norwegian & Newfoundland owned, established a whaling station at Snook's Arm, Notre Dame Bay, Newfoundland, & relative thereto bought the Skimmer of the Waves hulk from 'Dundee Arctic Fisheries', the only Scottish whaling company involved in the Newfoundland sealing industry. To carry equipment men & stores to the construction site. I presume that 'Dundee Arctic Fisheries' must have been owned by David Bruce. I cannot tell you when the hulk was broken up.
Can you add anything additional or correct the above? #2095

7 Tetuan
435, later 438 tons

28381
1860

A wooden barque which was, I read, launched on Mar. 23, 1860 & first registered (scroll to #28381), at Sunderland, on Apl. 20, 1860. The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1860/61 thru 1889/90 at least (LR of 1890/91 is not available to the webmaster) & per LR was owned thru 1874/5 by 'J. de Abrca' of Santander, Spain. Now it is a pleasure, when researching a vessel's history, to find extensive data already WWW available. In that regard, do visit 'vidamaritima.com' which fine site does not wish to be Google translated into English, which extensively covers the vessel's Spanish history & has provided the image of the vessel, available at left. The vessel was, as stated above, first registered at Sunderland & at that time was granted Official Number #28381. 129.0 ft. long, later (1874/75) 132.9 ft., later (1889/90) 131.0 ft. long, signal letters WBTQ. It would seem that the vessel was modified, by Briggs it would seem, in or about 1874.
The origin of the vessel's name is of interest. I read that the vessel was, in fact, built for Messrs 'Abarca, Seminario and Plasencia' of Santander, intended for trade into the Pacific Ocean. 'Plasencia', correctly Don Antonio Plasencia, named the vessel Tetuan, to honour the then new peace between Spain & Morocco. Spain had declared war upon Morocco in 1859 & such war came to an end with the Spanish victory at the Battle of Tétouan on Feb. 04 or 06, 1860. Such battle was the subject of a much later (1962) lithograph by Salvador Dali entitled 'The Battle of Tétouan' (A, & B ex C). Tétouan is a major north Moroccan seaport city. It would seem that in 1867 at least there was a Spanish Ironclad of the same name - a print of such vessel, in the harbour at Havana, Cuba, was published on Mar. 23, 1867 in Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper. A major portion of such print can be seen here - ex a long expired e-Bay item thanks to eBay vendor allthingsbrooklyn.
My apologies! I digressed from the subject at hand! The vessel was first registered at Santander on May 11, 1860. Under Spanish ownership, the vessel served, per LR, from Sunderland to Spain thru 1863/64, then ex London, & from 1868/69 thru 1872/73 from Liverpool to Havana. Per LR, 'A. Plasnua' served as her captain thru 1864/65, then 'Ansoleaga' thru 1874/75. 'A. Plasnua' should correctly be, I read, Don Antonio Plasencia, & 'Ansoleaga' should correctly be Caledonio de Ansola. Link 1 however tells us that the vessel's first voyage ex Santander was not to or back to Sunderland but was, rather, to Havana & onwards to Valparaiso, Chile, under the command of Plasencia. On Nov. 06, 1861 (may well mean 1860), the vessel arrived at Santander ex Guayaquil, Ecuador, with a cargo of cocoa. It would seem that the vessel also traded regularly to the Far East, particularly to the Philippines & to Hong Kong. The vessel suffered no damage when a major storm hit Manila Bay, the Philippines, on Sep. 26, 1865. In or about 1874/75, the vessel became owned by C. H. Stewart of London, as is confirmed by Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') of 1876 thru 1880, which clarify the vessel's then owner as being Chas. H. Stewart. With, per LR, 'J. Gavine' & then 'Barlow' as captains (their exact years of service are LR confusing). In or about 1881, J. (John) Palmer jun., also of London, became the vessel's owner thru to about 1887 (MNLs of 1882 & 1887). With 'Hyne' (thru 1883/84 at least) then 'Roper' (thru 1888/89 per LR), serving as her captain. The vessel is not listed in MNL of 1888, when, per LR of 1887/88, the vessel was registered at Shanghai, China, & owned by F. Burchardi. 'Burchardi' would seem to have been from Hamburg, Germany. I say that because LR of 1888/89 has the vessel registered at Hamburg & owned by F. A. Burchardi. Ownership soon changed again. LR of 1889/90 tells us that the vessel was again registered at Shanghai & owned by P. V. Grant, which name is clarified by MNLs of 1889 & 1890 to mean Peter Ventnor Grant, of Shanghai. With 'Brown' serving as the vessel's captain. The vessel is not recorded in MNL of 1891.
The webmaster tried, without success, to find significant operational data re the vessel - other than a voyage ex Swansea, Wales, on Jan. 18, 1881, to Santos (São Paulo, Brazil), with a cargo of coal. Possibly 'Daubert' (a new name) in command. I do not know what finally happened to Tetuan, in or about 1891. Can you add anything additional? #2098

8   Victory
595 tons

29396

Cinco Hermanos
1860

In assembling this site, the webmaster has access to two master lists of vessels built at Sunderland. Both of such lists include Victory AND Cinco Hermanus (with a 'u'), each of 595 tons, both built by Briggs in 1860. It seems quite clear that Victory only became Cinco Hermanos in or about 1864 when sold to Spanish owners. I cannot explain how events of 1864 could have so affected the 1860 records.
The vessel, thru 1863/64 a ship & thereafter a barque, was, I read, launched on Jul. 19, 1860 & first registered (scroll to 29396) at London on Mar. 28, 1861. A long delay, or errors in the data? The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1861/62 thru 1864/65 as Victory & from 1864/65 thru 1885/86 as Cinco Hermanos.
Victory would seem to have been initially owned by Briggs & Sons, registered at London & captained by W. (William) Briggs. LR refers to its intended voyages as being from Sunderland to Australia in 1861/62 & 1862/63. So far as I can see, the vessel made one voyage only to Australia, its maiden voyage in fact, which departed London on Apl. 18, 1861 bound for Adelaide, South Australia (arrived Jul. 25, 1861, 96 days) under the command of William Briggs. It stayed in Australia what seems to be a long time, maybe searching for a return cargo - it left Adelaide for London only on Dec. 06, 1861, put in at Table Bay, South Africa, on Feb. 20, 1862 for medical aid, left again for London on Feb. 26, 1861 & arrived back at London on Apl. 23, 1862, 137 days out from Adelaide. The time in Australia would seem to have been eventful for William Briggs, her captain. On Sep. 08, 1861, the horse he was riding to the port, distracted apparently by a dead pig in the road, threw him off. His leg caught in the stirrup, he was dragged nearly a hundred yards & ended up unconscious on the road. His condition was initially thought to be precarious, but even though he suffered a concussion, a week later he was on his way to recovery. On Nov. 05, 1861, William got married, to Elizabeth Gibb, of Queenstown, Adelaide. The vessel made a short voyage to Port Wakefield, N. of Adelaide, there loading 2,210 bales of wool. It returned to Adelaide, and, with Mrs. Briggs on board of course, left for London on Dec. 6, 1861. In 1862/63, per LR, the vessel, became registered at Sunderland & owned by H. Craven of Sunderland. Now the Mercantile Navy List of 1865 lists her owner as being H. Craven Fulwell, of Sunderland, which words lack, I believe, a comma - there is a place called Fulwell in Sunderland. So H. Craven. Under 'Craven' ownership the vessel is LR noted as serving China ex London with L. Moon serving as her captain.
LR of 1864/65 records that the vessel had been sold, to 'Magurequi e Hijo' (& Sons) of Bilbao, Spain, & renamed, with 'Ormaechea' serving as her captain. Who served a long term as her captain it would seem - per LR he was still her captain in 1885/86. When Spanish owned, the vessel traded ex Liverpool, to the West Indies in 1864/65 & thereafter thru 1873/74 to Manila, the Philippines. Alas, I am not able to locate any later data about the vessel, which ceased to be LR listed in 1886/87. I suspect that we need additional data from Spanish sources. 146.0 ft. long, signal letters QFLR. Crew lists of Victory are available for just two years i.e. 1863 & 1864. Can you add anything additional? #2099

9   Dorothy
441 or 442/442 (N/G) tons

29792
1861

A wooden barque which was launched on Jul. 06, 1861 & first registered, at London, on Jul. 16, 1861 (scroll to #29792). Per 1 ('sjohistorie.no' data, am unable to provide a 'Google' translation link). The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1861/62 thru 1894/95, at least - LR of 1895/96 is not available to the webmaster. The vessel is not recorded in LR of 1896/97. LRs from 1881/82 refer to 'W. Briggs & Sons' as her builders.
The vessel was initially, thru 1886/87, owned by 'Suart' of London - Suart & Co. thru 1875/76, Suart & Simpson from 1876/77 (if you ignore the likely error of 'Stuart & Co.' from 1863/64 thru 1866/67). For service from Sunderland to India, but from 1862/63 for service ex London to India, thereafter ex London to i) the West Indies (1863/66), ii) India (1866/68), iii) West Indies again (1868/74). The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') of 1865 lists Stuart V. Simpson as her then, likely managing, owner. MNLs of 1867 thru 1875 all list William Simpson, of London, as her then owner (MNL of 1870). The equivalent lists of 1876 thru 1888 all record Geo. Suart Simpson, of London as her owner (MNL of 1880). Per LR, the vessel became of 442 tons in 1876/77, but MNL always recorded such tonnage. Under Suart etc. ownership, the vessel, per LR, had a number of captains - B. or R. Bruce thru 1868/69, J. Corrigall thru 1871/72, & P. Inkster thereafter thru to 1886/87. LR of 1887/88 advises that Mrs. A. Owens, of Swansea, Wales, had become her owner with J. Owens her manager & L. Riordean her captain. MNL of 1889, however, lists the vessel, now registered at Swansea, as owned by James William Evans of Swansea. The vessel must soon after have been sold, since MNL of 1890 does not list the vessel (no longer U.K. registered) while LR of 1889/90 advises that the vessel's then owner was C. L. Alumn, of Drammen, Norway, with J. Rabe her captain. LR of 1892/93 records S. (Simon) Allum, also of Drammen, as her owner, while LR of 1894/95 records H. J. Larsen, of Lillesand, Norway, with N. Gundersen replacing Rabe as the vessel's captain from 1892/93. Link 1 tells us that Hans Jørgen Larsen & others were the vessel's owners from 1895 & that the captains names were J. Raabe from 1889 to 1893 & Nicolai Gundersen in 1894 & 1895. 134.5 ft. long, signal letters QHDC.
The webmaster has had only modest success in finding data re the operational history of the vessel. On Jul. 27, 1876 it was reported (in red) that Verbena (there were two vessels of the name at the time, one of them built in Sunderland in 1856) ran into Dorothy of London, most likely 'our' Dorothy, & both suffered significant damage as a result. Dorothy was en route from Demerera (Guyana, N. coast of S. America) to London at the time. Verbena put into Plymouth while Dorothy also entered Plymouth but in her case under tow by Bywell Castle. On 4 occasions from Jul. 1890 thru Mar. 1891 the vessel passed signalling stations at Swansea Bay & at the Mumbles, both near Cardiff. Per link 1 (thanks!) :- a) in 1891, the vessel was remodeled or rebuilt at the Fevik iron shipbuilding yard 'for regning O. S. Wingaard of Kristiansand' which translates as 'at the expense of O. S. Wingaard of Kristiansand'. Not sure of the meaning of those words. b) the vessel was repaired in 1893. What finally happened to the vessel? Re such matter link 1 tells us that in 1895 the vessel was 'Solgt til København - avrigget' - i.e. sold to Copenhagen, Denmark, but the meaning of 'avrigget' is unclear - means 'rigged' or 'the rig'. Can you add to or clarify any of the above? #2083

10   Eleanor
433 tons

43966
1861

A wooden barque which was launched on Oct. 19, 1861 & first registered, at London, on Nov. 15, 1861 (scroll to #43966). It is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1861/62 thru 1885/86 & owned, thru 1879/80, by J. Shepherd (J. Shepherd & Co. from 1876/77) of London. With four captains during the period of 'Shepherd' ownership, i.e. Silk or T. Silk thru 1868/69, T. Maxwell thru 1872/73, G. Jobson thru 1876/77 & Langlois thru 1879/80. The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') of 1865 lists J. Shepherd & Co., of London, as the vessel's then owner, while MNLs from 1867 thru 1879 list J. Shepherd (MNL of 1870). The vessel is not recorded in MNL of 1880, the vessel no longer being British owned, rather owned, per LR of 1879/80 thru 1881/82 by 'Mercadé' of Le Havre, France, with Courle serving as the vessel's captain. The vessel's name was not changed. From 1882/83 thru 1885/86, 'Marcadet' of Le Havre is listed as the vessel's owner with 'Tahé' serving as her captain. 135.0 ft. long, signal letters TRFB.
Now LR reported intended voyages thru to the 1873/74 edition. The vessel's initial service was, per LR, from Sunderland to India (thru 1864/65) & thereafter always ex London, to i) Japan (in 1865/66 & 1866/67 & from 1869/70 thru 1871/72), ii) Amoy (Xiamen, China, in 1867/68), & iii) Singapore (in 1868/69 & in 1872/73 & 1873/74). I have tried to find operational references to the vessel but found only one - that on Jul. 09, 1869 the vessel left London for Amoy with Silk in command.
Many crew lists, thru 1879, are available here. The vessel is not recorded in LR after 1885/86. I cannot yet tell you what happened to the vessel nor when. Do be in touch should you be able to add to or correct the above? #2100

11   Eunice
321 tons

29309
1861

A wooden barque which was launched in May 1861 & first registered, at Aberystwyth, Wales, on Jun. 19, 1861 (scroll to #29309). It is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1861/62 thru 1864/65 only, listed (incorrectly I believe) as built by Reed rather than Briggs, registered at Aberystwyth, owned by Lewis & Co. & captained by D. (David) Lewis. Two lists of Sunderland built vessels both reference W. Briggs as the builder. I read that Jenkin Jones became the vessel's captain from Mar. 19, 1866. The Mercantile Navy List of 1865 lists Lewis Lewis of Llanrhystyd as her then owner. For service from Sunderland to the Cape of Good Hope, South Africa, thru 1863/64 & from London to Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) in 1864/65. The only reference I have found re the vessel is that, likely in or about Jul. 1866, Eunice en route from Newport, Wales, to Antigua, West Indies, assisted in putting out a fire aboard Gitanella, a barque en route from Swansea, Wales, to St. Jago de Cuba, presumably with a cargo of coal. As per this newspaper article. (It would seem that such vessel was correctly Gitanilla, ON 51167, built in 1865 at Sunderland by Robert Thompson Jun.) 108.0 ft. long, signal letters QFCV.
The first link above advises us that the vessel had been lost as per an advice dated Nov. 10, 1866. I have not been able to find when she was lost nor the circumstances. Can you tell us what exactly happened & when or otherwise add anything? A couple of crew lists are available here. See here also. #2096

12   Matilda
386 tons

43977
1861

A wooden barque which was launched in Sep. 1861 & first registered, at London, on Dec. 04, 1861 (scroll to #43977). It is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1861/62 thru 1868/69. With no captain name referenced. Owned for that entire period, per LR, by Hankey & Co. of London, for service from London to the West Indies. LR of 1868/69 notes that the vessel had been 'Lost'. 127.3 ft. long.
That whole LR record is quite a puzzle. Why? Because the vessel was, in fact, lost back in Jan. 1862. On Jan. 18, 1862, per line 2068 here, the 386 ton barque was stranded at Guadeloupe while en route from Sunderland to Port Louis (NW Grande Terre, Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles, Caribbean) with a cargo of coal. Crew of 15 - none lost. Then owned by George Hankey. Can you tell us the circumstances of the vessel's loss or otherwise add anything? #2084

13 Harriette Wardle
252 later 214 tons

44461

Harriett Wardle
Harriet Wardle
1862

A wooden brig. Per 1 (inquiry into 1888 grounding). 103.5 ft. long, signal letters TVGB. Built for J. Wardle ('Wardle'), of Sunderland. The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Register available to him from 'Google' books, thru 1889/90 - see left. The vessel's name was changed, by 1864, from Harriette Wardle to Harriett Wardle, i.e. the final 'e' on 'Harriette' was dropped. No later Register name change thru 1889/90. In 1866/67, Wardle sold the vessel to 'Shepherd & Co.', of London, later recorded as 'J. Shepherd & Co.' - James Shepherd. At that time, the vessel was modified slightly - it became 104.4 ft. in length. In 1883/84, the vessel became owned by 'T. G. Robins', later 'T. G. Robins & Co.', registered at London. On Sep. 21, 1888, the vessel, then owned 50/50 by 'Thomas G. Robins' ('Robins') & 'George Godfrey', both of Guernsey, Robins being the managing owner, ran aground at Reikslakt, Dago, (an Estonian island also known as Hiiumaa). In the Baltic, N. of the Gulf of Riga. She had sailed from the Tyne, with a cargo of 340 tons of coal, under the command of Robert Crawley with a crew of 9 all told. An unnamed schooner became involved in the vessel's salvage, & for a fee of 1/4 of the value of ship & cargo (60 or 70 tons of coal were discharged), floated the vessel, which was then sailed to Kertel. Major damage was apparent. The vessel then proceeded to Aho, where her bilge & keel plates were repaired. I cannot place Kertel & Aho, but they are both likely on Dago island. After repairs were completed, the vessel proceeded to Rafso, Finland, loaded a cargo of deals & battens & reached Guernsey on Jan. 23, 1889. The later Inquiry determined that the grounding was due to the Captain's 'reckless navigation' & 'subsequent utter disregard for time, distance, and soundings'. His master's certificate was suspended for 4 months during which time it was recommended that he be granted a mate's certificate. A puzzle is that the Inquiry names the vessel Harriet Wardle, i.e. one 't' only. The exact location was not stated - at about 58.25N/22.50E, however. I have no Lloyd's Registers after 1889/90 so the later changes of ownership, etc., are unknown to the webmaster. However, the Mercantile Navy List of 1900 states the then managing owner of the 214 ton vessel to be Charles Earl of South Shields. It would seem, however, that the ship may still have been in existence in 1901. It certainly was! Judy Hill has kindly been in touch to provide a census report for the vessel which was at Portsmouth, Hampshire, on the appropriate day i.e. Mar. 31, 1901. She then had a crew of 8 with Joseph Avitt, age 52, of Robin Hood's Bay, her master. As you can read here (1 & 2). Thanks Judy! The register was closed in 1903. Need help!

14   Macedon
496 tons

44115
1862

A wooden barque which was launched on Oct. 24, 1862 & first registered, at Bristol, on Nov. 14, 1862 (scroll to #44115). Macedon? An ancient Kingdom dating from the 7th or 8th centuries BC, centred on the plains W. of The Gulf of Salonica, today in NW Greece. The origins of Alexander the Great. Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1862/63 thru 1885/86, the vessel was initially registered at Bristol & owned by W. Brass, which owner name is clarified by Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') of 1865 thru 1872 to mean Wm. Brass, of Reigate, Surrey. With Summerfield serving as the vessel's captain. For service from Sunderland to China (in 1862/63 & 1863/64), from London to Ceylon (now Sri Lanka, in 1870/71 & 1871/72), & otherwise ex London. In 1872/73 the vessel became both owned & captained by W. F. Hodge, of Falmouth, Cornwall, for service from London i) in 1872/73 to Karachi (now Pakistan) & ii) in 1873/74 to Rangoon, Burma. MNLs of 1874 thru 1879 state her owner to be Wm. F. Hodge of Devoran, Cornwall. In 1879/80, but only for a brief period, the vessel became owned by J. Cairns of Greenock, Scotland, i.e. John Cairns per MNL of 1880. In 1880/81, per LR, C. Fergus, also of Greenock, became the vessel's owner - Charles Fergus per MNL of 1882. While Greenock owned, J. Evans per LR served as the vessel's captain. The vessel is not listed in MNL of 1883, having been sold to Norwegian owners, LR stated to be H. Petterson, who also served as the vessel's captain. No change of name, it would appear. No port of registry within Norway is LR indicated. The vessel's last LR listing is in 1885/86. 137.5 ft. long, signal letters TRQW. Crew lists are available including many lists held in Bristol.
I have tried to find operational data about the vessel. But found only a couple of references to Macedon passing the Lizard signal station. I found nothing about what finally happened to her. Can you tell us what happened to the vessel & when or otherwise add anything? #2101

15   Medusa
848 tons,
later 818/866,
later 833/860 tons

44844
1862

A wooden ship (later a barque) which was launched on Apl. 15, 1862 & first registered, at London, on Apl. 22, 1862 (scroll to #44844). And survived for over 36 years being abandoned at sea in 1898. 'Briggs' clearly built a most sturdy ship! Per 1 (data in Norwegian, 'KulturNav.org'), 2 (Norwegian data, 'digitalmuseum.org'). The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1861/62 thru 1898/99. For the first 25 years of its life, the vessel was owned by 'Allan' of London - 'Allan & Sons' thru 1875/76, 'J. Allan & Sons', thereafter. With, per LR, just three captains thru that period i.e. S. Plant thru 1869/70, 'Flindell' thru 1878/79, Roberts or J. H. Roberts thru 1885/86. The Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') clarify the owners names to mean John Allan (in 1865), John H. Allan from 1867 thru 1882 (MNL of 1870) & Henry H. Allan from 1883 thru 1885, all of London. Now LR records intended voyages thru 1873/74 only. In such period the vessel served India i) ex Sunderland from 1861/62 thru 1863/64 & ii) ex London in later years thru 1873/74.
The vessel is not recorded in MNL of 1887 having been sold to T. F. Andorsen, of Mandal (southernmost Norway, W. of Kristiansand [Oslo]). From 1892/93, LR notes the owner had become Actieselsk "Medusa" (T. F. [or J. F.] Andorsen). And from that date had become a barque. During its Norwegian ownership period, the vessel had two captains i.e. E. Oxholm, Jr. soon E. Oxholm thru 1894/95 at least, & H. J. Hansen from 1896/97 at least.
It would seem that the vessel must have been, per LR, modified a couple of times. Its initial length was 161.0 ft., later 168.9 ft. in 1886/87 (818/866 tons) & 171.2 ft. in 1892/93 (833/860 tons). Signal letters TWRL, later JDWG.
There were many vessels of the name & identifying operational detail for this particular Medusa is difficult. I could find virtually no data during its 'Allan' years. But the following, I think, relate to 'our' vessel. i) On Dec. 03, 1868, the vessel left Cardiff, Wales, for Copenhagen, Denmark, with a cargo of coal. ii) Late in May 1886 the vessel left Cardiff, for Cape Verde with a cargo of coal. iii) On Oct. 25, 1886, when the vessel was at South Dock, Swansea, Wales, a Medusa sailor fell from the main yard & died from his injuries. iv) on Jul. 04, 1887, the vessel landed at Bristol, timber & deals ex Pensacola, Florida, U.S.A. v) On Jul. 22, 1867 the vessel was entered out at Newport, Wales, for Rio de Janeiro ('Rio') with 1,170 tons of coal. vi) On Jun. 29, 1889, the vessel arrived at South Dock, Swansea, with timber ex Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada vii) On Jul. 27, 1889, the vessel was again entered out from Swansea for Rio with coal, Oxholm in command. ix) On May 26, 1893 the vessel left Newport for Para (Brazil?), Oxholm in command. It would seem that the vessel had been under tow heading from Portsmouth into Newport. Also x) On Sep. 28, 1896 a Swedish owned barque of the name was towed into the outer roads at Holyhead (Anglesey, N. Wales), with damage to her port bow 'apparently' caused by a collision, & having lost parts of her masts & sails. She had encountered a major storm while en route from Ardrossan, Scotland, to the Baltic with a cargo of phosphate (3 & 4). Was it 'our' Medusa? I suspect so since I have not spotted a Swedish barque of the name at that time.
Links 1 & 2 above refer in Norwegian to the vessel's final destiny as being (in translation) '25/4 Darien - Grimsby. Timber load (pitch pine). Leaky. Dismasted. Abandoned in 1898. Wreck was seen by several ships in May-June in the North Atlantic'. From the 'Indianapolis News' of May 20, 1898 - 'It is feared that the crew of twenty men of the Norwegian bark Medusa has been drowned. She sailed from Darien, Ga. (Georgia U.S.A.), on April 25, for Grimsby (Lincolnshire, U.K.) under command of Captain Hansen. On May 12 the waterlogged and abandoned hulk of the bark was passed in latitude 34.02 and longitude 72.04 by the schooner Susie M. Plummer.' Can you correct the above or add anything additional? #2102

16   Rosalie
349, later 349/357 (N/G) tons

45380

Manuela
Rosalie

1862

A wooden barque which was launched on Sep. 26, 1862 & first registered, at Liverpool, on Oct. 24, 1862 (scroll to #45380). It is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1862/63 thru 1886/87. LR of 1862/63 first advises that the vessel was owned by J. Wood of Liverpool, with 'McGuffie' serving as the vessel's captain, for service from Sunderland to the West Indies. It secondly advises that the vessel, renamed Manuela, had become owned by 'Echevarra', of Havana, Cuba, with 'Labrador' serving as the vessel's captain. 'Echevarra' owned the vessel thru 1879/80, for service ex Sunderland thru 1865/66, & ex Liverpool thereafter to i) the West Indies in 1866/67 & ii) to Havana, thru 1873/74. 'Naveran' took over the captaincy from 1866/67 thru 1873/74, then 'Aquirre' thru 1875/76 & 'R. Guardiola' thru 1879/80. All per LR. In 1879/80 per LR, the vessel, now of 349/357 (N/G) tons, became owned by 'G. G. Mcandr'w' of Liverpool, as the renamed Rosalie. Such new owner's name is clarified by Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') of 1880 thru 1884 to mean George G. Macandrew of Tower Buildings, Liverpool. 'Naile' served as the vessel's captain under 'Macandrew' ownership at least thru 1883/84 (LR of 1884/85 is not available to the webmaster). LR of 1885/86 lists the vessel as then owned by Calder Shipping Co. Ltd., also of Liverpool, with T. Barker her captain. LR of 1886/87 confirms the 'Calder' ownership but adds the name of A. Inkster & Co., presumably the vessel's managers. MNL of 1885 confirms that the vessel's owners were 'The Calder Shipping Co. Ltd.', of Irwell Chambers, Liverpool. 123.0 ft. long, signal letters SPDJ.
LR of 1886/87 notes that the vessel had been 'LOST'. Thanks to the folks at 'Welsh Newspapers Online', I have found this reference to a British barque named Rosalie, en route from Bremerhaven, Germany, to the Mumbles (Swansea Bay, Wales), in ballast, run down & sunk by an unknown vessel. As advised by Lloyd's on Jan. 06, 1886. Maybe in the English Channel. The reference notes that nine of her crew had been drowned. And that Henry Ranch had been saved. I cannot tell you who Henry Ranch was. It seems clear that this referred to 'our' Rosalie, since only one barque of the name was LR or MNL listed at the time. Many crew lists are available here, including, it would seem, lists from the period when the vessel was named Manuela. Can you tell us anything additional? #2108

17   Trafalgar
293 tons

44464
1862

A wooden barque which was launched on Mar. 15, 1862 & first registered, at Sunderland, on Apl. 04, 1862 (scroll to #44464). The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1861/62 thru 1881/82 & for many of those years, thru 1872/73, was owned by 'Collingwood' of Sunderland. With J. Hart noted to be her captain thru 1863/64 & J. Hall thereafter thru 1875/76. The Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') clarify such owner names. MNL of 1865 lists J. W. Collingwood, of Sunderland, as the vessel's then owner, while MNL of 1867 rather states A. J. Collingwood. MNLs of 1868 thru 1872 (at least) list Mrs. A. J. Collingwood. During the period of 'Collingwood' ownership, per LR, the vessel served the Mediterranean ex Sunderland in 1861/62, 1862/63, 1870/71 & 1871/72. It served China ex Sunderland in the period of 1863/64 thru 1865/66. In 1866/67 the vessel served the West Indies ex the Clyde, & in 1867/68 & 1868/69 served the Mediterranean, again ex the Clyde. The vessel served South America ex Sunderland in 1869/70.
From 1873/74 thru 1880/81, per LR, the vessel was owned by 'Golightly' of Sunderland - Golightly & Co. thru 1875/76 & G. Golightly & Co. thereafter. MNLs of 1874 thru 1880 list George Golightly of Southwick, Durham, as the vessel's then owner thru 1875, & in the years of 1876 thru 1880 rather of East Bolden, near Sunderland. Turnbull's Register of 1874 lists her then shareholders as being J. Golightly of Sunderland & G. Golightly of Southwick, each with 32 shares. 'Lockwood' per LR, served (from 1875/76) as the vessel's captain under 'Golightly' ownership. Crew lists thru 1880 are available here.
It would seem that in or about 1880 or 1881, the vessel was sold to non-British owners & thereupon ceased to be MNL listed. LR of 1881/82 provides no owner name but does tell us that the vessel had become registered in Sweden. The vessel is not listed in LR of 1882/83, at least not as Trafalgar, but may well be listed there under a different name. 103.5 ft. long, signal letters TVGF. Can you tell us the name of her new Swedish owners and/or advise us what later happened to the vessel? #2112

18   Bentuther
306 or 307 tons

45908
1863

A wooden barque which was launched on Apl. 17, 1863 & first registered, at Liverpool, on Apl. 28, 1863 (scroll to #45908). Bentuther is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1862/63 thru 1883/84 (306 tons to 1874/75, 307 tons thereafter) & for its entire lifetime it was owned, per LR, by 'Sproat' & registered at Liverpool - Sproat Bros. thru 1881/82 & then J. Sproat. With, per LR, many captains, i.e. 'Hannah' thru 1864/65 or 1865/66, 'Conning' or J. Conning (LR reports the name confusingly) thru 1873/74, G. Halliday thru 1876/77, 'Milligan' thru 1880/81 & J. Clachrie thereafter. 'Miller', was her captain when the vessel was lost in early 1884. LR reports her intended voyages as being i) to India ex Sunderland (in 1862/63 & 1863/64) ii) ex London in 1864/65, iii) from Shields to Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) from 1865/66 thru 1867/68, iv) from London to Malabar (the SW coast of India) in the period of 1868/69 thru 1872/73, & v) from London to Valparaiso, Chile, in 1873/74. On a voyage from Liverpool to Callao, Peru, in early 1879, one seaman was reported with scurvy. On Sep. 27, 1880, the vessel arrived at Rio de Janeiro ex Cardiff with a cargo of coal, Jones in command. 113.0 ft. long, signal letters VGHM.
The Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') report her ownership (307 tons from 1865) rather differently, but always registered at Liverpool. From 1865 thru 1868, MNL reports the vessel as being named Benluther (amended to Bentuther from 1870), & owned from 1865 thru 1872 by James Conning of Kirkcudbright, Scotland. In 1874 & 1875, MNL lists Dr. J. Sproat, also of Kirkcudbright, as her then owner. MNLs of 1876 thru 1883 (MNL of 1880) list Jas. Sproat of Kirkcudbright as her owner & in 1884 Jas. Sproat of Brunswick St., Liverpool. It would seem likely that Conning & Sproat were in partnership along some portion of the period.
LR of 1883/84 notes that the vessel had been 'Wrecked'. In late Dec. 1883, the vessel, under the command of Captain Miller, was en route from Le Havre, France, to Liverpool, in ballast & with a crew of ten all told. At 1 or 1:30 a.m. in the morning of Jan. 02, 1884, the vessel struck Grassholm Rocks (a then unlit, uninhabited island located about 8 miles off the coast of Pembrokeshire, Wales, the most westernmost point on the Welsh coast). Off the 'Smalls'. The vessel was bumping heavily on the rocks & launching a ship's boat was considered to be impossible. Fortunately the ship's jibboom hung above a rock on shore & by means of ropes the crew all managed to escape the vessel via such route, many of them badly bumped & bruised as a result. Captain Miller was the last to leave & as he did so the ship capsized. Tilly, a ketch came by in the afternoon of that day (I think), took the crew aboard & landed them at nearby Milford Haven. On Jan. 04, 1884, the Lloyd's report re her loss was published (in red). Two contemporary newspaper reports (A & B). Crew lists thru 1883 are available here. Can you add  to or correct the above? #2115

19   Seabird
333 later 334/339 (N/G) tons

44540
1863

A wooden barque which has many inconsistencies in the recording of its data. Two lists of Sunderland built ships name the vessel Seabird - a name that is consistently recorded in Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') from 1864 thru 1882. However Lloyd's Registers ('LR') of 1863/64 thru 1873/74 rather list the vessel as Sea Bird, & record Seabird only in 1874/75 & thereafter. The vessel was clearly first registered at Sunderland on May 19, 1863 (scroll to #44540) which is a further puzzle since the vessel would appear to have been launched in Dec. 1862. MNLs from 1872 list the vessel as built in 1863, while LR always lists her as 1862 built, as do the two Sunderland build lists. Since she was first registered in 1863, I have accepted that year as being correct. There are further anomalies in the available ownership data.
So I will advise what I know & have read.
The vessel is LR listed from 1863/64 thru 1882/83. LR advises that thru 1868/69 the vessel was owned by Parker & Co. of Sunderland, for service from Sunderland to China with W. Steward serving as the vessel's captain. MNLs of 1865 thru 1875 record T. Parker of Monkwearmouth, Sunderland, as the vessel's owner. Now readers may be interested to know that Thomas Parker, of Sunderland, earlier owned a vessel of a similar name i.e. Sea Bird of 1839. In 1868/69, per LR, the vessel became owned by 'Holmes' of Sunderland, 'H. Holmes' from 1871/72, for service from Falmouth, Devon, to China (in 1868/69 thru 1870/71), & to the West Indies ex i) Cork, Ireland, (in 1871/72) & ii) Cardiff, Wales (in 1872/73 at least). With 'Martyn' serving as her captain thru 1871/72 & R. Dodd thru 1874/75. MNLs do not refer to an owner named Holmes. I can now see why though the data creates some further confusion. Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1874 lists a 382 ton barque named Seabird, built in 1864 & registered at Sunderland & owned by Thos. Parker (48 shares) & Henry Holmes (21 shares). Which numbers do not add up to the normal 64 shares. In 1874/75, per LR, R. Croft & Co., of Liverpool, became the vessel's owner with G. E. Trigg her captain. MNL does not refer to 'Croft' either but does, in 1876 list Wm. H. Rowan (a name not LR referenced), of Liverpool, as her then owner. In 1876/77, per LR, R. J. Swyny, of Liverpool, became the vessel's owner with 'T. Kearon' her captain thru 1880/81, 'E. Bryne' thru 1882/83 & finally 'Martin'. MNLs of 1878 thru 1882 list Richard J. Swyny, of Fenwick Court, Liverpool, as her owners (MNL of 1880 is here). 110.0 ft. long, signal letters TVMG.
LR of 1882/83 notes that the vessel had 'Stranded'. I have not yet spotted what specifically happened to her or when or where. Can any site visitor help with such data, or add to or correct the above? Many crew lists thru 1882 can be accessed via this site. #2109

20   Alexandria
481 (later 497) tons

Catalina
1864

A wooden barque, 142.3 ft. long, later 139.7 ft. The record for this vessel is confusing indeed. It was launched on May 05, 1864 & was owned, per Lloyd's Registers ('LR') of 1863/64 thru 1866/67 by 'Wood & S' of Liverpool, for service from Sunderland to the West Indies. With 'McGuffie' her captain. So far as I can see, the vessel was not issued an Official Number, which is most unusual. LR of 1866/67 advises that the vessel had been renamed Catalina, & become owned by Afabfesser of Havana, Cuba, for service ex Sunderland (thru 1867/68) & then from Liverpool to the West Indies. The vessel continued to be LR listed thru 1881/82, still owned by Afabfesser, with just one captain thru that entire Afabfesser period - Guardiola. With no reference to its prior name. The vessel is not recorded in LR of 1882/83 nor in the following years & I thought that the vessel must have been lost in some way. But ... searching for a later vessel of the name, I have spotted that this vessel is again recorded in LR, from 1891/92 at least (LR of 1890/91 is not available to the webmaster) thru 1896/97 (but not in 1897/98), now of 497 tons & with signal letters HGBT, owned by Jané & Co. of Barcelona, Spain, from 1893/94 M. Jané. With 3 captains in that period i.e. Roig, Ferrara & J. Ferreras (but could it be that Ferrara & Ferreras were one & the same person). The vessel, previously 142.3 ft. long, was during such period recorded at 139.7 ft. only. Some further 'confusion'. I note that the vessel is recorded, from 1876 thru 1897 in the 'Record of American & Foreign Shipping' & the 'American Lloyd's Record of American & Foreign Shipping'. With quite different data than that recorded in LR. The vessel's owner is there listed as Bosq & O, becoming J. Borch & Co. & from 1886 Romulo Bosch, all of Barcelona. With, in time sequence, J. Ferran, Goredo, Bengorrhea, Goredo again, Bengorrhea again, & Garriga her captains. Do check my captain detail at Mystic Seaport & for expanded data. The webmaster is not aware what finally happened to the vessel nor when. Can you tell us? Or add anything additional? #2150

21   John Allan
734 tons

48742
1426 (Castellammare, Italy)

San Francisco
1864

A wooden ship, later a barque, which was launched on Apl. 06, 1864 & first registered, at London, on Apl. 21, 1864 (scroll to #48742). 159.1 ft. long, signal letters VWCK. The vessel is listed in Lloyd's Register ('LR') from 1864/65 thru 1889/90 at least - LR of 1890/91 is not available to the webmaster.  The vessel was initially owned, thru 1885/86, by J. Allan of London, from 1876/77 J. H. Allan, for service to India, ex Sunderland (in 1864/65) & ex London thereafter. With J. Horne, per LR, her captain thru 1878/79 (J. A. Horne, I believe) & then 'Mabbit' until ownership changed in 1885/86. There seems to have been some early confusion as to the owner's name despite the vessel name. The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') of 1865 lists John Allan & Sons, of London, as the vessel's then owner, while MNLs of 1866 thru 1870 list John H. Allen (with an 'e') before reverting to John H. Allan (with an 'a') thru 1882 & Henry H. Allan from 1883. (MNLs of 1870, 1880 & 1885). The vessel is not listed in MNL of 1887. For your interest ... The webmaster has seen just one reference to 'John Allan & Sons', re the Board of Trade Inquiry, in 1866, into the loss of Countess of Ripon, (ON 48548, built in Hull in 1863) described as an Indian emigrant ship. That vessel, on its final voyage, carried a cargo of rice & 408 or 508 coolie emigrants from Calcutta (now Kolkata, India) to work the sugar plantations of St. Vincent, Grenada & Demerera until it was lost, near Barbados, on Jan. 21, 1866. Such service may or may not be representative of the activities of John Allan & Sons. It would be good to learn more about the company.
LR of 1885/86 first records that the vessel i) had been renamed San Francisco, ii) had become owned by M. Lubrano & iii) was registered at Marseilles, France. And then lists the vessel, now a barque, as owned by Lubrano Bros. of Castellammare di Stabia ('Stabia'), which is in Italy, located about 19 miles SE of Naples. And registered at Stabia. As is confirmed by 'Registro Italiano' of 1886. There would seem to have been many ship owners named Lubrano - LR of 1891/92 lists 11 such owners, 9 living in Stabia & 2 in Marseilles. Lubrano Bros. continued to own the vessel, per LR, thru 1889/90 at least. With L. Genuto (in 1885/86 & 1887), & L. Scotto (thereafter), serving as the vessel's captain. San Francisco is listed in 'Record of American & Foreign Shipping', from 1886 thru 1890 with L. Scotto her captain. The webmaster does not yet know what finally happened to San Francisco nor when, though likely in late 1890 or in 1891. If you have that data, do consider advising the webmaster for inclusion here. Many John Allan crew lists, thru 1883, are available here. #2155

22 Silver Craig
322 tons

50272
1864

A wooden barque. 117.3 ft. long, signal letters WHLK, not Miramar listed. The vessel was launched on Jul. 05, 1864 & first registered, at Liverpool, on Jul. 22, 1864 (scroll to #50272). It would seem that the vessel was earlier intended to be named Ailsa Craig. Silver Craig is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1864/65 thru 1880/81, always owned by 'Sproat' & registered at Liverpool (J. Sproat from 1876/77). For service thru 1866/67 from Sunderland to Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), from Liverpool to South America during the period of 1867/68 thru 1869/70 & in 1873/74, & otherwise ex Liverpool. LR did not report such data after 1873/74. The Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') of 1865 thru 1872 (1870 is here) list James Sproat Brothers, of Kircudbright (Kircudbrightshire, Scotland, on N. side of the Solway Firth), as her then owners. MNLs of 1874 & 1875 list D. & J. Sproat as the vessel's owners, while MNLs of 1876 thru 1880 list Jas. Sproat, all of Kircudbright. LR reports a number of captains over the years - Baker thru 1867/68, Currie thru 1870/71, D. Phillips thru 1873/74, Hunter thru 1876/77, Murdoch thru 1879/80 & R. Mainland from 1879/80.
A single operational detail. On May 15, 1870, while en route from Islay (Inner Hebrides, Scotland) to Pernambuco, Brazil, Captain Cohu (possibly Cohn) in command, something unusual was spotted on Rocas Reef, 160 miles NE of Natal, Brazil. The vessel ended up rescuing from such reef 6 seamen, the sole survivors of Mercurius (of Liverpool), marooned on the coral reef for 51 days. The Mercurius captain, Captain Cuthbertson, & 15 other crew members were not so fortunate. The six had reached shore & survived in large part due to 2 water tanks, part of the wreckage of Duncan Dunbar which had been wrecked on the reef on Oct. 07, 1865. Such tanks, found on the sands, fortunately contained fresh drinking water, otherwise unavailable on the reef. Silver Craig later landed the 6 at Liverpool. As per these (A & B) newspaper reports, amended as necessary. A 37 page account of the experiences of those 6 survivors is to be found at page 408 in 'Shipwrecks and Disasters' by W. H. G. Kingston, published in 1875 - a Google book available here. The story was also published in many other places incl. 'Sea Breezes' in 1924.
I learn that on Nov. 07, 1880, Silver Craig ran aground & was lost on Seca Island, off Port Polonio, Uruguay. I have also read that it was rather lost at Rasa Island, further that it must have later been floated off since it was towed to Maldonado, Uruguay, by Norsmann, a steamer owned by a submarine cable company. A Naval Court of Inquiry into her loss was held at Montevideo on Dec. 31, 1880. The court concluded (in red) that the vessel's loss was caused by an error of judgment of her master. His name? It would be good to be able to access the Inquiry's full report. The vessel would seem to have sailed on Sep. 01, 1880 from Liverpool for Montevideo with a general cargo. This page, the source of the image at left (thanks!), tells us that the London Times of Nov. 11, 1880 reported that the vessel was ashore at Polonio & 'cannot be saved'. Is there anything you can add? #2158

23 Varuna
489 (later 512) tons

58075
1867

A wooden barque. 144.2 ft. long, signal letters RCWF, not Miramar listed. The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Register available to him from Google Books, thru 1889/90, but the vessel is not recorded in the 1889/90 edition. It certainly is listed in the 1898/99 edition. See left. The vessel was initially registered to Briggs & Co. of Sunderland, but soon was owned by 'M. Amsinck', of Hamburg, Germany, maybe for 'M. G. Amsinck', as recorded in the 1876/77 & later register editions. For trade to Singapore, it would seem. In 1880, under the command of Captain E. H. Koopmann (or Koppmann), the vessel sailed from the English Channel to Valparaiso, Chile, in 112 days. In 1880/81, the vessel made the reverse journey, under Captain J. Goettsche, in 103 days. In 1883, the vessel was sold to 'H. Bauer', of Rostock, Germany, i.e. Heinrich Bauer. I am advised that the vessel was later sold to other Rostock owners, specifically in 1892, to 'W. Maack', & in 1895 to 'Ed. Burchard'. In the 1898/99 edition, the owner was Paul Lüthgens, also her captain, of Rostock. In 1899, the vessel was sold to 'P. L. Hogstedt' of Oscarshamn, SE Sweden, as is recorded, I am advised, in the 1899/1900 edition of Lloyd's Register. What later happened to the vessel is not known, either to the webmaster or to Dr. Ottfried Thümmel, of Germany, who suggested the vessel's inclusion here & has kindly provided much of the detailed data. The very first voyage of Ottfried's great-uncle, at age 16, was aboard the vessel, in 1897/98, from London to Sweden & on to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, & back. Ottfried has provided the names of many who served as the vessel's master over the years. I have been unable to find other WWW data about the vessel. Its final disposition? Silke Brandt has been in contact to suggest (thanks Silke!) that a wooden barque listed as Verona (Varuna) was lost off the coast of South Africa in 1902. As per this page. Could it possibly be related? Need help!

24   Bethany
359/375 (N/G) tons

62560
1870

Bethany, a barque which was launched on Jan. 13, 1870, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1869/70 thru 1877/78. It was first registered, at Sunderland, on Feb. 17, 1870. Owned by Richardson & Co. (my translation of the LR contraction), of Sunderland, thru both 1874/75 & 1875/76. For service from Sunderland to the Mediterranean thru 1872/73 & from the Clyde to the West Indies in 1873/74.
The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') records Bethany as Sunderland registered in both 1874 & 1875 - with Robert Richardson, of Amble, Northumberland, her (presumably managing) owner. Now the vessel is recorded in Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1874 with her then shareholders stated as being R. Richardson, W. E. Melrose & Ann Duncan, all of Amble, & W. S. Schollar, of Bridlington, Yorkshire. With, respectively, 16, 16, 8 & 8 shares each (which quantities do not add up to the required 64 shares).
The vessel was clearly sold along the way. LRs of 1874/75 & 1875/76, & onwards thru 1877/78, record Bethany as Sydney registered & owned by J. G. Punch. MNLs of 1876 & 1877 clarify the owner's name - i.e. John G. Punch of Sydney, News South Wales, Australia. An Australian Ship Registry page for the vessel is available. Alas, the webmaster's old eyes cannot read every detail but it would seem that the 'G' in the owner's name meant 'Greenwray', & that he owned all 64 shares in the vessel. The Register seems to refer to 'Punch' being the vessel's captain until Feb. 05, 1876, when James Beedell (? spelling) became her master.
I note that every LR edition records G. Benbow as serving as the vessel's captain.
127.0 ft. long, signal letters JLRV, crew lists thru 1874 are available via this page.
Bethany's service while Australian owned - thanks to 'Trove'. I read that Mr. Punch had bought the vessel in London. It presumably left London for Mauritius since on Oct. 29, 1875 the vessel left Mauritius for Sydney with a cargo of sugar. It encountered severe weather en route & a portion of its cargo - 669 bags that ended up damaged - were sold at a Sydney public auction on Jan. 05, 1876. On Feb. 13, 1876, the vessel, 'Biddell' said to be in command, left Sydney for Shanghai, China, with 584 tons of coal. In its final voyage, which would appear to have been from Hong Kong to New York, U.S.A., Bethany carried silks & teas stated to be valued at 500,000 dollars. But it foundered near Cape May (S. of Atlantic City, New Jersey). I read that the weather made the launch of any ship's boats impossible. And that the brave Chief Officer, 'Scott' his name, swam to shore with a line. And presumably via that line the crew were all rescued. Some contemporary reports - 1 & 2.
So, on Mar. 09, 1877, Bethany, registered at Sydney & owned by J. G. Punch, en route from Hong Kong to New York with a general cargo & under the command of W. J. Beedell (should be Biddell), was lost at Hereford Inlet, 4 miles N. of Cape May, on the New Jersey, U.S.A. coast. Per this U.K. Government 1877 wreck listing page. No lives were lost. The ship & cargo was insured. I have also read that the vessel foundered on Two Mile Beach, near Wildwood, & was rather carrying $600,000 of porcelain. LR of 1877/78 notes that the vessel had been 'Wrecked'. I hope in due course, to be able to locate additional detail about the loss circumstances. But the help of any site visitor, in that regard, would be welcomed.
Can you tell us anything additional? Or correct the above text in any way. #2888

25   Bride
830/855 (N/G) tons

62603

Hugo
1870

A composite (wooden planks on an iron frame) ship, later a barque. 189.4 ft. long, signal letters WQGS, later MDNC, later WBJG, later JCWK, not Miramar listed. The vessel, which was likely launched on Oct. 11, 1870 & was first registered, at Sunderland, on Nov. 10, 1870 (scroll to #62603), is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1871/72 thru 1910/11 at least, though many LR editions during such period are not available to the webmaster. It was initially owned by W. Briggs & Sons of Sunderland, thru 1871/72, though the Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') of 1871 lists Robert Scott Briggs of Sunderland as her then owner or managing owner. Her captain, thru 1872/73 per LR was 'J. Hendrsn', presumably J. Henderson, for service from Sunderland to India in 1870/71 & thereafter, thru 1873/74, for service from London to India.
From 1871/72 thru 1885/86, the vessel was London registered & owned by the 'Allan' or Allen' family. LRs report J. Allan initially as her owner, becoming J. H. Allen (or Allan) & later, from 1883/84, J. H. Allan & Co. MNL records J. H. Allan from 1872 thru 1882 (1880 is here), & from 1883 thru 1887, Henry H. Allan, all of London. During the period of 'Allan' ownership, LR records 'Gedye' (from 1880/81 F. Gedye) as the vessel's captain thru 1883/84 & 'Cornwall' her captain in 1885/86.
In 1886 or 1887, the vessel was sold to C. (Carl) Rahtkens, of Rostock, Germany, who owned the vessel (MDNC) thru 1891/92. 'Rahtkens' would seem to have re-rigged the vessel as a barque, from 1889/90 per LR. From 1889/90 thru 1891/92, F. Pagels is stated to have served as the vessel's captain.
In 1891/92 the vessel, renamed Hugo, became owned by J. (Joh) Boysen of Xiansand (Kristiansand, i.e. Oslo), Norway, thru 1895 it would appear. In 1896/97, (from 1895 per next link below) G. T. Jörgensen, also of Xiansand, became the vessel's owner, thru 1905 at least. In 1904, certainly in 1908/09 per LR, 'Kr. Knudsen', of Xiansand, became the vessel's owner, thru 1908. Per LR, N. I. Ortiniussen (Corneliussen per next link) served as the vessel's captain from 1891/92 thru 1897/98 with H. C. Hansen her captain in both 1898/99 & 1899/1900.
This fine page (thanks!) clarifies much of the above data. It particularly advises us that the vessel, en route from Hudiksvall, Sweden, to Cape Town, South Africa, with a cargo of timber, stranded in the Øresund (the strait between Denmark & Sweden) on Aug. 6, 1901. It was refloated on Aug. 22, 1901 & had to be rebuilt as a result of the damage that it suffered. The vessel's service is described as 'Timber shipping on Canada's east coast La Plata'.
The vessel was sold in 1908 to owners from Uruguay, South America. LR of 1910/11 records Hugo as then owned by R. Melina of Montevideo, Uruguay. With T. Gantes her then captain. The webmaster notes that Hugo is not recorded in LR of 1914/15. Crew lists thru 1886 are available here.
But I read, ex a 'pdf' file ('skipsforlis1906') which does not reference Hugo, as follows:- '1910: 19.10: Slept inn til Key West som vrak. Kondemnert'. Which I believe translates into English as 'On Oct. 19, 1910, was towed to Key West, Florida, U.S.A. as a wreck. Condemned'. If you can add additional data about the vessel, do consider being in touch with the webmaster for inclusion of your data here. #2240


BRITISH SHIPBUILDERS LIMITED

Can you help with the history of this company?

G. BROAD

OF HYLTON

The webmaster includes this name solely as a result of seeing a reference to a tug that was said to have been broken up in 1928 by G. Broad, of Hylton. So G. Broad would appear to have been a ship breaking yard & may or may not have been a shipbuilder also - I just do not know.

The reference was from eBay in Mar. 2012, respecting a faded c1906 photo postcard of an iron paddle tug named Shah, 84 ft. 3 in. long, stated to have been built, in 1874, by John Readhead & Co. of South Shields, for Joseph Martin, of London, & sold a few years later, in 1878, to Goole & Hull Steam Towing Co., of Goole. The tug was further stated to have been sold again, in 1914, to George Alder of Middlesbrough, & renamed Dales Thorpe in 1916. The eBay item is now long gone, but for your interest, the listing image, adjusted for your better viewing, can be seen here.

All by way of an introduction to G. Broad. So ... can you tell us anything at all about G. Broad, of Hylton?

EDWARD BROWN

OF NORTH HYLTON

A shipbuilder that, so far as I can see, built 38 ships in the period of 1831 thru 1851.

1   Hartley
300/322, later 300 & 277 tons

2689
1836

A barque, later a snow or brig. The Lloyd's Register ('LR') record for Hartley leaves much to be desired. It is LR recorded from 1836/37 thru 1846/47, from 1849/50 thru 1855/56 & from 1866/67 thru 1871/72.
The vessel was advertised for sale, at London, in Jan. 1837, as per this advertisement (in red). It was owned, per LR thru 1839/40, by J. Panton, of Sunderland, for service from Sunderland to London.
In 1839/40, Laurie & Co., of London, became Hartley's owner for service, where indicated, of London to Africa. Their period of ownership was short however - in 1843/44, 'Hamilton' of London became the vessel's owner, for continued service from London to Africa. Then some LR silent years.
In 1849/50 & 1850/51, it would seem that 'Holderness' of Liverpool was the vessel's owner for service ex Liverpool. Sleddon & Co., also of Liverpool, owned the vessel in 1851/52 & maybe in 1852/53 also, per LR, for service from Liverpool to California, U.S.A.
Dunbar & Co., of Glasgow, is LR reported as the vessel's owner in 1853/54 for service from Liverpool to Valparaiso, Chile. They may well have owned the vessel in the 2 following years also.
Then many years of LR silence. However, Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1856 advises that Hartley, a snow, was then registered at Sunderland & owned by R. J. Brown of Sunderland. While Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 records John Fleming, of London, as the then owner of the 300 ton Sunderland registered snow.
The vessel was first LR listed as a brig (previously noted to be a barque) of 300 tons in 1866/67, where the owner's name was listed as Shearer & Co. of Ardrossan (Ayrshire, Scotland), but the name is deleted through, so presumably they were the prior but not the then current owners of the vessel. For service ex the Clyde it would seem. The LR record of 1867/68 thru 1871/72 is cryptic indeed, with no owner's name listed nor the vessel's dimensions then routinely recorded for all vessels.
The Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') are most helpful re the vessel's ownership & registry. They record Hartley as registered at Sunderland from 1857 thru 1860, at London from 1861 thru 1863, at Liverpool in 1864 & 1865, at Ardrossan from 1866 thru 1871. And at Sunderland again in 1872. In 1865 MNL lists E. S. Roberts, of London, as her then owner. In 1866 James Shearer of Ardrossan is her owner, but from 1867 thru 1871 (1870) Hugh Boyd, also of Ardrossan, is so listed. In 1872, per MNL, the vessel was owned by John Peterson, of Sunderland.
Signal letters HQFG, a number of crew lists are available via here.
Wikipedia records (thanks!) that on Oct. 11, 1872, Hartley, en route from Sunderland to Copenhagen, Denmark, was wrecked near Marstrand (N. of Gothenburg, Sweden). Further that her crew were all rescued. As is confirmed by line 2626 here. The vessel was carrying a cargo of coal & had a crew of 8 - none of whom were lost. Then owned by John Peterson. 'Lloyd's List' tells us that 'Oates' was in command at the time of the vessel's loss. As does this contemporary Shields newspaper report.
Can you add anything? #2692

2   Pomona
284 later 253 tons

2251
1836

A snow or brig. Pomona is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1837/38 thru 1871/72 & also in 1874/75.
It looks to be certain that 'Glaholm', of Newcastle, was the vessel's initial owner, thru 1847/48, with J. Smith serving as the vessel's captain throughout. For service ex Newcastle in 1839/40 & from Newcastle to the Mediterranean for the following years until 1846/47 & 1847/48 where service from Liverpool to Alexandria, Egypt, is noted. The vessel certainly, however, traded with Quebec, Canada, & Bathurst, New Brunswick, Canada, in its first 3 years in service thru 1838.
In 1848/49, per LR, Dixon & Co., of South Shields ('SS'), became the vessel's owner, thru 1853/54, with 'Johnston' serving as her captain. For service ex Shields, certainly to London in 1852/53 & 1853/54 & maybe earlier to Quebec, & to America. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9, in Jul. 1848 data, lists J. Watt & A. Dixon, of SS, as the then owners of the vessel with such owner names being clarified by Marwood's equivalent register of 1854/5, in 1854 data, which lists John Watt & Alexander Dixon as her then owners with James Johnston her then captain. In 1854/55 & 1855/56, the vessel was, per LR, owned by Tose & Co. of SS with W. Tose & then J. Taylor serving as her captains, for service from Shields to America.
In 1856/57, in which year Pomona was first LR listed at 253 tons, the vessel became owned by R. Jolly of SS & they owned it thru about 1871/72. With three captains, per LR - i.e. A. Carr thru 1858/59, J. Thompson thru 1860/61 & from 1861/62 thru 1871/72 A. Butcher. For consistent service ex Shields incl. to the Mediterranean & to the Baltic in 1861/62. And saw service as a Shields coaster. The vessel's ownership by 'Jolly', i.e. Robert Jolly, is confirmed by Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1856, by Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 & by many editions of Mercantile Navy List ('MNL'), certainly from 1865 thru 1871 (1870). LR of 1871/72 recorded 'Jolly' as the owner but then struck the name out.
It is clear, per MNLs of 1872 & 1874, that Jos. B. Bushell, of SS, had become Pomona's owner. There was one later ownership change per LR (but not by MNL). LR of 1874/75 lists J. L. Robson, of SS, as her then owner with R. J. Wilson her then captain.
85.9 ft. long, signal letters HNKB. Many Pomona crew lists are available via here.
What finally happened to the vessel? Line 285 on this page tells us that on Jul. 05, 1874, Pomona, en route from SS to Cronstadt (St. Petersburg, Russia), with a cargo of coal, ran into bad weather & became leaky. The crew became exhausted by trying to keep the incoming water under control & they had to abandon the vessel in a sinking state. In the Cattegat (Kattegat, the sea area N. of the Danish straits islands, that lie between Denmark & Sweden), 20 miles off the Nidigen Light. A crew of 9 - no lives were lost. This contemporary newspaper report tells us that the vessel was rather en route to Riga, Latvia, & state her then owner to be Charles Robson of SS. The crew abandoned ship at 11 p.m. & successfully made their way in ship's boats to Warburg (Varberg), Sweden (30 miles S. of Gothenburg).
Is there anything that you can add to or correct in the above text? #2654

3   Epsilon
207/217 later 190 tons

2409
1839

A snow or brig. Epsilon? The 5th letter of the Greek alphabet - from the ancient Greek. Epsilon, which was launched in Jan. 1839, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1839/40 thru 1857/58. It was initially owned, thru 1844/45, by 'WearShC' (Wear Shipping Company?) of Sunderland, for consistent service from Sunderland to London with 'McDonald' serving as the vessel's captain. Such data looks to be unreliable as to the end-date - the vessel was likely sold in 1842. I say that because this page (scroll to #2409) tells us that that the vessel was registered at Newcastle on Mar. 24, 1842.
In 1844/45, per LR, the vessel became owned by R. Soulsby of Blyth, as is confirmed by the North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9, in Jul. 1848 registered at Newcastle & owned by R. Soulsby & Co. of Blyth. It would seem, per LR, that 'Soulsby' owned the vessel for the rest of its lifetime, with J. Sample the vessel's captain from 1844/45 thru 1853/54 (except for 1851/52 when J. Holland so served), followed by 'Armstrong' in 1854/55, T. Constbl (Constable?) in 1855/56, & D. Williams in 1856/57 & 1857/58. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5, records Epsilon as Newcastle registered in Apl. 1854, owned by Robert Soulsby of Blyth, Edward Atkinson of Newcastle & J. Young of Bellingham, Northumberland, with J. Sample her then captain. Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1856 records the vessel as Shields registered & owned by R. Soulsby, E. Atkinson & J. Young, all of Blyth, while TR of 1855 essentially confirms such data with J. Armstrong then the vessel's captain. Actually the vessel is listed twice in TR of 1856, the second time registered at Newcastle & owned by R. Soulsby of Blyth, E. Atkinson of Newcastle & J. Young, of Bellingham.
Epsilon's service per LR while 'Soulsby' owned? From Blyth to Fécamp (Normandy, NE of Le Havre, France) in 1844/45, from Blyth to the Baltic in 1845/46 thru 1849/50, from Shields to i) Archangel, Russia, in 1851/52 & ii) London in 1852/53, from Newcastle to the Baltic in 1853/54, from Blyth to iii) Honfleur (mouth of River Seine), France, in 1854/55 & iv) France generally in 1855/56, & thereafter as a Blyth coaster.
What finally happened to the vessel? Wikipedia tells us (thanks!) that on Jan. 04, 1857 Absalom or Epsilon, a brig, foundered in the North Sea off Craster, Northumberland, with the loss of all hands while en route from South Shields to Havre de Grâce, France. Wiki also tells us, via the same link, that Espilon, on Jan. 04, 1857, foundered in the North Sea off Dunstanburgh Castle, Northumberland, with the loss of all hands. Clearly some confusion in the press as to the vessel's name. It is clear that in early Jan. 1857, massive gales with towering seas, high winds & snow storms, hit up & down the U.K. east coast. They lasted 3 or 4 days & were particularly savage on Jan. 03 & 04, 1857. Quite everywhere there were ships destroyed at sea, ships smashed on shore, & wreckage everywhere - & many drownings. Epsilon was a victim of that giant storm. On the morning of Jan. 04, 1857, Epsilon, en route to France with a cargo of coal, was off Craster, a fishing village a little to the S. of Dunstanburgh Castle & NE of Alnwick, both Northumberland. Driven near the beach, she was hit by heavy seas & in the sight of people on shore, just capsized & vanished. All 8 Epsilon crew members were drowned. Some data sources (1, 2 & 3) re the loss.
Of 190 tons from LR of 1856/57, no crew lists are available.
Is there anything you can add, or correct? #2487

4 Naomi
170/137 later 123 tons

24418
1846

A brigantine, later a schooner. The vessel, which was launched in Jun. 1846, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed, so far as I can see, from 1847/48 thru 1855/56, then a gap of many years, & then from 1874/75 thru 1876/77. The vessel was initially owned by S. Evans of Sunderland, for service from Sunderland to Rouen, France. In 1848/49, 'Saunders', also of Sunderland, became Naomi's owner for service as a Sunderland coaster. As is confirmed by the North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9 which notes that in Apl. 1848 her owner was B. Saunders of Bishopwearmouth, Sunderland.
From 1851/52 thru 1855/56, the vessel was, per LR, owned by J. Pyle of Sunderland, with J. Pyle serving as the vessel's captain. But beware! Marwood's North of England Maritime Directory of 1854 lists the Shields registered vessel as then owned by George Bird of South Shields with Zaccheus Baines her then captain. Naomi seems not to be listed in Turnbull's Shipping Registers of both 1855 & 1856, which register covers many NE ports.
Per the Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL'), the vessel was registered at London from 1857 thru 1864. From 1865 thru 1874 (1870), per MNL, the vessel, now of 123 tons, was registered at Colchester, Essex, & owned by W. E. Denton of Wivenhoe, Essex. LRs of 1874/75 & 1875/76 confirm that Naomi, now registered at Sunderland, was owned by 'Denton'. While LR of 1876/77 lists G. Lamb & Sons as her then owner. Which data is confirmed by MNLs of 1875 & 1876, which list the vessel, now a schooner, as owned by Friend Lamb of Sunderland & registered there. LR of 1876/77 notes that the vessel had been 'Wrecked'.
77.4 ft. long, signal letters NWQS. Some crew lists are available.
I can now tell you what happened to the vessel. A U.K. Government wrecklist report page, available here ex here, tells us that Naomi, under the command of R. Friend & with a crew of 4, was lost on Apl. 13, 1876 at Chapel, Lincolnshire. The vessel, owned by F. Lamb, was en route from Sandwich, Kent, to Sunderland, in ballast. Force 10 winds at the time, so in gale conditions. This contemporary new report (in red) states that the vessel was rather en route from Norwich & states further that her crew were all saved. Can you add to and/or correct the above text? #2466

5   Caroline Frances
148 tons
1847

The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1848/49 thru 1853/54 only. Always, per LR, owned by T. Wood of Sunderland, for service from Sunderland to the Baltic. With Marlbro' serving as the vessel's captain thru 1851/52 & Robson in 1852/53 & 1853/54. This article surely refers to the vessel's launch - on Jul. 14, 1847 at North Hylton. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9 lists Thomas Wood, of Monkwearmouth, as her then owner. The vessel is not listed in the equivalent register of 1854/5. On Feb. 07, 1848, a vessel of the name grounded but was got off. The vessel was not granted an Official Number so I presume that the vessel was not in existence on Jan. 01, 1855. The webmaster has not yet located data as to what happened to her & when. Can you tell us anything more? #2297

BROWN J. & J.

OF PALLION

A small shipbuilder that, so far as I can see, built just 7 ships in the period of 1860 thru 1862. Just two of those ships are so far detail listed below. The others are named with modest detail.

    George Stephenson
259 tons
28590
1860

A brig. Initially owned by J. & J. White of North Shields.

1   Chaturanga
350 later 334 tons

29257
1861

A barque. The vessel, which was launched on Jan. 26, 1861 & first registered, at Sunderland, on Feb. 27, 1861 (scroll to #29257) is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1861/62 thru 1871/72. It was owned initially by Hudson & Co. of Sunderland, with, per LR, R. Blyth serving as the vessel's captain thru 1865/66, Denton thereafter thru 1868/69 & J. Hardy thru 1870/71. For service from Sunderland to the West Indies thru 1862/63, from Shields to India in 1863/64 & 1864/65, ex Sunderland, maybe to India, in 1865/66, ex Sunderland and, from 1868/69 thru 1870/71, from Cardiff, Wales, to Singapore. I note, at Welsh Newspapers Online, that on Aug. 31, 1861 the vessel left Cardiff for Mauritius, Blyth in command, with 491 tons of coal. Did not spot any later (1868/69 thru 1870/71) references there to the vessel. The Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') of 1865 thru 1871 (1870 is here) all list Ralph M. Hudson, of Sunderland, as her then owner. LR of 1870/71 records Schollar & Co. of Blyth, as the new owner of the now 334 ton vessel, with W. Schollar serving as her captain. For service from Blyth to the Baltic. The vessel is not listed in MNL of 1872. LR of 1871/72 states 'Wrecked'. 114.5 ft. long, signal letters QDVK.
On Aug. 21, 1871, per line 1495 here, the 351 ton barque was stranded at Neckmannsground, while en route from Blyth to Cronstadt (St. Petersburg, Russia), with a cargo of coal. Crew of 11 - none lost. Then stated to have been owned by William E. Melrose. Ilkka Järvinen advises (thanks so much!) that Neckmannsground is located off the NW shores of Hiiumaa Island, Estonia, at the entrance to the Gulf of Finland. Can you add anything? #2151

2   Polly
362 tons

29711
1861

A barque which was launched on Jul. 10, 1861 & first registered, at Shields, on Jul. 18, 1861 (scroll to #29711). A launch announcement. The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1861/62 thru 1881/82, initially owned, per LR, by 'H. Weatly' of N. Shields, thru 1864/65, for service from Sunderland to the Mediterranean (in 1861/62) & for service from Shields to China thereafter. The owners clearly means H. Wheatley, who earlier possibly, recorded as John Wheatley, owned another vessel of the name, built at Sunderland in 1858. Per LR, G. Jack served as the vessel's captain during the period of 'Wheatley' ownership, indeed thru 1867/68.
In 1864/65, W. Coward of London became the vessel's owner for continued service from Shields to China thru 1867/68, for service from Bristol to Singapore in 1867/68 & for service from London to Algoa Bay, South Africa, from 1868/69 thru 1870/71. With a new captain taking over from Jack - J. Perherick or J. Petherek or J. Petherck as spelled in various editions of LR. The Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') of 1865 thru 1871 (1870 is here), all record the vessel as registered at London & owned by Wm. Coward of London.
In 1870/71, E. Wait of Bristol became the vessel's owner - per MNLs of 1872 thru 1876 Emanuel Wait. For continued service from London to Algoa Bay thru 1871/72 & from 1871/72 thru 1873/74 for service from Cork, Ireland, to Halifax, presumably the Nova Scotia, Canada, Halifax. With T. Jenkins her new captain thru 1873/74 & J. le Grealey from 1874/75 thru 1876/77 per LR. LRs of 1875/76 & 1876/77 list C. T. Bennett of London as the vessel's then owner. LR of 1877/78 is not available to the webmaster while LR editions from 1878/79 thru 1881/82 list no owner or captain names. 115.0 ft. long, later (from 1874/75) 116.5 ft., signal letters QGSP. Even though the vessel is LR listed thru 1881/82 it is not recorded in MNL from 1878. I presume that it had, likely in 1877, been lost or broken up. I cannot yet, however, tell you what finally happened to the vessel. Crew lists, thru 1876 are available here. Can you tell us more? #2164

    William Walker
245 tons
43743
1861

A brig. Initially owned by E. Bassett of Sunderland.

    Daisy
311 tons
44468
1862

A snow. Initially owned by Potts & Co. of Sunderland.

    Rosedale
459 tons
45380
Manuela
Rosalie
1862

A barque. Initially owned by J. Wood of Liverpool.

    Ruth
199 tons
44830
1862

A brig. The vessel's initial owner is not known to webmaster. Owned by Noah Glendinning of London from 1865.

BROWN & JOHNSON

OF SUNDERLAND

Can you help with the history of this shipbuilder? Most likely a very small ship builder indeed, & probably in business for a short period only.

1 Jessie Annandale
123 (but references to 127) tons

20177
1857

A 2 masted sailing vessel, a brigantine, which had a long life, indeed. Per 1 (extensive data - a 'Word' document provided by Roger Barrett), 2 (data, painting, Jessie Annandale), 3 (crew on Apl. 03, 1881, census day, 75% down). There used to be data re the vessel in the form of 'Notes' re the ship re the Garvey family of Wivenhoe, but the site & data is no longer available, it would seem. Data re the vessel is in Record Offices in both Colchester & Exeter, while the painting is at the 'Nottage Maritime Institute', of Wivenhoe Quay, Wivenhoe, Essex. The vessel is not listed at Miramar. The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Register available to him from 'Google' books, thru 1889/90 - see left. 87.5 or 88.7 ft. long, signal letters MWCD, crew of 5 in 1881, with woman's bust figurehead. Described 'as one of the fastest vessels on the coast'. Jessie Annandale was completed, in Aug. (or Oct.) 1857, for 'B. Balkwill', of Salcombe, Devon, which means 'B. Balkwill & Co.', i.e. a partnership. B. (Benjamin) Balkwill was presumably the managing owner but he then owned 4 shares only of the 70 shares that were issued (Robert H. Balkwill owned another 8 shares). The largest shareholder, with 48 shares, was William Annandale, ship owner, of Dodbroke (or Dodbrook), nr. Kingsbridge, Devon, hence the vessel name. Jessie Annandale? Catherine Wright has been in touch (thanks!) with extensive data about William Annandale. Catherine suggests that the ship would most likely have been named after William Annandale's first wife Jane, which name is often known as Jessie in Scotland. Her full message can be seen here. There would appear to have been an earlier vessel of the name (ref. in book published in 1854). In Dec. 1857 & in 1862, William Annandale sold all of his shares, many being acquired by George, James & Benjamin Balkwill. The vessel was registered at Salcombe, but it certainly was, in 1857 & 1859 at least, registered at Dartmouth, Devon (however Roger Barrett advises that Salcombe was a sub port of Dartmouth, until 1865, when Salcombe became a separate port of registry). The 1866/67 edition of Lloyd's seems to indicate that the vessel had been sold, but does not state to whom it was sold. 2 states that it was, in fact, sold to Abraham Harvey (i.e. Abraham David Harvey) ('Harvey') & James Husk of Wivenhoe, near Colchester, Essex, & registered at Colchester. The 1874/75 register indicates J. Husk alone to be the then owner. But by 1876/77 the vessel was owned by Harvey, who remained as owner thru 1889/90 at least. 2 advises us further, that in 1893 the vessel was sold to John Danby of West Hartlepool, & in 1898 to R. & W. Paul Ltd., of Ipswich, with the vessel remaining Colchester registered throughout. The vessel was apparently removed from the registers in 1909, the vessel, without masts & rigging, having become a storage hulk on the river Orwell, at Ipswich. The webmaster would welcome additional data, as would Roger Barrett, who provided much of the data recorded above, & is researching Salcombe based vessels.

BUCHANAN & GIBSON

Can you help with the history of this shipbuilder? A list of Sunderland built vessels, available to the webmaster, lists 25 vessels built by 'Buchanan & Gibson' in the period from 1845 thru 1852.

1   Clara Jane
168 later 156 tons

2039
1849

A snow or brig. The vessel, which was launched on Feb. 23, 1849 & first registered, at Shoreham, Sussex, on Mar. 19, 1849 (scroll to #2039), is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1850/51 thru 1862/63 only.
Per LR, Clara Jane was always owned by Gates & Co. of Shoreham, for service from Sunderland to Shoreham thru 1852/53, & as a Shoreham coaster from 1853/54 thru 1858/59. With 'Cheeseman' (my interpretation of the contracted name in LR) the vessel's captain from 1850/51 thru 1852/53, & W. Parsons from 1853/54 thru 1862/63.
A little operational history. At an unknown date in early Dec. 1850, the vessel was, apparently, in collision with a Blyth brig, off Flamborough Head it would seem, & suffered some damage as a result.
LRs of 1858/59 thru 1862/63 provide limited detail but still do record 'Gates' as Clara Jane's owner. The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL'), however, records that the vessel became registered at Whitby, Yorkshire, in 1858 (in 1857, actually, it would seem). Indeed MNLs of 1865 thru 1868 all record John Mills, of Robin Hood's Bay, Yorkshire, as the owner of the now 156 ton Whitby registered vessel.
Signal letters HMLV, crew lists only re 1868 are available.
What finally happened to the vessel? I read, here (in red), that in Feb. 1868, bound from London to Hartlepool, Clara Jane sprang a leak in heavy weather & was run on shore on the island of Borkum. Which island is located in the East Frisian Islands of NW Germany. Wikipedia advises that the vessel was lost on Feb. 12, 1868 - with confusion in the sources as to the vessel's name. In a report from Emden (NW Germany & close to Borkum Island), on Feb. 12, 1868, 'The Standard' of London reported on Feb. 17, 1868 - 'The Clara and Jenny (British brig) from London to Hartlepool, is reported lost on Borkum Island ; crew saved'. It would not suprise the webmaster to learn that the vessel was actually lost on Feb. 11, 1868.
Can you tell us anything additional? #2515

2   Luna
229 later 206 tons

22283
1850

Per this newspaper article, Luna, a snow, was launched, at Ayres Quay, Sunderland, on Jul. 09, 1850.
Luna is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1851/52 thru 1869/70 at least. The available LR edition of 1870/71 is, alas, missing many pages including the section which would cover Luna, which is not listed in LR of 1871/72. It is, however, a puzzle that the vessel was LR recorded thru 1869/70 at least because the vessel was surely lost late in 1863!
Luna was owned throughout by Carr & Co. of Sunderland (from 1860/61 J. Carr), for service always ex Sunderland. To the Baltic from 1851/52 thru 1853/54 & from 1860/61 thru 1869/70, & to London from 1854/55 thru 1859/60.
The North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5, in Mar. 1854 data, records Jas. Carr & Robt. Newton, both of Sunderland, as Luna's then owners, with Robt. Newton noted to be her then captain. Such owner names are confirmed by Turnbull's Shipping Registers of both 1855 & 1856 with the 1855 edition rather listing C. Henderson as her captain. Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 clarifies the owner names to mean James Carr & Robert Newton.
I note that R. Newton was, per LR, the vessel's captain thru 1859/60. Then 'Moffit' from 1860/61 thru 1863/64 & D. Brown from 1863/64.
An event in the life of the vessel. In the early hours of Jan. 11, 1854, Luna, with a cargo of coal & bound for London, was found abandoned & derelict - aground on the West Rocks at Wivenhoe, Essex, with 4 feet of water in her holds & with her rudder unshipped. The vessel was found by Scout, a HM Government cutter & by two smacks, the Prince of Orange & Kate. The crew of Luna had taken to ship's boats and were safely picked up. I read that Luna was not in fact lost - it was brought into the harbout at Wivenhoe. The webmaster has not read the circumstances of her stranding nor the name of Luna's captain at the time. But her captain was likely Robert Newton. This contemporary report relates.
88.5 ft. long, a crew list re 1863 is available via this link, the vessel became, per LR, of 206 tons in 1860/61.
The vessel is listed in the Merchant Navy List ('MNL') from 1857 thru 1864, but is not listed in MNL of 1865.
A site visitor advises (thanks!) that he has read elsewhere that Luna was abandoned, on Dec. 04, 1863, in a gale off the Outer Dowsing (a shoal located about 20 miles off the mouth of the Humber), while en route from Sunderland to London with a cargo of coal.
I learn that there were massive gales, maybe a hurricane, on the U.K. east coast in early Dec. 1863. Principally on Dec. 02 & 03, 1863. it would appear. Major damage was inflicted on the fishing fleets but many larger vessels, incl. Luna were also lost. Luna, en route to London with a cargo of coal, 'Brown' in command, was swept by heavy seas off the Outer Dowsing & became leaky to an extent that the pumps could not control. On Dec. 04, 1863, Violet, a smack, rescued the crew of Luna & landed them at Yarmouth. So no lives were lost but there were injuries. Luna was abandoned, off the Leman or Leman and Ower Lightship, located NE of Cromer, Norfolk. Sails etc, from the wreck of Luna were later landed. It would seem that at the time Luna was worth £2,000 & its cargo was worth £250. Per these contemporary news reports. - 1, & 2.
Can you tell us more? #2828

3   Martha
178/154 tons
1850

A schooner. The vessel, which was launched in Feb. 1850, is Lloyd's Register listed in 1850/51 & 1851/52 only. It was owned, per LR, by 'Peacock' of Sunderland for service from Sunderland to the Baltic, with E. Evans serving as the vessel's captain.
This page tells us, at line 2067, that on Sep. 29, 1852, en route from Sunderland to Portsmouth, Hampshire, with a cargo of coal, Martha foundered off Dimlington (N. of Spurn Head, E. Yorkshire, E. of Hull). Such date would seem to be in error. This (in red) newspaper article reported the loss - from Hull on Sep. 27, 1852 - & advised that 'Sharpe' was at the time, the vessel's captain. The crew were saved. I happily now find that the U.K. Government published another more detailed list of vessels lost in 1852, which list included Martha - here ex here. Which tells us, in an extensive report i) that Sharp, Richard Sharp it would appear, was then the vessel's captain & ii) that the crew were rescued by Engineer, a steamship, & landed at Hull.
Can you tell us anything additional? #2439

J. BURDON

Can you help with the history of this shipbuilder? A list of Sunderland built vessels, available to the webmaster, lists 37 vessels built by 'J. Burdon' in the period from 1818 thru 1833.

1   Echo
231 tons
1831

A snow or brig. Echo, which was launched in Oct. 1831, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1834 thru to 1850/51. It was, per LR, owned thru 1844/45 by T. Orwen of Sunderland, for consistent service from Sunderland to Archangel, Russia. With, per LR, T. Orwin (with an 'i') her initial captain, 'Sutherland' from 1834 thru 1839/40 & 'Smith' from 1839/40 thru 1844/45.
In 1844/45, per LR, Echo became owned by W. Herring of Sunderland. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9 lists the vessel, in Apl. 1848 data, as registered at Sunderland & owned by W. Herring, Jun., of Monkwearmouth, Sunderland. The vessel's service while 'Herring' owned? From Sunderland to St. Petersburg, Russia, in 1844/45, from Sunderland to the Baltic in the years from 1845/46 thru 1847/48, & from Sunderland to Archangel again in 1848/49 & 1849/50. LR records that J. Steel was the vessel's captain during the entire, per LR, 'Herring' ownership period.
The webmaster notes that the LR record in 1850/51 is limited. Which suggests that the vessel may have been lost or possibly was in process of sale.
It would seem that 'Steel' was the vessel's master from early Jan. 1844 thru to Dec. 1851.
There are a great many references to Echo with 'Steel' in command. Just a few of them. i) On Mar. 25, 1844, the vessel left Sunderland for Miramichi, New Brunswick, Canada. ii) On Aug. 24, 1844, the vessel was entered out for departure from Shields for Cronstadt (near St. Petersburg, Russia). It returned to Southampton on Oct. 05, 1844. iii) In May 1846 the vessel returned, to Shields I think it was, from Windau (Ventspils, Latvia), with a cargo of timber. iv) Voyages to Archangel & to Hamburg, Germany. v) On Aug. 21, 1854, the vessel arrived at Cardiff, Wales, ex Gloucester. vi) The vessel left Sunderland for Archangel on May 30, 1850. vii) And left Sunderland for Quebec, Canada, on Apl. 21, 1851 - arriving back at Rye Bay on Aug. 23, 1851. viii) On Nov. 25, 1851, Echo arrived at Sunderland ex Rotterdam.
On Dec. 18, 1851, Echo arrived at Sunderland, ex London, with 'Steel' in command, clearly in ballast. On that voyage up the U.K. E. coast, Echo was in collision, at 9:30 p.m. on Dec. 17, 1851, off Whitby, with Harper of Whitby, which vessel was significantly damaged. This contemporary news report makes no reference to Echo having been damaged in that collision. Harper, so far as I can see, was built at South Shields in 1813 (in blue).
The webmaster does not know what finally happened to Echo. The data trail seems to go cold at that point in time. Possibly, just possibly, Echo was indeed damaged in that collision. Perhaps to an extent that the vessel could not be repaired. But that is just the webmaster's guess. Does anybody know?
The vessel was first listed when the webmaster tried to identify a Sunderland registered vessel named Echo, 'Dodds' in command, that became a wreck off Hartlepool on Jan. 03/04, 1854 - during major storms that ravaged the entire E. coast. Referred to but unmarked on this page. Such lost vessel clearly was not this vessel, i.e. Echo built 1831. 'Dodds' would seem, so far as I can see, to have been the captain of the lost Echo from Nov. 1850 thru to the vessel's loss in early 1854. The webmaster has not so far identified the Echo so lost, nor determined if it was Sunderland built.
Can you tell us more? #2734

BURN

Can you help with the history of this shipbuilder? A list of Sunderland built vessels, available to the webmaster, lists 'Burn, F. S. and Ann' and 'Burn, Ann'. The former would seem to have been in business from 1808 thru 1814 & built 10 vessels in that period. The latter is recorded as building 10 ships also, but in the period from 1814 thru 1816. Need help!

1   Blenheim
223/225 tons

6271
1816

A snow or brig which was built by Ann Burn. Blenheim, which was launched in Jul. 1816, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1817/18 thru 1838/39, ex 1828/29, then an LR silence of 9 years, & again from 1848/49 thru 1857/58.
The vessel was, per LR, initially owned by M. Laws, thru 1818/19, for service from Liverpool to Le Havre, France, with W. Cassop (or Cassup) her captain. In 1819/20, per LR, the vessel is noted to be owned by 'Patterson', also her captain, for service as a London coaster. In 1820/21, per LR, 'McLean' is recorded as the vessel's owner, becoming 'Lane', for service from London to Jamaica, with 'Mildran' being replaced by 'Mosselman' (I think), who would seem to have served thru 1827/28. LRs thereafter thru 1827/28 all record 'Lane' as the vessel's owner.
I must note that the above looks to be, partially perhaps, of doubtful accuracy. I say that because a list of vessels registered at Sunderland in 1826 was published. It records T. Laws as Blenheim's then owner with J. Eilley, her then captain.
From 1829/30 thru 1832/33, LRs record Vipand & Co. as the vessel's owner, for service as an Exmouth (Devon) coaster, with J. Taylor noted to be her captain.
I have indicated above that the vessel is LR listed from 1834 thru 1838/39. Per LR, registered at Sunderland. Such a comment is 'kind' to what exists. All of such registers state that the 223 ton vessel was registered at Sunderland with R. Watson her captain - with no other data whatsoever.
LRs of 1848/49 thru 1857/58 all record Baxter & Co. as Blenheim's owner, of Stockton thru 1854/55 & of Middlesbro' in 1855/56. With 'Storm' (A. Storm from 1853/54) as her captain. I note, however, that the Mercantile Navy List (scroll to #6271) records that the vessel became Stockton registered on Sep. 28, 1844, so the 'Bexter' ownership likely commenced earlier than LR indicated. We are able to partially confirm the accuracy of the 'Baxter' ownership. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9 records the vessel, in May 1848 data, as registered at Stockton & owned by Elliott Baxter & Jas. Storm, both of Middlesbro'. The equivalent register of 1854/5, in 1854 data, records Elliott Baxter & James Storm jun. as the vessel's owners with James Storm her captain. Turnbull's Shipping Registers of 1855 & 1856 (in 1855 data), list E. Baxter & Co. as the vessel's then owner with W. Booth her captain.
The vessel's service, per LR, when 'Baxter' owned? Always ex Stockton (thru 1855/56) generally for service to London or as a Stockton coaster, but for service from Stockton to the Baltic in 1850/51 & 1854/55.
A little, 'best-efforts', Blenheim operational history. 'Storm' - On Aug. 19, 1845, the vessel arrived at Middlesbro' ex Hamburg, Germany. On May 28, 1846, Blenheim was at Riga, Latvia, ex Hamburg. An 1847 voyage to Swinemunde (now Świnoujście, NW Poland), & 1847 & 1848 voyages to Danzig (now Gdańsk, Poland). On Apl. 26, 1850 the vessel arrived at Gothenburg, Sweden, ex Hartlepool. 'Gibson' - On Aug. 02 or 06, 1850, the vessel arrived at Gothenburg ex Hartlepool & returned to Gravesend, London, on Sep. 29, 1850. 'Storm' again. - Voyages to Gothenburg, Copenhagen, Memel (now Klaipėda, Lithuania) & many voyages to Hamburg. The last 'Storm' ref. I spotted was an arrival at Cuxhaven, Germany, (likely for Hamburg), ex Middlesbro' on Sep. 12, 1855. 'Wade' - at least 3 voyages to Hamburg, arriving back at Middlesbro' on May 09, Jul. 24, & Nov. 20, all in 1856.
No crew lists seem to be available for the vessel.
What finally happened to Blenheim? Wikipedia advises (thanks) that on Jan. 06, 1857, a brig of the name was driven ashore & wrecked at Corton, near Lowestoft, Suffolk. The result, most certainly, of a massive 2 day storm which hit much of the U.K. east coast & forced many ships ashore. This 'Lloyd's List' report tells us that such vessel was i) Stockton registered, ii) carrying a cargo of coal, & iii) broke apart there. It does not, unfortunately, mention the name of Blenheim's captain at the time of her loss. Which likely would have been 'Wade' (maybe 'Ward'), who, I have read, served as the vessel's captain from May thru Nov. 1856 at least.
Is there anything you can add, and/or correct? #2623

BURN T.

Can you help with the history of this shipbuilder? A list of Sunderland built vessels, available to the webmaster, lists 'T. Burn' as building 55 vessels between the years of 1763 & 1822. And also lists what may be a related name - 'Burn T. & Raffield' credited with 4 vessels in the period of 1810 thru 1812. Need help!

1   Palladium
206, later 207 & 191 tons

22563
1814

Palladium (a brig, later a snow, a schooner, a snow & a brig again) was launched in Apl. 1814. It would seem to have been Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed in 1815/16, from 1817/18 thru 1827/28, from 1831/32 thru 1844/45 & from 1851/52 thru 1854/55. I note that Lloyd's Register Foundation has two documents available re the vessel, which they indicate was built by Thomas Brown. The webmaster believes such data is in error.
Palladium was owned, in 1815/16, per LR, by 'Burne & Ci', for service from London to St. Petersburg, Russia. In 1817/18 it was owned, per 2 different LR editions, i) by T. Burn for service from London to Elsinore, Denmark which became London to Smyrna (today Izmir, Turkey), & ii) by 'Pattison' for service from London to St. Petersburg, which became London to Smyrna.
From 1817/18 thru 1827/28, the vessel was, per LR, owned by Pattison & Co., initially for continued service from London to St. Petersburg, soon from London to Smyrna, & from 1821 for service from London to St. Vincent (there are many places of the name, maybe St. Vincent, S. Portugal?). During the 'Pattison' years thru 1821, 'Pattison' was LR listed as the vessel's captain. Then 'Patterson' for many years - maybe a typo?
From 1831/32 thru 1836/37, 'Middleton', of Newcastle, later of South Shields, was LR listed as the owner of the 207 vessel, now a schooner (but which became a snow in 1834). 'Middleton' was recorded as the vessel's captain. For service from London to Memel (now Klaipėda, Lithuania), later Newcastle to London. An 1830 list of vessels registered at Newcastle records Joseph Middleton as Palladium's then owner.
In 1836/37, J. White of South Shields became both the owner & the captain of the vessel, thru 1844/45, for service from Shields to London.
From 1851/52 thru 1854/55, J. Young of Shields was, per LR, the owner of the 207 ton Palladium for, where referenced, continued service from Shields to London. Again owned from an earlier date - in Jul. 1848 it was, per the North of England Maritime Directory, registered at Newcastle & owned by James Young of South Shields.
Now the LR data in 1853/54 & 1854/55 is limited, which suggests that the vessel might have been sold at about that time. However Marwood's North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5, in Apl. 1854 data, lists E. Richardson, James Young & W. Wright jun. as the vessel's then owners. With J. Scott her captain. While Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1856 records E. Richardson, J. Young & W. Wright, jun., all of South Shields, as her then owners, which owner names Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 clarifies as meaning Emer Richardson, Jas. Young & Wm. Wright, Jun. TR of 1855 lists J. Frazer as the vessel's then captain. And ... the Mercantile Navy List of 1867 records James Young of South Shields as the then owner of the 191 ton vessel.
The equivalent list of 1870, however, lists the vessel as registered at Whitby, Yorkshire, & owned by William Frankland of Whitby. This Whitby history book page tells us that Palladium was first registered at Whitby in 1868, owned by Jas. Page (master mariner), Will Frankland & Paul Stamp & also by Geo. Mather of Newcastle. And states that the vessel was lost in the North Sea in Dec. 1872.
The webmaster has not researched the operational history of Palladium. But he did spot that on Oct. 07, 1869. the vessel was entered out of Newcastle for Rotterdam with 'Frankland' in command. Further that on Oct. 16, 1869, the vessel left Shields (rather than Newcastle) for Rotterdam with 300 tons of coal. A heavy gale hit the U.K. east coast on Oct. 17/19, 1869 which caused Palladium to lose anchors & chains & become leaky. At 10.30 p.m. on Oct. 19, 1869 her crew abandoned ship when near to Corton Sands (N. of Lowestoft, Suffolk). At 1.30 or 2 a.m. on Oct. 20, 1869 her crew were landed at Lowestoft by the Gorleston Lifeboat. A couple of hours later members of the crews of both Palladium & the lifeboat went out aboard Rainbow, a tug, & found Palladium riding 'all right'. Palladium itself was brought into Lowestoft by beachmen & under the tow (not of Rainbow) but rather of Andrew Woodhouse, a Yarmouth tug. It was reported from Southwold, Suffolk, on Oct. 24, 1869 that a Palladium's ship's boat was picked up by Providence pilot cutter No. 2. On Nov. 09, 1869, Palladium left Lowestoft to complete its voyage to Rotterdam & arrived at Browershaven (Zeeland, Holland) on Nov. 10, 1869. Many contemporary news reports stated that 'Franklin' was her captain of the time. But it clearly was George Frankland - per these news reports - 1 & 2.
Signal letters NMBF.
On Aug. 19, 1871, the vessel, George Frankland in command, left Newcastle for Dordt (Dordrecht, Holland, I believe) with 284 tons of coal. Soon after 2 a.m. on Aug. 21, 1871, when near Flamborough Head, Yorkshire, Palladium was struck by Supply, a Seaham schooner. Palladium suffered considerable damage & became badly leaky. In urgent need of repairs, Palladium was towed into Hartlepool by Esk, a steamer. Per these contemporary news reports - 3 (in red) & 4.
What finally happened to Palladium? On Dec. 07, 1872, per line 3260 here, the 191 ton brig went missing while en route from the Tyne to Boulogne, France, with a cargo of coal. Crew of 6 - all lost. The vessel was then stated to be owned by Jas. Page.
I have spotted that the vessel visited Boulogne, France, on a number of occasions - with cargoes of coal. On Dec. 07, 1872, Palladium, George Frankland in command, left Newcastle for Boulogne on what proved to be its final voyage. The newspaper record is modest. But ... on Dec. 13, 1872, the smack Waterwitch of Great Yarmouth, John Powles her master, passed a damaged ship's boat when 40 miles ENE of Yarmouth. Such boat had recorded in gilded letters on its stern 'Palladium. Whitby'. Palladium had gone missing. These reports relate - 5, 6 & 7.
A modest puzzle or coincidence. There was another vessel named Palladium operating in late 1872. Which had 'Mather' as her captain. The same name as is recorded in the Whitby history book re 'our' Palladium.
Is there anything you can add? #2912

BYERS & CO.
WM. BYERS
MICHAEL & THOMAS BYERS

I know absolutely nothing about this shipbuilder. Can you help? Data, available via the WWW, is modest indeed. I only became aware of the very name thanks to 'Tug' of Thames Tugs.

It would appear, however, that in 1846, 'Messrs Byers & Co.' were shipbuilders at North Sands, as referenced about 30% down on this fine page (sorry that link no longer works & I have not found a good new link - it is probably somewhere in this site). And on June 10, 1857, there were legal meetings of some sort involving 'Michael Byers & Thomas Byers' of Monkwearmouth Shore, Sunderland, ship builders'. That reference appears in 'The Jurist', a legal record made available on the WWW thanks to 'Google' at page 209 here. I am most grateful to find those references, but they are, alas, the only references I have so far found that seem clearly relevant. That said there is a reference here (close to top of page, but the same comment - I cannot find a good new link) to one 'Wm. Byers' who carried on a business near to 'East House' as a 'Block and Mast Maker', employing a large number of men and apprentices. He apparently also owned the 'Ropery' at the top of Church Street, & was a ship owner. He may very well be related to the ship building business. Most clearly, help is needed.

Now there was a Sunderland company which was prominent indeed in the sale of ship's anchors. Data re that company - W. L. Byers & Co. Ltd. - used to be at this location, with the thought that 'Byers' the shipbuilder & 'Byers' who sold anchors were related to one another. But .... no data has yet been located which suggests that the businesses were, in fact, related. So the data about 'W. L. Byers & Co. Ltd.' re anchors has been moved from this page to a more appropriate page - page 212 here. I can move it all back again should new data prove a relationship!

Anyway, names of vessels constructed by 'Byers' of Sunderland - in a table in build date sequence. Just ten vessels so far. But we now know, through a link above, of two more 'Byers' built ships - Borderer (built 1845) & Merse built 1853. But Tom Purvis has kindly now provided a little data about a few more 'Byers' ship launches, so a new 'Byers build page' has been added to record the limited data that I now have about those ships. Page 142 - here.

A build list of Sunderland built vessels, available to the webmaster, lists 54 vessels built by 'Byers' in the period from 1832 thru 1857.

1   Emily
188 or 189 tons

1832

Emily, a snow or brig which likely was launched in early summer of 1832, was surely always registered at London. It is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1831/32 thru 1849/50, and, so far as the webmaster can see, not thereafter.
I note that Lloyd's Register Foundation kindly makes available four Survey documents re what clearly is this Emily - available via this page. One of such documents refers to 'Buyers' as being the vessel's builder. Which surely means 'Byers'.
The vessel was owned thru 1846/47 or thereabouts, by Roome & Co., of London, with T. Roome serving as the vessel's captain thru 1843/44 & then 'Petterg'll' (F. Pettingall, I believe). For service from London to Hamburg, Germany, thru 1842/43 & then ex London.
In or about 1846/47, J. Smith, also of London, became Emily's new owner for service from London to Archangel, Russia, with P. Hindson serving as the vessel's captain.
Emily was first site listed because the webmaster happened to spot that on Dec. 06, 1848, the vessel, en route from Newcastle to Messina, Sicily, with 'Hindson' in command, was in collision with Canova (built at Sunderland in 1839), which vessel was en route from Sunderland to Dieppe, France - in the Cockle Gat (near Winterton-on-Sea, N. of Great Yarmouth, Norfolk). Emily had bowsprit damage, etc., while Canova lost its main mast. Both vessels put into Yarmouth, Canova under the tow of a steam tug. Per this contemporary news report - 1 (in red).
After repair, Emily continued its voyage to Messina. But never made it to Messina. On Dec. 25, 1848, when at 46N/8W in the outer Bay of Biscay, the vessel, 'Hindson' in command, foundered at sea. With no loss of life. Her crew were picked up by Jane & Margaret (built at Sunderland in 1809), 'Gordon' in command, & landed at Plymouth. Per this contemporary report.
Can you add anything additional? Or correct the above in any way?#2918

2   Champion
286 later 287 tons

5964
1835

Champion, a barque, had a long life - thru to 1870 it would seem.
The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1836/37 thru 1869/70. Initially owned by W. Byers, presumably the vessel's builder, in 1836/37 it became, thru 1853/54, owned by P. Tindall of London.
For some varied service per LR. From London to the Cape of Good Hope, South Africa, in 1836/37, from Sunderland to London in 1837/38 & 1838/39, from London to Leghorn (Livorno, Italy) in 1839/40, from London to Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, in 1840/41 thru 1842/43, from London to Constantinople (now Istanbul, Turkey) in 1843/44 & 1844/45, from Hull to the Mediterranean from 1845/46 thru 1847/48. In 1848/49, service from London to Puerto Rico became service from Liverpool to Jamaica. From Liverpool to the West Indies in 1850/51, & from London to the West Indies from 1851/52 thru 1853/54. With, serving as her captains while 'Tindall' owned, per LR, 'Tindall' thru 1839/40, 'Spencer' from 1839/40 thru 1843/44, 'Mosey' from 1843/44 thru 1848/49, 'Pickering' from 1839/40 thru 1851/52 & W. Huntly from 1851/52 thru 1853/54 - indeed, per LR, thru to 1869/70.
From Mar. 03, 1854 thru Apl. 14, 1854, the vessel, then lying in St. Katharine's Dock, London, was offered for private sale. One of the many advertisements.
I read, at a Sunderland shipping website that requests no links or recognition, that Champion became registered at Scarborough on Jul. 11, 1854. From 1854/55 thru 1869/70, per LR, 'Mosey' of Scarborough, Yorkshire, was the vessel's owner. The vessel's earlier captain, perhaps? For service ex London in 1854/55 & 1855/56, from Scarborough to the West Indies in 1856/57, to the Mediterranean ex i) London in 1857/58, ii) Liverpool in 1858/59 & iii) Cardiff, Wales, in 1859/60 & 1860/61. And from Shields to the West Indies from 1861/62 thru 1869/70.
Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 lists Champion as Scarborough registered & owned by (as I interpret it) James Mosey & M. and C. Williamson, all of Filey, Yorkshire, & Wm. Mosey & others of Scarborough.
The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') lists Champion from 1857 thru 1870, & records it as always registered at Scarborough. From 1865 thru 1869, MNL lists William Mosey of Scarborough as the vessel's then owner or managing owner. While MNL of 1870 rather lists William Huntley, master mariner, also of Scarborough.
94.0 ft. long, signal letters JLTN, a few crew lists are available via this page, LR records the vessel as always of 286 tons while MNLs from 1865 rather record 287 tons.
What finally happened to Champion? On May 11, 1870, per line 198 on this U.K. Government 1870 wreck list, Champion, (said to have been built in Sunderland, Nova Scotia!), foundered at Horn Reef, while en route from the Tyne to the Baltic with a cargo of coal. There noted to have had a crew of 10 & owned by James Youll.
I read that on May 04, 1870, the vessel, under the command of 'Youll' of Sunderland, left Newcastle for the Baltic with a cargo of coal. 'Youll' had recently acquired the vessel & such voyage was, I read, the first voyage under his ownership. Champion was en route to Dahlsbruk, which I believe is at the SW tip of Finland. The vessel however ran aground long before nearing Finland. It grounded on Horn Reef ('Horno Rev'), near the island of Fanoe (Fanø), a Danish island in the North Sea off the SW coast of Denmark. The vessel's crew were saved by Anna, 'Mikkelsen' in command, and landed at Fanø. Some contemporary news reports - 1 & 2.
Can you tell us anything additional? #2834

3   Horatio
280/296 tons
1839

A snow. Horatio, which was launched in Sep. 1839, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1839/40 thru 1853/54 only.
Per LR of 1839/40, 'Thompson' of Sunderland was the vessel's initial owner for service from Sunderland to Hamburg, Germany, becoming Sunderland to London, with J. Potts serving as the vessel's captain. 'Thompson' did not own the vessel for very long. During 1840/41, per LR, 'Hpl&StkShCo' - Hartlepool & Stockton Shipping Co.? - of Hartlepool, became the vessel's new owner for service from Stockton to Quebec, Canada, with 'Waterworth' her captain thru 1844/45 or 1845/46. W. Brough per LR then became her captain thru 1846/47 followed by 'Fairburn' (thru 1850/51). For service from Hartlepool to London and/or to the Mediterranean.
LRs of 1844/45 thru 1846/47 seem, however, to record Horatio's then owner, as being 'Hartlepool & Stockton Commercial Shipping Co.' which became just 'Commercial Shipping Co.' per LRs from 1847/48 thru 1850/51. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9 records the vessel, in May 1848 data, as registered at Hartlepool & owned rather by 'Hartlepool & Durham Commercial Shipping Co.'. While Hartlepool owned, the vessel would seem to have always traded out of Hartlepool to London, to the Mediterranean or to Hamburg.
LR of 1851/52 records 'Duke', of Newcastle, as the vessel's new owner (M. Duke in 1853/54), for service in 1851/52 from Shields to Wyborg (Vyborg, NW of St. Petersburg, Russia), from Newcastle to the Baltic in 1852/53 & from Newcastle to the Mediterranean in 1853/54. With 'Errington', J. Brown, & A. Ellis serving in succession as her captains.
What happened to Horatio? In late Aug. 1853, the vessel was returning from Odessa, Black Sea, Ukraine, to Bremen, Germany, with a cargo of rye grain, & with 'Ellis' her captain. Horatio did not make it to Bremen. At about 8 p.m. on Aug. 31, 1853, the vessel got onto the Goodwin Sands (English Channel 6 miles east of Deal, Kent), & became a total wreck, her crew being safely landed at Deal. As per these contemporary news reports, in red (1 & 2).
Can you add anything additional? #2550

4   Isabella
228/234 tons
1843

A snow. The vessel, which was launched on May 18, 1843, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1842/43 thru 1851/52 only, always owned by T. Crozier of Sunderland. For service, thru 1845/46, from Sunderland to America, & from 1846/47 thru 1851/52 for service from Sunderland to the Mediterranean. With 'Johnson' her captain thru 1846/47 & 'Campbell' thereafter. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848 lists T. Crozier, of Monkwearmouth, as Isabella's owner in Apl. 1848.
This listing was first advanced after noting, in a Jan. 26, 1850 report (in blue) from Malta, that Isabella, Campbell in command, en route from Alexandria, Egypt, to Queenstown, Ireland, had put back, 'leaky', to Malta having touched ground off Mustafa, near Cape Bon. Mustafa is a prominent Cape in NE Tunisia, while Cape Bon is at the tip of a peninsula, NE of Tunis, Tunisia.
The webmaster is not yet aware of what finally happened to Isabella. Can you tell us? There are many vessels of the name shipwreck referenced in 1851 by Wikipedia. But I cannot determine if any of them is 'our' Isabella. #2436

5   Borderer
421/357 tons

270
1845

A barque. J. (John) Willis of London owned the vessel for its entire lifetime. Initially for service from Sunderland & then Bristol to Demerera, Guianas. Later, where Lloyd's Register indicated, to the East Indies & from London to India. On Sep. 26, 1860, per line 320 here, the 421 ton barque was abandoned at 26S/50E (SE of Madagascar) while en route from Akyab (now Sittwe, Myanmar), to Falmouth, with a cargo of rice etc. A crew of 15 - none lost. Vessel then stated to be owned by John Willis. Can you add anything? #1916

6   Solon
177/194, later 164 tons

22413
1849

A snow or brig. The vessel, which was launched on Mar. 05, 1849, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1848/49 thru 1857/58, then a 16 year silence, & again in 1874/75 & 1875/76. Her initial owner, per LR, was N. Smirke of Sunderland, thru 1850/51. Tom Purvis advises (thanks!) that that meant Nicholas Smirke & Son, of Sunderland.
In 1851/52 per LR, but surely in 1850, Solon became Whitby, Yorkshire, registered, & both owned & captained by Benjamin Granger of Robin Hood's Bay, Yorkshire. Why 'surely in 1850'? I say that because registry data here (scroll to #22413) tells us that the vessel became Whitby registered in 1850, in Apl. 1850, I have read. The 'Granger' ownership & captaincy is referenced in a number of contemporary Whitby shipping registers - i) here (1853 data) in the North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5, ii) in 1855 data in Turnbull's Shipping Registers of 1855 & 1856, & iii) in 1858 in Christie's Shipping Register (Grainger).
LR of 1857/58 has limited data, which suggests that the vessel may well have been in process of sale.
For many following years LR did not list the vessel. The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL'), however, comes to our rescue. It advises that from 1857 thru 1861 Solon was Whitby registered & from 1862 the vessel was rather registered at Hartlepool or West Hartlepool. I have read that it was sold to Hartlepool owners in 1861. MNL of 1865 lists Sherinton Foster, of Hartlepool, as the then owner of the vessel, now of 164 tons. From 1866 thru 1875 (1870) MNL lists Robert Hutchinson, of West Hartlepool, as the vessel's owner. LRs of 1874/75 & 1875/76 also list R. Hutchinson as Solon's owner.
Another ownership change it would appear. MNL of 1876 lists John Ashton of West Hartlepool as the vessel's then owner.
80.4 ft. long, signal letters NLJD, many crew lists are available here.
Now this vessel was first detail listed as a result of the webmaster finding a U.K. Government wrecklist report, available here ex here, which tells us that Solon, under the command of J. Ashton & with a crew of 6, was lost on Apl. 14, 1876 at Saltfleet, Lincolnshire. The vessel - there noted to have been owned at the time by J. Furness, junr. of West Hartlepool - was en route from London to West Hartlepool in ballast. High winds at the time, so in gale force sea & wind conditions. A brief report in the 'Daily News' of London, on Apl. 18, 1876, advised that Argo of Whitby (built at Whitby in 1815) & Solon of Hartlepool, both in ballast, were ashore off Saltfleet, further that the stripping of both vessels had commenced. Both sets of crews were noted to have been saved.
Can you add anything additional? #2467

7   Thebes
382/432 tons

25993
1850

A barque. Thebes? There are two ancient cities named Thebes, one located in Greece & the other in Egypt. The Egyptian city (now Luxor), is located on the Nile about 314 miles S. of Cairo. The vast temple complexes/remains of Karnak are located there, also the temple of Luxor, while across the river to the west lie the treasures of the Valley of the Kings.
Thebes, which was launched in Sep. 1850 & first registered at Liverpool on Oct. 09, 1850 (scroll to #25993) is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1851/52 thru 1864/65. It was owned, thru 1858/59 per LR, by 'R'thb'ne' & Co. (clarified below) of Liverpool - i) for initial service, in 1851/52, from Sunderland to Alexandria, Egypt, ii) from Liverpool to Montreal, Canada, from 1851/52 thru 1854/55 & iii) ex London from 1855/56 thru 1858/59. With 'Scotland' serving as the vessel's captain thru 1854/55, followed by 'T. Gardn'r' thereafter thru 1858/59. Now Marwood's North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5, in Mar. 1854 data, clarifies such owner & captain names. It lists the Liverpool registered vessel as then owned by Rathbone Brothers & Co., of Liverpool with T. B. Gardner her then captain. Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1855 lists Rathbone & Co. as her then owner & 'Scotland' as her then captain.
In 1858 & per LR from 1859/60 thru 1862/63, 'Lamp'rt' & Co., presumably Lamport & Co., of Liverpool, became the owner of Thebes for service ex Sunderland in 1859/60 & 1860/61 & ex Liverpool in 1861/62. With 'Daniell' serving as the vessel's captain. In 1862/63, E. S. Roberts of London became the vessel's owner - for just a short time however. In 1863/64, per LR, Weinholt & Co., of London, became the vessel's owner for service from London to South America, with J. Nutkin serving as her master from part way thru 1863/64.
Some operational history. 1) I read (1 & 2) that on Aug. 21, 1863, Benjamin R. Milan, an American owned ship, was abandoned in the Atlantic Ocean while en route from New York to Cádiz, Spain. Thebes, I read, then en route from Jamaica to London, rescued her crew at 43N/49W (about 800 miles SE of Newfoundland) on the following day. It seems likely that the vessel referred to was Benjamin R. Milan, built in 1848 at Portland, Connecticut, of 472 tons, registered at New York. Most of those rescued were later landed by Thebes at London, however, the master & two crew members were landed at New York by Minoma of Gottenburgh. 2) In Feb. 1864, the vessel was involved in a collision & became leaky. As per this page - which I think means that the vessel left London for San Francisco, was involved in a collision, returned to London for repairs, & resumed its voyage. But the collision may well have been rather at San Francisco.
LR of 1864/65 notes that the vessel had been 'Abandoned'. Wikipedia advises here (thanks!) that on Aug. 12, 1864, Thebes foundered in the Pacific Ocean at 55.59S/83.26W (W. of Cape Horn), while en route from Deal, Kent, to San Francisco, California, U.S.A. Further that her crew were rescued by the barque William Wilson (ON 47781, built at Bristol in 1863). As per a report in the 'Dundee Courier' of Sep. 29, 1864 (it would be good if some kindly site visitor could provide that 'Dundee Courier' report to the webmaster, especially in view of the data which follows below). I read here that Thebes' cargo was mainly of railroad iron & coal. But .... such page refers to the vessel's loss being in Jul. 1864 rather than in Aug. 1864. Could that be so? It would seem, upon further research, to have been so. This contemporary news report tells us that Thebes had encountered heavy seas off Cape Horn, at 56S/83W, & foundered on Jul. 12, 1864, further that her crew were landed at Valparaiso, Chile, on or before Aug. 16, 1864 - by 'Wm. Wilson'.
112.0 ft. long, signal letters PJGT. Just two crew lists are available.
Can you add to and/or correct the above? #2468

8 Her Majesty
848 tons
1854

A ship per Lloyd's Register (at left). Which had a short life indeed. Per 1 (bottom). Data quite limited. The webmaster believes that this launch announcement records the launch of the barque in early Jan. 1854 or maybe in very late in Dec. 1853. Built, however, for 'J. Watkins', of London, (John Roger Watkins), when much later incorporated, became 'William Watkins Limited', of London. The 'Watkins' company would seem to have been 'one of the first tug owning companies in the world' having commenced business as early as 1833. I was most interested to read that one of their tugs, Anglia, in 1878 towed 'Cleopatra's Needle' from Ferrol, Spain, to London. Sorry, I digressed! On Mar 01, 1854, Her Majesty was one of many ships engaged by the British Government for service as transport ships re the Crimean War. These pages (1 & 2, ex here) tell us that J. R. Watkins was the vessel's owner & that Her Majesty 'carried artillery, gun-carriages, and horses to Constantinople and Varna ; afterwards employed on various services in the Black Sea, until wrecked off Eupatoria, 14 November 1854. Link 1 above tells us that her voyage to the Crimea, from Woolwich to the Crimea, was her maiden voyage & that in Nov. 1854, she was driven ashore in a hurricane, along with many other vessels, at Eupatoria, (Crimea, Black Sea port, now Ukraine). And there she was 'hacked to pieces by the freezing troops' & used as firewood. Need help!

9 Royal Family
915 tons
1854

A ship. Which also had a short life. Per 1 (25% down). Data most limited. Built for 'J. Watkins', of London, (John Roger Watkins), which when much later incorporated, became 'William Watkins Limited', of London. On Oct. 30, 1856, while en route from Calcutta to Bombay, both India, with a cargo of sugar & gunny bales, Royal Family, was destroyed by fire. 'Master, his wife and crew rescued by French ship Rose and later landed at Pondicherry'. The vessel name is not an easy WWW 'search term'. Can you provide more data.

10   Northumbrian
555/639, later 571 & 572 tons

14744
1855

Built by M. Byers, I read (Michael). A ship, later, from 1865/66 per Lloyd's Register ('LR') a barque. The vessel, which was launched in Mar. 1855 & first registered, at Newcastle, on Mar. 27, 1855 (scroll to #14744), is LR listed from 1855/56 thru 1881/82. It clearly was always registered at Newcastle. For most of the vessel's lifetime, thru 1879/80, the vessel was owned, per LR, by Scott & Co. (from 1877/78 J. & H. Scott & Co.) With, again per LR, very few captains - i.e. J. Smith thru 1862/63, & 'Piggie' thereafter. LR specifically records D. Piggie as the vessel's captain from 1862/63 thru 1872/73 & from 1875/76 thru 1881/82. From 1873/74 thru 1875/76 LR records B. Piggie. David Piggie, in fact, born at Kirkaldy, Scotland. Who must have had an association with Nova Scotia, Canada, since he, along with two others from Northumbrian, donated a collection of fossils to a Halifax, Nova Scotia, museum.
The owners' names are clarified by a number of shipping registers. Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1856 records J. J. and H. Scott and H. Smith, all of Newcastle, as her then owners. Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 records J. Jackson (surely in error, should be J. Jackson Scott), H. Scott & J. Smith. TR of 1874 provides shareholder detail - then owned by J. J. Scott, H. Scott and J. Smith with, respectively, 32, 16 & 16 shares. While the Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') (which incidentally always record the vessel, from 1872, as a ship), of 1865 thru 1880, all record Jas. Jackson Scott, or J. Jackson Scott, as her presumably managing owner.
Some operational detail. Per LR, the vessel served India in all the years from 1855/56 thru 1870/71 except for 1859 (ex London) - ex Sunderland from 1855/56 thru 1857/58, ex London in 1861/62 & ex Shields in all of the other years. From 1871/72 thru 1873/74, the vessel, per LR, served Philadelphia, U.S.A., ex Shields. If I understand this link correctly, Northumbrian, David Piggie in command, carried 255 emigrants to Yanaon (now Yanam), nr. Pondicherry, India, on Nov. 05, 1866. On Aug. 04, 1870, the vessel was entered outwards for departure from Cardiff, Wales, for Port Said, Egypt, Piggie in command. On Jul. 31, 1871, the vessel, then a barque, arrived at Port of Beaufort, North Carolina, U.S.A., from Trinidad de Cuba, Piggie in command. I have spotted a reference to the vessel having rescued the crew of Aquila ex their ships' boats after Aquila sank off Spurn Head, Yorkshire, on Sep. 12, 1875.
127.6 ft. long, 134.9 ft. from 1877/78, 571 tons from 1860/61, 572 tons from 1875/76 (both per LR) but of 572 tons per MNL from 1865, signal letters LPJV. Many crew lists are available here.
The MNL of 1881 is not WWW available. I mention that because the LRs of 1880/81 & 1881/1882 record W. Goldfinch of Newcastle as the vessel's then owner. LR of 1881/82 notes that the vessel had been 'Broken up'. Is there anything you can add?

T. CAIRNCROSS
BELL and CAIRNCROSS

I have virtually no knowledge of this Sunderland shipbuilder & only know of his very existence as a result of the guestbook entry of Susan Enns - which message you can read here.

The builder may not have been in business for many years. Why do I say that? The 'North of England Maritime Directory, Shipping Register, and Commercial Advertiser', of 1848/49, published, it would seem, in Aug. 1848, (a 'Google' book), lists the Sunderland ship builders in 1847. The list is long, of 59 names, but T. Cairncross is not included, nor is there any name that includes 'Cairncross'. The volume also lists the vessels that were built at Sunderland in 1847 & their builders. That list is long also, of 147 vessels, & there are no 'Cairncross' references. I presume therefore that 'T. Cairncross' was no longer in business in 1847. I am not aware of the earlier date at which he commenced shipbuilding, or, even roughly, where his yard was located.

If you have any knowledge about the ship builder, do please be in touch, so this limited reference can be expanded.

I have now added in the name of 'Bell and Cairncross' above, having detail listed a vessel whose builder was 'T. Cairncross' in one available Sunderland build list & 'Bell and Cairncross' in a second such list. T. Cairncross is recorded as having built 9 vessels in the period of 1836 thru 1844. While 'Bell and Cairncross'' is noted to have built 13 vessels in the period of 1837 thru 1842. I do not know whether they are, in fact, related to one another.

So far, only three vessels built by both names are listed below.

1   Martin
244/245 tons
1836

A snow or brig. A vessel which, I read, was launched in Nov. 1836 but is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed as being an Oct. 1836 vessel. Which had a very short life - LR listed in 1836/37 & 1837/38 only. Owned by 'Thompson' of Sunderland for service from Sunderland to London - with 'Addision' LR noted to have been the vessel's captain.
This listing was first created having seen a report in the 'Shipping Gazette ....' of London, which tells us, twice in fact, that in early Feb. 1838, Martin was en route from Shields to Liverpool with a general cargo, under the command of captain Addison. In the early morning hours of Feb. 05, 1838, the vessel ran onto the the Goodwin Sands (English Channel 6 miles east of Deal, Kent) & ended up as a wreck. Seven crew members including the captain were saved but three crew members, all boys, unfortunately were drowned.
That same edition of the 'Shipping Gazette ...' published also a detail report that names the three boys that lost their lives (Harris, Robson & Gobble), & tells us that the vessel was spotted at daybreak from Deal to be in difficulty. Three Deal lifeboats were launched but two of them were swamped when they attempted to make it through the heavy surf. Only one lifeboat got to sea & reached Martin to find her hull under water with the surviving crew clinging to the upper rigging. Seven only of the crew were safely taken aboard the lifeboat & landed back at Deal at about 10 that morning. It would seem that some of the vessel's spars were saved from the wreck but not any of her cargo which was underwater. But one of the vessel's masts, recovered from the wreck, later was carried away by the sea, in a gale on Feb. 09, 1838. Lloyd's List essentially reported the basic facts as stated above but refers specifically to the vessel going aground on South Sound Head (located at the southern tip of the Goodwin Sands). Wikipedia, however, reports, per 'The Standard' of London on Feb. 17, 1838, that the loss occurred rather on Feb. 12, 1838. Surely a reasonable interpretation of the words. The article that 'The Standard' had published was likely this article, a reprint from a Kentish newspaper, which tells us that the lifeboat that saved the crew was the Sparrow, and that two of the boys were below & unable to escape when the hull was inundated. The Deal lifeboat that was lost was the Dart.
Is there anything you can add? #2563

2 Radical
251, later 228 tons

33757
1836

A snow rigged brig. Per 1 (National Archives, Kew, 1860 collision).
The vessel, which was first registed, at Sunderland, on May 30, 1836, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1836/37 thru 1862/63 with the exception of 1845/46. For that entire period, per LR, the vessel was Sunderland registered & owned by R. French. The North of England Martime Directory of 1848/9 records the vessel, in Apl. 1848, as owned by R. French, of Bishopwearmouth. The equivalent register of 1854/5 records, in Mar. 1854, Robt. French of Sunderland, with Henry Warren her then captain. Data essentially confirmed by Turnbull's Shipping Registers ('TR') of 1855 & 1856, the 1855 edition also listing Henry Warren as the vessel's captain.
There must have been a change of ownership soon thereafter. Christies Shipping Register of 1858, lists Radical of 228 tons, a snow, now owned by Robert Adamson, of Sunderland.
The vessel's captains, per LR? 'Hodson' from 1836/37 thru 1838/39, 'Anderson' from 1839/40 thru 1844/45, A. Jack from 1846/47 thru 1848/49, 'Stafford' from 1848/49 thru 1854/55, & H. Warren thereafter thru 1862/63. Her service while 'French' owned? From Sunderland to Riga, Latvia, from 1836/37 thru 1838/39, from Plymouth to Newcastle in 1839/40 & 1840/41, from Sunderland to London for the next 4 years i.e. from 1841/42 thru 1844/45. Service from Sunderland to i) New York, U.S.A., is LR noted in 1846/47 & 1847/48, ii) America in 1848/49 & 1849/50, iii) Quebec, Canada, in 1850/51 & 1851/52. The vessels later service, where LR indicated, is ex Sunderland, to London &, in 1856/57 only, to the Mediterranean.
Some operational history. a) On May 04, 1848, the vessel was in collision at 1:30 a.m., in thick fog, at 42.40N/67.30W (approx. 160 miles off the U.S. E. coast), with Amber, a schooner, which was en route from Portsmouth to the Bay of Challeur (Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada). Amber sank immediately & the crew (9 all told) were picked up by Radical & landed at Boston, Massachusetts. There are a number of Portsmouth's in the U.S., the one in Virginia being the biggest & perhaps most likely start point for Amber's final voyage. b) On Oct. 31, 1855, en route from Hamburg, Germany, to Sunderland, with 'Warren' in command, the vessel came ashore near Hartlepool. It seems that the vessel was ashore for a number of days. On Nov. 08, 1855, it was reported from Hartlepool that the vessel had been got off & taken into E. Hartlepool for necessary repairs. c) On Aug. 04, 1860, Radical, then owned by Robert Adamson, was in collision with the 55 ton Monkwearmouth steam tug Springflower, which it appears was sunk. Have not read the circumstances. Susan Enns advises however that the collision occurred in the river Thames, when Springflower was towing Sir George Seymour (Sunderland built in 1844) back to Sunderland. 'So far the records indicate that the 'Radical' first was hit by the tug and then seriously damaged by Sir George Seymour in tow.
LRs from 1857/58 thru 1862/63 provide limited detail, which suggests that the vessel may well have been lost. However the Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') records the vessel as registered at Sunderland thru 1864, does not list the vessel in 1865, but notes, if I read the handwriting correctly, here, (scroll to #33757) that the vessel was abandoned, as per a certificate dated Mar. 08, 1864.
Wikipedia advises, here, that on Dec. 05, 1863, en route from Dantzig (then Prussia, today Gdańsk, Poland), to Sunderland, the vessel was abandoned at sea. Further that her crew were rescued by Max and Emil of flag unknown. This contemporary report, from Sunderland on Dec. 29, 1863, tells us that on Dec. 03, 1863 the vessel sprang a leak when in the North Sea, 110 miles ENE of Sunderland. Three days later, on Dec. 06, 1863, the vessel was in a sinking state & was abandoned with topforemast cut away. Radical's crew were picked up by the Ino and Emil & landed at Leith, Scotland, on Dec. 28, 1863. It seems likely that the rescuing vessel was U.K. registered but neither name is recorded in MNL records.
Signal letters RGPK. Crew lists seem to be available re 1863 only.
Susan Enns, who has kindly provided a portion of the above data, herself seeks data i) about the ship, ii) about T. Cairncross, the builder, & iii) about both R. French & Robert Adamson, who owned her, & iv) what exactly happened to Sir George Seymour in the end in or about 1867/68, when the ship was burned. The webmaster will gladly forward to Susan, such data as site visitors may be able to provide, were Susan to provide her new e-mail address.
As this listing was revised & updated in May 2022, I note that Wikipedia reports that, on Dec. 18, 1867, Sir George Seymour was en route from Liverpool to Bombay (now Mumbai), India with a cargo of coal. The cargo caught fire when the vessel was at 25S/25W (in the South Atlantic Ocean, about 1400 miles SE of Rio de Janeiro) & her crew abandoned her. Leda, en route to Calcutta (now Kalkata), India, rescued 15 Sir George Seymour crew members. If you can add to or correct the above, please consider being in touch with the webmaster.

  Andrew White
256/251 tons
1838

A snow or brig. Built by either T. Cairncross or by Bell & Cairncross. The vessel, which was, I read, launched in May 1838 but is Lloyd's Register ('LR') noted as being an Apl. 1838 vessel, is LR listed from 1839/40 thru 1849/50 only. It was per LR, initially owned by 'Thompson' of Sunderland, for service from Sunderland to Quebec, Canada, with 'Cockerill' serving as the vessel's captain.
This listing was first created having seen this reference (in blue) to Andrew White having capsized 'in the Cul de Sac' on Aug. 09, 1838 & 'lies nearly bottom up'. How distressing that must have been for 'Cockerill', the vessel's captain! Wikipedia tells us (thanks!) that the vessel was righted on Aug. 25, 1838 & found to be severely damaged. It would seem that 'Cul de Sac' likely refers to a small section of the St. Lawrence river at Quebec City, Canada, near, perhaps at the foot of, a street of such name. A portion of the Quebec City waterfront, perhaps. Can anybody clarify?
The webmaster has not yet read why Andrew White capsized, though it likely happened when her cargo of timber was being loaded. I learn that parties were engaged to right the vessel & indeed they attempted to do so. But they soon abandoned the effort leaving the vessel more damaged than it had been before. It seemed certain that the vessel would soon need to be abandoned & sold as a wreck. At that time, H.M.S. Andromache was at Quebec being refitted - with one George Peacock her master 'with Captain Baynes'. 'Peacock', seeing the vessel's predicament, devised a novel mechanical method by which the vessel might be righted, &, necessary permissions obtained, proceeded with his plan with the help of 20 seamen from H.M.S. Malabar. To the jeers & derision of those who had earlier failed to raise the ship, 'Peacock' assembled his gear & proceeded with his plan. And 3 days later successfully completed his self-appointed task. 'Peacock' charged nothing for his efforts, though 8 years later he was awarded fifty guineas for his achievement by the 'Indemnity Marine Assurance Company', of London, with whom the vessel had been insured. Should you wish to read more about the subject, this article sets out what 'Peacock' did. And these are 'Peacock's' descriptive words on the whole subject.
In 1841/42, per LR, Andrew White became owned by 'Hutchinson' of Sunderland for service ex Liverpool. With 'Clark' LR noted to be her captain.
There would appear to have been a number of later owners following in relatively quick sucession. In 1845/46, & thru 1846/47 per LR, the vessel became owned by R. White, of Sunderland, for service from Sunderland to the Mediterranean with 'Purvis' serving as the vessel's captain. From 1846/47 thru 1848/49, Dixon & Co. of Sunderland per LR owned the vessel for service from Falmouth, Cornwall, to Cork, Ireland, with 'Purvis' then T. Purvis her captain. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/49 clarifies such ownership. It records the vessel, in Apl. 1848, as being owned by Hugh Dixon & Co., of Sunderland. In 1848/49 the vessel per LR became owned by C. Alcock, of Sunderland, for service ex Sunderland.
Wikipedia tells us (thanks again!) that on Oct. 17, 1849, Andrew White, en route from Quebec City to Sunderland, sprang a leak and was abandoned in the Atlantic Ocean, at 49.38N/18.10W (about 700 miles W. of the SW tip of Ireland). Her crew, exhausted from pumping to try to control the leak, were rescued by the brig Nicholson. (Two vessels named Nicholson are LR listed at the time - the likely vessel that effected the rescue was built at Whitehaven in 1811). Andrew White was, I learn, carrying a cargo of timber. This contemporary newspaper report tells us additionally that 'Anzas' was the vessel's captain at the time she was abandoned & that the crew were landed at Fleetwood, Lancashire. The abandoned vessel did not sink at sea, presumably due to the buoyancy of its cargo. On Nov. 20, 1849, in a report from Kilrush, County Clare, SW Ireland, the vessel, in a derelict condition, was reported on shore & breaking up at Credane Point near Miltown Malbay.
Can you add anything additional? #2506

JOHN CANDLISH
J. and R. CANDLISH
ROBERT CANDLISH

OF SOUTHWICK (1844/1854), OF NORTH SANDS (?/1847)  & A THIRD LOCATION, IT WOULD SEEM

A webmaster modified image of J. J. Candlish, ex a cabinet portrait by A. & G. Taylor, 'Photographers to the Queen'. Believed to date from 1893 when he became a Justice of the Peace. Ex an eBay item. NOT, it would seem, John Candlish the shipbuilder, who died in 1874. Presumably a family member & worthy of inclusion here.
The early varied commercial career of John Candlish, (1816/1874), was not a success. He commenced a shipbuilding business at Southwick, in 1844, which yard is 'said to have produced "fine ships" but made little profit.' He later however was successful with 'Seaham Bottle Works' at Seaham harbour, which enterprise, renamed 'Londonderry Bottle Works', became, in its time, the largest bottling business in Europe. In his lifetime, he was elected as Sunderland Borough Council councillor in 1848, Mayor of Sunderland in 1858 & 1861 & a Member of Parliament from 1866 thru to his death in 1874. You can read more at the link provided. A statue of him was erected in Mowbray Park (can be seen here & at a number of other WWW sites).

There also was a Candlish shipbuilding yard at 'Strand Slipway', Monkwearmouth, on North Sands. 'Where Ships Are Born' advises us that John Candlish transferred that yard to John Crown in 1847. Much much later, almost a century later in fact, in 1946 Joseph L. Thompson took over 'Strand Slipway'. After the 1847 transfer to John Crown, John Candlish continued in business in partnership with his brother Robert clearly at Low Southwick. So Robert is presumably the R. in 'J. and R. Candlish'.

The Southwick shipbuilding yard was located on the north bank of River Wear roughly 600 yards east of the (later) Queen Alexandra Bridge. A site that had previously been occupied by William Havelock.  In 1852, 'J. and R. Candlish' were listed as ship builders at Low Southwick. The yard's life was brief. It was taken over in 1854 by Robert Thompson (1819/1910), who had worked at the Candlish yard alongside his father, Thompson, Robert (1797/1860) (a foreman there) and his two brothers Joseph Lowes Thompson and John Thompson.

Vessels built by 'Candlish'? Successor, built in 1850, as detailed below. Pilgrim of 1853 covered here, Coloroon, of 710 tons. And it was, I read, taken over & completed by William Pile. And William, of 370 tons, built by Robert Candlish in 1857. Maybe you might help in populating a Candlish ships built list, or help otherwise with the history of this shipbuilder? So far as I can see, Candlish built 27, maybe 30 vessels during the period from 1844 thru 1857. A list of such vessels, at present in its infancy, has been commenced here.

In my heading to this section, I suggest that there was a third 'Candlish' shipbuilding location - for reasons that I cannot re-establish as this page is updated. I presume that I must have read some reference to that third yard, hence my inclusion of the words. In Oct. 2012, a guestbook message draws to my attention a shipbuilder at Middlesbrough by the name of 'Candlish, Fox & Company', which was in business at least in the years 1864 thru 1866. Were the businesses in fact related?

Clearly there is more to the story. Which hopefully will be located & recorded on this page in due course.

1   Adele
333 tons
1845

A snow or brig, later, per LR at least, a barque. For a few years I have advised that this vessel was built by an unknown Southwick builder. The vessel would appear to have never been registered at Sunderland (rather at Hartlepool), hence the fact that the vessel is not included in two lists of Sunderland built ships available to the webmaster. I now know, however, that the vessel was built by John Candlish. as per this & other available Lloyd's Surveys which relate. Adele was 96.0 ft. long.
The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1845/46 thru 1855/56, always owned, per LR, by 'Mesnard' of Hartlepool. Which owner name is clarified by the North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9 to mean, in May 1848 data, Jane Mesnard. The vessel had, per LR, two captains only - J (John) Youlden thru 1849/50, then Layckl'ck (William Laycklock, I believe) as best I can determine the name. It is likely that Robert Gray was also the vessel's master. LR records the vessel as a snow thru 1850/51 & then as a barque.
The vessel sems not to be listed in the North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5, nor in Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1855.
The vessel would seem to have had some varied service. From Sunderland to Boston (Massachusetts, U.S.A.) in 1845/46, from Sunderland to the Mediterranean in 1846/47 & 1847/48, ex London in 1848/49 & 1849/50, from Liverpool to Demerera (Guyana, N. coast of South America) in 1850/51 soon from London to such destination. And from 1851/52 thru 1854/55, per LR, from London to Mauritius.
While no info. about Jane Mesnard is available, Hartlepool History Then & Now has helpfully made available, (thanks to the Hartlepool Library Service & Hartlepool Customs), Adele's registration documents - here & here. How wonderful! The only problem is my old eyes cannot read them well! I am unable to read there the name of her builder, if indeed, such data is therein referenced. It would seem, however, that on Jan. 25, 1853 the vessel was transferred to registration at London, perhaps (my eyes!) to become owned by Pow & Co. The documents seem to refer to a bill of sale dated May 19, 1857 which date at present is a puzzle.
I should note that the Mercantile Navy List does not record the vessel - which would mean that the vessel was not in existence & British registered on Jan. 01, 1855 or in the short period thereafter.
What happened to the vessel? The webmaster earlier had seen that Wikipedia had reported that a vessel named Adele was lost on an unknown date early in 1853 'on the Northern Triangles', as per a report in 'Ship News' in 'The Morning Post' of London of Apl. 16, 1853. There are a number of places known as 'Northern Triangles' including one in the Honduras area. I now learn that 'The Morning Post' had republished a brief report of Apl. 15, 1853 which had been originally published in Lloyd's List. Both articles tell us that it was Adele, from Honduras, that was lost. But was it 'our' Adele? I now know that it wasn't. Such Adele was a French brig, 'Menez' her captain, which had been en route to Le Havre, France, & was lost on Feb. 05, 1853.
So back to the drawing board re what happened to 'our' Adele!
I read that from Jan. 03, 1853 thru Feb. 11, 1853, 'our' Adele, with Laycklock her captain, was loading at London for a departure to Portland Bay (coast of Victoria, Australia, 360 km. W. of Melbourne) & Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. On Feb, 22, 1853, the vessel left Deal, Kent, for Portland Bay but not with 'Laycklock' in command - rather with 'Bell' her master. The vessel, noted to be a brig, arrived at Portland on Aug. 20, 1853, with, amongst its cargo & passengers, a party of miners for the Anglo Australian Gold Mining Company. On Sep. 25, 1853, the vessel, now under the command of A. Thompson, left Portland for Sydney, arriving there on Oct. 04, 1853 - with 15 passengers.
In the following months, Adele served as an Australian coaster. It departed Sydney for Melbourne on Oct. 31, 1853, with 14 passengers. It left Melbourne on Mar. 04, 1854 for Portland, 'with sundry free & duty-paid goods', now with W. (William) Shannon (her final master) in command - to soon leave Portland for Adelaide, then to Melbourne, then Adelaide & back to Melbourne.
On Jul. 20, 1854, Adele left Melbourne for Hong Kong, in ballast & with a couple of passengers - to arrive back at Melbourne on Jan. 31, 1855 (ex Hong Kong Nov. 22, 1854). On Mar. 06, 1855, the vessel left Melbourne again, but this time for Calcutta (now Kolkata), India, where it arrived on Apl. 28, 1855. It left Calcutta on Jun. 03, 1855 to return to Melbourne. But .... on Jun. 07, 1855, leaky, Adele had to put back to Calcutta for repairs but did not make it - it was wrecked on the Gaspar Sands (mouth of the Hugli or Hooghly River, the channel whereby the river Ganges enters the Bay of Bengal) - on Jun. 10, 1855 as I read the published words - with her crew being saved by a P. & O. steamer. Apparently named Chusan. These contemporary news reports relate - 1 & 2.
Some 'puzzles' in the data. i) It seems likely that LR reported Adele in error to have been a barque. ii) Adele clearly was in existence on Jan. 01, 1855 & should accordingly, you would think, have been granted an Official Number - but was not. I cannot explain the above reference to an 1857 bill of sale related to this vessel.
We thank the City of Hartlepool & 'Trove' Australia, for much of the above data. Is there anything you can add? Or correct? #2341

2   Hindoo
387 tons
1846

A barque. The vessel, which was launched in Nov. 1846, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1848/49 thru 1851/52 only. LR stated to be owned, throughout such period, by J. Hay of Sunderland -  J. Hay & Co. from 1849/50. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9 lists the vessel as owned, in Apl. 1848, by J. Hay of Bishopwearmouth. For initial service, it would seem, from Shields to India, but then ex London. With 'J. Pounder' LR noted to have always been her captain. J. Pounder, I learn, means James Pounder (1820/?) who was granted a Master's certificate on Nov. 30, 1849.
A little operational history. i) On Apl. 11, 1847, Hindoo arrived (Pounder) at Cape of Good Hope with coals, having left Plymouth on Feb. 02, 1847. ii) On Nov. 28, 1847 the vessel arrived at Gravesend, London, ex Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). iii) On Feb. 04, 1848 it left Shields for Calcutta (now Kolkata), India, via Bermuda. But ... iv) On Jun. 15, 1848, as I understood the reference, the vessel left Charleston, South Carolina, U.S.A. for London. v) On Aug. 03, 1848 it left the Downs for Ceylon.
As per line 812 here, the 387 ton barque was, on Mar. 21, 1851, en route from Shields to Aden with a cargo of coal & a crew of 15. It apparently was involved in a collision & sank, at 5S/25W (NW of the Ascension Islands in the S. Atlantic). No lives were lost. The vessel was noted to have then been owned by Walter Allan. Wikipedia tells us (thanks!) that (per the 'Times' & 'Daily News', both of London, on May 15, 1851) Hindoo had collided with John Q. Adams, an American vessel & further that John Q. Adams had rescued the crew. This article provides greater detail, & tells us that Ellis was then Hindoo's captain & that the vessel sank in 10 minutes. Can you add anything additional? #2309

3   Rienzi
211 later 188 tons

2772
1846

A snow or brig. The vessel, which was launched in Jul. 1846, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') from 1846/47 thru 1867/68 with the exceptions of 1856/57 & 1857/58. Rienzi was initially owned thru 1851/52 per LR, by 'Denniston' of Sunderland, for service from Sunderland to London with 'Watson' serving as the vessel's captain. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9 records the vessel, in Apl. 1848, as owned by J. Denniston of Bishopswearmouth, Sunderland.
In 1852/53, again per LR, Mills & Co. of Sunderland became the vessel's owners for service from Sunderland to the Black Sea, with 'Watson' continuing throughout as the vessel's captain. Such data is doubtful or requires an explanation. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5 lists Geo. Hastie & Eleanor Menham, both of Sunderland, as the vessel's owners in Mar. 1854, with John Fenwick her then captain. Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1855 lists George Hastie & Eleanor Menham as the vessel's owners with William Sinclair her captain. While TR of 1856 lists G. Hastie & E. Newham as her then owners.
LR of 1855/56 provided little detail &, as noted above, the vessel was not listed in LRs of the following two years. Such lack of recording may well relate to Rienzi being reported, from Sunderland on Dec. 03, 1856, as being ashore near Sunderland & damaged. And on the next day reported to be a wreck. With 'Gowland', Ferguson Gowland I learn, her then captain. As per these reports. It seems clear that the vessel must have been repairable.
When LR coverage recommenced in 1858/59, Rienzi, now of 188 tons, was registered at Whitby, Yorkshire, & owned by J. Storm (it became Whitby registered, I read, in May 1858). Per Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 that meant John Harrison Storm of Robin Hood's Bay. For service from Newcastle to France in 1858/59 & 1859/60 & thereafter for service from Newcastle to the Baltic. With, per LR, J. Parkes her captain thru 1859/60, R. Smith from 1860/61 thru 1863/64, J. Stancliffe from 1863/64 thru 1865/66 & A. Allen from 1865/66 to 1867/68 - in which year LR noted that the vessel had been 'Wrecked'.
The webmaster has not yet learned what happened to the vessel & exactly when. I read, however, that Rienzi was en route from Memel (then E. Prussia, now Klaipėda, Lithuania) to Newcastle at the time of her loss & was lost on the island of Bornholm (a Danish island in the Baltic, between Sweden & Poland), in Dec. 1867. That first reference was reported, on Dec. 26, 1867, by 'The Commercial Daily List', of London, with Lloyd's data.
132.0 ft. long, signal letters HQMS. An 1867 crew list.
Can you tell us more? #2488

4 Successor
280/294 tons
1850

A snow rigged wooden sailing vessel, that had a very short life indeed, being both built & lost in the same calendar year. Per 1 (wreck ref., Successor, about 45% down, Mutton Island). Likely about 90 ft. long. The vessel was listed in but a single edition of Lloyd's Register, that of 1850/51, see left. The vessel would seem to have been built for 'Culliford' of Sunderland, with G. Miller, also of Sunderland, her Captain. In Nov. 1850, the vessel, under the command of Captain Miller, left Liverpool with a cargo of oats. I presume that she was bound for an Irish port, Limerick perhaps. The vessel encountered a severe storm at sea, as a result of which the vessel lost her masts & it would seem the entire crew was swept overboard. On the morning of Nov. 19, 1850, the vessel was driven ashore at Clohaneinchy (or Clohaninchy), on the Atlantic coast of County Clare, opposite Mutton Island, & became a total wreck. At 52.47N/09.29W. Perhaps at a point between Seafield Point & Mutton Island. Mutton Island (1, 2) is a private 185 acre island, for sale as this listing was first created in Nov. 2011, located 20 miles S. of Galway Bay, & 1 mile off Seafield Harbour, County Clare. The bodies of the Captain, his wife, & three others, were washed ashore on Mutton Island & were buried there on Nov. 24, 1850. The crew was 7 all told. The wreck was plundered by the local people, callously perhaps, & anything valuable was carried away, including, it would seem, every stitch of clothing of one poor crewman who was washed up on the beach. But ... I wonder how they were sure that his clothes were so removed - is it not possible that his clothes were lost either in the fury of the storm or when his body was battered on the shore? Only limited data about the vessel is WWW available. Can you possibly provide more? #1808

5   Chevy Chase
400/384, later 342 or 341 tons

23984
1852

Chevy Chase? A bloody battle, in the Cheviot Hills (Anglo/Scottish border area), that would appear to have been a Percy, Earl of Northumberland, hunting party into Scotland, that was interpreted by the Earl of Douglas as an invasion of Scotland. The Ballad of Chevy Chase commemorates the 1388 battle.
The available data re Chevy Chase is quite confusing. But it does seem possible to get a good idea overall of its ownership history. The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1853/54 thru 1862/63 only.
I have previously advised that the vessel's initial owner was unknown. However, thanks to survey documents made available by the Lloyd's Register Foundation, it is clear that 'Candlish', the vessel's builder, had Chevy Chase sailed to London for sale. A Lloyd's Survey report, prepared while the vessel was under construction, is available here. On Aug. 27, 1852, the vessel was further surveyed re a change of ownership to 'Bonus & Co.', likely J. Bonus & Son, re a proposed voyage to Montreal, Canada. It was surveyed again, on Mar. 11 & 14, 1853 re Hammond & Co. becoming the owners.
This ties in well since, having made a single voyage, I have spotted that Chevy Chase was advertised for private sale on Dec. 31, 1852. From Jan. 04, 1853, the vessel was advertised for sale at a public auction to be held at London on Jan. 13, 1853 - one of the sale announcements. But presumably was not sold at such auction because on Feb. 08, 1853 the vessel was again offered for private sale.
Some 'best-efforts' Chevy Chase operational data. i) On Sep. 08, 1852 Chevy Chase left Deal, Kent, 'Hinton' in command, for a voyage to Quebec & Montreal, both Canada. It arrived at Quebec on Oct. 07, 1852 & was cleared for departure to London on Oct. 30, 1852.
In 1853/54, per LR, the vessel was owned by Hammond & Co. of London with T. Hinson (T. G. Hinson it would seem) serving as the vessel's captain - for service from London to Montreal, Canada.
LR of 1855/56 lists no owner name, port of registry or captain name.
LRs of 1856/57 thru 1861/62 list Lucas Brothers of Bristol as Chevy Chase's owner with 'Roberts' her captain. For service to Africa ex Liverpool in 1856/57 & from Bristol to Africa thereafter thru 1861/62. In late Apl. 1858, the vessel, I think, arrived at Bristol from New Guinea. LR of 1862/63 lists 'Lucas, Brs' as the owner but struck the name out offering no replacement name, the vessel now being of 342 tons for service from Shields to the Mediterranean. J. Bell, per LR, became the vessel's captain in 1862/63. Sounds tidy? I think not.
The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') tells us that the vessel was first registered at Bristol on Nov. 23, 1853 (scroll to #23984). I must presume, accordingly, that 'Lucas' would have from such date owned the vessel rather than from either 1855/56 or 1856/57. MNL further confirms that the vessel was Bristol registered thru 1863. It became South Shields registered in 1864.
MNL tells us that in 1865 & 1866, Chevy Chase's owner, managing owner most likely, was Harry J. Edwards of High Dock, South Shields. But that may well, more correctly have been Harry Smith Edwards. So the ownership sequence seems to be 'Candlish', 'Bonus' in 1852/3, 'Hammond' thru 1853, 'Lucas' thru about 1863 & 'Edwards' thereafter.
120 ft. 3 in. long, signal letters NTVS, 1864 crew list(s) are available via this page.
What finally happened to Chevy Chase? These two pages (1 & 2) tell us that an an unknown date in Nov. 1865, surely late in the month, the vessel is 'supposed to' have foundered between the Isle of Wight, Hampshire, & Swanage, Dorset, while en route from Shields to Carthagena, Spain, with a cargo of coal. Crew of 11 - all lost. It would seem that the vessel foundered in the English Channel with the loss of her entire crew. Chevy Chase had left Shields for Carthagena on Nov. 12, 1865, with Wm. Thomas in command, & was off the Isle of Wight on Nov. 20, 1865. On Nov. 26, 1865, her damaged lifeboat came ashore at Swanage. I read that at the time of her loss the vessel was owned by H. S. Edwards and Co. of South Shields, W. Archbold of Craster (Northumberland coast) & J. W. Nichol of Blyth. Some contemporary news reports 1, 2 (in red) & 3.
Can anybody add to or correct the above account? #2849

6   Lebanon
284 later 249 tons

24798
1854

A snow or brig. This vessel was launched on Jul. 10, 1854, intended for the Mediterranean trade. Lebanon is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1855/56 thru 1859/60 only. It was initially owned, thru 1856/57 per LR, by J. Candlish of Sunderland for service from Sunderland to the Mediterranean. Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1855 records John Candlish as the vessel's then owner with J. W. Campbell her then captain.
In 1857/58, the vessel, now of 249 tons, was, per LR, owned by 'Somerville' of Shields for service from Shields to the Mediterranean. Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1856, however, already lists the vessel as registered at Shields & owned by J. Somerville of North Shields, which owner name is clarified by Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 to mean James Somerville.
Some modest operational history. 'Somerville' clearly was the vessel's captain in addition to being her owner, from & after 1856. Lebanon, 'Somerville' in command, traded with Cork (Ireland), Venice (Italy), Taganrog, (Rostov Oblast, Russia, Sea of Azov, Black Sea), & Genoa (Italy). On Jun. 09, 1859, the vessel was at Genoa having arrived there from Constantinople (now Istanbul, Turkey).
On Sep. 22, 1859, when 35 miles S. of Alicante, Mediterranean coast of Spain, Lebanon sprang a leak. It was, I read, 'supposed to have been enroute from Sulina to Liverpool'. Sulina is located at the mouth of the Sulina branch of the Danube River, Romania, Black Sea. It must have been a major leak because the vessel foundered as a result. The entire crew were saved by barque Stentor & landed at Gibraltar. As per these reports. The Stentor in question was likely the vessel of the name built in Nova Scotia in 1854 (there was another vessel of the name at the time also, built at Sunderland - in 1814). Can you add anything additional, or correct in any way the above text? #2427

HYLTON CARR

OF HYLTON FERRY - 1840/1856

I know nothing about Hylton Carr, alas. He built, I read, 50 vessels between 1840 & 1856 at his Hylton Ferry shipbuilding yard. Have read of both North & South Hylton. Many of his vessels are covered in the build pages re the 1840s & 1850s (site pages 122 & 123). Nine of such vessels are detail listed below. A few others are named only below.

1   Royal Oak
295 later 266 tons

2499
1840

Royal Oak, a snow which was launched on Oct. 30, 1840, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1841/42 thru 1858/59, with the exceptions of 1851/52 & 1852/53. Lloyd's Register Foundation kindly provides this Oct. 1840 Survey document conducted while the vessel was under construction. Which document names 'H. Carr & Co.' as the vessel's builder. I note, however, that one Sunderland build list available to the webmaster rather states 'H. & W. Carr'.
For most of its life, thru 1857/58, Royal Oak, per LR, was owned by the 'Brown' family of Sunderland - T. Brown thru 1840/51 & R. Brown thereafter. But ... The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9, in Apl. 1848 data, lists T. & R. Brown, of Sunderland, as the vessel's then owners. While the equivalent directory of 1854/5, in Mar. 1854 data, lists Robt. Brown of Sunderland as the vessel's owner with John Fielder her then captain. Such ownership data is confirmed by Turnbull's Shipping Registers ('TR') of both 1855 & 1856, with TR of 1855 recording W. Greenfield as the vessel's then captain.
The vessel's service, per LR? While 'Brown ' owned. Ex Sunderland thru 1844/45, from Liverpool to Montreal, Canada, from 1845/46 thru 1847/48, from Sunderland to Quebec, Canada, in 1848/49 & 1849/50. In 1853/54, LR notes service from Sunderland to the Baltic & from 1856/57 thru 1857/58 from Sunderland to the Mediterranean.
With, again per LR, H. Robson serving as the vessel's captain from 1841/42 thru 1850/51, J. Fielder from 1853/54 thru 1855/56, & 'Gre'nfield', clearly 'Greenfield', in 1856/57 & 1857/58,
In 1858/59, per LR, Royal Oak became owned by 'Mitches'n', of Sunderland, with 'Nattrass' now her captain - for continued service from Sunderland to the Mediterranean. Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 records Charles T. Mitcheson & Nicholas Nattrass, as the then owners of the now 266 ton snow.
The webmaster has not researched the operational history of Royal Oak. But he did note the following selected references to the vessel while under the command of 'Fielder' - who would seem to have been her captain from late Dec. 1851 thru Sep. 1854. i) On Feb. 16, 1852 Royal Oak left Sunderland for New York, U.S.A., with 360 tons of coal. It arrived back at London on Jul. 24, 1852 ex Parsborough (Parrsboro, Bay of Fundy), Nova Scotia, Canada. ii) In early Sep. 1852, the vessel was at Elsinore, Denmark, en route to Cronstadt (St. Petersburg, Russia). It left Cronstadt on Oct. 19, 1852 on its return journey to London, where it arrived on Nov. 12, 1852. iii) The vessel went on to Hartlepool & on Dec. 19, 1852 encountered a gale while en route from Hartlepool to London. The vessel struck on Aldborough Neaps (off the Suffolk coast) very leaky, was towed into Lowestoft & was 'laid upon the mud' there. iv) In late Mar. 1853, Royal Oak carried coal ex Hartlepool to Newhaven (Connecticut), U.S.A., went on to Quebec & arrived back at Hartlepool on Sep. 11, 1853. v) On Apl. 03, 1854, the vessel left Sunderland for Quebec, arriving there on Jun. 22, 1854 with part of the crew of Sun, a brig which had been lost in the ice. Sun was built at Sunderland in 1840. On Jul. 24, 1854 Royal Oak left Quebec for Stockton (arr. Sep. 07, 1854).
88 ft. 0 in. long
What finally happened to Royal Oak? There are many newspaper references to inns & hotels of the name but relatively few references to ships named Royal Oak. But I learn that on Aug. 07, 1858, the vessel, 'Natrass' in command, was cleared out of Quebec for Seaham. Further, that on Oct. 12, 1858 the vessel arrived at Sunderland ex Seaham, to depart from Sunderland on Nov. 02, 1858 for Bordeaux, SW France, with 424 tons of coal.
I read that on Nov. 20, 1858, Antionetta y Juana, a Spanish brig commanded by 'de Urrutia', en route from Bilbao, Spain, to Norway, put into Queenstown, Ireland, leaky & with her rudder badly damaged. Such vessel had on board the rescued crew of Royal Oak. On Nov. 11, 1858, during a ESE gale, the Spanish brig had come upon Royal Oak waterlogged & in a sinking condition when at 46.36N/5.56W (in the Bay of Biscay). And just five minutes after her coming on the scene, Royal Oak had sunk. 'Nattrass' was Royal Oak's captain at the time of her loss. One news report noted (clearly incorrectly) that R. Brown of Sunderland, was then her owner. There is not 100% clarity as to the name of the Spanish brig which was also reported as being i) Antoinette de Juano & ii) Antionetta Juana. I note that the Shipping & Mercantile Gazette reported on Nov. 23, 1858 that Antionetta Juana arrived at Queenstown on Nov. 22, 1858. These contemporary news reports relate 1 & 2.
Is there anything you can add? Or correct? #2927

2   John and Ann
108/90, later 83 tons

3527
1843

A schooner. With a couple of missing years, John & Ann is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1843/44 thru 1860/61, owned thru 1855/56 by S. Fletcher of Newcastle, later of South Shields, initially for service from Sunderland to Rouen, France, later Leith to London, Shields to Caen or Bordeaux, both France, & ex Hartlepool. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9 lists the Newcastle registered vessel as owned by S. Fletcher in Jul. 1848. The equivalent directory of 1854 lists the vessel, now Shields registered, as then owned by Stephen Fletcher of South Shields with Jas. Oliver her then captain. Turnbull's Shipping Registers of both 1855 & 1856 record S. Fletcher as her then owner, the 1855 version with Geo. Wright her captain.
LR of 1857/58 lists John & Ann as Newcastle registered & owned by 'Boutland', for service ex Newcastle. The LR of the following year provides minimal detail which suggests that the vessel was in course of being sold.
In 1859/60, per LR, W. Simpson, of Whitby, Yorkshire, became her owner for service from Newcastle to Rotterdam. Which owner name is clarified by Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 to mean William Simpson of Whitby. This page (in red) confirms such ownership but advises (possibly in error) that John & Ann was Whitby registered from 1856.
On Dec. 17, 1860, per line 908 here, the 82 ton schooner sank at Barber Sand (off Caister, Norfolk), while en route from Whitby to Littlehampton, West Sussex, with a cargo of stone. None of the 5 man crew was lost. The vessel then stated to be owned by William Simpson. The loss was described here (in red) as being at Patch Sand, near Yarmouth.
Can you add to and/or correct the above? #2463

3   John Murray
200, later
179 tons

23626
1848

A snow or brig. John Murray, which was launched in Nov. 1848, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1848/49 thru 1857/58, then a 'gap' of 16 years, & again from 1874/75 thru 1882/83.
The vessel, per LR, was owned thru 1853/54 by S. Murray of Sunderland, with P. Murray her captain, for consistent service from Sunderland to London.
In 1854/55, per LR, John Murray became owned by Robinson & Co., of Whitby, Yorkshire, for service, thru 1856/57 at least, from Liverpool to Quebec, Canada. With F. Robinson serving as the vessel's captain.
A puzzle, perhaps, is that the North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5, in Mar. 1854 data, lists the vessel as registered at Liverpool & owned by Daniel Willis and James Poole, with G. S. Justice serving as the vessel's captain. None of those names are referenced in LR.
In 1908, a fine Whitby Shipping History volume was published (a 'Google' book), Richard Weatherill the volume's author. Such volume has proved itself, to the webmaster, as being over time most accurate. It tells us that John Murray became Whitby registered in 1854, owned by Ed. Corner, James Mutter & Hen. Robinson. The vessel's 1879 owners are noted to have been Ed Corner & Ann Stevenson, each with 32 shares in the vessel. Further, that the vessel was 'sold to Hartlepool' in Mar. 1879.
The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') comes to our rescue re the many years of LR silence. MNL records John Murray as registered at Whitby from 1858 thru 1882, & from 1865 thru 1876 (1865 & 1870) MNL lists Henry Stephenson, of Whitby, as the vessel's owner. The renewed LR coverage of 1874/75 thru 1877/78 essentially confirms the MNL data - the now 179 ton vessel is listed as registered at Whitby, owned by H. Stephenson, with no captain name recorded. And from 1878/79 thru 1882/83, owned by W. H. Wattley, LR stated to be stiil registered at Whitby.
Now MNL records the ownership in those final years a little differently. In 1878 & 1879, MNL lists Edward Corner, of Whitby, as John Murray's then owner & in 1880 thru 1882 lists William H. Wattley, a resident of Hartlepool as owner of the Whitby registered vessel. It seems likely that the Whitby ownership of the vessel from 1858 is essentially the same group of individuals over the years with changes in managing owner. I say that because what LR & MNL record is the name of the managing owner in cases where there is more than a single owner. Turnbull's Shipping Register of both 1855 & 1856 lists her 1855 owners as being E. Corner, J. Mutter and H. Robinson, all of Whitby, with F. Robinson her then captain. While Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 lists Henry Robinson, Edward Corner & James Mutter. Note the E. Corner name, which shows up 20 or so years later in 1878.
84.9 ft. long, signal letters NSKB. A great many crew lists, thru 1883, are available here.
LR of 1882/83 notes that the vessel had been 'Lost'. Now John Murray is not a frequently used name for a vessel. I read, thanks to 'Welsh Newspapers Online', that a vessel named John Murray, surely this vessel, left Hartlepool for London on Jan. 25, 1883 & was never seen again. The Whitby history volume, referred to above, notes that the vessel was 'supposed lost' in the North Sea in Jan. 1883. Per this brief report, in red, 'Furlong' was in command. With a crew of 6, I have also read, & likely then a Hartlepool registered vessel. (Note Denock Water, also missing, clearly means Devock Water, built in 1881 at Whitehaven).
I have now confirmed that on Jan. 25, 1883 John Murray left Hartlepool for London with a cargo of coal under the command of 'Furlong'. She clearly did not arrive at London. I read further, in a report from Maasluis (just W. of Rotterdam) dated Feb. 16, 1883, that 'Roest' a fishing boat captain, on Feb. 11, 1883, at 55.56N, had picked up a nameboard marked John Murray. And that there was, at the time, much wreckage floating about. I note that (as I interpret the words) W. H. Wattley had died & that his son was probably the vessel's owner at the time of her loss.
Is there anything you can add to the above. Or correct? #2747

4   Escape
248 (later 258) tons

21562
1849

A wooden sailing ship. 2 masts, snow rigged, with a female bust figurehead. An expired eBay item, 3 documents including a mortgage document, was, some years ago, my main source of then data. Per that source, the vessel would seem to have been owned by Sylvester Emile Sichel (1850) & registered at Liverpool. Now, in 2020 & 2024, we add additional data.
The vessel was launched on Apl. 24, 1849. It is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1848/49 thru 1858/59 &, per LR, was owned thru 1854/55 by 'Huntley' of Sunderland. For consistent service from Sunderland to Archangel, Russia, with 'Huntley' serving as the vessel's captain.
This listing was updated having seen Marwood's North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5, in Mar. 1854 data, which lists the Liverpool registered vessel as then rather owned by Atkinson Wilkin of Liverpool, with John Brown her captain. LRs of 1855/56 thru 1858/59 all list the vessel, now of 258 tons, as Liverpool registered & owned by A. Sichel (A. Sichell in 1858/59), for service ex London thru 1857/58 & from Southampton to the Mediterranean in 1858/59. With J. Brown her captain thru 1857/58 & C. Shrift in 1858/59.
What finally happened to Escape? Wikipedia records (thanks!) that a brig of the name was wrecked on Mar. 16, 1858, 15 miles E. of 'Djygelle', Algeria, with the loss of three of her nine crew. Per an article in 'The Times' of London, of Mar. 26, 1858. Now Escape was not a common name for a vessel. It is likely that such Escape was 'our' Escape. It would be good to read the 'Times' article in question to see if it provides additional detail.
The webmaster has not been able to access the 'Times' article but spotted these two Lloyd's List references to the loss of Escape - the first of which likely was the source for the 'Times' report. The articles tell us that the Liverpool registered vessel left Shields on Feb. 14, 1858 & was wrecked, 15 miles E. of Djygelli or Djidjelli, Algeria, on Mar. 16, 1858. Three lives were reported to have been lost while six crew members, including the vessel's captain, were saved.
Such articles do not state the name of the vessel's then captain. I learn, however, that Escape, with 'Thrift' in command i) had left Newcastle for Alexandria, Egypt, with a cargo of coal, in mid Feb. 1858, ii) was reported on Feb. 22, 1858 to have safely arrived at Portland Roads, Dorset, & iii) had left Portland Roads on Feb. 24, 1858 to continue its voyage. It seems clear that the lost vessel was, indeed, 'our' Escape. The webmaster has not spotted details as to the circumstances of the vessel's loss.
Can you tell us anything additional?

5   Trio
205/191, later 176 tons

24506
1849

A snow or brig. Trio, which was launched in Nov. 1849, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1850/51 thru 1857/58 only. It was, per LR, owned thru 1853/54 by Bell & Co. of Sunderland with 'Robson' LR noted to have been her captain. For service from Sunderland to Marseilles, France, in 1850/51 & from Liverpool to California, U.S.A., from 1851/52 thru 1853/54.
I note that on Aug. 18, 1853, the vessel, then lying at London, was offered for sale. As per this sale announcement.
It seems clear that Trio was purchased by G. Duncan of London, who, per LR, owned the vessel from 1854/55 thru 1857/58, for service from London to Australia, with 'Walker' her captain. The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') tells us that the vessel became London registered on Sep. 24, 1853.
I note that MNL records the vessel as London registered in 1857 & 1858, & Sunderland registered again, from 1859 thru 1863.
Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 records the Sunderland registered vessel as then owned by Francis, George, Anne & Jane Robson, presumably of Sunderland. Possibly related to 'Robson' her earlier captain?
Crew lists re 1863 seem to be available via this page.
What finally happened to Trio? I learn that in mid Mar. 1863, the vessel was en route from Sunderland to Saint Malo, Brittany, France, with a cargo of coal, 'Dean' in command & with a crew of 6 all told. Early on Mar. 16, 1863, in hazy weather & in high seas, Trio got onto the Margate Sands (NE Kent - part of the Goodwin Sands) & became a total wreck. The crew were rescued by Eclipse, a Ramsgate lugger, & landed at Ramsgate at about 8 a.m. that morning. I read that the loss was caused by an unfortunate navigational error - the Girdler Light was mistaken for the North Sand Head Light. At the time of loss, Trio was noted to have then been owned by James Robson & was insured. As per these contemporary news reports (1, 2 & 3).
Can you tell us anything additional? Or correct the above in any way? #2729

6   Resolution
368/419, later
390 tons

12310
1850

A barque. The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1851/52 thru 1865/66. Resolution was, per LR, initially owned by J. Rodham, of Sunderland, thru 1859/60, for service from Sunderland to the Mediterranean thru 1854/55 & for service ex London thereafter. Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1856 lists J. Rodham, of Hylton, as her then owner, while Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 lists the vessel as then registered at Scarborough & owned by John Rodham of Scarborough.
In 1860/61, per LR, the vessel became of 390 tons, & owned, thru 1861/62 only, by Doxford of Sunderland for service ex Sunderland. In 1861/62, Nicholson Jun., also of Sunderland, became the vessel's owner i) for continued service ex Sunderland, ii) for service from Swansea, Wales, to Madiera in 1863/64 & iii) for service from Sunderland to Montreal, Canada, in both 1864/65 & 1865/66. Resolution is listed in the Mercantile Navy List of 1865, registered at Sunderland, with William Nicholson, of Sunderland, noted to be her then owner. LR of 1865/66 notes that the vessel had been 'Wrecked'.
110.0 ft. long, signal letters LBHQ. Crew lists for a couple of years are available here.
Earlier I could not tell you what finally happened to the vessel & when. Now, thanks to the kindness of John Gray, I can advise that on Dec. 17, 1865, en route, with a cargo of grain, from Trieste, Italy, to either Cork, Ireland, or Falmouth, Cornwall, for orders, Resolution foundered at a point about 20 miles NW of the island of Galite (located in the western Mediterranean, 24 miles off the coast of Tunisia). The vessel was at the time captained by John McDonald Gray (1839/1884), one of John's ancestors. His first command indeed. The crew of 13 (all told) were saved by Unione, an Austrian brig, & landed at Valetta, Malta. Wikipedia essentially confirms such data per a report in the 'The Times' of London on Jan. 9, 1866. It would be good to learn more as to the circumstances of the vessel's loss. Can you tell us anything additional? #2407

    Myrtle
541/621, later
488 tons
165
Lady Clermont
1853

A ship, later a barque. See here.

    Portia
325/336, later
356 & 322 tons
3972
1853

A barque. See here.

    Freedom
334/338 tons
2271
1854

A barque. Owned by 'Harper &' - W. & J. S. Harper, R. H. Weightman, R. Swan & W. Wigham in 1856, registered at Shields per Turnbull's Shipping Register.

7   Isabellas
219, later 199 tons

7632
1854

A snow or brig. The record for this vessel is confusing indeed. I now see that the vessel was first registered, as Isabellas, at Shields, on Dec. 13, 1854 (scroll to #7632). So far as I can see, Isabella (with no 's' at the end), said to be an 1855 vessel, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1855/56 thru 1859/60, owned thru that period by J. Dowey of North Shields with W. Arkley serving as the vessel's captain. Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1855 (in the supplement) lists Isabellas (with an 's' on the end), registered at Shields, owned by J. & E. Dowey of North Shields with W. Arkell her captain. TR of 1856 lists J. & E. Dowey of North Shields as the then owner of Isabellas & provides an Official Number ('ON') of 7632. Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 confirms that ON number & lists James and Elizabeth Dowey as owners of Isabellas, a brig of 219 tons. Re ON 7632, Crewlist.org (insert 7632) rather records only a vessel named Isabellas. Upon further searching I find that LR records a vessel of such name, a snow of 199 tons, from 1860/61 thru 1869/70, owned by D. Hill, of Shields thru 1862/63 & then of Sunderland. J. Hill was such vessel's captain until part way thru 1863/64. Under 'Hill' ownership, the vessel served ex Shields to the Baltic, to France & to the West Indies in 1860/61, 1861/62 & 1862/63 respectively & after that date saw service as a Sunderland coaster. The Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') of 1865 & 1866 record the vessel, registered at Southampton, Hants, & owned by William Hill, jun. of Southampton (registered there from 1862). MNLs of 1867 thru 1872 (1870) all list the Sunderland registered vessel's then owner as being William Stokeld, of Seaham, Durham. We are not quite at the end of the documentary record. So far as I can see, LR of 1870/71 thru 1873/74 does not record the vessel, but LR of 1874/75 does - i.e. Isabellas owned by J. Harrison of Sunderland but stated as being an 1854 vessel - the first LR reference to a year other than 1855. TR of 1874 lists John Harrison, of Robin Hood's Bay, Yorkshire, as her then owner. As is confirmed by MNLs of 1874 & 1875. 88.5 ft. long, later (1874/75) 90.8 ft. long, signal letters JTRQ. What finally happened to the vessel is not yet to hand. Many crew lists are available here. Can you clarify any of this rather confusing record. #2220

8   Ocean Spray
364/363, later 328 tons

33732
1854

A barque. The vessel, which was launched in Jul. 1854, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1855/56 thru 1866/67. LR of 1855/56 advises that the vessel was then registered at Liverpool, owned by Wilson & Co., with 'Grthwait' serving as the vessel's captain. For service ex Sunderland. A fine site which requests no links or recognition tells us that 'Wilson Boyd & Co.' of Sunderland were the vessel's first owners. I can tell you that Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1855 lists the vessel as registered at Liverpool, owned by 'Wilson & Co.', with Garthwaite serving as the vessel's captain. The Wilson ownership was clearly of short duration. LRs of 1856/57 thru 1866/67 all list the vessel as owned by Moon & Co. of Sunderland, with T. Moon her captain thru 1862/63, W. Snowd'n her captain from 1862/63 thru 1865/66 & A. Trotter thereafter. For service from Sunderland to the Mediterranean thru 1861/62, from Sunderland to New York from 1862/63 thru 1864/65, & from Sunderland to Cadiz, Spain, thereafter. LR first records the vessel at 328 tons in 1862/63. Now the Mercantile Navy Lists of 1865 & 1866 both list F. Robson of Sunderland as the vessel's then owner. It is clear that Moon & Robson were joint owners of the vessel. TR of 1856 tells us that T. J. Moon & F. Robson, both of Sunderland, were the vessel's then owners, owner names which are clarified by Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 as meaning Thomas J. Moon & Francis Robson. 114.0 ft. long, signal letters RGMS.
LR of 1866/67 notes that the vessel had been 'Wrecked'. No detail has yet come to hand as to the circumstances or date of her loss. Some crew lists are available here. Is there anything you can add? #2219

9   Percy
126 later 124 tons

7639
1855

A snow but see below. The vessel, which was first registered, at Shields, on Nov. 27, 1855 (scroll to #7639) is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1856/57 thru 1880/81. For most of those years, i.e. thru 1875/76, the vessel, per LR, was owned by 'Barry & Co.', of Whitby, Yorkshire, thru 1863/64 & of Amble, Northumberland, thereafter. With 'D. Dchbrn', presumably D. Ditchburn, her captain thru 1860/61, R. Hart her captain from 1860/61 thru 1873/74 & J. Stewart thereafter - per LR thru to 1880/81. For service to France - from Sunderland thru 1859/60 & from Blyth thereafter thru 1874/75. The vessel's ownership is clarified by Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1856, which lists the then owners of the Shields registered vessel as being J. Shotton of Amble, J. Shotton of Warkworth, R. Green of Toxton, J. Henry & J. Barry, both of Whitby. Her ownership is slightly different as per Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 - James Shotton of Amble, John Shotton of Warkworth, Robt. Green of Toxton, John H. Barry & John Barry, both of Whitby. The Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') of 1865 thru 1876 all list the vessel as Shields registered & owned by James Shotton of Amble as presumably her managing owner. The ownership is different again, in 1874 per Turnbull's Register - then owned by James Shotton of Amble, John Shotton of Warkworth, & Donald McInnes, of Alnmouth, with, respectively 42, 11 & 11 shares in the vessel. LR of 1876/77 lists J. Shotton of Amble as her then owner. There were, it seems, further ownership changes. LR of 1877/78 lists D. Stephenson of Amble as the Amble registered vessel's owner but substitutes that name with A. Kent, who owned it to the end. MNLs of 1878 thru 1881 (1880) list John Kent, sen., of Mevagissey, Cornwall, as the owner of the vessel, still Shields registered. LR listed the vessel's length at 80.0 ft. in 1863/64 & then 79.0 ft. from 1864/65 when it became of 124 tons. Signal letters JTSF.
I have noted, above, that the vessel was a snow. As was reported by LR thru 1859/60 & MNLs from & after 1865. LR, however, listed the vessel as a schooner from 1860/61.
LR of 1880/81 notes that the vessel had been 'Lost'. I have read, at a site that requests no recognition, (I thank them regardless) that on Oct. 28, 1880, the vessel foundered in the St. George's Channel (between southern Wales & Ireland) while en route from Par (S. coast of Cornwall) to Glasgow with a cargo of china clay. So far I have found no other references to her loss. Many crew lists are available here. Is there anything you can add? The circumstances of her loss, perhaps. #2221

H. & W. CARR

1837/1845

I know nothing about H. & W. Carr or H. & W. Carr & Co. Who built, I read, 29 vessels between 1837 & 1845.  Of Hylton Ferry, I read.

1   Carrs
214/205 tons
1839

A snow or brig. Carrs, which was launched in Nov. 1839, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1839/40 thru 1850/51, & not thereafter. It was initially owned by Carr & Co., of Sunderland, for service from Sunderland to London &, in the 1841/45 period, for service from Liverpool to St. Petersburg, Russia. Of interest, Carr & Co. had earlier acquired this vessel of the name, built at Sunderland in 1838. But soon sold it to rather acquire this 1839 built vessel.
During the period of 'Carr' ownership, T. Cliburn, per LR, served as the vessel's captain thru 1841/42 & then 'Vennis' from 1841/42 thru about 1845/46.
In 1845/46, thru 1850/51, per LR, 'Nicholson' of South Shields became Carrs' owner for service from Shields to St. Petersburg thru 1847/48 & for service from Shields to the Baltic in 1848/49 & 1849/50. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9 lists the vessel, in Jul. 1848, as registered at Newcastle & owned by J. H. Nicholson & Co. of South Shields. During the period of 'Nicholson' ownership, 'Nicholson' is LR stated to have been the vessel's captain.
The webmaster suggests that the above data about the vessel's captains is significantly flawed. There are a great many references in 'Lloyd's List' to Carrs, 'Nicholson' in command, from the spring of 1840 thru to Aug. 1848. In that period the vessel traded with Hamburg & Wismar, Germany, St. Petersburg & Archangel, Russia, also with many other Baltic ports - incl. Danzig, Stettin, Memel & Riga. For many different U.K. ports - incl. Newcastle, Sunderland, Liverpool, Stockton, Hull, Leith, Whitby, Dundee, Seaham & Lynn. It seems clear that 'Nicholson' was the vessel's captain for most of the vessel's life. The webmaster has not yet spotted any reliable references to 'our' Carrs after Aug. 1848.
The LR data re 1850/51 is limited - it seems likely that the vessel had been sold or maybe had been lost.
I find that the U.K. Government published a list of vessels lost in 1852, which list includes Carrs - here ex here. Which tells us that the vessel, of 205 tons, en route from Liverpool to Newcastle with a cargo of salt, had run upon rocks, 2 miles E. of Moelfre (NE coast of the Isle of Anglesey, N. Wales) & become a total wreck. It refers to a crew of five & advises that Geo. Foreman was then both the vessel's owner & master.
Wikipedia reports that the vessel's crew were rescued by lifeboat & that the vessel had become a wreck by Oct. 04, 1852. Yes indeed! Awards were later granted to the crew of the lifeboat - of the Anglesea Branch Institution, based at Moelfre, who on Sep. 29, 1852 saved Carrs'' seven man crew. Soon after they had done so the vessel, I read, broke to pieces. There is much confusion about the identity of the vessel which was so lost that day. This U.K. Government report, at line 2064, ex here, identifies the lost vessel as being i) built at Sunderland in 1838, ii) of 287 tons with a crew of 8 & iii) at the time of her loss was owned by George Foreman. The webmaster believes much of that report to be in error & that the loss was truly of the 1839 built vessel named Carrs, i.e. this vessel.
Can you add to or correct any of the above text? #2438

2   Scio
288/286 tons

34881
1839

A snow or brig. The webmaster believes that Scio is an 1859 vessel, even though Lloyd's Register ('LR'), when it listed the vessel thru 1857/58, consistently recorded it as a Dec. 1838 vessel.
The vessel is LR listed from 1839/40 thru 1849/50, a gap of 4 years, from 1854/55 thru 1857/58, a gap of 15 years, & from 1874/75 thru 1881/82.
The vessel's initial owner would seem to have been Wood & Co., of Newcastle, for service, per LR, from Sunderland to Quebec, Canada, in 1839/40. 'Wood's' ownership may have been very short. LR of 1840/41 recorded Wood & Co. as the vessel's owner, but then struck the name out. No owner name is LR referenced fron 1840/41 thru 1845/46. While 'Wood/No Name' owned the vessel, 'Donaldson' is LR listed as the vessel's captain. And her service, per LR, was from Shields to Quebec in 1840/41 & from Shields to the Baltic from 1841/42 thru 1845/46.
In 1846/47, per LR, thru 1857/58, J. Parkin, of South Shields is LR noted to have been Scio's owner for service, where indicated, from Sunderland to London. With G. Ramsay her captain from 1846/47 thru 1849/50 & T. Winter from 1854/55 thru 1857/58. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9 records the vessel as then Newcastle registered & owned, in Apl. 1848 data, by J. Parkin & Co. of South Shields. The equivalent directory of 1854/5, in Apl. 1854 data, lists the Newcastle vessel as owned by J. Parken & C. H. Fleck, both of South Shields, D. Cropton of Bishopwearmouth, Sunderland, J. Wilson of Whitby & W. D. C. Balls of Lowestoft, Suffolk. With T. Winter her captain. Turnbull's Shipping Registers ('TR') of 1855 & 1856 essentially confirm such data but with J. Parker. While Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 lists the vessel as now Shields registered & owned by James and Robert Parkin (of South Shields), John Gibson & Dorothy Cropton (of Sunderland) & J. Wilson (of Whitby).
The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') comes to our rescue in the absence of LR data. MNL records the vessel as Newcastle registered in 1857 & 1858, registered at Shields from 1859 thru 1865, registered at South Shields in 1866, registered at London from 1867 thru 1881 & again South Shields registered in 1882.
In 1865 & 1866, MNL lists James Parkin of South Shields as the vessel's presumably managing owner. From 1867 thru 1871, MNL records J. H. Brenan, of London, as her owner.
Now this listing was initially advanced having spotted that Scio was offered for sale in 1870. On Mar. 12, 1870 & later from Jun. 08, 1870 thru Sep. 26, 1870 the vessel, then lying at Lady Dock, London, was offered for sale by R. Brenan and Son of London. One of the many sale announcements.
MNLs of 1872 thru 1881 record Jas. Robt. (or Rt.) Goodhew, of Rotherhithe, London, as her owner, such data being confirmed by LRs of 1874/75 thru 1881/82 (with no captain data).
LR of 1881/82 & also MNL of 1882 records the now South Shields registered vessel as owned by John B. Bushell, of South Shields.
94.4 ft. long, signal letters RMHJ, many crew lists are available via this page.
What finally happened to Scio? LR of 1881/82 notes that the vessel had 'Stranded'.
The month of Nov. 1881 proved to be a disastrous month for Scio. On Nov. 01, 1881, the vessel left Shields for Copenhagen, Denmark, under the command of Captain Carr - Jacob Wilson Carr, I learn - with a cargo of coal. Soon after leaving port, the vessel encountered heavy weather when about 40 miles off Coquet Island (near Amble, Northumberland). A sudden lurch caused the mainboom to snap - striking Henry Munro an 18 year old seaman who was standing on deck. He died, alas, a few minutes after he was hit. The vessel put into Leith (Edinburgh), Scotland, on Nov. 05, 1881 to land Munro's body & to get repairs, the vessel being leaky as a result of the bad weather. On Nov. 11, 1881, now repaired, Scio left Leith for Copenhagen, but struck the Heriot (or Herwit) Rocks near Inchkeith (a Firth of Forth island), & again became leaky. It returned again to Leith. On Nov. 28, 1881 it left a third time for Copenhagen, but ran into a hurricane which caused giant damage to shipping up and down the E. coast. Scio became waterlogged, tried to return to Leith but was not able to do so. Scio then attempted to make the harbour at Methil, Fife, but did not make that either. She drove upon the beach near Methil, becoming a total wreck. All seven crew members tried to enter a ship's boat to get to shore but the painter broke & one seaman was left on board. The boat, now with 6 crew members, capsized - its occupants were saved by John Robertson of Methil in his yawl. All seven did make it safely to shore. A little confusion - another report says the crew were eight in number. Per this U.K. Government 1881 wreck listing. And per these contemporary news reports 1, 2 & 3.
Can you tell us anything additional? #2814

3   Taylor
265/274, later 261 tons
1839

A snow or brig. Taylor, completed in Jun. 1839, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1839/40 thru 1850/51 with the exception of 1847/48. The vessel's launch on May 28, 1839 (in red).
It was owned, thru 1846/47 at least, by Gateshead & Tyne Shipping Co. of Newcastle (per LR, the launch notice records the name differently), for service, thru 1843/44, from Sunderland to St. Petersburg, Russia, & from 1844/45 thru 1846/47 at least for service as a Shields coaster. With R. Stephenson her captain thru 1844/45 & B. Youens from 1844/45 thru 1846/47.
In 1848/49, LR lists J. Pippet of South Shields as Taylor's new owners for service from Shields to Hamburg, Germany, which service became Shields to the Baltic. LRs of 1849/50 & 1850/51 list J. Pippett (with an extra 't' at the end) as her owner for service from Shields to Hamburg in 1849/50 & from Shields to the Baltic in 1850/51. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9, in Jul. 1848 data, lists the 261 ton snow as Newcastle registered & owned by J. & T. Pippet of South Shields. During the period of 'Pippet' ownership, G. Skee is LR noted to have been the vessel's captain.
What finally happened to Taylor? On Jun. 07, 1850, per line 213 on this page, the 261 ton square sank at Filsand, (or Vilsandi, a small island off the west coast of Saaremaa Island, Estonia, the Baltic), while en route from Newcastle to the Baltic with a cargo of coal. Crew of 9 - none lost. Then stated to be owned by John Pippet. I read that J. Carlin was in command at the time, & that Taylor struck on a rock near Filsand. When she came off she filled & sank near to the Dagerort Light. The crew took to the ship's long boat with a part of their effects & were picked up from that long boat by Martha (a brig built in 1841 at Cape Breton, Canada), 'Ferris' her master. And landed at Cronstadt. A contemporary news report.
I read that the Dagerort Light, or Kõpu Lighthouse, on the Estonian island of Hiiumaa, was built in 1531 & has been continously in service ever since.
Is there anything you can add? Or correct? #2745

4   Hero
338/374 tons
1845

A barque. Hero, which was launched in Jan. 1845 is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1844/45 thru 1851/52 only, owned throughout such entire period by Blair & Co. of Sunderland. With, again per LR, 'Smart' her initial captain thru 1847/48 & then 'Hendersn', presumably 'Henderson', from 1848/49 thru 1851/52.
The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/49 records the vessel as then being Sunderland registered & in Apl. 1848 owned by Spark, Simey, & Blair, of Sunderland.
Hero's service per LR? From Sunderland i) to Canada in 1844/45 & 1845/46, ii) to the Mediterranean in 1846/47 & 1847/48, & ex Sunderland with no destination port noted in 1850/51 & 1851/52. The vessel may have served from Gloucester to Calcutta (now Kolkata), India, in 1848/49. Service from Liverpool to Calcutta is referenced in LRs of 1848/49 & 1849/50.
The vessel is site listed having noted that the vessel, 'Smart' in command, was, in the spring of 1846, en route to Quebec, Canada. It fortunately came upon Lyra, also built in 1845 at Sunderland, SW of the southern tip of Greenland. Lyra had suffered bow-sprit damage & had 9 ft. of water in her holds having, on Apl. 24, 1846, encountered ice. Hero took Lyra's crew aboard & later landed them at Quebec. All as you can read here.
On Nov. 29, 1850, the vessel, 'Elms' in command, left Liverpool for Calcutta, but put into Beaumaris (Isle of Anglesey, North Wales) on Dec. 5, 1850. It resumed its voyage to Calcutta on Dec. 10, 1850.
What finally happened to Hero? I read that the vessel was, on May 19, 1851, lost on Suadava Atoll while en route from Liverpool to Calcutta. As per line 864 on this U.K. Government 1851 wreck listing. Stated to have then been owned by Geo. Spark, with a crew of 15 none of whom were lost. This 'Lloyd's List' report tells us that 'Elms' was the vessel's captain at the time of the loss & that the crew were landed at Galle (then Ceylon, now Sri Lanka). The Suadava Atoll (known by many names incl. Huvadhu), is an atoll located N. of the Maldives in the Indian Ocean.
The webmaster believes that there is some doubts as regards the details of the vessel's loss. The 'Indian News', of London, in its Jul. 17, 1851 edition, tells us that Hero's crew left the vessel in ship's boats & landed at Point de Galle - on May 14, 1851. And also notes that the date she ran aground, surely rather earlier than May 14, 1851, was then unknown.
Can you add anything additional? Or correct the above text in any way? #2592

5   Daisy
242/252 tons
1846

A snow or brig. The vessel, which was launched in Jun. 1846, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1845/46 thru 1852/53 only. Its initial owner, per LR, was T. Elliott, of Sunderland, for service from Sunderland to Archangel, far north of Russia, in 1845/46, & from Liverpool to Hamburg, Germany, in 1846/47 & 1847/48 - with T. Johns her captain thru 1848/49.
LR of 1848/49 lists W. Holmes of Sunderland as the vessel's new owner. Per the North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9, in Apl. 1848 data, 'Holmes & Scurr' of Sunderland. For service from Sunderland to Hamburg thru 1852/53 with 'Holler', per LR, always serving as the vessel's captain.
At operational matter. On Aug. 07, 1846, en route from Onega (SW of Archangel) to Liverpool, 'Johns' likely in command, the vessel was spoken to by Rhoda. Daisy was making a great deal of water having struck a sandbank off Orlofka Point in the White Sea (near Archangel).
It seems, to the webmaster, that 'Holler' (noted above) was the vessel's captain but only briefly so. The webmaster has spotted just one reference to 'Holler' - at Sunderland on Nov. 22, 1850. Thereafter it seems clear that 'Oliver' (Chas. Oliver it would seem), became the vessel's captain. Daisy made a number of voyages ex Sunderland to Cronstadt (St. Petersburg, Russia), Oliver in command, from Sep. 1851 thru Nov. 1852. It then, in late Mar. or early Apl. 1853, sailed from Sunderland to Hamburg, Germany, & then onwards via St. John's, Newfoundland (arr. Jun. 09, 1853), Canada, to Harbour Grace, Conception Bay, Newfoundland (arr. Jun. 28, 1853). On Jul. 04, 1853 the vessel cleared Harbour Grace for Quebec, Canada, in ballast. Alas, Daisy never made it to Quebec. It went onshore at Cape Race (S. of St. John's) on Jul. 05, 1853, & was locally reported as being a total wreck. Per Lloyd's List, of Aug. 04, 1853 the vessel was got off and towed to nearby Renews 'much disabled and in a leaky state'. The crew were all saved. They all arrived, at St. John's (I think), by longboat. It would seem that the vessel must have been beyond repair. The webmaster has not spotted any later references to Daisy. If you can add to and/or correct the above text, do consider being in touch with the webmaster for inclusion of your data here. #2408

JAMES CARR

1838/1840

I know nothing about James Carr, alas. He built, I read, 18 or so vessels between 1838 & 1840. Including the vessels listed below.

1 Sheraton Grange
261 tons
1838

A snow or brig. Per 1 (data - link no longer works. Will the site regenerate?), 2 (1854 item), 3 (part of an 1890 postcard image of Herrington, the lifeboat coxswain), 4 (Harriet). The vessel, which was launched in Nov. 1838, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1839/40 thru 1853/54, owned initially, in 1839/40 & 1840/41 only, by R. (Robert) Liddell of Sunderland for service from Sunderland to London. In 1840/41, per LR, the vessel was acquired by T. (Thomas) Sharer of Hartlepool. It would seem, however, that Liddell & Sharer were business partners, since the North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9 lists her then owners as being Thomas Sharer of Hartlepool & Robert Liddell of Bishopwearmouth. The vessel served many places while owned by 'Sharer'. From Hartlepool to London in 1840/41, from Shields to 'Mendra' (that's what I think it says, maybe India?) in 1841/42, from London to 'Sincpr' (Singapore?) in 1842/43, from Liverpool to St. Petersburg, Russia, in 1844/45, from Hull to the Mediterranean (in the period of 1845/48) from Hartlepool to Holland in 1848 thru 1851, from Liverpool to Montevideo, Uruguay, in 1851/52 & 1852/53 & from Hull to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in 1853/54. On May 03, 1853, en route from Bahia, Brazil, to Falmouth, the vessel came upon the schooner Harriet, damaged in a storm & with her Captain confined to his bed by illness. Sheraton Grange stood by for 3 or 4 days & then took Harriet in tow & delivered her safely 15 or 16 days & 1,000 miles later at Plymouth. The High Court of the Admiralty awarded Sheraton Grange £800 for her services. In late Nov. 1853, Sheraton Grange was bound from Sunderland to London, under the command of Captain Turnbull, it would seem & loaded with coal. It went aground, on Aldboro' Napes on the Suffolk coast & drifted towards land in a gale in the late afternoon of Nov. 29, 1853. Link 2, which relates to the Southwold Lifeboat Society lifeboat station at Southwold, Suffolk, records the issue of silver lifesaving medals to Coxswain Benjamin (Benicks) Herrington & Second Coxswain William Waters 'for rescuing nine of the crew of the brig Sheraton Grange on 29 November 1853'. It would seem that the crew of Sheraton Grange had abandoned the ship, described as a grounded wreck, & taken to their long-boat. The lifeboat which went to their rescue was the brand new Harriett, which I read, despite the report at the thumbnail (at left), performed so poorly that the lifeboat crew refused to go to sea in her again. (I cannot find that reference again). The vessel sank off Southwold, & its timbers etc. were later recovered & sold at auction on Dec. 29, 1853. Is there anything you can add?

2   Beaver
244/254 later 239 tons

2974
1840

A snow or brig. The vessel, which was completed in Feb. 1840, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1839/40 thru 1865/66, owned for that entire period, per LR, by 'Fairlamb' of Sunderland. With 'Burn' serving as the vessel's initial captain, thru 1843/44, then 'Shields' or J. Shields thru 1860/61, & T. Crawford from 1861/62 thru 1865/66. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9 lists, in Apl. 1848 data, Fairlamb & Thompson, both of Sunderland, as Beaver's then owners, which names the 1854/55 edition clarifies meant, in Mar. 1854, Geo. Fairlamb & Peter Thompson, with John Shield (no 's') her then captain. Such data is essentially unchanged in Turnbull's Shipping Registers of both 1855 & 1856, the 1855 edition also noting John Shield as the vessel's then captain. Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 also confirms such ownership.
We thank today's John Pearson for advising that John Shield, for some years the captain of Beaver, was correctly John Willison Shields - John Pearson's great great grandfather. Born in Dundee, Scotland, I note.
Under 'Fairlamb' ownership, the vessel, per LR, always served out of Sunderland to London, to America (1843/44 thru 1847/48 & in 1855/56), to the Baltic (in the 1852/54 period), to Quebec, Canada (in 1854/55) & to France (in 1856/57 & 1857/58). A Sunderland coaster from 1861/62.
86.0 ft. long, signal letters HRKF. Crew lists are a puzzle - such lists appear to be available re 1864 - and also re 1900!
The vessel is not recorded in the Mercantile Navy List of 1865. It is noted in LR of 1865/66 that the vessel had been 'Wrecked'. This page tells us (in red) as follows:- The "Beaver" of Sunderland, official number 2974, laden with deals, ran aground on Stammo. After having been abandoned by her crew, and the cargo having been discharged into lighters, she drifted off and was towed into Fredrikshamn where she will be repaired. No date was mentioned but the report which contained the words was re 1864. Fredrikshamn (Frederikshavn) is on the NE Danish coast of Jutland. I have not yet located Stammo. I now note that Wikipedia tells us (thanks!) that on Sep. 16, 1864, Beaver was driven ashore on Stamnio, Denmark. She was on a voyage from Vyborg, (Vyborg, NW of St. Petersburg, Russia, rather than Finland) to Wisbech, Cambridgeshire. Per this contemporary news report (in red). It seems likely that the vessel was so damaged that it could not, in fact, be repaired. Stammo or Stamnio is clearly very near to Fredrikshamn.
Can you add to or correct the text above? #2514

CARR, WILLIAM

1846/1853

I know nothing about William Carr, alas, other than the fact that he was a South Hylton builder. He built, I read, 21 vessels between 1846 & 1853.

1   Messenger
300/330 later 280/295 tons

11587
1846

A snow or brig. Messenger, which was launched in Jul. 1846, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1846/47 thru 1877/78 with the exception of 1873/74. It was, per LR, owned thru 1865/66 by T. Coxon of North Shields & registered at Newcastle thru 1853/54 & at North Shields from 1854/55 thru 1865/66. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9 lists the vessel, in Jul. 1848 data, as registered at Newcastle & owned by T. Coxon of North Shields. While the equivalent register of 1854/5 states that Thomas Coxon of North Shields was the owner of the Shields registered vessel in 1854 with Robert Walker then her captain. Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1856 lists T. Coxon of North Shields as her then owner, which owner name is clarified by Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 to mean Thomas Coxon. The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') of 1865 confirms such ownership.
Messenger's captains per LR while 'Coxon' owned & her voyages? 'Morgen' ('Morgan' in 1846/47 & 1847/48) was the vessel's captain thru 1851/52, R. Walker from 1852/53 thru 1857/58. W. Lambert from 1858/59 thru 1860/61, J. Hall from 1861/62 thru 1863/64 & A. Muir from 1863/64 thru 1865/66. Service from Sunderland to the Mediterranean is LR recorded thru 1851/52, from Limerick, Ireland, to Quebec, Canada, in 1852/53 & 1853/54, from Newport, Wales, to the Mediterranean from 1854/55 thru 1857/58 & from Shields to the Mediterranean thereafter thru 1865/66.
LR of 1865/66 records that 'J. Somervlle' of North Shields had become Messenger's owner - thru 1866/67. Now LRs of 1867/68 thru 1872/73 record no vessel owners' names whatsoever. Fortunately MNLs come to our rescue. They report that from 1866 thru 1868 James Somerville, of North Shields was the vessel's owner. And from 1869 thru 1871 they record William Elder, of Seaton Sluice, Northumberland as the vessel's then owner.
The vessel is not listed in LR of 1873/74, however LRs of 1874/75 thru 1877/78 all list S. Nichols, of South Shields as what proved to be, Messenger's final owner. It is clear however that 'Nichols' acquired the vessel rather earlier. MNLs of 1872 thru 1877 all record Samuel Nichols of South Shields as the vessel's owner. And I note that TR of 1874 lists S. Nichols as the vessel's then sole owner.
Per LR, 'W. Robinsn' presumably 'Robinson' served as the vessel's captain from 1865/66 thru 1872/73.
95.0 ft. long thru 1872/73, 96.5 ft. long thereafter, signal letters KTGL, many crew lists are available here.
What finally happened to Messenger? LR of 1877/78 notes that the vessel had been 'Abandoned'. Per this U.K. Government wreck listing page, on Apl. 18, 1877, the 295 ton brig was lost, at 45.52N/9.04W in the Bay of Biscay, while en route from South Shields to Carthagena (Mediterranean coast of SE Spain), with a total cargo of 276 tons of coal & coke. Crew of 9 - none lost. The vessel's owner, stated to be S. Nichols of South Shields, attributed the loss of the vessel to stress of weather - there was no shifting of the cargo apparently. Presumably it had encountered a storm. This page (also U.K. Government) tells us that S. Nichols was the vessel's captain at the time of her loss.
Now Wikipedia (thanks!) reports the events rather differently. It reports that on Mar. 18, 1877 the brig was abandoned in the Bay of Biscay with the loss of three of her five man crew. That her survivors were rescued by Olindo, a steamship, (surely means Olinda, built at Hull in 1865). Further that the hulk of Messenger was discovered on Apl. 20, 1877 by the steamship Astarte which set her on fire & sank her. (There were two British vessels named Astarte at the time, one of them built at Sunderland in 1868, the other at Glasgow in 1870. I cannot identify which Astarte it was from the available data). 'Wiki' identifies three data sources for their listing. Any site visitor who can acess such articles is invited to consider providing them to the webmaster for inclusion here. So we might read their exact wording.
Can you tell us more about the circumstances of her loss? Or otherwise add or correct anything? #2537

2   Amaranth
120 later 110 tons

12482
1848

A snow or brig. Amaranth was launched or completed in Apl. 1848. It is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1848/49 thru 1868/69, with the exception of 1857/58 & 1858/59, owned thru 1852/53, per LR, by Booth & Co. of Sunderland. Which, per the North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9, in Apl. 1848 data, means Booth, Bell & Shortcliff, of Monkwearmouth, Sunderland.
For service from Sunderland to Hamburg, Germany, in 1848/49 & 1849/50 & ex Sunderland thereafter. With T. Bell her captain thru 1849/50 & 'Booth' thereafter.
LR advises that from 1853/54 thru 1856/57, Amaranth was owned by J. Elliott, of Leith, Edinburgh, Scotland, for service from Shields to Rouen, France, thru 1855/56 at least. With A. Minto serving as the vessel's captain.
When LR coverage resumed after a 2 year gap in 1859/60, Amaranth is stated to be registered at Lynn, Norfolk, & both owned & captained by J. W. Hall, for service ex Lynn. It is clear, however, that Hall must have acquired the vessel in 1855 since this page (scroll to #12482) tells us that the vessel, stated to be of 109 tons, was first registered at Lynn, on May 08, 1855.
The Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') of 1865 & 1866 confirm Hall's then ownership of the vessel. But rather record J. B. Hall as her then owner.
Now LR advises of no later ownership changes thru 1868/69. We know, however, that in 1867 & 1868, per MNL, the vessel was registered at Wells, Norfolk, & owned by F. B. Southgate of Wells.
69.0 ft. long, signal letters LCBF, some Amaranth crew lists are available via here.
What finally happened to Amaranth? Wikipedia advises (thanks!) that on Mar. 23, 1867, i) the vessel was abandoned off Lowestoft, Suffolk & ii) her crew were rescued by a vessel named Grace. I learn that Amaranth, under the command of Robert Cringle, was en route from Portsmouth to Sunderland in ballast. With a crew of five all told. In conditions of dense fog, the vessel stranded & became a wreck on what proved to be Hasborough Sand (located N. of Great Yarmouth, near Cromer, Norfolk). The crew took to a ship's longboat & were rescued from it by Grace, which would seem to have been a brig, built in 1806 at Kingmore, then owned by Ralph Morton of North Shields - with Watson her captain. But 'Kingmore', as her place of build, may prove to be in error. Perhaps it should be Ringmore, Devon? Some related contemporary news reports 1, 2 & 3.
Can anybody add anything or correct the above in any way? #2719
Of interest, I earlier hoped that I might find a reference to the loss of this vessel at 'Welsh Newspapers On Line'. While I did not find such a reference, I did find a reference to a vessel named Amaranth, stated to be of 830 tons & registered at Sunderland, that was lost in Mar. 1867 with the loss of 11 members of her crew. For a very long period, I could not figure out which Amaranth it was, where it was built or who owned it. To assist fellow researchers, I provided, here, an image of what I had found - I now note that that such report was widely published in U.K. newspapers of the time. The webmaster now believes that the vessel which was lost was mis-identified as being Amaranth. And in fact it was Araminta, ON#1745, built in New Brunswick, Canada, in 1851. Her loss is referred to at line 17 on this U.K. Government 1867 wreck listing page. At the time of the vessel's loss, Araminta was owned by George C. Packet, of Sunderland, & before he acquired it, it was owned by W. & R. Grindlay, of Liverpool.
Is there anything you can add? Or correct? #2645

3   Defender
264/280 later 253 tons

16269
1850

A snow or brig. Defender, which was first registered, at Sunderland, on Oct. 22, 1850, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1851/52 thru 1869/70 only. It was initially owned, per LR, by Frost & Co. of Sunderland, thru 1856/57, for service from Sunderland to the Mediterranean. With M. Vowell, per LR, always her captain. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5 records the vessel, in Mar. 1854 data, as Sunderland registered & owned by Wm. Richardson, Thos. Stamper, Wm. R. Blyth, all of Sunderland, & Wm. Dowell of Shadwell (east end of London), with Michael Vowel then her captain. Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1856 advises that W. Richardson, T. Stamper & J. Frost, all of Sunderland, were her then owners. I note that TR of 1855 rather records David M. Bridges as the vessel's then captain.
In 1857/58, per LR, 'Sheraton', of Sunderland, became Defender's owner, initially for service from Sunderland to Hamburg, Germany, but later for many years as a Sunderland coaster. With a number of captains per LR - i.e. M. Vowell thru to 1858/59, 'Wilson' from 1859/60 thru 1861/62, 'Christians'n' in parts of 1861/62 & 1862/63, & 'Heslop' from 1862/63 to 1869/70. The Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') of 1865 thru 1868 all record George Sheraton, of Bishopwearmouth, Sunderland, as the vessel's owner. Strangely, perhaps, the vessel is not listed in Christie's Shipping Register of 1858, which volume covers Sunderland & many other ports in the north-east.
No owner name is recorded in LR after 1867/68. MNLs of 1869 thru 1872 (1870) all record John Bowey of Sunderland as her new owner.
94.0 ft. long. Became of 253 tons, per LR, in 1859/60. Many Defender crew lists are available here.
On Mar. 19, 1872, per line 2343 here, the 253 ton brig was stranded at Goodwin (Goodwin Sands, off the coast of Kent), while en route from Sunderland to Dieppe, France, with a cargo of coal. Crew of 8 - none lost. Then owned by John Bowey. I read, in this detailed report, that the loss occurred during a fresh NNE gale. The lifeboats of both Broadstairs & Ramsgate ventured out & found Defender full of water, missing her rudder & with high seas breaking over her. The Broadstairs lifeboat saved one crew member when Defender was almost capsized. While the Ramsgate lifeboat (the Bradford), was able with great difficulty to save the other seven. Both lifeboats were towed back to Ramsgate by Vulcan, the Ramsgate Harbour steam tug, which was also on the scene. I have not so far read the name of Defender's captain, at the time of the vessel's loss.
The Royal National Life-boat Institution later made a modest cash award to Capt. James Elyard & the crew of the Broadstairs lifeboat. And awarded a Silver Medal to Daniel Reading, master of the steam tug Vulcan.
An Official Inquiry into the vessel's loss was held, at Sunderland, on Apl. 06 & 08, 1872. The master was held not to be at blame for the vessel's loss.
Is there anything you can add? Or correct? #2645

W. (WILSON) CHILTON

OF SOUTH HYLTON

A shipbuilder that surely merits better coverage. It would seem that 'Chilton', I believe Wilson Chilton, built ships at South Hylton. Maybe at Southwick too. Quite a lot of them! 56 vessels over the years of 1829 thru 1866. I have read that he went bankrupt along the way, though I saw no details. But built more ships later.

Seven of such vessels are now detail listed below. Hopefully more in the future.

1   Naiad
254 later 250 tons

667
1831

Naiad? In classical mythology, a 'water nymph'.
Naiad, a snow or brig which was built in Mar. 1831 at the Union Dockyard at Pottery Bank (site formerly perhaps owned by T. Tiffin), is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1831/32 thru 1866/67, with, however, no ownership details etc. after 1860/61.
A Sunderland shipping website, which site requests no links or recognition, tells us that Naiad was registered at Newcastle on May 05, 1831, owned by John Hunter of Bishopwearmouth, Sunderland, & Thomas Elliott of Offerton (a suburb of Stockton, Greater Manchester). Possibly Thomas Elliot? Further that the vessel became Sunderland registered on Oct. 05, 1838. We sincerely thank such site for such data.
Thru 1859/60, per LR, Naiad was owned by the Hunter family of Sunderland, initially Hunter & Co., but from 1845/46 J. Hunter. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9, in Apl. 1848 data, lists Hunter & Watson as the vessel's then owners. While the equivalent directory of 1854/5, in Mar. 1854 data, lists the vessel as Sunderland registered & owned by John Hunter & Wm. H. Watson. With Thos. Franks her captain. Turnbull's Shipping Registers ('TR') of both 1855 & 1856 list J. Hunter & W. H. Watson, both of Sunderland as her then owners. Data clarified by Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 to mean John Hunter & Wm. H. Watson.
For service including London to Halifax (likely Nova Scotia, Canada), Sunderland to America, Gloucester to the Mediterranean & Sunderland to the Baltic.
Naiad's captains while 'Hunter' owned - per LR at least? C. Brown thru 1840/41, 'Watson' from 1840/41 thru 1844/45, 'Croft' from 1844/45 thru 1847/48, 'Ligertin' in 1848/49 & 1849/50, 'Chambers' from 1850/51 thru 1852/53, 'Franks' from 1853/54 thru 1857/58 & 'Wilson' in 1858/59 & 1859/60. TR of 1855 lists T. Franks as the vessel's then captain.
LR of 1860/61 lists Newton & Co., also of Sunderland, as Naiad's new owner but they may well have only owned the vessel for a short time since, in LR of 1861/62, the name was recorded but then struck through. LRs from 1860/61 thru 1866/67 do however list the captain's name - 'Errington'.
I note that the Sunderland shipping website referred to above, also states that on Nov. 13, 1860, Naiad was Newcastle registered in the names of John Thomas Taylor & Christian Adolph Lichtenburg. And on Dec. 31, 1864 was registered at West Hartlepool in the names of Thomas Smallwood, James Goldsmith, Robert Colling & James Smith.
Signal letters HDSL, a few crew lists are available via this link.
The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') records Naiad as Sunderland registered from 1857 thru 1860, Newcastle registered from 1861 thru 1864 & registered at West Hartlepool from 1865 thru 1870. MNL of 1865 records the vessel as then owned by Thomas Ramsay of Newcastle, while MNLs of 1866 thru 1870 record Thos. Smallwood of West Hartlepool, as her then owner.
What finally happened to Naiad? On Jan. 11, 1870, per line 12 here, the 250 ton brig was stranded at Calais, France, while en route from Hartlepool to Calais with a cargo of coal. Crew of 9 - none lost. Then owned by Thomas Smallwood.
I learn that on Jan. 07, 1870, Naiad left West Hartlepool for Calais with a cargo of coal with 'Smallwood' in command. Naiad went ashore, during the morning of Jan. 11, 1870, at a place about 1/4 mile NW of the pierhead at Calais. The crew were all saved 'by dint of great exertions'. A tug boat went to her assistance & tried to get her off - unsuccessfully in the high seas. The vessel soon became a wreck. At the time of her loss, Robert Collin, a blacksmith & Captain Goldsmith (said to be the master of Bransons) - both residents of West Hartlepool - were part owners of Naiad along with others. The reference to Bransons is likely in error. There does not seem to have been a British vessel of such name at the time. Some contemporary news reports - 1, 2 & 3.
It would seem that a year or so before the date of her loss, Naiad had grounded on the bar at Hartlepool. Have not yet spotted any contemporary newspaper references to the matter.
Can you add anything? Or correct the above in any way? #2923

2   Elliots
249 tons
1832

Elliots, a snow or brig which was launched on Apl. 18, 1832, & first registered at Sunderland on May 15, 1832, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1834 thru 1850/51.
It was owned, per LR, in 1834 & 1835/36 & also in 1838/39 thru 1840/41, by Hunter & Co. of Sunderland. The missing LR years (i.e. 1837/38 & 1838/39) rather record Elliot & Co. as the vessel's owner. I gather that collectively that means that the vessel was jointly owned by John Hunter of Bishopwearmouth, Sunderland, & Thomas Elliot of Offerton (a suburb of Stockton, Greater Manchester).
The vessel's captains while 'Hunter' owned? And her service? J. Hunter thru 1835/36, 'Cuthbert' or W. Cuthbert from 1835/36 thru 1837/38 & 'Smith' from 1838/39 thru 1840/41. For service from Sunderland to Alexandria, Egypt, in 1834 & 1835/36, then ex Bristol it would appear, & from 1838/39 thru 1840/41 for service from Sunderland to London.
In 1840/41, per LR, Elliots became owned by 'General Shipping Company' of Hartlepool, for service from Hartlepool to London. With 'Errington' & then J. Dunbar serving as her captains. A Sunderland shipping website, which website requests no links or recognition tells us that the vessel (they name it Elliotts), was Hartlepool registered rather earlier that 1840/41 - on Nov. 11, 1837.
This Hartlepool website tells us that in 1844, 'Hutton & Co. (R. E. Hutton)' became the vessel's owner. Robert E. Hutton was, I read, a shareholder in General Shipping Company of Hartlepool.
The webmaster has spotted that from Apl. 30, 1844 thru May 28, 1844, Elliots was one of seven vessels offered for sale at a public auction held at Hartlepool on May 30, 1844 - by order of the Hartlepool General Shipping Company of Hartlepool. One (in blue) of the many such advertisements.
Elliots was bought by Couper & Co. (Cooper & Co. per LR) of South Shields, for service ex Shields or Newcastle to London or to the Baltic. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9, in Jul. 1848 data, lists the vessel as then Newcastle registered & owned by R. Couper & Co., of South Shields. The Sunderland shipping website referred to above advises (thanks!) that Robert Couper of South Shields & James Errington Ritchie, of North Shields, became the vessel's registered owners on Jun. 10, 1844.
LRs record 'Ritchie' as the vessel's captain from 1844/45 thru 1847/48 & then, thru 1850/51, M. Hill.
88.0 ft. long.
Some best-efforts data 'snippets' re Elliots. i) On Apl. 04, 1834 the vessel, 'Hunter' in command, left Deal for Honduras. It was back at Plymouth on Oct. 04, 1834. ii) On Dec. 05, 1834 (Hunter) the vessel was at Deal, en route from Newcastle to Alexandria - it arrived at Milford, Wales, ex Alexandria on Jul. 08, 1835 with 'Cuthbert' in command. iii) another voyage from Alexandria with 1553 bales of cotton. iv) On Dec. 25, 1835 the vessel (Cuthbert) arrived at Trieste, Italy, towed in having cut away her masts. v) On Jul. 18, 1836 the vessel arrived in the U.K. from Licata, Sicily, with 390 tons of brimstone. vi) On Oct. 20, 1836 (Cuthbert) the vessel arrived at Stornaway (Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland), ex Archangel, Russia, vii) On Apl. 18, 1839, Elliots left Hartlepool for Quebec, Canada, with 'Smith' in command. Was back at Deal on Aug. 20, 1839. viii) On Jan. 01, 1844 the vessel (Smith) while entering Hartlepool from London, took ground to the south of the pier but came off on the following tide, ix) On Sep. 11, 1840 (Smith) the vessel arrived at Port Talbot, Wales, ex Quebec. x) On Nov. 23, 1840 (Smith) the vessel put into Wisbeach, Cambridgeshire, having lost anchors & chain in Bridlington Bay. No replacements were available at Wisbeach or Lynn, Norfolk. xi) On Aug. 02, 1844 the vessel (Ritchie) was at Elsinore, Denmark, en route to Cronstadt (St. Petersburg, Russia). xii) On Aug. 24, 1846 Elliots (Ritchie) arrived at Hull ex Archangel. xiii) On Aug. 23, 1847, the vessel was at Belfast ex Cronstadt. xiv) Many voyages (Hill or Hills) to Cronstadt. xv) On Nov. 11, 1849 (Hill) the vessel arrived at Stockton ex Cronstadt with a cargo of tallow.
What finally happened to Elliots? I learn that on Mar. 27, 1850, the vessel, 'Hill' or 'Hills' in command, left Newcastle for Hamburg, Germany, with 146 chs (chaldrons) of coal. 'Hills' states that it rather left on Mar. 26, 1850. At 9 a.m. on Mar. 30, 1850, when at 55.30N/3.33E (NE of the Dogger Bank in the North Sea) Elliots was struck by a tremendous sea which did great damage to the ship, stove in her boats & made her leaky. The crew struggled at the pumps. But by 5 p.m. that day there was 5 ft. of water in her holds & 10 ft. by midnight. At 12.30 a.m. on Apl. 01, 1850 the crew abandoned the vessel in a skiff & were picked up at 9 a.m. by Mercurius, a Hamburg schooner or galliot en route to Grangemouth, Firth of Forth, Scotland. Mercurius landed the crew at Leith, Scotland, on Apl. 03, 1850. Per these contemporary news reports, both of which misspell the vessel's name - 1 & 2.
Can you add to or correct in any way, the above text? #2902

3   D'Arcy
284/303, later 323 tons

879
1836

D'Arcy, a snow or brig, was launched on Apl. 20, 1836. It is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1836/37 thru 1856/57 & not thereafter. It was, per LR, owned thru 1841/42 by J. C. Carr of Sunderland, always for service ex Sunderland & specifically to Malta from 1838/39 thru 1840/41. With 'Philips' her captain throughout the period of 'Carr' ownership, indeed thru to 1844/45 under new owners.
In 1841/42, per LR, the vessel became owned by Currie & Co., of Liverpool. 'Currie' would seem to have owned the vessel thru to Apl. 1853, with 'Philips' her captain & then 'Garrick' (B. Garrick from 1846/47) thru 1847/48 & T. James from 1848/49 thru 1852/53. Always for service ex Liverpool, inc. to i) Aden in 1844/45, & ii) Hamburg, Germany, from 1845/46 thru 1847/48. LR of 1848/49 records service from Liverpool to Jamaica becoming Liverpool to Odessa (Black Sea, Ukraine).
So far as I can see, from Jan. 21, 1853 thru Feb. 01, 1853, D'Arcy was offered for private sale. One of the sale announcements.
J. Smith would seem to have acquired the vessel. LR of 1853/54 records J. Smith of Sunderland as the vessel's new owner, for service from Sunderland to Australia in 1853/54 & 1854/55 & from London to the Mediterranean in 1855/56. With J. Brown, per LR, the vessel's captain while 'Smith' owned. The vessel was registered at Sunderland on Apl. 11, 1853. The North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5, in Mar. 1854 data, clarifies the owner to have been John Smith with Joseph Brown her captain. Data essentially confirmed by Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1855.
Some 'best-efforts' D'Arcy operational data. I note that the vessel did not go to Australia as above indicated. On Apl. 27, 1853 the vessel was at Deal, Kent, en route to Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). On Sep. 30, 1853, the vessel left Galle, Ceylon, for Moulmain (now Mawlamyine, Burma i.e. Myanmar) where it arrived on Oct. 24, 1854. It left Moulmain for Sunderland on Dec. 01, 1854 arriving back at Plymouth on May 16, 1854 after a 136 day voyage. On Oct. 16, 1854, D'Arcy arrived at Belize (NE coast of Central America), ex St. Thomas. On Nov. 29, 1854 the vessel left Belize for Queenstown, Ireland, with 289 mahogony logs, logwood & coco-nuts. But rather went on to London, it would seem.
There would seem to have been further ownership changes. LR of 1856/57 records Thompson & Co., of Sunderland, as the vessel's then owner with R. Watson her captain - for service from Sunderland to Quebec, Canada. While TR of 1856 rather records J. C. Mounsey of Newcastle as the owner of the 209 ton Sunderland registered D'Arcy.
284/303 tons from LR of 1841/42.
What finally happened to D'Arcy? The Mercantile Navy List (scroll to #879) notes that the vessel was lost as per a certificate dated Feb. 28, 1857. I learn that on Nov. 10, 1856, D'Arcy was one of four vessels that were stranded on Faludd reef. The webmaster is not certain as to the correct spelling of the name of such reef - 'Lloyd's List' referred to it as Pallud or Fallud & later as Fahlud. Such reef would seem, however, to be off the S. end of Gothland (Gotland, the largest Swedish island, Baltic Sea, off the E. coast of Sweden). While I have not read about the weather conditions at the time, I presume that severe winter weather in the Baltic must have been a major factor in the four strandings. The other three vessels were John Hunter (a snow, built at Sunderland in 1846), Black Nymph (a barque built at Sunderland in 1834) & Tyne.
D'Arcy had been en route from Cronstadt (St. Petersburg, Russia) to London with a cargo of tallow (rendered animal fat) - under the command of 'Watson'. It surely ended up as a wreck. But D'Arcy was clearly stranded on the reef for a while & a portion of the vessel's cargo was later landed. On Dec. 08, 1856, in a report from Wisby (Visby, Gotland), the vessel was still there with her bottom out & her mainmast gone. Some contemporary news reports - 1, 2 & 3.
Is there anything you can you add? Or correct? #2847

4   Hannah
275/300 tons
1837

A snow. The vessel, which was launched in Jul. 1837, is Lloyd's Register listed in 1838/39 only, there stated to have been owned by Ranson & Co., of Sunderland, for service from Sunderland to Archangel, Russia. With 'Collie' noted to have been the vessel's captain.
I have read that the vessel, Collie in command, arrived at Archangel, ex Sunderland, on Aug. 21, 1837.
Now Wikipedia tells us, here (per 'The Standard' of London, of Sep. 06, 1838 & one other source), that on Jul. 26, 1838, Hannah was wrecked at Gabarus, while en route from Bordeaux, France, to Miramichi, New Brunswick (now Canada). Gabarus is, I learn, located on the E. coast of Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia. This 1839 U.K. Government report respecting shipwrecks of ships carrying timber, refers to Hannah's loss at page 26 in the downloaded volume. It tells us that the vessel, Collie in command, was indeed lost on Jul. 26, 1838, lost at Galarus (means Gabarus), further that the vessel's crew were saved. The vessel is there noted to have sailed from England rather than from France. (Loss report). It would seem to be a reasonable assumption that the vessel must have intended to load a cargo of timber at Miramichi. Is there anything you can add? And/or correct? #2382

5   Stephen Watson
235/240, later 219 tons

2661
1838

This vessel was first listed, many years ago, having seen this extensive website whereby 'Mike' sought details about the vessel. And stated that 'According to newspaper reports she ran aground at Gunfleet Sand on the 13th December 1863. Apparently bound for London carrying coal. One newspaper gives the owners as Messrs. A. Watson and S. Grieves. Whilst a second gives Alexander WATERS as owner. One or both reports may be correct as ownership was in 64ths.'
Stephen Watson, a snow which was launched in Aug. 1838, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1839/40 thru 1863/64, with the exceptions of 1847/48 & 1857/58. I note that Lloyd's Register Foundation kindly makes available this Survey report conducted while the vessel was in course of construction in Sep. 1838.
On Aug. 31, 1838, the launch of the vessel was announced - for R. M. Watson. Stephen Watson was owned, per LR, by Watson & Co. of Sunderland thru 1846/47 & from 1848/49 by A. Waters, also of Sunderland. It would seem likely that the vessel was sold from 'Watson' to 'Waters' in or about 1847/48, the year in which LR did not list the vessel.
LR is not particularly helpful about Stephen Watson's voyages. They record consistent service from Sunderland to London thru to 1843/44 & from Liverpool to Leghorn (Livorno, Italy, W. of Florence) from 1844/45 thru 1846/47. A 'best efforts' attempt to summarise the vessel's movements while 'Watson' owned.
Stephen Watson did deliver coal to London, Portsmouth & other British ports but it also traded to Hamburg, Texel, Schiedam, Amsterdam, Gibraltar, Malta, the Black Sea, & a great many other ports too numerous to mention. And into the Baltic. To Leghorn indeed. Some specific voyages. i) To Riga, Latvia, in Apl. 1839 returning with wheat to London. ii) In the summer of 1840 to Kertch and/or Odessa (both Black Sea, Ukraine) returning to Falmouth & then (I think) onwards to Gloucester. iii) In late Mar. 1843 the vessel left Sunderland for Quebec, Canada, arriving there on Jul. 21, 1843. It returned to Gloucester with a cargo of timber. iv) Onwards to Narva (Gulf of Finland, Estonia), with a cargo of 355 tons of salt arriving back at Montrose, Scotland. v) Into the Mediterranean in 1844 - to Malta, Gallipoli, Tunis & Greece. vi) To Leghorn in Jan. 1845 ex Liverpool, (an event en route - in red) then to Licata, Sicily, & on to Cork, Ireland where - a modest matter - it grounded at Cork Bay Bank on Jul. 11, 1845 but got off, it would seem on the next tide. On to Gloucester with a cargo of sulphur. vii) In Aug. 1845, the vessel left Cardiff, Wales, for Cronstadt (St. Petersburg, Russia) with a cargo of iron, returning to London with a cargo of tallow. viii) In Apl. 1846, the vessel again left Sunderland for Quebec, arriving back at Sunderland on Aug. 22, 1846, likely with timber. A couple more voyages to Cronstadt, returning to Leith (Edinburgh) on one voyage with a cargo of tallow & 100 ankers (casks) of cranberries. 'Research', such as the above, is most time consuming. The above may well contain unintentional errors.
Now Turnbull's Shipping Register ('TR') of 1848 tells us that her then owners were R. Grieve & A. Waters, both of Monkwearmouth, Sunderland. Marwood's North of England Maritime Directory of 1854/5, in Mar. 1854 data, lists Alex. Waters & Robt. Grieve, both of Sunderland, as the vessel's then owners, with Robt. Grieve her then captain. Such ownership was essentially unchanged in TRs of 1855 & 1856 (A. Waters & R. Grieves, both of Sunderland), but the 1855 edition rather states Robert Grieve. The vessel is not recorded in Christie's Shipping Register of 1858, though she would seem to have then still been registered at Sunderland.
The Mercantile Navy List ('MNL') lists Stephen Watson from 1857 thru 1865, always registered at Sunderland, & owned, in 1865, by Alexander Waters of Monkwearmouth.
It would seem, per LR at least, that the vessel had just a single captain for all of its years. Though the captain's name was variously spelled by LR thru the years i.e. R. Greave thru 1846/47, R. Greive in 1848/49 & 1849/50, 'Green' in 1850/51 & 'Grieves' for all the later years. The name was spelled in news reports in multiple ways also. I cannot, with any certainty, tell you which name is correct.
84.0 ft. long, signal letters HQCK, crew lists may well be available via this link (that site is presently out of commission).
Some day, hopefully, it may prove possible to research the vessel's voyages from 1848 to 1863. But ... a project for another day! But I did spot that on Dec. 04, 1848, coming into St. Nicholas Gat (an old channel to Yarmouth Roads), the vessel struck ground & became leaky. I did also spot more voyages to Quebec & into the Baltic - to both Cronstadt & to Riga.
What finally happened to Stephen Watson? In early Jan. 1863, the vessel, with Fairley in command (her captain from Jun. 1863 it would appear), left Sunderland for London with a cargo of coal. At midnight on Dec. 11, 1863 - during a gale it would seem - the vessel grounded on the Gunfleet Sands, located 7 km. off Clacton-on-Sea, Essex. The crew, assisted by the crews of four fishing smacks, attempted to get her off - without success. By the next day she was a total wreck. The eight person crew were taken aboard the smack Lord Howe to be landed at Harwich. I read i) that a great part of her sails & rigging were recovered, and ii) that the vessel was worth £900 at the time & was insured, presumably with cargo, for £1,400. A Stephen Watson ship's boat with a variety of gear on board, was picked up on Dec. 16, 1863 by Mary, 'Gibbon' in command, en route to Hartlepool. Such ship's boat apparently had 'Robert Graves' marked upon it. Per these contemporary newspaper reports - 1 & 2.
Is there anything you can add? Or correct? #2942

6   Dart
193/174 tons
1840

A schooner, later a brigantine. The vessel, which was launched in Aug. 1840, is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1840/41 thru 1848/49, then a 2 year LR silence, & again in 1851/52 & 1852/53. Owned thru such periods, per LR, by Ord & Co., of Sunderland, for service from Sunderland to Limerick, Ireland, thru 1848/49 & from Hartlepool to London in 1851/52. With 'Williams' thru 1848/49, & 'I. Williams' in 1851/52 & 1852/53, serving as the vessel's captain. I wonder why there was that two year LR 'gap'. My mind thinks that in those days LR was a list of vessels insured at Lloyd's rather than a list of all vessels. So if a ship owner chose to self insure his vessel, or insure it elsewhere, the vessel would be LR de-listed. Does anybody know if that is correct? If so, I would love to hear from you.
The North of England Maritime Directory of 1848/9 records William Ord, & Co., of Bishopwearmouth, as the vessel's owner in Apl. 1848. In Mar. 1854, the 1854/5 edition of such directory lists "Wm. Ord and Co.", Thos. Davison & Isaac Williams, all of Sunderland, as the vessel's then owners with Jas. Carr her captain. I note that LRs of 1851/52 & 1852/53 record the vessel as a brigantine.
What finally happened to the vessel? I read, here, that on Oct. 22, 1854, the vessel was en route from Sunderland to London. At 3 o'clock in the morning, when near Hasbro' Sands (Hasborough Sands, located near Cromer, Norfolk) in the North Sea, Dart was in collision with Tecumseh & sank. No lives were lost. Tecumseh saved them all. LR of 1853/54 lists only one vessel named Tecumseh, a 451/452 ton barque built in Lower Canada in 1840. Is there anything you can add? Or correct? #2326

7   John Reay
302 later 283 tons
later 298/318 later 295/315 (N/G) tons

43642

John
John Reay
Önund

1862

A barque, later a barquentine & a schooner. The webmaster believes that the launch of the vessel, in Jul. 1862, is referenced in this newspaper cutting. The vessel was launched on Jul. 03, 1862 - of 302 tons, at South Hylton, for Reay & Co. of South Shields. Per the Mercantile Navy Lists ('MNL') of 1865 thru 1869 John Reay. Later, per MNLs of 1870 thru 1875 James Reay - both of South Shields.
Niels Hald-Andersen advised in 2016 (thanks!) that the vessel was sold in 1875 to N. D. C. Jansen, of Dragoer, Denmark, with no change of vessel name. And sold in 1883 to H. Kjoesterud & Sons, of Drammen, Norway, & re-named ØNUND (OENUND). Was sold again, in 1894, to H. Ellefsen & H. C. Bollaeren, of Toensberg, Norway. And sold once more, in 1899, to A/S Ønund (A. Andersen), of Moss, Norway. Was broken up in 1906.
The above was essentially written back in 2016. I add the following data mainly extracted from available editions of Lloyd's Register ('LR'). The vessel is LR listed, as John Reay, from 1862/63 thru 1881/82, owned, thru 1874/75 at least, by Reay & Co. of South Shields with J. Baker her captain thru 1870/71, then 'Garrick' thru 1878/79 per LR (though his captaincy lasting so long seems unlikely). Of 283 tons from 1868/69. Turnbull's Shipping Register of 1874 lists James Reay of South Shields as owning 42 of the vessel's 64 shares with the other 22 being owned by J. T. Baker, also of South Shields. For service always to the Mediterranean - ex Sunderland in 1862/63 & ex Shields thereafter thru 1873/74. LR lists no owner name from 1875/76 which jives with Niels' advice that the vessel had been sold in 1875.
Somewhere along the way, the vessel would appear to have been renamed John. I say that because LRs of 1890/91 thru 1893/94 again list John Reay, now of 298/318 tons, with prior names of John Reay then John. Owned by J. Mitchell, of Montrose (NE of Dundee, Scotland) with A. Gilbert serving as her captain. With a slightly incorrect ON of #43643. The MNLs of 1891 thru 1893 all list John Reay, then a barquentine, registered at Montrose, with James Mitchell her managing owner. LR of 1893/94 further indicates that the vessel had become in that year a 3 masted schooner owned by H. Kjosterud & Sonner of Drammen, Norway, had been renamed Önund & was captained by H. Jespersen. LRs of both 1896/97 & 1897/98 list the vessel, still named Önund, now of 295/315 tons, owned & captained by H. C. Bollæren of Tonsberg. Listing her prior names as being John Reay, John, & John Reay. Many crew lists are available here, covering from 1863 thru 1874 & 1890 thru 1893. The National Archives, re ON 43642, refer to the U.K. registry of John Richards (likely in error) being closed in 1893. It would seem that the vessel's history needs further research.
104.5 ft. long, later 106.3 ft. & 105.6 ft., signal letters LRJC, later HKVF. Is there anything you can add? #2194

GEORGE CLARK ENGINE WORKS
GEORGE CLARK (SUNDERLAND) LIMITED
GEORGE CLARK (1938) LIMITED

First a few images. Hover your mouse over each thumbnail to read the subject matter.

The postcard image immediately above, which was converted from sepia to black & white by the webmaster, was sold via eBay on Nov. 3, 2017, for GBP 22.55 or U.S. $29.58.

I read that in 1938, the business was acquired by Richardsons, Westgath & Co. Ltd. of Hartlepool, Middlesbrough & Sunderland.

The above fine image, available thanks to Tyne & Wear Archives, is an aerial view of George Clark's Southwick Engine Works, taken in Aug. 1959. With Iron Ore at quayside.

Another fine image, also available thanks to Tyne & Wear Archives, shows a crankshaft being lowered into position, in Apl. 1955, at George Clark's Southwick Engine Works.

'Fairplay Weekly Shipping Journal' advised, in its issue dated Jan. 12, 1961, that in 1960 'George Clark (Sunderland) Limited' had constructed engines for 7 vessels (Canterbury Star, Cheviot, Longstone (Austin & Pickersgill), Mabe 50 (Cantieti Navali M. & B. Benetti), Moana Roa (Grangemouth Dockyard Company Limited), Turakina, & a 7th (unnamed) vessel. Additionally they carried out complete machinery installations of 6 vessels with main engines of other builders.

M. CLARKE

I know nothing about M. Clarke, who built, I read, 11 vessels between the years of 1850 & 1858.

1   Olive Branch
318 tons

5986
1856

A barque. The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1856/57 thru 1874/75. Thru 1871/72, the vessel was owned by T. Hick of Scarborough - for four early years a 'Hick' was her captain - 'Hick' in 1856/57 & 1857/68 & 'W. Hick' in 1859/60 & 1860/61. For quite a range of service - initially Sunderland to the Mediterranean, then London to South America, Bristol & Shields to the West Indies, Liverpool to South America, Scarborough to the Mediterranean & Sunderland to the continent. Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 advises that the vessel was then owned by 'Thomas and Pantland Hicks and others' of Scarborough.
From 1872/73, 'Riseborough' of Sunderland is LR recorded as the vessel's owner, with J. Annan & R. Oates LR listed as being her captains. The Mercantile Navy Lists of 1870, 1872, 1874 & 1875 list John Riseborough, of Sunderland, as her then owner.
112.0 ft. long, signal letters JLWB.
Per line 424 on this page, the vessel was lost on Aug. 28, 1875 (about 15 miles) off the Butt of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, while en route from Liverpool to Cronstadt (St. Petersburg, Russia) with a cargo of 480 tons of salt in bulk. A crew of 10 - no lives lost. There was an Official Inquiry into the loss and as a result of it the captain's certificate was cancelled. The loss was determined to be caused by the 'gross misconduct of the master in persisting in the prosecution of his voyage when his vessel was unseaworthy'. The vessel was leaky when it left Liverpool, the pumps were endlessly in use until they became clogged with salt, while the suggestion of the crew that the vessel be diverted to the safety of a nearby port was rejected. The vessel sank by the head at about 7:45 p.m. The entire crew, then aboard a ship's boat, landed at Cape Wrath & after necessary repairs to the boat made it safely to Thurso. You can read all about the circumstances of the vessel's loss in the lengthy report of that Court of Inquiry, available here (ex here). It makes difficult reading at times, most particularly, for me, the brutal attacks on crew members using brass knuckle dusters. The conduct of the master, Frederick Williams, & of the ship's boatswain, John Lindsay Howell, is extraordinary in view of the condition of the vessel at the time. I wonder whether the vessel was insured? And if so was an insurance claim accepted? Crew lists for the vessel are available here. Is there anything you can add? #2348

SAMUEL COOKE

I know nothing about Samuel Cooke, who built, I read, just 4 vessels between the years of 1808 & 1810. At Deptford, I have read.

1   Success
162/129 tons
1810

A brigantine, later a snow or brig. The webmaster has been able to find little data about the history of this vessel, which was launched in Jan. 1810.
The vessel is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed in 1848/49 thru 1850/51 & is, I believe, also referenced in LRs of 1834 thru 1838/39. The earlier such entries are fragmentary - of 162 later 162/129 tons, belonging to Whitby, with J. Skerry her captain. With no other data whatsoever - no owner name, no place & year of build, no rig data, no proposed voyage data. Nonetheless the webmaster believes it is 'our' Success.
The later LR references are more informative - owned by Skerry & Co. of Whitby, of 129 tons, built in 1810, for service from Whitby to Tees. With T. Dennis noted to have been the vessel's then captain. The last such reference, i.e. that of 1850/51, has limited detail, which suggests that the vessel had then been either sold or lost. It clearly had been lost.
The webmaster first listed this vessel having seen, in a U.K. Government report, that Success was stranded near Bridlington, Yorkshire, on Oct. 28, 1852. At line 2100 here, the vessel there noted to be owned by Jas. Skerry, & incorrectly noted to have been built in 1820. Look at all the vessels that were casualties at the end of Oct. 1852! A more detailed list of 1852 vessel losses was also U.K. Government published - you can read the page that relates to Success here ex here. It states that the vessel, noted to be 'very old', & incorrectly listed as a barque, en route from Hartlepool to Rochester, Kent, with a cargo of coal, went on shore 1/2 mile S. of Bridlington while attempting to enter the port. The vessel soon broke up - the wreck was sold by public auction. 'Dennis' is there noted to have been the vessel's master at the time of her loss. Both lists record the crew at six in number.
Since the above was written, the webmaster is happy to have found a reference to the vessel in 'The Ancient Port of Whitby And Its Shipping ...', Richard Weatherill, 1908, a Google Book. Such reference is available here (in red). It tells us that the vessel, originally a brigantine, was built at Deptford, Sunderland, in 1810, & registered at Whitby in 1811, owned by Addison Brown of Staithes. Further that in 1827 the vessel became owned by Hezekiah Godden, James Skerry & T. Coggin, presumably all of Whitby. Lost at Bridlington in 1852 (as we already knew!).
Can you add anything additional? #2459

CORNFORTH, W.

1832/1834

I know nothing about W. Cornforth, alas. He built, I have read, just 10 vessels between 1832 & 1834.

1   Henry Tanner
388 tons

24673
1834

A barque. Henry Tanner is Lloyd's Register ('LR') listed from 1834 thru 1858/59 & not thereafter - registered at Sunderland thru 1836/37 but thereafter registered at London. I am advised that on Apl. 05, 1834, the vessel's owners were George Fawcus & Robert Pow, 32 shares each, both shipowners of South Shields. Which data changed on Apl. 09, 1834 to four Monkwearmouth, Sunderland, owners, i.e. Henry Tanner, William Beckworth, Henry Ferguson & Robert Beckworth.
The first reported owners of the vessel, per LR, were Tanner & Co., of Sunderland, for service from Sunderland to New South Wales ('NSW'), Australia. I note that Henry Tanner was a prominent Sunderland citizen indeed, being a magistrate, a Wear Commissioner, and a noted shipowner. He died at Sunderland, at age 74, on Oct. 25, 1858.
Details about the vessel's voyages 'down under', thanks to 'Trove, Australia'. i) On Jul. 01, 1834, Henry Tanner left London for Sydney, NSW, under the command of Captain Henry Ferguson (often spelled Fergusson, i.e. with two letters 's') with 220 male convicts (or 218) & related guards. I gather that 2 convicts died during the voyage, which presumably accounts for that difference in the numbers. It arrived at Sydney on Oct. 26, 1834 (117 days), & left on Jan. 01, 1835 for Madras (now Chennai), India, with, amongst its cargo some Indian military officers & 35 to 40 horses intended for the cavalry needs of The East India Company. Or perhaps intended for resale? It arrived at Madras on May 13, 1835 & presumably later left for London. ii) On Dec. 21, 1835, the vessel left London for Sydney with cargo & 18 passengers. Later, on Jul. 09, 1836, it left Sydney in ballast for Madras (have also read for Guam). It certainly did later arrive in India because on Sep. 23, 1836 it left Bombay (now Mumbai) for Calcutta (now Kolkata). iii) There was, it would seem, a third voyage from London to Sydney, a voyage notable for the fact that the vessel, early in 1837, sailed over the top of an under-water volcanic eruption, though there were no smoke or ashes above the surface of the water.
In 1838/39, per LR, 'Thomson', of London, became Henry Tanner's owner, thru 1848/49, mainly for service from London to Jamaica but in 1840/41 only, for service from London to Calcutta. The vessel had, on Apl. 22, 1838, been transferred from the Sunderland to the London registry. In 1848/49, LR advises that Bews & Co., also of London, became the vessel's owner for service from London to Bermuda in 1848/49 & 1849/50 & for service from London to Port Natal, South Africa in 1850/51.
Paul Raw kindly advises that Henry Tanner left London on Jun. 25, 1849 for the colony of Natal, South Africa (Durban), with about 150 emigrants (how does one see the rest of the list that used to be available?). This website refers extensively to the voyage.
From 1851/52 thru 1853/54, Henry Tanner, per LR, was owned by Lightfoot of London, (F. Lightfoot the captain in 1852/53 & 1853/54 per LR) for further service from London to NSW. But earlier, per Paul Raw, on May 30/31, 1851 the vessel arrived at Quebec, Canada, with passengers under the command of Thomas Lightfoot. Just one Australian voyage that I can see. On Mar. 16, 1852, the vessel, under the command of W. Lightfoot, left London for Adelaide with cargo & 20 passengers. It later arrived at Adelaide on Jul. 14, 1852, under the command of George Vaggers. En route, on May 24, 1852, Captain Lightfoot had died 'in a fit of apoplexy' & Vaggers, the vessel's chief officer, had taken command. It spent many months refitting at Adelaide & only left there on Mar. 18/19, 1853 for London, arriving in England in mid Aug. 1853. This site (search for Henry Tanner) states, however, that the vessel could rather not get a crew, so many of its sailors having become prospectors during the Australian Gold Rush of 1852.
During the balance of the vessel's life, the vessel, per LR, was owned (& captained thru 1857/58), by R. Peter of London. Under 'Peter' ownership, (where indicated by LR), the vessel served from London to California, U.S.A., in 1854/55, (left California Sep. 25, 1854 for Callao, Peru) from London to Ascension Island in 1856/57 & from Newcastle to Aden in 1858/59. The vessel was last recorded in LR in 1858/59.
Of interest perhaps. On Oct. 24, 1975, Christie's of London sold at auction an oil on canvas painting of the vessel by English artist J. Murday. A puzzle because the work is apparently dated 1835 & the artist (said to be 1830/1870) would seem to have then been just 5 years old when it was painted! I have since read that the artist died in 1860. No image of the work seems to be WWW available, alas.
Wikipedia advises (thanks!) that on Jan. 02, 1858, Henry Tanner was driven ashore at Alnmouth, Northumberland, while en route from Nieuw Diep (Nieuwe Diep, N. end of North Holland Canal, effectively Amsterdam) to Newcastle. Two weeks later, on Jan. 16, 1858, the vessel was floated off & taken into Warkworth, Northumberland. For repairs to be effected at the Warkworth shipyard of Sanderson and Leighton. These 'Lloyd's List' reports tell us additionally that the vessel was in ballast, under the command of 'Gardner' & went ashore just 3 miles N. of Warkworth.
On Mar. 25, 1858, the vessel, 'Gardner' (maybe 'Gardiner') in command, was at Deal, Kent, en route from Shields to Aden with a cargo of coal. This Nov. 03, 1858 reference (in blue) tells us that Henry Tanner was wrecked near Aden with the loss of many members of its crew. The date at which the vessel was wrecked is not there referenced, but I learn that it was on Aug. 17, 1858.
What exactly had happened to Henry Tanner? In 1899, 'Chambers's Journal' published part III of the reminiscences of Lieutenant-Colonel Sir R. Lambert Playfair, KCMG. In Jan. 1858, Telegraph, a Bristol barque, had been sailing along the Somali African coast headed for today's Khuriya Muriya Islands off the coast of Oran. Telegraph was 'piratically seized' by pirates of Ourbeh, Somalia (where exactly is it?). HEIC (Honourable East India Company) Elphinstone was sent, from Aden, to punish what was regarded as an outrage & did so. 'Playfair' was sent, in H.M.S. Chesapeake, to further inquire into the circumstances & to act as he thought fit.
Telegraph was, I learn, a brig not a barque. It likely was built in Prince Edward Island, Canada, in 1851. I have read that Jan. 25, 1858 was the date of her loss.
On Oct. 07, 1858, Chesapeake was at Bunder Murayah, near Ourbeh, & was surprised when a small boat approached with 2 English sailors aboard. Such sailors, survivors of the wreck of Henry Tanner, advised that their vessel had struck on the coast near Ras Hafoon & immediately began to break up. 5 members of Henry Tanner's crew - her master included, were drowned, while 9 others made their way to shore on floating spars. Once ashore, per Playfair's account, the survivors were treated with great kindness, taken to a port W. of Cape Guardafui (NE coast of Somalia), & fed with the best that the village afforded.
Under these circumstances Playfair determined to meet with the local Somalis to discuss the matter of the Telegraph. Which proved to be have been a total misunderstanding. Playfair accordingly did not avenge the loss of such vessel by destroying towns on the coast within reach of Chesapeake's guns. It used to be possible to read the related 'Playfair' text at true pages 161 thru 163 in the volume which is referenced here. Via which page it used to be possible to download the volume in question - i.e. 'Chambers's Journal', Sixth Series, Vol II, published in 1899 by W. & R. Chambers Limited. Alas it is no longer possible to download it from that page today. But ... here is most of the 'Playfair' text, with the Henry Tanner references marked in red.
I have read, via this WWW page, in a 2021 volume entitled 'Colonial Chaos in the Southern Red Sea', by Nicholas W. Stephenson Smith, a very different account of the treatment that the Henry Tanner survivors experienced, after their vessel had standed in Jul. 1858 off Cape Guardafui. Per Mr. Smith, the survivors were taken hostage at knifepoint, & held hostage for many weeks, for intended use as a bargaining chip in relations with the British.
There are contemporary newspaper references to the loss of Henry Tanner but few of them provide much by the way of detail. This newspaper report sets out the basic facts while this report, ex the The Bombay Gazette, provides greater detail including the names of the survivors. The vessel's last port of call was Johanna, likely on the coast of Somalia. The vessel ran aground during a storm, 'on the sandy ridge inside of Ras Hafooa' (or Ras Hafoon, today Ras Hafun, Somalia), & became a total wreck. Six crew members, including the captain, were swept off the deck by high waves & were drowned. The nine survivors made it to shore on spars etc., & eventually made their way to Bunder Murayah, where they were taken aboard HMS Chesapeake - to be landed at Aden on Oct. 10, 1858.
References are made above to Mr. Paul Raw. We hope that we will be able to provide, one day, Paul's research study re the vessel, which, in 1849, carried two of Paul's ancestors as immigrants to the colony of Natal.
Can you add anything additional? #2607

TO END THE PAGE

For your pleasure and amusement.

A series of creative advertisements (23 of them) arrived in my e-mail in-box in Nov. 2010. Advertisements for AT&T around the world. The page which showed them is now long gone.

I show just three of them, my personal favourites of the group. Though the best of all, to me at least, is of the elephants at top left. The image below is available in a larger size here.

May I suggest that you navigate the site via the index on page 001.PRIOR PAGE / NEXT PAGE

To Thomas M. M. Hemy Data Page 41. All of the other Thomas Hemy pages, including image pages, are accessible though the index on Thomas Hemy page 05. [ ] £ á è é ö ü

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DATA ABOUT WILLIAM ANNANDALE (1806/1863) - kindly provided by Catherine Wright, as per the Jessie Annandale listing above.

I can tell you something about the William Annandale who owned this ship.

William Annandale (1806–1869) was born in Newcastle upon Tyne to the papermaker John Annandale – founder of John Annandale & Sons – and his wife Joanna Bowie. This pair came from Midlothian – probably from one of the many paper mills on the Esk just south of Edinburgh. William was their fourth son (out of seven). He left the partnership of John Annandale & Sons in 1839 and bought a farm at Bingfield in Northumberland. He ended his days at Collingwood House, Morpeth, Northumberland. He married twice. His first wife was a second cousin, Jane Bowie. There were two sons. Jane died in 1854 in Newcastle. Williams second wife was Jane Hindmarch whom he married in 1855 in Westminster. There were two more children, the elder of whom was born at Dodbrook, Kingsbridge in 1856. The second child was born in 1863 in Morpeth. All this ties in with what is on your web site. As to the name of the ship, I would guess it was named after William Annandale's first wife. Jessie is a very common pet form of Jane in Scotland, and although his second wife was also called Jane, she was not a Scot. So the naming is more likely to be for his first wife, particularly if there was an earlier vessel with the same name.

Summary Date List for William Annandale (1806/1863)

1806 Born Newcastle upon Tyne (Mar. 5, 1806)
1806 Baptised at Presbyterian Chapel, Carliol Street, Newcastle (Mar. 23, 1806)
1839 Leaves partnership of John Annandale & Sons
1839 Marries Jane Bowie (1803–1854) in Angus, Scotland (Nov. 20, 1839)
1841 Census shows William and Jane staying with his widowed mother Joanna in Shotley Bridge,
        County Durham. Listed as of Independent Means.
1843 Son William born in Hexham, Northumberland (Jan quarter)
1844 Son Alexander Bowie born in Hexham, Northumberland (Oct quarter)
1851 Census shows William and Jane at Bingfield, Northumberland. William is listed as a Landed
        Proprietor and Farmer of 156 acres. The sons are at school in Newcastle.
1854 Jane dies in Newcastle
1855 William marries Jane Hindmarch (1827 – 1900) in Westminster
1856 Son John born at Dodbrook, Kingsbridge
1861 Census shows William as a Ship Owner living at Collingwood House, Morpeth,
        Northumberland, with Jane and John aged 4.
1863 Daughter Joanna born at Morpeth
1869 Dies at Morpeth (Oct. 20, 1869)
1869 Probate (Dec. 30, 1869) to "William Annandale of Morpeth Civil Engineer the Son and Robert
        Dixon of the Borough and County of Newcastle upon Tyne Ship Owner the Executors".

I should be very interested to have details of any other ships that William Annandale is known to have owned.

County Durham was where John Annandale set up his (well-known in C19) papermaking business. The paper mills of County Durham and Northumberland were intimately tied up with the ship building industries on the Tyne and Wear.  Old rope, and also old sails and hessian, were important raw materials for making brown and 'whitey-brown' paper. You may well know all this already, in which case, apologies. 'Newcastle Brown' which you might just have heard of as a popular kind of ale here in the NE of England, was originally a type of paper. When sail gave way to steam this source of raw material dried up and many of the smaller paper mills went out of business. Others, including Annandale's, started using esparto grass as raw material & this was imported from Spain and Morocco into the Tyne and Wear stowed as ballast in returning coal ships.

Catherine Wright, October 1/2, 2013
(This William Annandale was my husband's 3 x great uncle.)